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Houston Voice, No. 1060, February 16, 2001
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Houston Voice, No. 1060, February 16, 2001 - File 001. 2001-02-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2797/show/2764.

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(2001-02-16). Houston Voice, No. 1060, February 16, 2001 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2797/show/2764

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1060, February 16, 2001 - File 001, 2001-02-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2797/show/2764.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1060, February 16, 2001
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 16, 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Staqe presence Houston ranks second only to New York City in the number of seats for theater-goers. Our guide to what's coming to a stage near you. Page 17 ISSUE 1060 www.houstonvoice.com ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. FEBRUARY 16, 2001 INSIDE Former Major L gue B seball pla r Biiiy B an who came out after he left ba ball, w II headline the upcoming Human Rights Campaign dinner n Hou ton. Page 2 alhng all pink couch pot toes. Take a walk in the park with old friends thank to a new group that s arts SaturdaJ Page 17 President Bush flip­flopped on the fate of the White House AIDS office, the same week sobering statistics about HIV infedlons were released. Page 12 Mayor switches tack in DP debate With backing from gay leaders, Brown drops benefits measure for sweeping anti-bias ban by D.L. GROOVER The placards (amed by the protestors m front of HoustoP City Hall on Tuesday left nothing to the 1magmatton "Sodomites are reiected by God," "Faggots for the fife ' 'Sex between t\\ o women 1s sodomy" and 'Sodom and Gomorrah was destro} ed beca.ise of sodomy" the phrases on the s1\":f\S screamed The group had g ther,d to shO\\ displeasure 0\ er an 1mpenaing proposal to allow city emplo} ecs to include same-sex partners m the ne\\ health insurance contract being hammered out by City Counal The measure was open for pubhc discuss on at City C.ounc1 T uesdav session before the formal debate Wednesda This flash-pomt issue IS hghtenini; rod for both Chn t on-srrvah\ E~ and gay ngrts ad\ ocat But the rheton dunn» th heanng was surpnsmgly tame Only three p ag.i n t the J m te 1ss;.ie .i A b au6hn p t r I l B.i t Cht.r~!l Jes.:nbed t n h minute- 1 ti d p ee other sroke t.iJnl m support t th mclus on of domeshc partPersh1p bene 1 r gay at} emplo ees Mayor Lee Brown met with nearly 100 members of the Houston gay community Saturday to discuss dropping a proposal to grant domestic partner benefits to city employees in favor of an anti-bias ban. "I want .i 11\ \Ith d1ver-;1ty and to erance tor d \ers1t Scott lilhnghast said Seven of this nat10P s 1 largest c1tt offer J me - he partner benefits as \\el, as non-cl scrmunation poltoe Austin Dall s, and Fort \\orth ha\e non-ct1scnmmahon pohaes O\er ~ > Continued on Page 11 Trans lobby day aims to educate, empower by GIP PLASTER Whill' gay and lesbian acti\'lsts solidify plans for a March Against Hate and Texas Gay Lobby Day next month, as many as I 00 transgender activists are experted to take to the halls of the state ccJpitol on Feb. 20 trying to stir up some support for their cause-a cause they say gay men and lesbians should be supporting, too. "These issues are so interrelated, I don't think there 1s a way to separate them," said Sarah DePalma, executive director of the Texas Gender Information Network and organizer of the lobby day. "We've told anybody who's anybody that they're more than welcome," she said. "We'\'e put the hand out. It's up to them to take it " And at least one gay group has: The board of directors of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucu~ agreed to par­ticiEate in the lobby day ongtime transgender achvbt Phyllis Frye said 1t makes sense for transgendered people and gay men and lesbians to work together, smce m the eyes of many, the communities are one "A lot of our detractors do not dif­ferentiate between lesbians, gays, bisex­uals and transgenders," she said The lobby day also allows a commu­nity that is often hidden in society to make its presence known in a very pub­lic way. "It allows the legislators and their staff as well as the capitol police and the media and other lobbyists who hap­pen to be in the building to actually see and meet transgendered people who > Continued on Page 10 The Feb. 20 transgender lobby day wiU take a 'low-key' approach, without mcwches or protests, according to Sarah DePalma. executive director of the Texas Gender Information Network. 2 INSIDE NEWS Notional News . . . . • • . ............. . 5 Police News .....•••.............••. 6 Bush flip-flops on AIDS office •••......•• 12 Gays react lo faith-based proposal . . . . . .13 Quote/ unquote Health news . VOICES & ECHOES . .15 .21 Shellon: Goy hotlines ore lifelines .8 Plant: Feng shur frustrolion .. 9 Ethan Green' .. 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU The Breakfast Oub •..........•.. 17 Theoter preview, port If . . • •••.•••••. 17 Eating Out at Ginzo . . • • . . •......... 20 On Screen •....................... 2 5 Community Calendar ......•....... 26-27 Occasions ....• .•............... 30 My Stars! . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . .31 ClASSIFIEDS • . . . . . . • . . . • . . • •...... 28· 29 Issue 1060 AD "'!Clterlal 1n Houston Voce IS pro!eeled by tedera copyright aw and may not be repro­duced wt!hout lhe wr nen consent ol Houston Voice The sexua ouenta1'00 ol a<Wertisers, photog:ap>iers. wr:ers and cartoorusts pub-lished ~ereui s neilller Inferred or Implied The awearance of names or p<C!orlal representa­bOt' does not 'leCeSSarily indicate lhe sexuai orientatior o1111a• pefSOf' or persons Houston Voice accepts unsolielted ed torlal material but CBl'not taf<e responslbillty foe Its return The ed~or reserves lhe right to accept. rejeet or edit any submiSSIO!l An nghts revert to authors upon publicatior Guide nes for freelance cootributors are ava !able upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd , Suite 200 Houston TX 77006 713-529-8490 NEWS FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HBC gala f ea tu res gay ball player, lesbian comic Fifth annual Houston event set for March 3 byKAYDAYUS The Human Rights Campaign's fifth annual Houston gala will be held March 3 at the Westin Galleria, emceed for the second lime by lesbian comedian Georgia Ragsdale. Billy Bean, a former maior league base­ball player who is one of the few profes· Billy Bean sional athletes to come out publicly, is slat­ed to be the guest speaker at the affair. Bean played baseball from1987 to 1995 with sev­eral different major league teams, leading a double life while in the league. He came out after retiring. "I know all about the self-hatred and the shame and how hard it is to get to a point where you feel good about yourself. .. It has to come out, and it comes out as anger, sad­ness and depression, Bean said in a recent interview with the Advocate. Now in an open relationshipwith Miami restaurateur Efrain Veiga, Bean will talk about his struggles dur· ing his years in professional baseball. Ragsdale, the first openly gay perfonner to sign a project development deal with a major TV studio, for a sitcom with ABC, grew up in Houston but now Jives in LA. She has appeared in hundreds of shows throughout the world and toured with her one-woman show, "Straight Up, With a Twist!" Bret Baccus, event co-chair, promises guests a great evening. "It's more than a fund· raiser; it's an event beginning when you enter the Silent auction. It starts when you walk in the door. There will be a lot of energy." Baccus said that if guests arc planning a vacation, they shouldn't do it yet because there will be lots of great vacations in the silent auction, which is sponsored by the Luxury Collection. Sue Lovell, the state's first open lesbian appointed to the Democratic National Convention, will be on hand to receive HRC's political equality award. The community service award will go to Gary Teixeira. The mother of African-American hate crime victim James Byrd Jr. will attend the gala for a special recognition to the Byrd family for their support of hate crimes legis· latton in Texas. "Stella Byrd continues to support hates crimes legislation not only for blacks and other minorities, but for gays and lesbians," said Baccus. The Human Rights Campaign is the largest national lesbian and gay political organizahon. Houston HRC Gala March 3, 6:30 pm Westin Galleria 5060 West Alabama Tickets: S 125 For tickets: 800-494-8497 For informat ion: Bret Baccus, 713-807-7408 Houston announces five-year HIV plan by KAYDAYUS In an effort to stem the flow of new HIV I AIDS infections, Houston-area offi· cials recently released a comprehensive five-year plan to address prevention and treatment of the disease. Spearheaded by the Ryan White Planning Council and developed by private and public agencies and individuals, the plan outlines objectives to be met by specif­ic deadlines, including coordination of funding, data collection and public aware­ness efforts. Officials hope the plan provides a blue­print for decisions about service priorities and resource allocations. The ultimate goal is to find a cure for HIV and "to stop the disease in its tracks," Harris County Judge Robert Eckels, coordi· nator of the plan, said at a recent press con­ference at the Names Project, speaking in front of a backdrop of AIDS memorial quilts. But until then, he stressed the great need for collaboration and coordination among the entities dealing with HIV I AIDS. "When I look at these quilts, I have mixed emotions. 1 experience the beauty of the tapestry. Each tapestry represents the fabric of each person's life," Eckels said." At the same time, there's a sadness there because each represents a life lost to this disease .... We want to keep as many people off these quilts as we can." Also in attendance was Mayor Lee Brown, who said it is essential to coordinate a comprehensive system to deal with HIV I AIDS m prevention and treatment. "We must bring the resources of our com­munity together to solve the problem.'' Brov.n said •we must talk about [HNI AIDS) and we must talk to our children about it. We must continually get the message out," he said. Advocates for the plan say its goals and objectives are measurable, time-phased rec­ommendations specific to HIV prevention and care, public advocacy, outreach and to the early treatment and prevention of AIDS progression. Although Brown declared an HIV I AIDS state of emergency in Houston's black com· munity in December 1999, little has been done since. Activists charged that Brown was only paying lip service to the problem, but not doing anything substantial about it. As a result of the state ofomergency, Project SOUL, a peer counseling program and a task force, convened by City Council member Jew Don Boney, were started. However, neither exists any longer and the HIV I AIDS count continues to rise. Between January 1999 and the end of June 2000, Houston/Harris County reported 2,108 new cases of HN. Of those, a disproportion· ate 1,237 were among African-Americans, with 496 whites and 363 Hispanics. What activists say is more astonishing is that of the 1,237 new HIV cases among African-Americans, 537 were black females. White females accounted for 90 cases and Hispanic women for99. Kathy Goode, of Goode Consulting Associates, a faith-based non-profit HIV /STD prevention firm, said that although the plan is a good start, outreach into the black communities b of the utmost urgency to slow the rate of new infections and to get treatment to those who need It. "The AIDS epidemic is changing colors," said Goode. "And the plan is trying to address that." AIDS is the number one killer of black men and women between the ages of 25-44. "That's before heart disease, cancer or hom1c1de," Goode said. Blacks also make up 61 percent of all new infections of HIV I AIDS, yet only 13 percent of the U.S. population, she said Only 31 percent of funds for HIV I AIDS are directed at blacks. A "phenomenon" in black society where black males refuse to accept being gay or bi· sexual may be to blame, Goode said. "They won't admit it because they will be called sissy; bemg gay is shameful to them." Instead, "black men go out and have 'freaky' sex with usually a white gay male," Goode said. The sex is usually unprotected, "and because they are not recipien ts of the sex, they can tell themselves they are still macho, still male and not gay.'' she added. Then they go back to their female part· ners and have sex with them, Goode said. The females are the unsuspecting victims, they believe their men when they tell them they have not slept with anyone else. The answer, says Goode, is "to blanket the com· munity with this message and keep it going until they get the message." The new plan is a good place to start the process, she said. HOUSTON VOICE• FEBRUARY 16, 2001 11ZER11 works tor many of my friends. I gotta believe ff can work tor me. I'm positive.'' 3 4 ZERITe(stavudine) ZERIT (stavudine) Capsules ZERIT (stavudine) for Oral Solution &_ONLY Bnet SummJry of Prescribing lntormJfion 12100. For complete prescribmg intormJtiOtl, please consutr otfiCiaJ pacb~ cm:u/ar WARlllHG lACTIC ACIDOSIS AHO SEVERE HEPATOMEGAlY WITH STEATOSIS, INCLUDING FATAL CASES. HAVE 8E9I REPOIITTD WITH THE USE Of NUCL£OSIOE AHALOGUES ALOllE OR Ill COMBINATION. INCLUDING STAVUDINE AND OTHER ANTI· RETROVllW.S. FATAL LACTIC ACIDOSIS HAS BEEN REPORTED IN PREGNANT WOMEN WHO RECEIVED THE COMBINATION OF STAVUDINE ANO OIOANOSINE WITH OTHER ANTIRETROVIRAl AGENTS. THE COMBINATION OF STAVUOINE ANO OIOAllOSIHE SHOULD BE USED WITH CAUTION DURING PREGNANCY AND IS REC· OMMENOEO ONl Y If THE POTENTIAL BENEFIT CLEARLY OUTWEIGHS THE POTEN· TIAl RISK (SEE WARNINGS ANO PRECAUTIONS: PREGNANCY). FATAL AHO NONFATAL PANCREATITIS HAVE OCCURRED DURING THERAPY WHEN ZEllT WAS PART OF A COMBINATION REGIMEN TllAT INCLUDED OIOANO· SllE. WITH OR WITHOUT HYOROXYIJRfA. tN IOTH TllEATMElfHWVE ANO TllEAT • MENl·EXPERIENCED PATIENTS, REGARDLESS OF DEGREE OF IMMUNOSUP· PRESSION (SEE WARNINGS~ INDICATIONS AHO USAGE ZERIT (staYVdinel, In combination wltll otller 1ntiretrov1ral agents. ls lnd1cal1d lor the &rutment al HIV-1 lnrecliaa (see Clinical Studies). Clinical Sludles: Camllln1Uo11 TMratTY· The combinatJon use or ZERIT IS based on Ille results or elm· lcal studies in HIV-tfllected patients 111 double- and tnpfe-comb1nation regimens witll Cl!hef anlirelroml agents. One al lliese Slud"ies (START 1) - a mulbcenlet randolr1lmd, Ol)en-label study companng ZERIT (40 mg IWite dally) plus 1am1vud1ne plus llldl­naw to Zidovudine plus lalnMJdme plUS !lldlnavir m 202 treatme:rt-113M! pabe& Both ~ l1!St:lad ma Slmllar rr:ao'lllude al inh:::;tion of HIV RNA levels and increase:: in C04 ce I counts throU1Jh 48 weeks Monothlrapy· The ett1cacy cf ZERIT was demonslr3!ed In a rand miZed, do ble-tllind s&Udy Al455-019 condacted 1992· 1994) companng ZERIT with zidovud1ne In 822 paHents with a spect111m cl HIV l?lat!d symptoms. The outcome teims ~ progresswn ct. ~IV disease an!l llealll - similar lor both dr.i gs. COHTRAINDICA TIONS ZERIT IS contr.Undated fl pa!lents with Cf!IUCal~i SIODllitam hypersensrtivity to staw­dine or to any of the compone!'ts conta ned In the formulation WARNINGS 1. LactJc Acidosis/Severe Hepalomagaly wll• Sl11tos11/Hepalic Failure. L1c1ic acldms and severe •epa1om11aly with 1111tosis. including talal casn, bavt hea reported wltll lhe 1so of 1acleoslde analogun alone or in coml11nallon. including stavudlna and oilier ••llrt1rmrlls. A m:IjOnty ol lllese cases have bee:l fl women. Obesity and protonged nucieoside eJll)CSUfe may be nsk tactors. fal.ll lac­llC acidOSIS has been re()Or1ed In preonant women who received Ille combma!IOn of stz/ud :e and didanosine With otller antlretrovtral agents The combination of sl3vtl­dine and dldar.Osine Should be used with cauton dunng pregnarcy arxl IS l!C001ITlel1ded only I the potenti.11 benefi1 clearly outweighs tile potential risll ,see PRECAllTIONS Pregnancy In addi!IOll. dea!fls at!Jilluted to hepatolOXIC ty have occumd m patients receM11Q Ille comblnatlOll ol ZERIT. didanoslne and hydroxyurea. Parllcular cautiOn Sllculd be exercised when admm!Stenng ZERIT to any patient witll known r1Slc lactors for liver diseJSe however cases have alsO been reported in pabents with no knOwn risll lactors Treatment witll ZERrr Sllould be SUS{Jended In any patient wno develops dime.al or laboratory flndl!!QS suggeS1lVe of lactic acidosis or pronounced hepato­tox! cil'i (which may ll1Clude hepalOmeOaly and S!eatosls even In the absence of marl<ed transammase elm=) Alt Increased lisle ol llepalJIOJcJCity which may be latll may OCQJf lnpa!Jen!S trealedWll!lZERITfl~wi!hdidiifllsineand ~oom­jl3! ed lo wllm ZERIT a used alone. Punts trealed W!l!1 tlliS airntlin3lm Shauid be closel't lllOlll!OFell for signs ol lr<er toxidty 2. Perl(llleral NtllfVtllltly Peripllerat neuropatlly, manifested by numbness. tlngling. Of pain fl the hands Of lee!. has been repor1ed fl pa!Jef1ts receMl10 ZERrr lllerapy. Penpheral nelJflllJ3lhY has oa:urred more frequent!y fl patien!S with~ HIV disease. a hlSIIXY ol lll!llrll(l3tl!y. nr ainwrren1 neurotoXic drug therallY lncllmlg dldancslne (See ADVERSE REACTIONS' 3. Pancrutilis: flllal and non­fatal pancreatrtis have occurred dunng therapy wllen Z£RIT was part ol a combination req1men 111.tt lnduded didanoslne. with or wtthoot hydroxyurea, In both treatment· 11311111 and trealmenl~ pallenls, regardieSs cf degree of lll1l1llB10SUpp The combinallOn ol ZERIT and didanosine (wtlll or wttl1out hydroxyurea) and any oltler agents that are loxiC to tne pancreas shoukt bl SIJSlleOded "' patients witll suspected pancrealJIJ$ RelDStlllJIJOn ol ZERIT after a confirmed dl3QllOSIS of pancreati!JS sllouid be underl3llen willl !llrliCufar caUllDrl and dose patJent monttonn11 The new reounen slloUld contain neilllef didanoslne nor l1ydtoxyurea. PRECAUTIONS ....,_ lar ,,_(See.._.....,_ lnftll fl"' presailJlng ilfon1l3!m ~ PallenlS Should be Informed Ilia! an lmpor1anl toXldty of ZERIT Is peripheral neu­rcpathy. Patients should be aware tl1at peripheral neuropathy IS manifested by numb­ness. bnghng, or pam In hands or feet.and Iha& tllesa symptoms shook! be reported to their DhYsiCJans. Patients sllouid bl counseled that penpheral neuropatlly ccxurs wUn graall!Sl l:eque!icy fl palienls wllo haw adWnced HIV disease oc a history al~ ml neurcpat!ly, and IN! dose modification andfor d1scont1nuatJon of ZERrr may be ,.μred W IDxidty dMqls. ClregNeR al ygurig clildren receMnQ ZERIT lheraov SIWd be Jnstructed regarding detecOOn and reporting of penpheral neuropatlly. Pa!ients should be Informed tl1at when ZERIT IS used fl combination with ot.'lef agents with similar toxic!tles. the ilddeflce ol adverse events may be higher tl1an wllen ZER!T is used alone. An increased risk o1 pancrea!J'.JS. whicl1 may bl fatll. may occur 1n pallents lrl3lld witll the combtNllon ol ZERIT and didanoSine, with Of wfthoot hydroxyurea Patients treated with !Ills combina!JCn Should be dosely morutored for symplOmS of parmatttJs. Ni lnlnased r1S1< ot hepatduxidly. w!icll mav bl fatal. may OCQJf 1n patients llUted with ZERIT In combination willl didaoosme and hydroxyurea. Patients trA!ed with tlllS combtnation shoutd be closely monitored for Signs of liver toxicity. Patients shook! be Informed tl1at ZERIT is not a cure for HIV 1nl8ctlon, and 111.tt they may con­tinue to acquire Illnesses asscdatlld witll HIV lntactJon, lnduding opportuniStic inlec­tions. Patients Should be advised to remain under the care of a physician when using ZERIT They Should be advised Ill.ti ZERIT therapy has not been Shown to reduce the nsk of l1allsmlssion of HIV to otl1ers 11110UQh sexual conl3ct or blOod contamination. Patients should be Informed tn.t the long-letm ellects of ZERIT are unknown 11 lhiS time Patients shcQld be Informed 11111 ltle Centers for 0-Control and PrMnllon !COC) recommend t!iat HIV<nfeded mother$ not nurse~ infants to reduce the nsk al pcslnala! transmisSiOll al HIV inllcllan. llnlg ...,_ 2XkMldine may oom­petitively Inhibit Ille lntracellutar phosphcrytatJon of sta'IUdme. Therefore. use of zldowdine In combination wttll ZERIT fs no! recommended (See CLINICAL PHAll· IMCOl.06Y fl fUI prascrllling inlormabon.) &al I 11 1111, .......-............. of Flltilily: In 2-year caranogemct!y studies In mtee and rats. stavudine was non­carcmogemc at doses which produced exposures (AUC) 39 and 168 tunes. respec­llvefy. human lllJQSUf8 at !tie recommended Cfmicaf dose. Bentgn and malignan1 liver tumors In mice and rats and malignant urinary bladder tumors "' male rats occurred at iMl& al 9lllOSln 2SO (llDJ aid 732 (ralsl lrnes lu!wl ecpo5IR at""' rllCOl1ml'Jded dll1lcal dose. Sl3vudule - not mullglnlC In Ille Ames. E. coli reverse mutltlOl'I, or Ille CHOlllGPRT mammaaan cell fonward gene 111t11atlon assays. with and wltllou1 tnelabolle ldi¥allort SlavudJne produc:ad posrtJve results In the 111 ..rro human l'Jm­pliocyte Clallogerme and mouse lilJrolJlast assays, and In lhe ii ,;,.o mouse micttn>- deus test In the " Wlro assays, stavudme eleYaled Ille frequency of chromosome aberrations In human i'jmphccytes \concentrations ol 25 to 250 llQfml. withOU1 meta­l> Olic acli'lallOll) and &ncreased tile 1equency of transformed loa In moose fibroblast cells (concentrations ol 25 to 2500 IJW!nl. with and wtthollt metabohc act1"3tion) In tile In I/Ml m1cronucteus assay. s1avud1ne was daslogenic ID bone marrow cells lo~ lowing oral staVudine admmistrabon lo mice at dosages of 600 10 2000 rng,1<~day for 3 days. No evidence of unpaired fertility was seen m rats wrth exposures (based on C...,.) up to 216 llmes that observed lo!IOW1ng a chmcal dosage of 1 ma-'k!jlday Pregnancy· Pregnancy ·caieoory C". Repr0duc11on studies have been performed In rats and raDbits with e>posures (based on C,,...,J up to 399 and 183 limes, respec­& Jvely, of that seen at 1 clinical dosage ol 1 ~1kg!ll3'/ and haw revealed no evidence of teratOQtfliclty The lf1Cidence In letuses of a common sketelal vanatien. unossi­fied or incnrnpfete osslf:cation of stemebra. was Increased In rats at 399 &unes human exposure while no effect was observed at 216 umes hUman e>posure. A slight post· mplantation loss was noted at 216 bmes the hur.ian e>posure with no effect noted at approximately 135 wnes the human e>posure An mcrease fl early rat neonatal mor­ta ty (birth to 4 dayS of age) occuned at 399 times Ille human exposure wlllle sur vtval of neonates was unattected at approximatei'j 135 bmes Ille human exposure A study 111 rats showed lh.:Jt stavudine Is transferred to the fetus through the placenta. The concentration In fetal tissue was approximately one-half the concentration m maternal plasma. A'*1'lal ~studies are not alw3'fs predldiW Of human response. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of s&avud ne In pregnant women. Slavud1ne shoU1<1 be used during pregnancy only H tile potential benefit rusl!lies Ille potential risll. fatal bctJc acidosis has been reported In pregr:ant women wllC received the combinallOll of stavudlne and didanosme with otller anbretrovfral agents. h IS unclear 11 pregnancy augments Ille nsk of ladle acidcsisnlepatic steatosis syndrome rtoorted In non-pregnant 1nd!Viduals receMng nucleoslde analogues (see WARN· INGS LaclJc Ac1dos~evere Hepatemegaly with Sleatesis,Hepallc Failure The combinabon of stavudine and didanos1n1 should be aud wt1ll caution during preg· nancy and Is recommended only 1f Ille polentlal benefit clearly outweighs the potenlial risll. Health care prewlers canng for HIV~nfected pregnant women recetV­ing stavud1ne ShQtJtd be alert for eartv diagnosis of lactic acidoslSlhepatiC steatosls syi>­drcme Antirelrov1ral Pregnancy Reg!ltry: To monttor maternal·fetal outcomes ol pregnant women e>pcsad 10 stavudine and other antiretroWal agents, an An11retroviral Pregnancy Reg1S&ry has been eslabhshed Ptws1cians are encouraged to register patients by calling 1·800-258·4263. Nursing Mothers. The Cenlers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend !!lat HIV·inlec1ed motflers not breast·leed tlleir infants to avoid risking poslnatal transmission ol HIV. S&udies m laclatmg rats demonstrated 11'.JI stl'/UOJ!le IS excte!ed II milk. Altllougll n IS not known whelher staw­d :ie ts excretell m human m lk there ex!Sls the potentl31 for adverse effects from stavudine in nursing IFlfants Because ol botll lhe potentia' for HIV transnusslOtl and tile potential tor se:ious adverse reactions In nursing infants mothers should be 1nstrucled not to brust·l11d 11 lhey are rec11v1ng ZERIT (stavudine). Pedlalnc Use· USe of stavud1ne In pediatric pauems IS supponed by evidence from adequate and well-Controlled studies of stavudme Ill adults with add Uonal pllarmacok1ne1ic and safety data fl pediatnc patients Adverse events that were reported lo occur fl 105 pedlalnc patients receMng ZERIT 2 mg/kg/day for a median of 6 4 months m &ludy ACTG 240 -e generall'/ SJm1lar to those reported m adults Stavudlne pharmacola­netu: s ~.ave been r.-aluated In 25 HIV-lnfected Pediatnc paUents rang ng In age from 5 weeks to ts years and 1n weight from 2 to 431<Q after Iv 0< oral 1dm1rnstrati0n ol sinCfe doses and twice daJtv rea mens (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY Table 1 In tuft prescribing intormaHonl. Geriatric Use CllFllcal stud.es of ZERIT did not include sul· f!Cienl numbers of p.;:ients aged 65 years and over to determine Wl1elher they respond d Herentl'/ than younger patients Greater sellSJ!Nlty 0( some Older ndividuals 10 the eftec1s o1 ZERIT cannot be ruled out In a monotllerapy Expanded AccesS Program tor pa!:en!S with advanc«f HIV infecllOn, penpfleral neuropatl1'J or ~ neuropatl1ic symptoms were obsmed Ill 15 of 40 (38%) elderly patients receiving 40 mg tw1te daily and 8 ol 51 (16%) elderly patients recei\llng 20 mg tw1te dally. Of the approx· lmately 12 000 pahents enrolled 1n the Expanded Access Program. pertpheral neu· rcpathy or penplleral neuropath1c symptoms developed In 30% ol pal!ents receiv­ing 40 mg twice daily and 25% ol paltents receMng 20 mg twice dally. Elderly patJents should be cfose"1 monaorell for S1Q!1S and symptoms of Pe<ioheral neu~ 2.ERrr ts known to be substantially e>creted by Ille kidney and &he Fisk of toxic react ons to this drug may be greater In patients with impaired renal function Because elderly patients are more hkety to have decreased renal function. n may be useful to monitor renal functJon Dose ad1ustment IS recommended lor 1>31ients vr!th renal unpairment {see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Dosage Adjustment ADVERSE REACTIONS Adults: ZERIT lherapy has been assOCTated with peripheral neuropatlly, which can be severe, is dose related. and occurs more frequently 111 pabents being treated Wi1h neurctoxic drug therapy. 1ndud1ng didanOS1ne, ., pat:ents with advanced HIV lnlec­Hon. or In patients who have previously experienced peripheral neuropathy. Pabents Should be monttorld for the development of neuropatlly, which ts usually manttested by numbneSS, bnghng, Of pain In Ille feet or hands Slavud1ne-rebted penpheral neu­ropaL'ly may resolve tt therapy is withdrawn promptly In some cases. symptoms may MJrsen lempCrafily lolowing discontiru!llon of tllerapy If symptcrns resolve com­pletely pat ents may &olera&e resumplJOn of treatment at one·haH the dOSJ! (see DOSAGE ANO ADMINISTRATION H neurll(l3tl!yf"t!Cln after resump11on of ZERIT. pe<· manent d1sconbnuallOll of ZERrr should be COllSldered When ZERIT IS used m com bination with otller agents witll SJm r toxicities, Ille Incidence of adverse events may be 119* than when ZERIT IS used alone Pancreatais, peripheral neuropa!hy, and 1ivet function abnorma bes occur more frequently In pabents treated witll lhe combona!IOll al ZERIT and did3noslne. '"ilh oc wttholJt hyd<OX'/1Uf3. F2b1 pana?3fJtlS and hepalOIOldClly may occur more lrequently in patients treated witll ZERIT In combination witll didano­slne and hydroxyurea (see WARNINGS and PRECALITIONS 1, Sefected chrncal adverse Ml'lls lhat occurred In adult patients recerwig ZER!T fl a controlled monotnerapy study (Study A1455--019) are pnMded by percentages as lolJows· ZERIT 40 mg twa dJJJy (n.412rHeadache t54J, Diarrhea (SOJ, Ptnpherat Neurotogic Symptoms/Neuropathy (52). Rash {40), Nausea and Vorrubng (39); and ZJdovudiM 200 mg 3 b!MS ddily (""'402}-Meadache (49), Diarrhea (44J, Penpherat Neurofooie Symptoms/Neuropathy (391. Rash (35), Nausea and Vomibng (44) Study Al.155-419 had a median duration al stlVIDne l!lelllpy • 79 wee1;s n a medal tu.mon cl lidoVIJdine ther.ll1f • 53 -'<s. Pancreatrtis was obseMd In tllree of the 412 adutt pa1len1s ""° received ZERIT In a controlled mono!herapy 'tudy. Selected dlnJCal adverse events that occurred"' antJ­retrOV1ral naive adutl patJents receMng ZERIT from two controlled combination .stud­ies are provided by percentages as foliOWS: ST ART t-ZERIT .lamivur!iM+lnd1rrmr (n.fOOJ Wt1h 1durationofSl3vudJMlhmvttor48 _.,..Nausea (43), 01arrflea {34), Headache (25), Rash (18). Vomrtong (18), Penpheral N«Jrotogic Symptoms/Neuropathy ~; zJdov!Jd1ne+~mMxilt1f+int!itYvlr (n-102r Nausea (63). Olarrllla (16). Headaehe ). Rash (t3). Vomiting (33), Penpheral NeuroloQIC Symptoms/Neuropatlly (7). ART 2-ZfRIT+didallOSint+indwvir (nz 102) with I dma!JOn of Slmldme thera/1'f for 48-"9- Nausea (53), Diarrhea {45), HeadaChe (46), Rash (30), VOl!lll1ng (30), Penpheraf Neurologic Symptoms/Nellropathy (21 ). DrkNrJtliM;/am/vudine+indinJvlr (nat03}- Nause.i (67), Diarrhea (39), HeadlChe (3n. Rash (t8), Vomlhng (35J, Penphlral Neorclogic Symptoms/Neuropathy (tO). st ART 2 compared two trlple­combmalJon '8Q11T1«1S In 205 treatment-naMI patiln!S. Patients receiwd lither ZERIT ( 40 mg tvrice daJJy) plus didanoslne plus indinaw or zldovudine plus lamtvud1ne plus fnd1navir Pancreatitis r1$Ultlng m death was obSelWd In patienls lreated w1tl1 ZERIT plus didanosine. wlt11 or wlthOut hydroxyurea 111 controlled clinical studies and "' postmarl<ebng reports Selected laboratory at>normalitles rtpcrted In a controlled mono!herapy study (Study A1455--019) are provided bv percentage w1t11 !he lollow1ng parameters ZERIT 40 mg twice ddily fn.412}-AST (SGOT) >5 0 x ULN (upper 11mtt of nonnaf}-11 %, Al T (SGP'T) >5 0 x lJl.N-13'4. Amylase ~ 1.4 x UUH 4% and zidovu.. th!» 200 mg3 llme$ dl/lly (n-4D2r AST (SGOT) >5 0 x Ul.H-t0%. ALT (SGPT) >5.0 x ULN-1 t%. Amylase ~1 4 x ULN-t3%. 0ata presented for pa!Jenls of Study Al455- 0t9 for whom laboratory evafuallonS-. petlormed Study Al455-019 had a median duration of stavudlnt lhe<apy • 79 weel<s and a m«liin duration ol ZJdo\ludine lhet­IPY. 53 wtel<s. Selected labofllory ~·toes reported In two conlroled combl- FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE natiOn stud"ies START 1 and STAR~ 2 are provided Grades 3-4 presented first by percentage as follows (Grades 3-4) START 1-ZERfT (st.1vudme)+lilmivvd11111+md1- naw (n-100Hlilirubin >2 6 x UlN (upper lim~ ol nonnai)·7%. SGOT (AST) >5 x ULN· 5%, SGPT (Al.T) >5 x ULN-6%, GGl >5 x ULN-2%, Lipase >2 x ULN-6%. Amylase >2 x ULN-4%; Zidovutfine;famivudine+lnd111i1V1t fnzf02}-B1Urubin >2 6 x ULN·6%, SGOT (AST) >5 x ULN·2%, SGPT (ALT) >5 x ULN·2%, GGT >5 x UlN·2%, lipase >2 x Ul.N·3% Amylase >2x ULN·<1%. Pelcen&aoes fnr (Grades 34) STAAT2-ZER/Ttdd;m­Slllll+ lnd11li1Vlr (nz102r Blurubln >2.6 x UlN·16%, SGOT (AST~5x ULN-7%. SGPT (ALT) >5 x ULN-ll'l'o, GGT >5 x ULN·5%, Lipase >2 x ULN-5'1'., se >2 x ULN-8%. Zidovudme+/amivudllle+llldmvir (n-103}- B1lirubm >2.6 x ULN· %, SGOT (AST) >5 x ULN·7% SGPT (ALT) >5 x ULN·5% GGT >5 x ULN·2%, L,pase >2 x OLN·S'l'o. Amylase >2 x ULN·2% Percentages for (All Grades) START 1-ZERIT+lilmlvv· rme+kldinavir /n-100}-Total Blurubln-65%, SGOT (AST)'"'!2%. SGPT (Al TJ-40%. GGT • 15%, Uiase-21'%.Anr/tas&-21%. ~(n-102}-lotllllii!rulJiD. 60% SGOT jAST)-20%, SGPT (ALTJ-20%, GGT-8%, Upase-12%, Amy!Jse-19% Pettentages or (Al Grades) START 2-ZERIT+dld4nosJne+/fldl113VIT(n-102r Tolal Bil1111bin-68% SGOT (AST)-S3%. SGPT (ALTl-50%. GGT·28% Upase-26%. Amylase- 31%, Zidovutfine+l.imMJdl1!e+lnd1118W(n:1031-Totll B~ rubin-55'!0. SGOT lASTl-20%. SGPT (ALT)-18%, GGT-12%, Upase- 9%, Amytas&-17% Observed During Clinical Practice: The follov.1ng events ha-., been identified dunng pos&-epprw.&I use ol ZERIT Because &hey are reported volunlanly from a population of unknown size, estimates ol frequency cannot be made These events have been chosen for mclus1on due 10 their seriousness. frequency of reoor!Jng. causal conned10n to ZERIT, or a combination ol lheSe lactors Body u 1 Wholtt- abdonunal 1>31n allergic reactlOll, and ch1Uslfever 0191Sllv1 01ronl1rs- anorexia Ezocrin1 G/1nd Oironlers - pancreat1tis (mdud1ng blaf cases (set WARNING~~malD/oglC Oisonl.,,. anemia. IP.'.~. and throm­boc: ytoperna Livef-Lldlt andhep.1llcste3!0Sls(seeWARNINGS1 hepatil!Sand Iver failure. Ml/##losk1/et1~ myalgia. Nl/YOl1$- insomnca. Padia!ric Patients: Adverse reactiOns and senous laboratory abnorma ties ID Pediatric patients were Sim far "' type end frequency to those seen "' adull pallents OVEROOSAGE Expencnce With~ traated With t2 to 24 bmeS the recommended daily dosage revealed no acute toxicity Complications ol chronic overdosage include peripheral neuropathy and hepaHc toxicity Slavudme can be removed by hemodia&ysls. the mean tSO hem0dialys1s clearance of stavud ne IS 120 • 18 mUmlD. Whether stavud1ne Is et1m· fl.lied by pentoneal dialysls has not been studied. DOSAGE ANO ADMINISTRATION The IFltervaf between doses ol ZERIT should be 12 hOUrs ZERIT may be taken with­out regard to meals Adults· The recommended dose based on body we111h1 IS as 101- lows: 40 mg twtce daily 10< patients~ kg and 30 mg twtce daily lor patienls <60 kQ Pedlatrfcs: The recommended dose for pedlatrfc 1>3tients weighing less than 30 kg IS 1 ma-'kgldose grven tverv t 2 hours Ped1atnc P3bents we1phmg 30 kg or greater should recerie the recommended adult dosage Dosage Ad1uslm1nl Patients shoukl be monl!ored tor Ille development of peripheral neuropathy, which IS usuall'1 mandested by numbness. Hnglmg or pam 111 the feel or hands. These symptoms may be dlfflcull to detect in young children (see WARNINGSl If lhese symptoms develop dunng treatment. stavud1ne therapy Should be interrupted Symptoms may resolve d therapy IS withdrawn promptly In some cases symptoms may worsen temporarily followtng d1SCOnUnuauon of therapy. If symptoms resc&w completely, patients may &olerate reswnptian of trea!menl al~ the recommended 00se 20 mg &'MCI! dailt lnr patients ~ ko and 15 mg IW1Ce daily lor patients <60 ko If neuro1>3thy recurs aher r8'ump­! i0n ol ZERIT._permanent cfiscontlnuatlon ol lERIT should be consldered Renal lmp1irment ZERIT may be adm nistered to adutt pabents with lmpaued ren.al lune· 1100 with ad1ustment 10 dose b'/ patient weight as follows Creat1mne Clearance (mUmm) of >50 (?&G kg.4Q mg every 12 heurs and <60 kg 30 mg every 12 hours) Creat1nlne Clearance (ml.11mn) ot 26-50 (~kg 20 ma every 12 hours and <liO kg ·t5 mg every 12 hours) Cieallnme Clearance (mUmm) of 10-25 (?60 kg·20 mg every 24 hours and <60 kg·15 ma every24 hours) Since urinary e•cre11on IS also a ma1or route of tlllminatJO!l of stavudine In pediatnc patients. Ille clearance of stavudine may be altered In children wrth renal 1m1>31rmem Mhough there are Insufficient data 10 recommend a specific dose ad1ustment of ZERIT In lhis paHent populabon, a reduction m &he dose and/or an mcreasaln Ille Interval between doses Sllculd be considered Hemodlllysls P1tlenl• The recommended dose IS 20 mg every 24 hOUrs (~kg) or 15 mg every 24 hours (<60 kg). administered after the cnmplet1on ol hem0diatvs1s ancf at the same bme ol day on non-dialysis days Melhod of Preparahon lERIT for Oral So/ofJOll· Prior to d!Spensing. the pharmacist must c:cnstJtute the dry pcw0er wtth puri­fied water to a conamtrabon ol 1 mg stavud1ne per ml of solution. as follows 1. Add 202 ml of punl•ed water to the con1ainer 2. Shake container Vigoroustv unnl the powder dissolves completely Cons11tut1on In thlS way prOduces 200 ml (deliverable volume) ol 1 mg/ml stavuth &ofutltJl. The solullon may appc:1r slightly hall 3. Dispense solu&oon 1n original conla1ner wrth measuring cup provided lnslruct paflent 10 shake &he container Yl!IOrously pnor to measunng each dose and to 'lore lhe t1ghlly closed container 1n a •efngerator, 36" to 46"f (2° to 8°C). Discard any unused portion after 30dayS HOW SUPPLIED ZERIT• (Stavudine) Capsules are avait:lblo In the follOWlllll strengths and contigura-llOllS of lie bottles wtth drild-resislant closures. Tablt 1' Product Capsule Martings on Capsule Capsules NOC No. Strengtll Shelf Color (In Black Ink) per Bottle 15mg Light yeUovr BMS 60 0003· 1964--01 & dart< red 1964 15 20mg L111ht brown BMS 60 0003· 1965·01 1965 20 30mg Light orange BMS 60 0003· 1966-01 & dart< orange t966 30 40mg Oarl<oraDOl! BMS 60 0003-1967--01 t967 40 ZERIT9 (stavudineJ fa< Oral Solution IS a dye-f1ee, fruit-flavored powder &hat pro­vides 1 mg of stavud1ne per ml of aofut1on upon constitution wtth water Directions for so1ubori p!lpaflllJon are Included on lhe produCt label and In the DOSAGE AND AOMM­ISTRATION secllOn of this insert ZERIT for Oral .Solution (NOC No 0003· t 968·01) IS available m child-resistant containers &hat provide 200 ml of solution after consl1· Moon witll waler. US Paten! No. 4.978.655 Star111 ZERIT Capsules should be stored In lightly closed containers at con­trolled room temperature. 59" to Wf (15' to 30"CJ. ZERIT fOf Oral Solution Shouk! be protected trom excesstve moiswre and 'lored 1n bghliy dosed containers at con­trolled room temperature. 59' to 86'f (15" to 30"C). After constrtut1on. store tJghtty closed containers of ZERIT fOf Oral Sohition In a refrigefator 36' to 46"F (2" tn 8-C). Otscard any unused portion alter 30 days f9.8001A·1--01 J46738 Prflted USA ··" llKl,lt'i 111 I K' '\ll llll\ :_;::.'~ Bnstol-My.n Sqdiit Compony -Nf0S54) Us.A. Adapted hem I 0998 t 3A2 t96701M·4 Revised December 2000 HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 NEWS around the nation Clinton caught in flap over lesbian joke overheard at NYC dinner NEW YORK CITY-A controversy has erupted over whether former president Bill Clinton told lesbian jokes at a New York Italian restaurant. The Washmgton Blade reported that Ointon was eating with former Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey and several former staffers, including open lesbian chief of staff Karen Tramontano, and regaled his table with several "raunchy lesbian jokes." A Feb. 9 report in the Washington Post's "Reliable Source" column has Kerrcy saying he was the joke teller, and that he and Clinton were reminiscing about a controversy dunng the 1992 presidential campaign when Kerrey apologized for telling a lesbian joke that was pKked up by a C-SPAN camera. Kerrey refused to say whether Clinton was also telling JOkes that evening "l don't want to nail it down. To me, it's not sufficiently important to get the facts straight. I'm feeling .i little like Rhett Butler. Frankly. I don't give a damn," said Kerrey, who now serves as president of Manhattan's New School Umversity. Former Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerry has taken the blame for telling a 'r111ndiy lesbian joke' during a recent dinner with President Clinton in New York. Kerry was aiticized during his failed 1991 presidential <ampaign for a similar joke. IL judicial board criticizes judge for anti-gay bias in decisions CHICAGO-An Illinois agency filed a complaint Feb. 5 against a Cook County Circuit Court judge, claiming that her bias against gays "resulted in her making rulings contrary to Illino1s law and advancing her own personal beliefs," the Chicago Tribune reported. The Jud1oal Inquiry Board filed the complaint against Judge Susan Mc Dunn stemming from her handling of two lesbian adoption cases in 1998 and 1999. McDunn, the complaint alleged. contmucd to ISSUe rulings despite the presiding judge removing her from the cases. McDunn also "disobeyed the law" by providing confidential information in the cases to a conservative Washington, D.C., group that opposes adoptions by gays McDunn's handling of the cases prompll•d a stinging rebuke from the Appellate Court in June 1999, and led to her removal from courtroom duties. ''This case is an egregious example of a judge putting her political viewpoint ahc;id of her Judicial obligations," said John Gallo, who is handling the case for the stall.'. McDunn's attorney. Michael Lavelle, pledged to mount a strong defense. Cap on straight players fuels controversy in FL gay softball league FORT LAUDERDALE-South Florida gay groups are threatening to boycott that area's gay softball league for limiting the number of straights who can play on a team to two, the Ft i.Jmdcrdale Su11 -Se11lmel reported. The rule has been in place for years locally and nation­ally within the North American Gay Amateur Athletes Alliance, enabling gay players to be more open about displays of affection and preventing teams from trying to win by stacking the team with straight athletes. But this yl.'ar, the rule incited a boycott of the South Florida Softball League by Express, a local gay paper, and the Gay & Lesbian Community Center. "We cannot ~ay don't 1udge us by our sexual orientation and then tum around and judge olhl•rs by 1t," said Larry Wald, co-owner of Cathode Ray bar, who threatened to pull his team and "do everything 1 can to make sure [!hi.' kague] falls apart" if the rule remained. Baltimore housing commish returns after drunken, anti-gay t irade BALTIMORF-The city's housing commissioner, who took a month-long leave after a drunken episode during which he allegedly made anti-gay remarks, has apologized and was slated to ml-et with gay activisl~ this week, the Baltimore 51111 reported. Paul T. Graziano took paid leave Jan. 4 after admitting to a drinking problem. Gay leaders a~ked Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley to fire Graziano, but O'Mallcy dl'Clined after he apologized for the remarks, which Graziano said he did not remember making. "I would like to take the opportunity of our Feb. 13 rneetmg to express my heartfelt apologies for the hurt that I have inflicted and to explain how this horrible event has prompted me to n.>cognize the presence of and obtain treabnent for my illness," Graziano said in a statement relea~ through the Gay & Lesbian Community Centl'f of Baltimore. O'Malley chose Graziano, who had had been general manager of the New York City Housing Authority until last Yl'ar, to run one of the city's most troubled agencies. Democrats retain openly gay business writer as top official WASHINGTON-Terry McAuliffe, newly installed chair of the Democratic National Committee, asked the committee to re-elect openly gay business writer Andrew Tobias as the Democratic Party's national treasurer, and the committee did so unanimously, the Washi11gto11 Blade reported. McAuliffe's decision to retain Tobias, who became party treas­urer in January 1999, is considered significant because of McAuliffe's reputation as an extraordinary political fund-raiser. Tobias is credited with raising more than $10 million from gay contributors during his tenure The Gay & Lesbian American Caucus of the Democratic National Committee also elected new officers Feb. 7, including chair Jeff Soref from New York, New Mexico delegate Gloria For more news, visit Nieto as vice chair, and Mandy Carter from North www.houstonvoice.com Carolina as secretary-treasurer. -From staff and wire reports HOUSTON SUNDAY MARCH 4, 2001 In Partnership With O C HASE Do the Texas Tvvo Step: 1 Coll for a registration card 2 Raise funds and jcin the walk at: Sam Houston Parle• March 4, 2001 • 8:00am To register, call: (713) 623-6796 or visit us at www.a idshelp.org Bes ielft '9 ADS Fomdalion Houston and 10 ohr local ADS Q gai lizatia IS ADS VWJlc Houston is supported in part by: HOUSTON VOICE One Community! One Voice! .. 5 6 Visit or call any of our 52 convenient branches in the Greater Houston area. Chase • Downtown 712 Main St. 713/216-4865 Chase • Kirby 3201 Kirby Dr. 713/525-2287 Chase• Reagan (Heights)· 545 W. 19th St. 713/868-6791 O CHASE THE RIGHT RELATIONSHIP IS EVERYTHING~ NEWS FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE police beat Gay man charged in WA slaying of partner's mail-order bride ~10lJ.:\TLAKE TFRRACF., Wash. (AP)-A woman who armed from the former Sov1t:t Lmon to marry an Americafl was murdert.>d last year, allegedly by a m.m \\ho claims to be tlie male partner of th!Ywoman's husband. /\n.istasia Solo1•1eva, 20 at the time of her death, was found in a shallow grave not far from her suburban Seattle home. I !er husband, Indle King, Jr., 39, who:-.e first marriage to another mail-order bnde ended m divorce after she accused him of abuse, 1s 1a1led on perJury charges refoted to his wife's disappearance. Daniel Larson, 20, a former tenant at their house who claims he 1s King's gay partner, has been charged with Solov1eva's death. Police say Kmg led inl'estigators to Larson, whom he had visited in pil where Larson was awaiting tnal on unrelated charges of molesting a teen-age girl. Under police questioning, Larson allegedly said he strangled Solovie1•a with a necktie at King's request last September while King pinned her down. King denied play­ing a role in his wife's death. Two lesbians included in pardon flurry during Clinton's last days \\'/\SI 11:\GTON-Two lesbian.-; who had been convicted of planting a bomb m the lJ.S. capital u1 1983 to protest the U.S. mvas1on of Grenada were among the 176 people who were issued pardon.-; or clemency from Bill Ointon dunng his finJI days in off1Ce, the Wasl11ngton Blade reported. Linda Evans and Susan Rosenberg. each of whom had been m pnson for O\'er a decade, were granted clemency by the president. A third lesbian in1·olved in the bomb planting, Laura Whitehorn, had completed her sentence m 1999. Since her release, \.\'hitehorn has worked as an assistant editor at POZ maga· zme. Evans, who lives in 5Jn Francisco, said she i.s excited about workmg again as an activist. Asked how the gay movement seems after more than a decade in prison, Evans said it was hard to tell. ''1 think too many gay people are 1denti­fymg with the values that are ag.iinst us or agamst life," she told the newspaper. Linda Evans (left} and Susan Rosenberg, lesbians convicted of planting a bomb in Washington, D.C., were among the 176 people who received pardons in the final days of President Ointon's administration. Protests over alleged bias don't delay execution of gay MO killer POTOSI, Mo.-A gay man convicted of brutally murdering a teenage boy was put to death m ~fo;soun on Feb. 7 de-pile protests by gay-rights and human rights organizations, Reuters reported Stanley Dewaine Ungar, 37, died from legal injection while about 40 demonstrators protested outside the Potosi Correction Center, said prison spokesperson lim Knie.st. Lmgar was sentenced to die for the January 1985 murder of Thomas Allen, 16, a hi~h school student who was offered a lift by l.ingar and Lingar's friend, David Smith. Ungar and Smith abducted Allen and killed him when he resisted orders to strip and mas­turbate m front of the men. Smith, who testified against Lingar, served a 10-year sentence. "The state of Missouri used Lingar's sexual orientation as a reason to give him a death sen­tence." said Queer Watch spokesperson William Dobbs Houston man arrested in strangulation death of popular drag queen HOUSTOl\-A man accused m the dl'ath of Orin Shane Honeycutt, also known as popular female imp~sonator Brandi Houston, was arrested last week in Florida. Richard Masterson will face murder charges in Texas, saJd Sgt. R. G. Parish of the Houston Police Department. Parish declined to say where in Florida Masterson was picked up. Honeycutt, 35, was found dead in his apartment Jan. 27 There were "no visible wounds to his body," according to initial pohce reports, but police :;aid Masterson allegedly strangled Honeycutt after the two met in a Houston gay bar. Honeycutt's car was m1SSing, and police are considering robbery as a possi· ble motive. They do not consider the murder to be a hate crime, Parish said. Honeycutt often raised funds for AIDS benefits and was popular in the Houston gay community. "Brandt was a big, big part of our community," said Don Gill, board chair for PWA Holiday Charities, which had recently named Honeycutt the group's "volunteer of the year" for 2000. Lesbian couple sentenced in U.K. scheme to defraud investors LON00:\1-A former brothel madam who rubo. d ~houlders with Queen Elizabeth II while ddraudmg wealthy investors was sentenced to five yrors m jail, the Scotsnum n.'ported. Au~tralian Evelyn Burton, 57, together with her lesbi.m pJrtner Lyla Andre, 50-who was scntencL'd to near­I}' four yeJrs m prison-used other in\'l>;.tors' money to create the appearance of wealth and suc­cess, dri\ing around in Rol.ls-Royces and staying at five-star hotels. An attorney told the court #that even profcs..,ional men who otherwtSC arc hard-he.1ded and skilled in the m.1tters of finance" were fooled by the women. Burton plc.1dt.>d guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud between O' ' • ·1<l6 and :vfarch 1998. Andre admittl'<i to one count of dishonestly retaining a wrongful For more news, visit www.houstonvoice.com m..J1t card and two chJrges of evJding a liability by dl'Ct'ption. The two were once prostitutes \.\-ho ran a massage parlor m Australia. -From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 AI;TE Alternatives Tips on Choosing Gay Treatment Ask: ,.. Artt you in a safe & secure Gay Owned and Operated facility? ,.. Will you be treated in a Dedicated GayUnitl ,.. Wiii you be cared for by experienced Gay Professionals and Gay Support Staff7 ... Is your Treatment Center dedicated to the Gay Community and supportive of PU!CQUS,11 Beware Of: @')Treatment centers and programs that exploit the gay community. from Alcohol, Drugs, Depression and Anxiety Alternatives: America's Leader in Gay and Lesbian Treatment Alternatives is the nation's only GAY OWNED AND OPERATED alcohol, drug and mental health program whose leadership has provided over 25 years of pride and service to the Gay, Lesbian, Bi-Sexual and Transgender Community. Alternatives specializes in treating HIV/AIDS-related griefand loss.Our HIV ! specialists are available to address all < medical concerns. " .x Medicare/Media Id Ir most insurance accepted. o JCAHO Accredited. l 429 • www.alternativesinc.com "Most deli owners Qo h·ome at 8 p.m. Mere mortals!'' 7 8 l~~i~~I STAFF Ge n e ral Manager David Barron dbarron@houstonvo1ce com Editor Wendy K. Mohon ed1torOhoustonvo1ce com Production S• nior Gn1phic Designer-Natasha Marquez Graphic Designer-Deborah Duplant Contributors Rich Arenschitldt, Kay Y Dayus. Trayce Diskin. Earl Dittman, D.L Groover. Robert B Henderson, Kathreen lee. Mana E M101cucc .. D.L. Murphy, Gip Plaiter, Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart, Kimberly Thompson AdvenJSing Sales Tom RobbltlS Kyle Cooke-Class1f1ed & Directory Admin1Stration & Sales Suppon carolyn A Roberu National Advertising Repr•sentative R-ndell Marketing Company. Inc 711-242-6863 President· Wilham Waybourn Editorial Director- Chns Cram Finandal Director· Kelly Smink lntem•t Director- Joel Lawson rn ......... ~=, ,., MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER Of COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Monrrose Star 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax (713) 529-9531 Contents copynght 2000 Offic:e hours: 9 am. to 5:30 pm. weekdays To submit a letter Lett•rs should be fewer thal"' 400 words. We reserve the right to •d1t for cont•nt and length W• w1 withhold 'lames upon roquest. but you must me i.de your name and phone number for ""' focat on Please s•l"'d r.a to Houston ll'olCe ')()() Lo""tt Blvd Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 fax (71 l' 5~53' or e-ma to ed torO~oustonvoJCe com op1n ans expressed thue n do not reflea those of tl\e Housto Vo ce VOICES & ECHOES FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE EDITORIAL Hotlines provide lifelines for gays by YIELl'.\'DA SI fE!.TON NEW ORLEANS­For many of us vi!.1ble U\ the gay community, com· ing to terms with our sex­ual orientation and its myriad personal and social issues is something talked about in the past tense. Underuably, being out al'-0 places us at risk. We arc visible targets for homophobes. Our famihes and associates may-and often do-reiect us. Employers can exercise silent dLscrimination, without openly hav­ing to say we' re demed a promotion or a raise because we're gay But by coming out, we have chosen to confront our fears and conquC'r as many as possible Being out builds sclf"6teem and forges alliances and friendships. Coming out of the closet and going pub­lic about such an intimate, private aspect of one's self takes incredible courage. lmagme a 15-year-old in Tupelo, MISS., struggling with hIS sexual orientation. Or a 20-year-0ld lesbian in &!ton Rouge who was raped at a fr.1termty party. Or a woman or man in Atlanta, who has gender identity ISSUCS, but doesn't know where to tum for information. For countless pt."Ople like these, informa· lion and support are \1rtual lifelines for sur- Gay & Lesbian National Hotline phone: 1-888-8434 564 Mon.-Fri., 4 p.m.·midnight (Eastern Time) Saturday, noon·5 p.m. (En e-mail: glnh@glnh.org Web site: www.glnh.org \1VaJ. Four years ago, a group of commuruty activ1Sts m New York decided to establish a national hotline to help people with sexual orientation or gl'!lder identity i&>ucs. The Gav & Lesbian National Hotlme first opened a volunteer-run office in New York, and today there is a second office in San Franmco. To say there is a demand for the Gay & Lesbian National Hotline is an understate­ment: It receives more than 100,000 calls every year, primarily from troubled teens and young adults. To say there IS a demand for the hotline IS an understatement The hotline reo.wes more than 100.(XXJ calls e\·ery year, pnmari­ly from troubled teens and young adults. The Gl ..\ ;ll is a volunteer-based pm· gram \\;th 75 volunteers, v.iio work an average of six to eight hours a month at either of the two offices, said Brad Becker, GL'\;H's execuhve director. IL~ annual $75,000 budget largely comes from private donations and foundation grants, and the bulk of the money is used to pay the tele­phone bills and office rent. Volunteers are trained to prO\·;de crisis intervention and make referrab from the organi1.ation's national database of more than 18,CXXJ listings. Counselqrs also provide health informa· lion, particularly on ways to avoid trans­mitting or contracting sexually traru;m1tted Click and ~reaa 'Stan' by Eminem? Popular rapper Eminern has been roundly criticized for his nusogyrust and anti.gay lyrics. Despite the controversy, he could receive up to four Grammys during the Ft?b. 21 awards show on CBS. Now Elton John, singer and gay icon, has accepted an invita· lion to perform the rapper's song 'Stan' in a duet with Eminem during the show. Should gay men and lesbians even care? •Gay rights groups like GLAAD were right to express 'disgust' with Elton. • Elton should snap Eminem's 'olive branch' in two and feed it back to the repul­sive rapper, washing it down with a dry Merlo!. • Eminem's lyrics have a direct effect on the lives of gays and he should be banned from the awards show. • I'm gay, Eminem is hot, and I don't care what he raps about. houstonvoice.com d;seases and I !IV. For many of the callers, speaking to a GL\JH volunteer 1s the first time the\'ve ever had personal contact \\1th someone from the gay community. Comforting words can mean the differ· ence between life and death, as those of us who have done crisis lme work, or who have made calls ourselves, know. For many of the callers, it's also the first time they have ever been told their homo­sexual feelings are normal and are not to be feared. This validation, Becker said, is essential to building strong self-esk'Cm. "For a young person in a rural, isolated town, or whose family makes gay jokes, or whose teacher makes homophobic com· menb, or who gcx>s to church and has to lis­ten to anti-gay fire and brimstone preach· mg-actually talking to someone who's gay means they no longer feel like they'rc alone," Becker said. Counselors do not give advice on what the person should do, but rather ask ques­tions about what the person is frcling. what she or he wants to do, and how she or he thinks can solve thC'lr own problems, Becker said. For many callers, simply talking to soml'One, expressing themsdvt~ ilbout their scxuJI orientation and related issu\'s and problems 1s an important first step. "Some of the callers are too nervous to talk to anyone else but us," Becker said, "and they're not ready to take any sll'p at all other than talking. It's our job to let them know what's there for them when tl1ey're ready." Many of the callers, particularly the young ones, are reluctant to discu~ their :.cxual activitie:;, so voluntl'ers are trained to broach the subjl'ct dunng the course of the conver.;ation. "The truth is, tl'Cns are the fastt'St­growing age group with new HIV infoc· lions, but a 15-year-old doesn't think he'll catch it by having sex with another 15-year-old," Becker said. Education is yet another lifeline the counselors throw. The GLNH database contains mforma· hon on community centers and hotlines, doctors, lawyers, counselors, service agen· cies, health resources, gay-friendly busi­nesses and gay-supportive groups in cihe:; and commuruties across the n.ihon. The list, Becker says, is the largest of its kind in the world. For the counties.~ thousands of those who are invisible, the hotline-and others like it-provides a vital link to our commu· nity. and a greater sense of St>!f-acceptance. Melmda Size/ton 1s tlze editor of Sou them Voice, a s1~ter paper ta llze Houston Voice The Houston Gar & Lesbian Switchboard operates 24 hour a dJY, 7 days a week 713-529·3211 HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 VOICES & ECHOES 9 PLANT LIFE Enough of 'Jeng shui by day'-and gay by DREW PLANT ls the feng shui craze over yet? I mean, I am happier than a bear in a campground that people have gotten water features, mirrors and big hunks of rock in the right places in their homes. but it has just gone too far. 1 do not want anyone else to tell me to cut down the single pine tree in front of my house (bad luck). Or to reroute the storm drain next to my house (it'll carry away my dreams, fertility or wealth, depending on who you ask-or don't ask). Surely you have heard of feng shui (pronounced "fung schway"). If not, you must have spent recent years on the cast of a television show that deposits you in a remote area from which you can only return naked, nch and inexplicably famous. No, as many Web sites, books and "feng shui by day" calendars will tell you, this "science" tl•aches "how to manipulate your surroundings to make ,111 impact on your finances, health and emotions." My feng shui frustration came to a head recently when some fool called me at work with a proposition that he come "balance" my office to further productiv­ity and enhance my "professional well being." 1 had a hard time being polite. 1 can tell you for absolutely no con­sulting fee whatsoever that my work­day mood would be improved by shorter days, long lunches and a bottle in my desk, not to mention the cessation of inam• phone calls from someone who is going to move a tree to the other side of my filing cabinet (a by-phone example this faux consultant gave me!). Literally, feng shui means wind and water, and it's purported to be the ancient Chinese study of how to position yourself in the natural order of the uni­verse. Key components: the year you were born, the environment surrounding you and movements of the solar system. I'm sure it started out legitimate enough, but then kooks and bad interior decora­tors got a hold of it. Still, feng shui's defenders protest a bit too much that it is a scientific disci­pline (based on the analysis of energy). Well, someone who uses a compass in my house to tell me the whole damn place · faces the wrong direction just doesn't seem too scientific to me. By the way, a Feng Shui Master's compass is called a "J..o..Pan." The feng shui office balancer who called me felt it was important for me to know that he had his own and started every job with it. 1 didn't know what a J..o..Pan was, but I do love a man who brings his own equip­ment. Espeoally after my et-based research indicated that feng shui involves balls and more balls. Specifically, therapy balls. Sometimes Chinese therapy balls. Other times iron balls. And, get this, the advice that you should select small balls and gradually increa~e to larger balls as you become more comfortable with your work' My Feng Shui Quest (also the title of my next romance novel) turned up an article on "sacred smells for your sacred spaces." , o comment. Another feng shut tome proposes that a really thorough house cleaning can get rid of bad karmic energy. Hey, my great-grandmother knew this and would have considered feng shui to be witchcraft at the very least Then there seems to be a whole debate over wind chimes-what they have to be made of, where they have to be placed, when they have to be moved and whether they really have any feng shui zing at all. I won't even go into the fact that there is apparently an entire school of thought around feng shui being kosher (or not). Oy Vey! I have most enjoyed learning and hearing about how to spot feng shu1 fakes and "feng shui charlatans." Even these feng shui consumer advocates The Mostly Unfabulous Social Life of Ethan Green ... f resh Guy is snickering because .. Tired Guy versus Fresh Guy Tired Guy doesn't know how to work the phone. seem to be out for a buck. They ultimate­ly sell you feng shui-zines (magazines for the devotee) and have Web sites full of stuff-mainly ducks and flutes and amulets that look like Angie Dickinson's earrings. Then again, that may be exactly what this craze has going for it. Drew Plant zs an Atlanta-based writer who is, at this moment, concerned that the lack of a fire element m his home is a harbinger of bad resale tialue Write Drewbob@mind· spring.com and tell him how you c/wse to Jumg your u•ind chimes Tired Guy has had enuff of Fresh Guy's crap. He knows how to work a cell phone, OK? He's iust never used one of these flip phones before. Tired Guy thinks maybe it's time to send Fresh Guy away. How:r:about a time & place with weird phones. Like, big deal. 10 NEWS Lobby Day attendance has increased - Continued from Page 1 are out and proud, so when they go back to their particular home~ or neighborhoods, they don't carry the stereotype," Frye ~aid She said she 1s glad to see De Palma and oth­ers leading the lobby day. "It ha:. allowed me to kind of sit back and be m an emeritus kind of a role," she 'aid DePalma said the lobby day, held three times m the past, has seen a 1ump in atten­dance through the years The first year, only seven people participated Twenty people took to the marble the next time; 50 people showed up for the third event As many as 100 are expected this year. They intend to speak out in favor of repeal· ing the sodomy law and in favor of proposed nondiscrimination in education bills. The group has not taken a pos1t10n on the hate crimes bill, DePalma ~aid. "I polled our member-hip and we really could not reach a con,ensus on whether to support 11," she said. ome members believe 1t would make for bad law while others ob1ect that gender 1dent1- ty 1 not included m the bill Still others say a toughened hJte cnmes law i a good ~ymbol even 1f does not directly benefit transgendered people "Rather than fracture the communit} over an 1 sue we decided to take a non-pos1hon" DePaima ~JI The activists will al~o lobby in f.ivor of Hou e 8111 15 7 introduced by State Rep Debra Danburg. D-Houston which IS aimed at s1mphh mg the process of getting name and gender changed if a 1udge 1s presented with .m affidavit from a doctor ~tatmg that a pahent 1dent1f1es as a gender d1fterent than the one on his or her official documents. S1mphrvmg that proce:.s 1s JU't one of num­ber of things that needs to be happen to give transgender people less of a d1sadvant.1ge in oc1ety, according to Brenda Thomas who runs a transgender support group and works for the c1t\ ot Houston on a proi:;ram targetmg trans· gendered people with HIV I AID~ educahon mformahon "Theres a really large gap m protechon of any size, form, shape or d1menswn for our commumt} " Thomas said "Especially once they have trans1honed, it's hke they re a non­per on Tne state ~ays they're neither male nor female DePalma said that unlike the gay lobbying event planned for March 18-19, there will be no march or protest as part of the tr.rn~gender event ' uwe feel like we would be better taking a low-key approach," she said "We don't want to attract the media to a 'Jerry Springer Shov. '. hke event' Jnstead, they mtend to gather the day before their event m space donated by a trans­gender clothmg shop called the Cheshire Cat and tram on how to be better lobtiyists. State Rep. Glen Maxey (D- Austin), Danburg and Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas Executive Director Dianne Hardy-Garcia are expected to help lead the · training, DePalma said. "It's not a simple matter of showing up. It's a matter of knowing what you're doing. We don't want anvone to be embarrassed in front of a legislator/' she said. On Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., the lobbyists will gather on the steps of the capitol for a photo, then go to the legislators to whom they were assigned at the training. Late arrivals will be whisked into space donated by Danburg where they will be given a crash course on lob­bying, then released to visit a legislator. DePalma said there is still much work to be done before legislators are likely to pay atten· lion to the transgender community, but the gathenng m Austin helps lay the groundwork for a network of activbt who someday could make a d1fterence. uThe truth of the matter 1s that this is large­Iv an issue ror us of community building," she said DePalma expresst>d that sentiment in a let· ter sent to activists by email "If you get nothing ebe from our lobby day, I hope vou will leave feeling a sense of hope and empowerment," she said. "We want you to go home with the knowl­edge that your voice mattered and your atten­dance made a difference. ~ Delira Dallburg FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Trans pioneer launches Website by GIP PLASTER Houston's longtime transgender activist Phyllis Frye has launched a new Web site aimed at sharing the wealth of legal infor­mation on transgender issues the attorney has written, helped write or simply collected through the years. And while the site, transgenderlegal.com, already includes a complete book chapter by Frye, a partial archive of her "Phyllabuster" newsletter and plenty of other documents and links, Frye said it is nowhere near finished. "There's about 85 percent more coming," she said. The site is intended as a resource for lawyers, activists and any transgendered person who wants to know about struggles that have gone before. "What's there and what's coming is a resource for lawyers who have transgendered clients but don't understand the nuances of the transgender issue and transgendered people themselves who want to hire an attorne\' and educate them," she said. Frye has been a recognized leader in the struggle for transgender rights for more than 20 years. She challenged Houston's law against cross-dressing in 1981 and founded the International Conference on Transgender Law & Employment Policy in 1992. The site features Chapter 22 from the book "Creating Change· Sexuality, Public Policy and Civil Rights." The chapter, entitled "Facing Discrimination, Organizing for Freedom: the Transgender Community," 1s an overview of the cause written br Frye. Also already on the sill' are some of the most important docu­ments in the short history of the transgender righb movement, mcluding the International Bill of Gender Rights, Health Law Standards of C.ire and a document detatlmg standards for dealmg with transgendered people m prisons Frye said she eventually plans to have much more of the infor· mahon generated at the confonmce she started available on the site The site also includes a link to information and documents rela t­ed to one of Frye\ recent chents, Christie Littlefield The transgen­dered woman was deemed legally a man after the death of husband and therefore left with no standing to sue her husband's doctor ior malpractice. There might be something there to help other lawyers, Frye said. "It should give lawyers who are handling the:.c case:; a starting point, a jumping off point,'' she said The resource will ;ilso continue to grow as new works are pro­duced Within a few weeks, an article Pryl' wrote for an upcoming issue of the College of Wilham & Mary's "journal of Women and the Law" will be added to the site • '1"hat is going to present an awful lot," she said. "lt'l> a legitimate law re\·iew article m a legitimate law review journal.'' Frye said she feels 11 is her responsibility to make this information available to others. "Without patting myself on the back or bl~wmg my own hom­wh1ch I'm not opposed to domg-I am the pioneer of national legal transgender actl\1sm," she said." And I have either generated myself or produced in concert with other people a boatload of information." But that information is often hard for others to obtain, she said. "Unfortunately. a lot of this informahon has not been very avail· able, but now it will be very available," she said. "And the way you fight is to give people information" transgender1egal.com tglegal com Phyllis Frye e-mail: PRFryeOaol com HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 NEWS 11 Censervatives to battle anti-bias ban .- Continued from Page 1 C1t1es oll ross the country do." But the pnhl!t,11 climate ms1dl• thl• hl•ar· mg and the hl'oltt•d rhetoric on the strl'l'ls below w.1s .inh·cl1m,1hc. A day e.irhcr, Houston Mayor Lee Brown-with the blessing of gay communi· ty lcadt.'rs-put domestic partner benefib on hold. opting mstcad to support a more­swel'pmg ordinance banning discrimination against gays and lesbians who work for the citv · ,\ similar 1 louston anh·discrimmation order was passed bv City Council m 1985, but soundly rebuffed bv voters in a refcren· dum noted tor its rancor. Fulfilling a campaign promise, in March 1998, Brown signed an executive order which bannl'd discnmmation in city go\·­emment on thl' basis of sexual orientation, Although the mayor's authonty to issue such ::m order did not require a \'ote from City C.ouncal, Coun<il member Rob Todd and consen·ati\'(;• businessman Richard Hotze hll•d an injunction against it, saying that thl' action contradicted the public \'Ole ofl985 SubSl'quently, I lotze was dropped from the sUlt by State Dbtnct Judge Patnck W. 1'.1ilell. who said Hotze lacked standing to make a claim, but Todd carried on as the lom· plaintiff ,\ ruling from the Texas Supreme Court 1s e'pected m October By all accounts, Brown had the majonty ot Council \'oles needed to pass the insur· ance benefits question, but he switched strategy O\'Cr the weekend and came out strongly for passage of the anh-d1scnmina· tion ordinance. Accompanied by City Council member Annise Parker, the panel's only openl}' gay member, supports both domestic partner­ship benefits and the anti-bias proposal, Brown met with 90 gay men and lesbians on Saturd,1y to talk strategy. In an informative meeting called togeth­er by his newly-appointed liaison to our community, Janine Brunjes, most of the peo­ple at the meeting wanted to delay the health contract issue and vigorously press forward with the anti-discrimination ordi­nance. "They [the council members) either have to 'ay I'm in fo\'or of discrimination or I'm not. That 1s a better place to start than one particular area of benefits," said Mitchell Katine, a gay attorney who has taken on gay civil rights cases. "This is the proper precur:;or to extend­ing insurance coverage to domestic part· ncrs, so that the city employees will be pro­tected against discrimination when they access insurance coverage," Parker said at a Selling your life insurance is a maior decision. Whet' you re gay.1mg w :ti Hl'I ond 1triJlg ol selirlg YoS ~le inil.<cnce. shol.'dn 1 you beg-en o foc1Ho-foce conslAto!lon., o nc>prem.<e. nc><tiigol!on envir0mlenl1 lried V.aficol Beneftf\ ~proud to be the otty gay o-.ned ond cperotect V10tical brol:e< with o local office"' HOOJSton. Atter al we bele•e.., prol'idrig yov !tie pellOOOf Oltet'l!on you dese<>e ond getting y()J Ille mo1t money ., the !hcil'e\t lime! Experience. Professionalism. Courteous Service! For Home, Health LOCALoma LINKED VIATICAl BENEFITS news c0nfcrcnce ~londa\' In a written ~tatemrnt, Brown<igreed "The non·dL'Cnmmation ordmancc \\111 gwe current gay and lesbian aty employees, and future city employees, comfort know· mg th.it they will not lose thcu JObs 1f they select domestic partner benefits m the future," the mayor said. But battle lines arc bemg drawn. A new, conservati\·e group, Houstonians for Family Values, is forming and pushing J petition drive to place the issue before vol· ers in November. The political action com­mittl'l' is led by Dave Wilson, a conservative activist and former mavoral candidate. The language of ihe group's petition would bar the city from providing benefits to anyone but employees, their spouses, and their dependent children, ;is well as prcn•nt "an) pnvill'ge in promotion, hiring, or con­tractingion the basis of se\ual prefr•rcncc." Some 20,000 signatures are required to add a rl'f Prcndum to Houst0n's ballot Calling samc-Sl'X benefits a moral issue, Wilson said, "Homosexual beha\10r 1s a ~In." Brown, who has a track record of attend· ing Gay Pride parades and speaking toga} groups, said the anti-bias measure 1s the right move to make. "I just don't thmk we should discrimi­nate against anyone," he said. When you have issues to deal with, being gay shouldn't be one of them. If you're struggling with addiction o depression, you need a treatment center where you can be yourself.... Where you can talk frankly and safely to people who understand you. We're Pride Institute, the nation's leader In providing treatment for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities. We have programs offering residential, outpatient and halfway house services. You have the power. Call us today. Tl.,1{11 JE INS'l'I'l'U1l'E 800-54-PRIDE Gty Counc~ member Annise Parker said an anti-bias ban would prote<t gay city employees who come out and ask for domestic partner benefits. - Medicare and most insurance plans cover our programs www.pride-lnstltute.com JCAHO Accredited 12 NEWS FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HIV prevention efforts face uncertain future A prominent gay activist challenges San Francisco AIDS stats, as the CDC announces a new prevention effort and the Bush administration waffles on AIDS office by ERi, O'BRIANT A study shO\\lng rates of new HIV infeclions among gay men in San Francisco have doubled since 1997 came from "weak" rese<irch using uneven samples a promi­nent g.iy .iuthor ch.irged 1.ist week. G.iy pundit Andrew, ull van took issue with statements issued by the San Francisco HIV Consensus Meeting, which said the rate of new HIV infection~ m SJn Francisco could re<ic.h 2.2 percent this ye;ir, up from the I 04 percent rate I.isl year Me<inwh1le, Centers for Disc;ise Control & Prev4!ntion ofllc1als announced a new HIV prevention 1mtallve at the th Conference on Retrovuuses & Opportumstic Infections in Ch1c;igo Feb. 4-8, and the Bush admims· trahon waffled on whether the Office of N.ibon.il AIDS Policy would remain open. SF studies flawed? The San Francisco researth indicated a doubling of the rates of new HIV infect10n~ since 1997 in the City. But according to Sullivan, those numbers can be expl.iined by fluctuations m sample size Only one of the studies in the body of research has "a reasonJbly representativ~ sample of young gay men," he said Even that study came under fire from Sullivan. who daimL>d that fluctuabons m s.nn­ple SJZe undcrmmcd resean:hers' conclusions. Thomas Coates, director of the AIDS Research Institute & Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at the Uruvers1ty of California, San Franasco, re.pondl>d by saymg the study Sullivan spt.'Cifically critidu'l:i has "bL't'll published m pa>r reV1ewed journals and has withstood the peer review system." Sullivan descnbed the other studies m the report as "equally weak" "No single study is without limitation," AIDS experts fe« 'an ileffective federal response to AIDS in this country en! abroad' if the Bush admilistration doesn't fuly support its AIDS office, said Terje AndersOI\. executive mre<tor of the National Association of People with AIDS. A spokesperson for President Bush first said the new president would cancel the Office of National AIDS Policy, but Bush's chief of staff later called the statement a 'mistake.' countered Coates. "But when such a large array of indicators, data, trends, numbers, com­munity input and even actual clinic and health care vio;its indicate that sometlung is shifting m the wrong direction, we would do best to not argue with the data but address the LSSUe." Focus on knowing HIV status The COC hopes to address the problem of new infections with it.> new HIV prevention program, the Serostatus Approach to Fighting the HIV Epidemic (SAFE). The ini­tiative focuses on expanding voluntary coun­seling and testing programs to reach every­one living with HIV infection, including the estimated 200,000-275,000 Amencans who are not aware that they are infected. Officials hope SAFE will cut new HIV infections in half nationwide by 2005. According to Robert Janssen, director of the COC's d1V1Sion of HIV/ AIDS preven· hon, studies show that people who know they are infected with HIV take steps to protect theu pJrtners Also, new HIV thera­pies, by lowering viral load, may reduce an HIV.positive person's degree of mfectious­ness. CDC officials said th!? organization needs .in additional $200 million m funding to pursue the proiect full} uFunding will have to be from both pub­lic a'ld pm.ite sourlCS, leveragmg the spe­cial skills the pnvate sec.tor has that we don't have/ said J.inssen Fate of national AIDS office The COC ma} rdy more hea\'ily than before on pnvate funds for HIV prevention dunng President Bush's tenure HIV confab vields troubling stats, new guidelines by ERIN O'BRIAt\'T The 8th Conference on RetroV!ruses and Opportunistic Infections took place in Chicago Feb. 4-8. Conference papers and presentations outlined important information for people affected by HIV and AIDS, including: • A study presented at the conference by Susan J Little of the University of California at SJn Diego showed that the incidence of drug·resL-;tant strains of new HIV infection has risen to 14 percent. Partiapants in the study were from Birmingham, Ala., and other cities m North Amenca, a,·rording to the Nrw York Times. Robert Janssen, director of the di\'ision of HIV I AIDS prevention at the Centers for Disease Control, suggested that researchers aren't :;ure whether Little i~ comparing numbers among people in the same population. • The Department of Health & Human USA Today and other news organiza­tions reported last week that the Bush administration would close both the White House Office of National AIDS Policy and the President's Initiative for One Arnenca, after White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card made a statement to that effect. But after the story broke, White House spokesperson Ari Fleischer denied plans to close the AIDS office, saying Card's state­ment was "a mistake." In a press briefing Feb. 7, Fleischer said President Bush will continue to have an office dedicated to "fight(ing] the scourge of AIDS." The Department of Health &: Human Services will "be detailing people to the White House," he said. "In addition, at our Domestic Pohcy Council we will have a White House employee who is dedicated to fighting AIDS and developing poliCJe. that can help us fight AIDS. l'here is also a task force in place that will remain m place that also is concerned with the battle agamst AIDS," Aeischer said. AIDS activists said they fear the Bush administration's waffling could bode ill for the campaign against the ep1dcm1c "Nothing I have heard from President Bush or An Fleischer clarifies the simple question, 'Arc you gomg to have an AIDS czar whose exclusive responsibility is to be ..a national and mternalional leader on AIDS 1SSues?"' said Alexis Schuler, spokesperson for AIDS Action Fleischer av01ded specific ment10ns of and plans for 0 'AP, the President's Advisory Council on HIV I AIDS, and the p0S1hon of national AIDS policy director, Services and the Hemy J. Kaiser Family Foundation issued an updated version of the "Guidelines for thr U~e of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents" Feb. 5. The new gwdelines recommend that doctors begin treatment when patients have a higher \'iral load and lower CD4 count than before. • An ongoing study by a COC epidemi­ologist showed that urban gay and bisexual men ages 23-29 have an overall HIV preva­lence of 12.3 percent. The study, which mcludl>d surveys of more than 2,400 men, sampled participants at pubhc venues m Baltimore, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City and Seattle. Thirty percent of young Afric.m-Amerimn gay and bisexual men, 15 percent of Hispani~ and 7 percent of whites were diagnosed with the virus. "We're very concerned about the high rates of HIV among gay men of color and are looking at our best response to that," Janssen said. Schuler said. Terje Anderson, executive director of the National Association of People with AIDS, expressed similar concerns. "There are a lot of federal programs that affect people with AIDS and having one person in one office coordinating them and providing a voice in the White House 1s mcredibly important," Anderson said. "The fear that we have is that we will have an ineffective federal response to AIDS in this country and abroad." White House representatives aid not return phone calls by press time. President George W. Bush 1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW wa1h1ngton, DC 20500 phone: 202-456 1414 fax: 202 456-2461 e-mail: presodentOwhltehouse.gov Web; http:/fwww.wh1tehouse.gov UCSF AIDS Research Institute 74 New MontgoMery, Ste. 600 San Francisco, CA 94105 plione: 415-597 9203 fax· 415-597·9213 e mail: eriOpsg.ucsf edu Web· http://111v1nslte ucsf .edu Andrew Sullivan e-maJl:andrewCandrewsull1van.com Web: www.al'drewsullivan.com HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 NEWS 13 Gays want meeting with Bush's faith-based office Pro-gay groups worry granting federal money to religious-based social service organizations could institutionalize homophobia order to be fed or am I going to be prayed O\'Cr? . We haw verv fundamental con­cerns that his proposal poses a threat to both GLBT social sen·ice worker~ and by ERIC ERIC KSO:'\ sooal sen·ice recipients." A co,11ition of pro-gay relig10us and secular groups IS c,1lhng for a mL'eting with john Diiulio, the tJninrsity of Penn:;yl\'ania professor tapped to he,1d the ' new White House Office of Fa1th-b,1sed & Commumtv lnitlatl\'es. Cay rights ,1d\'oc,1tl's and othl•r rntKs of the recently announced offin• say they fear 1t will \'iolate the Constitution's guar­antee ol sl'p.u.1t1on of church ,rnd state, and put gay mL•n and lesbians at nsk of President George W. Bush 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington. DC 20500 phone: 202 456 1414 e-mail: presidentOwh1tehouse.gov Equal Pa rtners in Fa ith 2026 P St. NW Suite 3 Washington D.C 20036-5914 phone: 202-332·6483 e-mail: uuawoOao .com National Gay & Lesbian Task Force 1700 Kai ·ama Rd. NW Saturday March 3, 2001 6:30pm THE WESTIN GALLERIA Featuring a globe trotting s1fent auction sponsored by The Luxury Collect1on, donating premier 1nterna11onal and domestic properties - so hold off on vour vacation plans! L1vo auction featuring a gentleman's stainless steel and 1 Bkt yellow gold Rolex Oyster Perpetual Oatejust watch. El discriminatory treatment from relig10us groups that oppose homosexuality The new White House office, and simi­lar offices created by Bush in fi\'e go\'em­ment departments, topped the agenda last week when the National Gay & Lesbian T,1Sk Force and Equal Partners m Faith con­n• ned the semi-annual meeting of the l\attonal Rehg10us Leadership ROLmdtable, an interfaith network of 40 rdig1ous leader~ who ad\'ocate for pro-gay n:ligious perspectives. The NRLR concluded its meetmg with calls for a discussion with the man who will head the new faith-based oftice, and a message for thl• new president. "We want Bush to know there are pro­gressive people of faith in the LGBT com­mlmity and that our voices are going to be heard by media and society," said Rev. Ste\'en Baines, executive coordmator of Equal Partners m Faith. The new offh'S will promote competition for $10 billion in federal grants, pre\'iously unavailable to religious organizations. Under Bush's proposal, any religious group providing soCJal scr\'ices may apply for kdcral funding "If I'm homeless," asked NGLTF spokesperson David Elliot, "and I go to a soup kitchen, am I going to have to pray in Elliot ~ud NGLTF and oU1l~r gay organi­zations fear thl':<e rdig1ous groups could ll"l' federal money to promote their 0\\11 con..«er­\' ah\·e agenda. "It's an attack on our commu­rul);" he said. 'Tw come not to expect much from this adnurustration. Tht> unportant tlung to keep in mind is that if thrse propostl.s go through we will face discnrrunation." Bush has ms1Sted that bias will not occur his proposal. While religious groups will be able to kl'l'P their rehgtott' sym· bols, character and internal gm ernmg structure during and after the grant appli­cation process, they cannot w•e the funds for actual worship, religiott~ education or conwrsion. In fact, under the plan. any congregation, including primarily gay congregations like Metropolitan Community Churches, would be eligible for funding. Yet Elliot said he rcmam.s skeptical. ''Do you reallv thmk the Bush admm1stra­tion is going to farnr our churches O\W the conser\'ative Baptist church-es''' he asked. Baines said he shares thosl' concerns. "We know from ewrythmg we see the Bush administration has done, [the funds are) going to go to groups that support his conservative theological viewpoints," he said. Honortnr. To purchase tickets: Continental Airlines CORPORATE EQUALITY AWARD Sue Lovell POLITICAL EQUALITY AWARD Gary Teixeira COMMUMITY SERVICE AWARD Special Recognition: The James Byrd, Jr, Family for their work in support of Hate Crimes leg1slat1on in Texas 800.494.TIXS Co-ehns Bret Baccus 713.807 7408 and Dalia Stokes 7 IS.522.2224 Table 1~lormat ion: David Muck 713.522 1115 Tm Llwin CGlucnoJt Gay activists say they want to meet with John Diiulio, tapped to head the new White House OffKe of Faith-Based & Community Initiatives. Bccatt.;e many ,\ml'rJCan.-. doubt the qual· 1ty of ~mces cunmtly available from gov­ernment s-xial sen·1ce agencies, Bush has sud he wants money to go to local religiott' group and ch 1c orgaruz.a hons. Bush said these group can ll'C contacts in their own community to better work \\1th needy peo­ple. Baml's said he recognizes religiou~ groups can admm1ster quality services, and he would be in favor of funding them with federal dollars, but only if they set up separate entitie~ to deli\'er 5ervices. ' The Office oi Faith-Ba~d and Community Inihati\'es is scheduled to open Feb. 20. MC: Georgia Ragsdale •Won.ING Asu.n• HUMAN &. ••I lllGHTS (.AliiUIOJll .............. .__ (Jiff!.~- eonii::ir:i~ • . ~ HOK ~SON • -·---·---------~,-..-·---~----~---------------~-----~~~-----' 14 Bringing you the Versatility of Digital Printing Things we can do for you ... Make Fabulous Full-Color or B&W Business Cards including your Scanned Image or Digital Photo ~ John's Personal Training l\ 1201 Wcsthcimcr 555-1212 cdl 555-0000 Scan Images for your Web-Posting ~rinting Needs Take Your Digital Photo (or scanned traditional photo) and turn it into a wonderful Large Format Poster Display Great for Trade Shows & Conventions .. FISCAL 2000 REPORT Print Your Powerpoint Files (or other presentation files) to excellent glossy paper or transparencies for your next business presentation. Make Beautiful Postcards or other Mail Pieces to promote your Business. We offer full color and greyscale printing on a wide variety of coated stocks. IJ01~ .la"U••·····IT- D fi!!Of Westheimer 713/5i!B-1i!Df Ps~chotherapy ·Consultation· Counseling for Personal linm1h & Dewlopment ~uumm ._... 111era P•~'"" When you 're ready for greater success with Life · Love · Relationships · Sexuality · Happiness Satisfaction • Inner Peace · Fulfillment · Career FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE A Center for CFS& Fibromyalgia Do You Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI A Smoking Cessation Research Study that uses a hand-held computer and the nicotine patch to help people quit smoking Call today 713-792-2265 TI-£ lNIVERSnY OF TEXAS ~AN)ERSON CANCER CENTER Making Cancer History .. HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 11@JCill@'Cs@/unquote" compiled by REX WOCHNER and STAFF REPORTS "Don't Fear It, Don't Flaunt It." Christopher Dandeker, who heads the war studies department at Kings College London, to the New York Times, Feb 10. Dandeker was comparing the approach of the Bflt1sh rP htary to qays serving openly to the US. military policy of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell • Brotain removed its ban on openly gay service members last year. "I am telling you, you're gonna blink and you'll be 80 and alone in a caftan with a lap full of catnip saying, 'Here kitty kitty kitty.' It's time to put the sex back in homosexual, Will." -Jack (Sean Hayes, left) to Will (Eric McCormack) on NBC's "Will & Grace,• Feb 1 "The most significant social change in the United States during the Clinton pres­idency was the social mainstreaming of gay Americans and the ebbing of anti-gay prejudice." -Author Bruce 8dwer writing in the New York Times, Jon 26, about the impact of President Clinton's adm1rnstrat Of" on gay men and lesbians "I get all kinds of e-mails telling me I'm working with the Nazis. But we're optimistic that President Bush will keep a dialogue going with the community." -Kevin Ivers of the Log Cabin Republicans to the New York Times, Jan. 26. LCR has been cnt1c1zed by some gay civil rights groups for not opposi!'lg conservative appointments to the Bush administration, like Attorney General John Ashcroft, who has made anti-gay statements as an elected official. "Ronan threw me out of Boyzone because I wasn't gay enough-it's as simple as that." -Ex-Boyzone member Shane Lynch (right) cnt1c1Z1ng former band mate Roman Keating for wanting him to be like Stephen Gately, the former Boyzone merrber who came out wt>1le still m the band, in the Mirror's "3am" column. "I hope no young gay man somewhere out there watches the show [Showtime's 'Queer As Folk'], packs his U-Haul, and moves to Pittsburgh, thinking he's going to a gay mecca. That would be kind of sad for him." -Pittsburgh advertising executive Robert Handley to USA Today, Jan 2 5 "It was my publicist, Stan, and he didn't dress well." -Actor George Clooney (left) when asked by reporters at the Golden Globe awards Jan 21 who his date was for the evening. "Stuart grins when he's fucking; you know he's having a good time. Brian looks grim and angry. Stuart has a heart; Brian is soulless. Stuart flirts with an attractive medical worker in the hospital; Brian fucks an attractive medical worker in the room where his friend is lying in a coma. Watching Stuart have sex, I want to join in. Watching Brian have sex, I want to scrub myself off with Lysol. If I'm going to watch sex, anonymous or otherwise, I'd like it to feature at least some minimal sense of delight at the touch of another human being. Otherwise I could just jerk off to 'On Golden Blond' or 'Guess Who's Coming at Dinner' or whatever this week's porno hit is called." -Dave Tuller comparing the protagonist of the British "Queer As Folk" (Stuart) -Xi'l.tll.the..ttWLWJil.lil.J:)fJhe.Amecican.Yer.s.!OnlBr1anl...Salao.com..Jao.. 10 15 End of Season Sale now through feb. 23 take 15-50% off on: • M2M • Calvin Klein •Roar • Kenneth Cole • YLMA • Andrew Christian • Navigator • Accessories M2M contemporary european style clothing for men phone 713.521.0804 3400 montrose 2 blocks south of westllelmer) mon-sat 10am-8pm sun 12-6pm 16 Don THE FUSION OF DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY. FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE _sey Cadillac 2000 ESCALADE USED CARS '97 Cadillac Deville • stk #2683A '96 Cadillac Seville • stk #2303P '96 Cadillac Deville • stk #8274P '96 Cadillac Deville • stk #2364A '96 Cadillac Deville • stk #8269PA •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Don Massey Cadillac SALES HOURS: 7:30am-6:00pm Monday-Friday 9:00am-6:00pm Saturday iH FUSION or OtSl~N &t TeeHNeLO~'f .. 2520 Main, Houston • 713-874-0900 Your caring, servicing, selling master dealer SERVICE HOURS: 7:30am-6:00pm Monday-Friday HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 ' wit amil Just in time for better weather, a new gay walking group u kicking up dust of /t\emarial Par by D.L. GROOVER How would you like to take a brisk morning con­stitutional in Memorial Park? How about taking your walk with some new friends? How about having breakfast after your hour's stroll with your new friends? Then the Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club is for you. This new social group is the brainchild of Jimmy Brown, who masterminded the Movie Club a few years back, a gay and lesbian group that combined dinner and a movie. It stayed in operation for about 18 months, but the scheduling hassles finally were too much for him. "It got real exhausting: picking the movie, leaving everyone messages. I had to plan a restaurant near the movie. But after all the obstacles they'd still come," he said. Wanting some exercise after sitting through all those movies, Brown started walking. ''I've been walking for about two years now," he said."! do it every week anyway, and this way I'll have other people to talk to and keep my mind off how hot by D.L GROOVER Houston ranks second only to New York Oty m the number of theater seats located in a downtown area­and th15 spnng's schcdu!C' illustrates the wide variety of shows available with so many venues to choose from. l louston's Theater District Association has calculat· ed that our aty on the bayou cushions 14,428 over­stuffed posteriors for the performing arts. That impres­sive number, however, encompasses only those theaters facing the tom-up streets of dmmtown and doesn't include the restroom-friendly Hobby Center now under construction. We are a theater-mad city, and insplIII1g work goes on all over town, all the time. Whatever your taste, it \\ill it is outside:' The group kicks off Saturday at 8 a.m. The course is 2.9 miles, and Brown said it takes an hour to walk it. 'Tm very much a coach potato-type person, and the first time I did it, it was a little challenging. They have a running group out there, but I tried that and I just can't run. I've had people call and saj; I don't know 1f I can make it around that track. But if you can walk a shopping mall from front to back, you can walk around this track," he said. The club has no dues and no rules, except for the starting time. If you don't want to exercise, stay at home until it's time to meet the group for breakfast at Java Java Cafe, 911 W. 11th Street in the Heights. To get the word out to as many prospective walkers as possible \~;thout spending bags of cash, Brown left fliers at the l louston Lesbian & Gay Community Center, and a few gay and gay-friendly churches like Bering, St. Steven's and MCCR. "I'm pretty sure it's going to start off slow," he said "But over time, it'll get bigger and bigger. I think after ::..- Continued on Page 22 be sated There's so much, m fact, that our Spnng Theater l'J"C\icw had to be split m two to adequate!) co\·er all that's about to happen. Go to the theater,"" hat· C\·er art form turns you on; it just might change your Ille Biem·enue I11eater 3722 Washington Ave 713-426-2626 NAKED BOYS SI~GI~G. dates not ~t Although no dates have been set as of press time, Chri.~tian DeVnes continues the fantastically succe;sful franchise of "Naked Boys Singing "This deverly direct­ed ca~h cow doesn't have a thought in its head, but the herds of gffitlemen lirung up to view the ur\Clothed ,.... Continued on Page 23 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE BERING MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rn Alanly11 Muh:r-U1//lams Sen or Pwror 1440 Harold Street .it Mulberl) • Houston, TX 77006 713 526 1017 • WW\ \ beringumc org ALWAYS YOUR BEST WEEICEND BRUNCH Look for it at these locations: @St. Thomas University, Montrose Branch Library U IVERSITY of H 0 UST 0 University Center Rice Universit y, Student Center Eating Out RESTAURANTREVIEW Sushi as it should be Ginza offers outstanding food, unassuming style by TRACE DISKIN If there's one thing Houston restaurants do well, it's the art of transformation. Leave it to Houston's chefs to redefine, rev.ork, or fuse a cuisine, menu or duung space until it's stylishly, and often deliciously, deviant Until a friend and I stepped mto GI~ZA. a popular but unassuming sushi bar m the Tanglewood neighborhood, 1 barely noticed how iazzed up the rest of our Japanese restaurants really are. Unlike the brightly-lit, tightly-packed, urban sushi dens of New York, 5an Francisco, O.C and Boston, most Houston Japanese l'l'Staurants seem to follow the trend of dimly lit, swanky est,1bhshments where authentioty falls second to ambiance and innovation. That's whv Gmza trulv makes a , orthem sushi lovd fed like she's home again. With pale bamboo light fixtures, wall hangings and simple, blonde wood fumi· ture, Gmza sets a tone that's more cafe than hip nightspot. One royal blue w.111 and the blue and white patterned carpet lend a col· orful, if understated touch, and make the rather large space feel intimate and local. Although the tables and booths are closely placed to one another, and families with kids chat about warmly in the open space, it's never too loud or encroaching. The eel is particularly prodigious and succulent, and since it's the only sushi that's actually cooked, it's a must for raw fish eaters and skeptics alike. When tt comes to authentiaty, though, one only has to open the menu. A vutual phone book of appetizers covers an entire page, with nearly SO Japanese staples listed alphabetically The Edamame (53.50), which are hard to come by at other, more upscale sushi haunts, appear on practically every cus­tomer's table. Edamame, for the uninihat· ed, are steamed green soybeans still m the pod, and sprinkled coarse salt. ~rved hot or cold, they pack a deep, nutritious flavor, and make great nibbling food while wall· mg for other, more substantial dishes. Although I predict it won't be long before you cnn grab them from the freezer section at your nearest Kroger or Randalls, nght now they're only available at Asian speoalty grocers Fortunately, Gmza serves them hot and in abundance, with each bean nearly bursting out of its grassy, salty skin. The Seaweed Salad ($4.50) 1s another find, with dark, gelatinous stnps of seaweed tn a piquant vinegar and soy ginger dressing. But when 11 comes to sushi bars, the rule IS ;udgc stnctlv by .sushi, and hero IS \\'here law- Ginza 5868 San Felipe 713.785.0332 Food: tptptptp' Service: tptptptp Value: tptptp' scene: •vtf Vtf tJ-Opt for bread, water at ho!T'e 'lf11f'OK, 1f you really rr1.ost tJIVV F ne for most V1'tVtf Worth the dr ve, so hve a httle tpif tfv(;. As good as It gets key Ginza dearly shines. The fish is mcred1bly fresh and beautifully handled and presented, but most of all huge. A piece of nigin sushi, that's one piece of sushi on a bed a nee, is $3.95 for 2 pieces and easily three times the size of that of other restaurants. The eel is particularly prodigious and suc­culent, and smce it's the only sushi that's actu· ally cooked, it's a must for raw fish eaters and skeptics alike. The salmon and mackerel were also impressive in size and quality. Although Ginza doesn't go O\'erboard on cleverly named rolls as much as other places, the rolls they do serve are artful and frighteningly good Do not pass up the Caterpillar Roll ($8.50), with cooked eel rolled m marinated rice and slathered in thin stnps of avocado. Not only docs the combination of flavors explode on the tongue, but the garnishings of shrimp. octopus and flying fish roe for eyes are adorably delectable. If Gin1~1 falls short at all, it is in the rather unremarkable main entrces, such as Chicken Teriyaki ($8.95), or Tempura ($6.95) 'lhe chicken, for example, arnved with chopped peppers and onions coated so thickly in a gelatinous sauce that it resembled Chinese food more than anything Japanese. And the small nugget-like pieces of chicken did little for the texture, which usually docs fmc m ten­derly grilled strips. The Soba Noodle dishes ($6.95), howev­er, make for loud and eager slurping. and the miso soup is well stocked with fresh green seaweed, chunks of tofu and tasty mushrooms. Ginz.a featul'l'S the staple desserts-Red Ban or Green Tea Ice Cream ($2.50)-from a popul.ir Japanese grocery brand advertised on many of the booths. The service IS friendly and efficient, and II' s common for the staff to rec· ogmze return customers and make them feel 1mmed1ately at home with a pot of green tea. As a break from the often overbearing atmosphere of other Japanese restaurants, Ginza makes the perfect choice. So ellJOY the unpretentious setting, but stay for the outstanding sushi. HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 PROVEN POWER FOR HIV Ast,.,.. docfw *"" Combivire lamivlKfhe!l!zidovtxJinel "i~~ 0 TA B L E T T w I c E A D A YC:11 .2 .,..•. ..,..,,.,,. .... ...,,,, .,. ..... ....... ,,,,, -.,,.,. ...,, SAFETY llFORMATIOI •Make sure to see your doctor regularly because serious side effects can occur, such as muscle damage and a decrease in red and white blood cells •A buildup of acid in the blood and an enlarged liver, including fatal cases, have been seen •The most frequent side effects are headache, upset stomach, malaise or fatigue, and runny nose •Low risk of fat wasting, tingling or burning In the hands and feet, or problems with the pancreas 'f.::o ll'l<l Soun:e Pmscriplioo Aull! (re!aa ~ Jal1\J3IY .Mie 2000 Rocho Anl)llCD' ltV 1 M<JfTOA" Tes! CALL 1-800-780-3311 for lnfonnatlon or visit our Web site at m. TrutlllV.com HIV- • OU> Wdlcomc Please see Brief Summary for COM8MR on 1118 adjaCBnt page. 19 20 BRIEF SUMMARY COMBIVIR~ Tablets (lamivudine/Zidovudine tablets) Tiie lollOlriof IS I ilnel~ Diiiy: set ..ii pr1$C1lbilll inlormmoo lor COl1'lefl ,,_ inlonnlticlft. WARNING. ZlDOVIJDIHE. ONE OF THE TWO ACTIYE INGREDIENTS Ill COMSIVIR. HAS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH HEMATOLOGIC TOXICITY INCLUDING NEUTROPENIA AND SEVERE ANEMIA. PARTICULARLY IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED HIV DISEASE (SEE WARHINGSI. PROLONGED USE OF ZlOOVUDINE HAS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH SYMPTOMATIC MYOPATHY lACllC ACIDOSIS AND SEVERE HEPATOMEGAl.Y WITH SlfATDSIS. INClUDlllG FATAL CASES. HAVE BEEN REPOIITTD WITH THE USE OF NUCLEOSIDE ANALOGUES ALONE DR IN COMBINATION. INCLUDING lAMIVUOINE, ZlDOVIJOlllE AND OTHER AllTIRETROVIRAlS !SEE WARNINGS). FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE CDMBIVIR T1blets ( l1m1Vud1ne~1do,.din1 tablets) Mm;eEwnt EPIVIR l)luS RETROVIR (• • 2511 Body IS I wllofe He3dJdle 35'11. Mal:l!se&la:igue m Feo.-erarctVllS 10% OlgabYI Nausea 33'- DlarrtJea 18'1. Nausea & vomtll10 13'4 Ancnxia and/or decreased awetta 10% Alldomilal pall 9"I. A1ldomml lmllJS 6% l>(spepsb 5'1. ......... ~ ~ Olhersleep cisorOers 12'!. 11% ~~crisonlers 10% 9'I. R..,atary ~ S9lS & symptoms 20'4 Coogh lB'lo .Sl.<.1.n ......,.., Slan raslles 9"I. ~pam 12'!. ~ 8'I. 5'1. HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 NEWS health news Medical implant could give women pleasure at push of a button WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.-A physician in North Carolina is working on a medical implant th.it could offer women the chance to experience orgasm at the push of a button, according to CNN. Stuart Meloy, the doctor seeking a patent for the device, thinks it could allow women with orgasmic dysfunction to resume normal sex lives. The device would work by implanting electrodes in the spine and a small signal generator in the skin under the buttocks. The patient could then control the sensation with a handheld remote control. "I was treating la patirnt with) a chronic pain condition and generated a response I was not anhc1pahng," Mcloy said. The patient told Meloy of the reaction, and his expenments shifted from the study of pain to that of pleasure. Clinical trials could begin later this year if Mcloy recl'iVl'S funding from a major medical implant manufacturer. The initial cost would be $15,000, not including the surgical procedures required to install the device. Microbicides see limited development over profit, liability concerns Cl IICAGO-A potential avenue of AIDS prevention, the creation of microbicide gels and creams that would kill HIV during sex, may be thwarted by troubles during expcri· mental trials, thl' Clricago Sun-Times reported. Microbicides would be especially valuable in fighting AIDS in Afric;i, where condom use 1s limited, and in some instances, during anal sex. "Ideally, women will one day be able to choose from among a wide range of microbi­cides, as they now choose, from among a range of contraceptives," according to a report by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a think tank specializing in reproductive health issues. But most big drug companies aren't developing microbic1des because they would be sold over­the- counter, where profits are lower and liabilities higher. A company could be sued, for example, if its microbicide failed to prevent an HIV infection, scientists said. Qne microbi­ode being tested in Chicago is Pro 2000, which coats HIV, preventing if from entering and infecting human cells. Mapping of genes could lead to secrets of genetic code, disease WAS! llNGTON (AP)-Scicntists released the ~-suits of the Human Genome Prtject, the map­ping of the gen~ that comprise the human genetic code. "We arc confirming Darwin," Sir John Sulston, who 1s spearheading the British end of the projl'C!, told Reuters on Feb. 12. One of the key uses of the projl'<:t could be the ability to fight disease, since mutations in the genome either cause or prcdisposl.' at least 1,500 diseases. Cancer researcher Barbara). Trask told A'>SOCiated Press that cancer is currently treated as a "di~·ase of the genome" with a "sledgehammer approach." But the information gleaned from the mapping could !rod to treatments that addres.5 only the cancer and leave the rest of the body alone. The project could also lead to an under.;tanding of why AIDS affects some pt.'Ople immedi­ately while leaving others unaffL'\.ied for years. The recently released results of the Human Genome Project could unleash the secrets to diseases fike AIDS, said researcher Sir John Sulston. Feds slow experimental drug approvals spurred by 1992 law NEW YORK-U.S. drug regulators took almost 40 percent more time in 2000 than they did in 1999 to approve new prescription drugs, Reuters reported. The U.S. Food&: Drug Administration last year approved 27 medicines that have active ingredients never before sold in the country. Last year, the FDA took an average of 17.6 months to approve the exper· imental drugs, compared with only 12.6 months for the 35 it approved in 1999. The slow­down ended a seven-year streak of faster approval times that was spurred by passage of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act in 1992, which was actively lobbied for by AIDS groups. J,inet Woodcock, head of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation &: Research, said her agency last year met all of the goab imposed by the 1992 law, including reviewing half of all ongmal new drug applicahons within 10 months. "The FDA has met all of our goals. In fact, we exccedl'<l them," Woodcock said Drugs pulled from market posed greater risk to women, FDA says WASlllNGTON-A draft of a federal government rrport suggests that eight of 10 pre­scription drugs that have been pulled from the market for safety reasot1 since early 1997 may have posed greater nsks to woml'n than to men, according to CN . The General Accountmg Office report pomts out that the withdrawal of a drug from the market 1s less a judgment on the safctv of a particular drug, and more a judgment on the relah\'C risks and bend1t cm~parl•d with a\ailablt• alternative~. Four of the eight drugs may ha\'e showed d1sproport1onatc levels of nsk to wum,•n because thl'}' are more often prescribed for women TI1e GAO report noted thr.t m four othl'I cases where drugs were evenly pre­scribed to men and women, physiological d1ften•nces between the sexes may account for the higher risks The. drugs in question range from appetite suppressantS Pond1mm and For more news, visit www.houstonvoice.com Redux, antihistamines Scldane and Hismanal. the he:irtbum drug Propulsid, and Lotronex, which w.is used to treat 1mtable bowel syndrome. -From staff and wire rrporls KINETIC SPORTS CLINIC AN HIV Life Enha11cement Center Progressil'e Kesistance Exercise Therapy Ed Ktn>cr. R1 habilitation Exercise Specialists \\orkmt? With >Ou On Every Visit Our Reputation is built 011 OUR MEMBERS! in Customer Satisfaction/ 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 Let us show you how our program will work for you! Monda) to Friday Sam -JO pm Saturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm /\'utrttumal Counseling \\Ith Easy To Follow Programs Myofascial Release For St rt' SS I Pain Management 21 22 Diana Ross Gay friendly icon and glam diva M ss Ross goes country and appears at the Rodeo of al p aces. I' she can scrao off the road apples fro!"' her ostrich boots, looK for an appearance around 8.45 p.'n .• but that s dubious. Feb 16 Reuant Astrodome, 8400 K"by, 713- 629-3700 Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater There's no better way to celebrate Black History Montli than Alvin A ey's Jubilant ·Revelations.· It Is a tr·umphant musical expression of the humal' spir t-glory and JOY set to rousing black churc" music: spir~ tuals, song-sermons gospels, and holy blues Choreographer A1 ey's finest Nork. it can be seen on every program of t'11s com­pany's weekend v1s1t. Other works on the programs include artistic d.rector Judith Jamison's 'Div mng." Ailey's ·Pas de Duke" to music by Duke Elhngton. and U ysses Dove's •Episodes· Fabulous bodies. fabu­lous darc1rg Feb 16 & 18, 8 p.rr., Feb. 17. 2 p.m. Jones Hall 615.Louisiana 713-227 4SPA OUT ON THE BAYOU Black Gays & lesbians In History An atternat ve view m celebrating Black History Month. II Michael Jackson 1s the only gay black mal'I (or black woman, for that mat ter) you can think of, then this d!alogue and l'1story lesson 1s for you. Let's see, we could talk about George Washington Carver, Alvin Alley, Josephine Baker Benjamin Senneker, Langston Hughes, Barbara Jordan, Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Billy Strayhorn, Bayard Rustin, Ahce Walker, Ruth C. Ellis, Howard Rollins, Angela Dav1sI Feb 17, 6:30 to 9:30 p.rn. Community Gospel Churcti 4305 Llihan 713-880.9235 Runt of the Utter Once a pro-baller with the Houston Oilers ( reMember them?). then an actor appearing on "ER" and "The John Larroquette ShoN," now Bo Eason's a writer/actor in his own one­man show. He plays a professional football player who's pitted against his brother in a pivotal champ1onsh1p game. However, dredg· mg up family r1story makes this big galoot tackle the big questions about his spor t, his dad, and his quest for fame Whatever the out· come, he"s got to be a better actor than Arnold, or O.J., or Greg. Feb. 21-March 18, Stages Repertory Theatre, 3201 Allen Parkway· Waugh at D'Amico. 713- 527-8243 Five Poems & The Firebird Two artistic directors of two of the best bal· let companies, our own Ben Stevenson and National Ballet of Canada's James Kudelka, have created a memorable ear·and·eyeful tor Houston Ballet's next program. Stevenson has taken Wagner's lush Romantic ·wesendonck Lieder· and set 1t to lyric dancing, while Kudelka gives his characteristic cerebral spin to Stravinsky's sublime and magical score. Jane Seymour • yes, Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman • Is a respected artist and has opened her paint box to design the Wagner in pastel cloud· scapes. Veteran designer Santo Loquasto puts the fairy tale Firebird in the steamy jungles of Central Al"'enca. The colors, the colors! Feb. 22-March 4 , Houston Ballet Wortham Theater Center 500 Texas 713-227-ARTS FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Breakfast Club walks ;;.- Continued from Page 17 it ratches on, it's going to become popular The people who have Gilled, they've gen­uinely been very excited about it. 'Oh, cool, I can't wait.' They're very interested in it. I'm happy about that. "We call it the Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club, but I would love to have some straight people join us. I iust want the gay and lesbian people to feel very welcome. "As I was walking 1 would see people who I suspect were gay, but you can't go up and ask them. Yeah, our family's out here. So, surely there are other people who would want to do this with me," Brown said. Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club Feb 17, 8 a.m. Memorial Park, tennis center 1500 E. Memorial Loop Drive phone: 713-864-7299 Web site: httpJ/members aol .com/morning club/gayfun3.htm#top r. .... ' ~ 1; tlti1 .. . 6/,,e 1/ut; e you're ifl..7 /; ic tJ,,e 1/,,a;e you Nafl.6.7 MUSCLE MECHANICS"" .. lllE" S ONAL TRAIN I NG STUDIO 713.523.5330 •Y A .. P'OINTMlllENT . CALL Now. 617 Richmo"d f\ve""e '" Mo.,frose Cefebrating 25 'fears in tk Communify Saturlays at 7:30pm 1307-:J{')'afe • 713-880-2872 HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 23 Spring theater preview, act II ;. Con tinued from Page 17 singers don't seem to nund Encore Theatre 4816 Mam Street 713-527-8277 ANTIGONE, April 6-28 Founded in 1994 to provide quality theater to the inner-oty and also as a traming ground for aspirmg professionals, Encore is going to give us all a run for our money with some dra­matic productions, including tlus masterpiece from the very begmrung of theater history. Sophocles' tragedy defines the term: a har­rowing tale of peroonal responsibility vs. the state, represented by an implacable Creon, whose need to be in control brings destruction to his family in the mother of all dramas. Infernal Bridegroom Productions Atorruc Cafe 1320 Nance Street ACTION and CHICAGO, Feb 23-March 17 These one-acts give u~ a rare Houston opportum· ty to experience early Sam Shepard, when he was the downtown grungl' voice of his generahon, before he started play­ing polo and hangin' with Jessica. When he was the John the Baptist of playwrights, crying in the wilderness, letting it all hang out, raw and powerful, if not always in controL Stu, who's ensconced in a tub in Shepard's Obie-winning 1965 "Chicago," goes on lin­guistic flights of fancy when his girlfriend announces she's leaving him to go to Clucago. Disjointed and in pain, he says whatever's in his head, no matter the situation. As he splash­es in the water, Stu's stream-of-conscious monologues make sense. Life's unravelmg. but you've still got to breathe. "Action," from 1975, is a riff on identity, and an actor's godsend. We as performance art is given full rem. 'Tm looking forward to my life," one of the four misplaced characters says, "the way I picture me." But there's no escape from where they've come. It's all part of the baggage they can't escape Little Room Downstairs 2332 Bissorinet 713-522-5737 VISmNG MR. GREENE, through March 17 Oy. what a ruce play. Jeff Baron's two char­acter comedy/drama has the warm, comfort­ing smell of chicken soup. There's so much, in fact, that we start clucking. This feel-good matzo ball of a play, d~1gned to leave us uplifted and better off for it, is beautifully acted and smoothly dtrected, I• ,....._v_ _o _u_ _R_ __M_ _E_ _N _s_ __s_ _r _o_ _R _E_ ___, • a: <( w -3 en a: <( w > 0 0 OJ a: <( w ~ a: w 0 z :J a: <( w ~ (.J l­o a: w • SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 19 YEARS! CLEARANCE SALE SELECTED ITEMS UP TO 75% OFF n r­e: CD ~ m )> lJ )> n n m en en 0 lJ I I 0 I h I I S erot i cattire . com m basicbrothers . com en 1232 WESTHEIMER • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 713. 522.1626 • MON-SAT 10-9 SUN 12-6 • but 1l's so sqwshy and shameless we don't want to pinch its cheeks so much as smack 1t. Get tough, scream out, do something! But it won't; it just plods. You can guess its inevitable conclusion from the get-go, and the shocking revelations are handled with all the emotional depth of a sit-com. There's a gritty. much better play con­tained within, but Baron doesn't want to write it. He'd rather lull than shock, please than dlS­turb. At the fade out, the t\\'o men wait anx­iously for the door to open so Mr Green's age­old family conflict can finally resolve. It wouldn't surprise us m the least if Molly Goldberg waddled m DISPARATE INGREDIENTS, March 16 - April 21 Now, this sounds promising. A world pre­miere musical by Richard Laub, LRD's artistic director, about a big city mayoral election, an ultra-conservah\'e politico, his gay-but-cl~t­ed spin doctor and his illegitimate son. Any city we know' THE WISDOM OF EVE, May 25-June 30 Mary Or's "Cosmopolitan" short storv from 1946, the ba,b for )o,eph L ~ankiewicz's truh• classic cinematic fable of fame, "All About E\'e," comes to the stage \\ith its onginal venom slill wet and potent enough to inflict psychic damage. If the coruscatmg humor and sophisticated devilhy of the film is halfway realized, then Eve's \\1sdom will be imparted to satisfied full houses Fasten your seatbelt!- Main Street Theater 713-524-{)706 Without question, the only Equity theater in town \\1th two separate buildings (their small Village location and their Chelsea Market space tor larger works), Main Street Theater delights with d1versitr THE COUNTESS. through February 25, 2540 Tunes Blvd To paraphrase Giotto, Gregory Murphy's play is no oil painting He takes the unpa,to and the bold brush strokes and the erotic col­oring of one of Victorian England's most scan­dalous trios and turns the whole shocking affair into a pencil sketch, blanclung the life out of II. In 1853, John Ruskin, England's preemi­nent art critic (and admirer of very. very young girls, although tlus 1wcy hdbit is barely picked at) in\1ted studly pre-Raphaelite painter John Millais to join him and his young bride on a trip to S..-otland where Ruskin would unpart his co1b1derable knowledge to the impre>.,1on­able artist. What got impressed mstead was Ruskin's nubile bnde and the painter. Rcpfl':'sed Victorian England wasn't prepared for a messy pic;ture like tlu~. Sexual hypocn~y. repression and pnggish ronformtt:y \·,.a woman's emanapation, great art and an unconsummated wedding rught. Enough good stuff tor any drama. 24 FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Edwina Features inelude: "Fun" - The Advoeate ··cool Site!" - Yahoo "Best online matchmaker" - HX Magazine • Multiple Matehing Profiles • Multiple Photos • Private Photos • More Matehing Control • hnproved Mail Features www .edwina.eom The Funnest Lesbian and Gay Online Dating Serviee in the Galaxy! t' u .5. = i j :i 0 £ ! ~ ~ a; ~• £ :! 1 IU "Ii • i "IU HOUSTON VOICE •FEBRUARY 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 25 on screen FILM, VIDEO & TV REVIEWS by STE\'F \\'t\RRrl\ You are who you eat A fictional sequel and an original documentary both offer a unique perspective on life Wht.>n I lannibal Lectcr (Anthony Hopkins), the thinking person's Freddy Kreuger, announet.>s, "I need to come out of retirement and return to public Life," fasten your scat belb1 It's ten ye.us after "The Silence of the Lambs." The !;Bl 1sstlll after Lecter but so is his sole surviving victim, filthy and nch Mason Verger (Gary Oldman), who lives in Asheville's Biltmore Estate. What's left of Verger's face 1s horrible to behold. A flashback shows how he got that way when he pickl•d Lecter up one night and brought him home to party. HANNIBAL is the ideal sequel, familiar yet different. Jodie Foster is sorely missed as FBI Agent Clarice Starling, although Julianne Moore is as good a,, any substitute could have bl>cn. Ridley Scott ("Gladiator") fares better, replacing Jonathan Demme as director ,ind keeping production values first-cl.iss ,111 the way. A bisexual wom,m character has been droppt>d from Thomas Harris' source nowl, but Vergl·r is gay .md the Justice Department':. Paul Krcndler (Ray Uotta) homophobIC; so the villam roster offers something for everyone .md GIAAD will still have plenty to bitch about. fbnnib.il's Panama hat makes him look rather like Truman Capote, but his madnes-~ 1s oc-yond sexuality. It you have a probll•m with Verger cut­ting off hb own face while high on poppers and swinging from a noose, forget about seeing the movie Like "Silence of the Lambs" it's not for the faint of heart or stomach, but it's done with more than enough grace notes to distinguish it from the typically cheesy movies of the genre. So many, 111 fact, that you have to be patient while the plot is set in motion, but know that your patience will be rewarded. Cl.1nce gets in trouble when a drug bust goes b,1d. Krendler, a misogynist as well as a homophobe, is sent to help with damage con­trol. Verger, who wants to administer his own iushce to l..ecter, offers a reward that Italian polite detL>ehve Giancarlo Giannini goes after; but Verger ,1Jso rekindle:; the FBI's interest in one of their Ten Most Wanted, who has bt<en laymg low for a dL>eade. Memorable ~t·quences become more numt•rous ,is Wt' .ipproach the climachc dinner-tJble scene· Leder IL>eturmg on the link bl•twcen avarice and hanging in art .is Gian111111 1w,1rs his dat(' with destiny, the threP·wav t«1hind·mou'c game iii .Unwn Stahon· Leck·r 'l'nrountcr with wild bo.irs a carnivorous .is he b; and his 'trange rcla honsh1p With Clance that m.ikl'S her \\ant to protect him even as she hunts him down. Moore lacks Fo tcr'~ vulnerab1hty and fare; more competition than her predccl'!>sor, Mth Hopkins' role being much larger and Directed by Ridley Scctt Starring Anthony Hopkins. Julianne Moore, Gary Oldman Queer Quotient: There's one despicable gay character but he's not as bad as the killer in 'Silence of the Lambs.' and for balance there's a homophobe who's almost as unpleasant. *** Anthony Hopkins suffers hunger pangs in 'Hannibal.' Oldman makmg Verger a compelling weirdo. "Hannibal" must be considered a suc­ce~ s 1f only because it's not too great a disappointment. A heady mix of politics and provocahve, LIVE NUDE GIRLS UNITE! documents a Jewish lesbian s effort to unionize a San Francisco peepshow while trying to keep her mother from learning what she does for a living. Julia Query, who ccrdirected with Vicky Funari, guides us amiably through her life, which also ~ervc:. as fodder for her stand-up act ma queer cabaret. R.iist'CI in a liberal New York household, Julia moved to San Francisco and became invol\'ed in the sex indu~try, wnthmg at a peepshow, the Lusty Lady, which had better working conditions than most but still exploited its workers. "I wondered why I could tell my mom I was gay but not a stripper," Julia says; but she finally comes out during the months of negotiations for a union contract. Her being a lesbian i~ no more an issue than it is a secret. In addition to more humor than the average documentary about labor conflicts, "Live- Nude Girls Unite!" includes more-­well, hve nude girls; but the nudity is often casual and more artistic than exploitative. Query's involvement in the story ensured that the camera was always in the nght place at the right time Equally importantly, Query, Funari and their crew knew how to assemble the footage they got in a way that's amusing, entertJining, informative and provocative. 'Live Nude Girls Unite!' Dtrected by Ju11a Query & Vicky F..inar Starring Juha Query, Dr. Joyce Wallace Queer Quotient: More fe'T!mist than les-bial\ but wr ter11roducer-01tector-star Query IS out and proud. *** " ... a side splitting, pants-ripping, riotously raunchy delight." -Texas Triangle "Laughter was never this nasty!" Now through Feb.24 Fri. & Sat 8 p.m. THEATRE NEW WEST 1415 California St. (Located on the ground floor of the Sonoma Restaurant Bldg.) Reservations: 713-394-0464 nckets: $20.00 Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) meets In the home of Central Congregational Church 6:30pm Sunday Evenings Sermon Series: "WHAT GOD DID TO WIN YOUR HE.ART" (Based on Max Lucado's book "He C/io5e tire Sails") February 18" "Compassion: Re\·. Janet Parker A Way of Living Together" February 25" "God Gives You A Choice" Rev. Janet Parker Please Join Us For E~·ening Serwces And Experience Tire Love That Afaranatlra Fel/owshrp MCC /las To Offer' Church Service begins at 6:30pm and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group· services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more infCJ ... 713-528-6756 or ema/I maranatha@ev1.net Our Church Can Become Your Homcl Gl\e U A TC) 1 \\c 'Would Lo'e Tu Ha\c Yo ¥1~11An}11me 26 'LEAIHER1 ~1ontrose Inn HOU STON OUT ON THE BAYOU FEBRUARY 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Galveston Mardi Gras Gay Bus Trip 2001 In 1979, The Ripcord and the original Barn began these yearly party bus trips for Galveston's big Mardi Gras Saturday parade. The Ripcord has oontinued the tradition every year since. So join us for the 23
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