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Houston Voice, June 10, 2005
File 004
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Houston Voice, June 10, 2005 - File 004. 2005-06-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2763/show/2741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-06-10). Houston Voice, June 10, 2005 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2763/show/2741

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, June 10, 2005 - File 004, 2005-06-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2763/show/2741.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, June 10, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date June 10, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JUNE 10,2005 3 local news briefs Retiring activist Ray Hill gets roasted j Activist Ray Hill, who announced recently that he will retire from activism following the June 18 Conference on the Future at the George R. Brown Convention Center, is the object of a roast to be conducted today (June 10) at 1415 California. Billed as "The Well Deserved 'Roast' of Ray Hill," the event will raise funds for the Houston GLBT Community Center. Stonewall Law Association of Greater Houston is among the organizations that will participate. Hill, whose business cards read "Citizen Provocateur," came out to his family in 1981 while a student at Galena Park High School. He has since worked for causes including gay rights and the rights of prisoners. The roast gets underway at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at the door, and seating is limited. Activist Ray Hill will be the subject of a roast later today at 1415 California. 52 weeks of Blockbuster up for grabs at Empower conference Empower, the annual business expo highlighting gay-owned and gay-friendly businesses, gets underway Saturday morning at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Sponsored by the Greater Houston GLBT Chamber of Commerce, this year's event includes a conference called Equality 101 that features a number of speakers, including Eileen Terry Senior Vice President of Diversity for Blockbuster Video. Terry, an out lesbian, brings with her 150 "Blockbuster for a Year" memberships that will be handed out to the first 150 attendees at the 9 a.m. session. The conference deals with a number of issues affecting gays and lesbians, including retirement, the law, building voting power and organizing for change. Admission to the conference is $10. Admission to the expo is $5. Admission to a "Taste of Montrose" luncheon is $25. Chamber Executive Director Coy Tow said coupons are available at participating businesses that would lower entrance fees by $5. Mandatory meeting for Pride parade entrants A mandatory meeting has been scheduled for representatives of organizations that plan to have floats or entries in the June 25 Houston Pride Parade. The meeting is at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Metropolitan MultiService Center, 1475 W Gray Parade packets containing assigned positions and rules will be distributed. More information is available at 713-529-6979 or www.pridehouston.org. Miss Mint Julep Kick-Off will benefit Montrose Clinic The "Miss Mint Julep Kick-Off," being called a night of live cabaret and fine dining, features performances by Clay Howell, Marsha Carlton, Keith Caldwell and Lisa Whitley and dinner at Riva's Italian Restaurant, 1117 Missouri St. The event is at 7 p.m. Tuesday Tickets are $25, and a portion of the ticket price benefits the Montrose Clinic. For information and to purchase tickets, call 713-830-3015. Rev. Madison T. Shocktey, II, (center) pastor of Pilgrim United Church of Christ in Carlsbad, Calif., will deliver the keynote address at the annual GLBT Pride Interfaith Service in Houston June 19. California pastor to speak at Pride week Interfaith Service Rev. Madison T. Shockley II, pastor of Pilgrim United Church of Christ in Carlsbad, Calif., will deliver the keynote address during the annual GLBT Pride Interfaith Service at 7 p.m. June 19 at Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church, 2025 West 11th Ave. The title of Shockley's address is "What's Love Got to Do With It?" The event, sponsored each year by the Interfaith Alliance, is expected to draw participants from varied faiths. national news Conn, leads in gains From staff and wire reports By ELIZABETH WEILL-GREENBERG Gay rights opponents and proponents battled in the courts, in referendum campaigns and in legislatures over domestic partnership rights, marriage and discrimination. Generally Christopher Labonte of the Human Rights Campaign said, it had been a mixed bag during the first six months of the legislative session. "The political environment is extremely challenging to say the least," he said. "Our community is used as a wedge to rally the religious right." Despite an at times hostile political climate, many states passed laws banning discrimination based on someone's sexual orientation or gender identity, including Colorado, Hawaii and Illinois (however Colorado Gov. Bill Owen vetoed his state's bill). Maryland extended its hate crimes act to include homosexuals and transgender people. Since January of this year, several states have moved toward recognizing same-sex couples and granting them the same rights and protections enjoyed by married couples. Six state legislatures — California, Washington, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico and Maryland — voted down constitutional amendments banning gay marriage, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Possibly the most significant gain for gay rights was achieved in Connecticut. In April, it became the first state to legalize civil unions without court intervention. Republican Gov M. Jodi Rell signed legislation that grants same sex couples the same rights as married couples. However, an amendment on the House bill was added which states that marriage is defined as between a man and a woman, a move Rell supported. Vermont and Massachusetts also recognize civil unions, largely as a result of lawsuits. Other states also moved toward recognizing civil unions or trying to extend some of marriage's benefits to same sex couples. This was often a difficult battle because many conservatives feared these protections were a slippery slope to condoning same-sex marriage. Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski (D), along with Senate Democrats, support a bill that will legalize civil unions for gay couples, granting them many of the same rights of married couples. Originally the bill also outlawed discrimination based on sexual orientation. The civil union bill passed a Senate committee, 3 to 2. House Republicans supported a reciprocal benefits bill which would give about 20 benefits to any two people older than 18, including same-sex couples and relatives. The bill mainly addressed property issues and medical emergencies. Critics of the reciprocal benefits bill said it failed to address the needs of families. An effort in California to legalize samesex marriage was defeated as the legislative session ended. Del. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) sponsored the measure, which, if it passed, would be the first state to legalize same sex marriage. The bill need- GOP Gov. M. Jodi Rell signed into law civil unions for Connecticut. It was the first time a state has provided the same benefits it bestows to straight couples without a court mandate. (File photo) ed 41 votes in the Assembly to pass; it failed with a 37 to 36 vote, according to Equality California. In Tennessee, Rep. Chris Clem sponsored a bill to ban gay parents from adopting. The House subcommittee changed the bill so it does not bar gay people outright now the bill favors heterosexual, married couples over singles. The judiciary was a frequent recourse for gay rights supporters. Courts in New York and San Francisco ruled it was unconstitutional to deny same-sex couples marriage licenses; both cases are being appealed. Progress for same-sex families Progress was also made for gay families' rights as well In New Jersey, a judge ruled that same-sex parents should both be listed on their baby's birth certificate. Arkansas started removing questions about sexual orientation from its foster parent application. And in Illinois, the state Supreme Court ordered a 5-year-old boy returned to his lesbian foster parent. A lower court had ruled the boy should be given back to his allegedly abusive grandparents. In Florida, a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit that challenged the Defense of Marriage Act. A same-sex couple had asked the court to force Florida to recognize their Massachusetts marriage The plaintiffs will appeal. Scott J. Bloch, head of the US. Office of Special Counsel, announced last month that he would not protect federal employees from being fired because they were gay An explosive fight grew in the legislature over President Bush's nominees, several of who were anti-gay To preserve the filibuster. a compromise was reached that allows an up or down vote on three nominees. One of those nominees. William Pryor, has been called the most anti-gay nominee in history While Pryor was attorney general in Alabama, he wrote a brief that argued constitutionally protecting consensual sex between homosexuals would result in protections for incest necrophilia, pedophilia, prostitution and adultery
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