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Houston Voice, June 10, 2005
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Houston Voice, June 10, 2005 - File 001. 2005-06-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2763/show/2738.

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(2005-06-10). Houston Voice, June 10, 2005 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2763/show/2738

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, June 10, 2005 - File 001, 2005-06-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2763/show/2738.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, June 10, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date June 10, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript The films of summer Crank down the cooler, warm up the DVD player and enjoy flicks with gay appeal. Page 12 Latinos played key role in California marriage defeat Bill dies in close vote as its co­sponsor abstains By EARTHA MELZER After a close vote on a bill that would have legalized same-sex marriage in California, advocates on both sides of the issue are examining the role of Latino law· makers and religion in dooming the measure. The Religious Freedom & Civil Marriage Protection Act, AB 19, was sponsored by Assembly mem· ber Mark lRno (0-San Francisco) and would have rewritten the mar­riage section of the California family code using gender neutral language and allowed licenses to be granted to same-sex couples. The bill also specified that no churches or religious organiza· tions would be required to per­form any marriage, and acknowl· edged that the First Amendment protects religious expression. The bill made it through com· mittee and to a vote on the Assembly floor. where it failed to earn the 41 votes needed to pass. falling four votes short. There are 48 Democrats in the SO.member Assc·mbl}: Nine of them abstainrd or voted no on the The Religious Freedom & Civil Marriage Protection Act. which would have legalized SJIOCLSeX mamage, failed to pass the California Assembly earlier thts month Bom-agam Christi.lll civil nghts lawyer Allerto T omco (D-Ncwari<J switched his po51lion and supported the bin in the final vote. Assembly member ~ l>jmally CD-Compton) (inset) was a ro-sponsor of the bill but was not present for the final vote. bill. All of the Republicans voted against the bill. Five of the nine Democrats who abstained or voted no were mem· lx'rs of the Latino Caucus, prompt· ing some observers to blame Latinos for the bill's failure. Eddie Gutierrez, communica· lions director for Equality California. said that most Latino representatives supported the bill, which he said was In the intPrests of Please see CALIFORNIA on Page 7 dish Gov. Rick Perry uses the backdrop of a Fort Worth Christian school to put his sig­nature to a bill that will advance the issue of same-sex marriage and ctVil unions to the statewide ballot tn November. (Photo courtesy of the Associated Press) Gov. signs gay marriage ban at a Christian school Perry suggests gay war veterans returning from Iraq find another state in which to live if they are are opposed to Texas marriage laws By BINNIE RSHER In a move that reverberated throughout !he countn: Gm: Rick Perry cho~e an evangelical Christian school in Fort Worth as a backdrop for sign Ing a measure that v.ill !bk Te.'\--as \ oter~ to decide in November whether to amend !he state con,titutton to Please see PERRY on Page 4 local life Todd Amdor and Matt Stone are partners in life and in Pride. Richard Dreyfuss plays a PAGES homo in 'Poseidon' remake and 'The L Word' gets expert direction. PAGE 17 2 JUNE 10, 2005 Give it up for Sophie B. Hawkins­live at the festival. PalSl•TID aY Q SPO•SOalD aY '@>TIME WARNER CAB LE here HOUSTON CHRONICLE Supporting our Community ADDITIO•AL SUPPOaT Wash nston 1.tdlt:4ti'fh Mutual voice o•• ,,o,., 'Ctffill@it' ~._ :::;;..- H tn ,.;.J.L..J.V.".".".".".;.r........w....... www.houstOOYOice.com HOUSTON VOICE '•r. Les~i11 . Ii, 111 Tr mauler Prile Saturday, June 25, 2005 Pr e Fest1 I 2:00 PM - Until Parade At Yoakum & Westheimer $10 At the Gate Discount Tickets at Pride Houston oru flATUWl•G Sophie 8. Hawkins Pansy Division Jade fsteban fstrada An "fnergy Dance Tent: Community Marketplace. Children's Activities. Beer Garden & Two Stages ol live fntertainment 845 PM lower Westheimer largest GlBT f vent in the Southwest With Over 200.000 Spectators! for All Ollicial Pride fvents & Parties. Go To: PrideHouston.org PRO CED BY PAID l<OU TON PWIDI PAWT•IWS ORB/TZ ... ,,, lfllS -~ KHMA .....w.... . ·- ~rJ -!witteJ 1-<IS ~Vt c;-.,_ ~.. ...,. w u ndom y HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I oca news briefs Retiring activist Ray Hill gets roasted Activist Ray Hill, who announced recently that he will retire from activism following the June 18 Conference on the Future at the George R. Brown Convention Center, is the object of a roast to be conducted today (June 10) at 1415 California. Billed as "The Well Deserved 'Roast' of Ray Hill," the event will raise funds for the Houston GLBT Community Center. Stonewall Law Association of Greater Houston is among the organizations that will participate. Hill, whose business cards read "Citizen Provocateur," came out to his family in 1981 while a student at Galena Park High School. He has since worked for causes including gay rights and the rights of prison· ers. The roast gets underway at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at the door, and seating is limited. Activist Ray Hill will be the subject of a roast later today at 1415 California 52 weeks of Blockbuster up for grabs at Empower conference Empower, the annual business expo high· lighting gay.owned and gay.friendly busi· nesses, gets underway Saturday morning at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Sponsored by the Greater Houston GLBT Chamber of Commerce, this year's event includes a conference called Equality 101 that features a number of speakers, including Eileen Terry, Senior Vice President of Diversity for Blockbuster Video. Terry, an out lesbian, brings with her 150 "Blockbuster for a Year" member· ships that will be handed out to the first 150 attendees at the 9 a.m. session. The conference deals with a number of issues affecting gays and lesbians, including retirement, the law, building voting power and organizing for change. Admission to the conference is $10. Admission to the expo is $5. Admission to a ''Taste of Montrose'' luncheon is $25. Chamber Executive Director Coy Tow said coupons are available at participating businesses that would lower entrance fees by $5. Mandatory meeting for Pride parade entrants A mandatory meeting has been scheduled for repres(•ntatives of organizations that plan to have floats or entries Jn the .June 25 Houston Pride Parade. The meeting is at 7 p.m. Tue day at the Metropolitan Multi· Service Centl'r, 1475 W. Gray. Parade pack· ets containing assigned positions and niles will be distributed. More informa· tlon is available at 713·529·6979 or www.pridehouston.org. Miss Mint Julep Kick-Off will benefit Montrose Clinic The "Miss Mint Julep Kick-Off," being called a night of live cabaret and fine din· ing, features performances by Clay Howell, Marsha Carlton. Keith Caldwell and Lisa Whitley and dinner at Riva's Italian Restaurant, 1117 Missouri St. The event is at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Tickets are $25. and a portion of the ticket price benefits the Montrose Clinic. For information and to purchase tickets, call 713-83().3015. Rev. Madison T Shockley, II, (center) pastor of Pilgrim United Church of Christ in Carlsbad. Calif. will deliver the keynote address at the annual GLBT Pride Interfaith Service in Houston June 19. California pastor to speak at Pride week Interfaith Service Rev. Madison T. Shockley, II. pastor of Pilgrim United Church of Christ in Carlsbad. Calif .• will deliver the keynote address durmg the annual GI.BT Pride Interfaith Service at 7 p.m. June 19 at Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church. 2025 West 11th Ave. The title of Shockley's address is "What's Love Got to Do With It?" The event, sponsored each year by the Interfaith Alliance, is exp{'cted to draw participants from varied faiths. From staff and wire reports JUNE 10. 2005 3 nation I news Conn. leads in gains By ELIZABETH WEILl-GREENBERG Gay rights opponents and propo· nents battled in the courts. in referen· dum campaigns and in legislatures over domestic partnership rights, mar· riage and discrimination. Generali,; Christopher Labonte of the Human Rights Campaign said. it had been a mixed bag during the first si.x months ci the legislative session. "The political emiron­ment is extremely challenging to say the least," he said. "Our community is used as a wedge to rally the religious right" Despite an at times hostile political cli· mate, many states passed laws banning discrimination based on someone's sexu· al orientation or gender identit;; includ· ing Colorado. Hawaii and Illinois (howev· er Colorado Gov. Bill Owen vetoed his state's bill). Maryland e>..tended its hate crimes act to include homosexuals and transgender people. Since January of this year, several states have moved toward recognizing same-sex couples and granting them the same rights and protections enjoyed by married cou· pies. Six state legislatures - California. Washington, Idaho, Colorado, New Mexico and Maryland - voted down constitutional amendments banning gay marriage, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Possibly the most significant gain for gay rights was achieved in Connecticut. In April. it became the first state to legalire civil unions without court intervention. Republican Gov. M. Jodi Rell signed legisla· tion that grants same sex couples the same rights as married couples. However. an amendment on the House bill was added which states that marriage is defined as between a man and a woman. a move Rell supported. Vermont and Massacllusetts also recognize civil unions. larg(>ly as a result of lawsuits. Other states also moved toward recog· nizing civil unions or trying to extend some of marriage's benefits to same sc.x couples. This was often a difficult battle because many conservatives feared these protec­tions were a slippery slope to condoning same-sex marriage. Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongosk1 (0), along with Senate Democrats. support a bill that will legalil.e er.ii unions for gay couples. granting them many ci the same rights of man-ied couples. Originally the bill also outlawed discrimination based on se)\llal orientation. The civil union bill pao;._'-Cd a Senate committee, 3 to 2. House Republicans supported a recipro­cal benefits bill which would b'ive about 2l> benefits to any two people older than 18, including same-sex couples and relatives. The bill mainly addressed property issues and medical emergencies. Critics of the reciprocal benefits blil said it failed to addre&; the needs of families. An effort in California to legalize sarne­sex marriage was defeated as the legisla live session ended. Del. ..\1ark Leno (D-San Franci'iCO) sponsored the measure, which, if it passed, would be the first state to legalize same sex marriage. The bill need· GOP Gov. M. Jodi Rel signed into law civil unions for Connecticut It was the first time a state has provided the same benefits it bestows to straight couples without a court mandate. (File photo) ed 41 votes in the As.c;embly to pass; it failed with a 37 to 36 vote. according to Equality California. In Tennessee, Rep. Chris Clem sponsored a bill to ban gay parents from adopting. The House subcommlttec changed the bill so it does not bar gay people outright; now the bill favors heterose..-..llal, marned oouples over singles. The judiciary was a frequent recourse for gay rights supporters. Courts in New York and San Francisco ruled it was unconstitutional to deny same-se.x cou­ples marriage licenses. both cases are being appeall'd. Pnqess for same-sex fcllilies Progress \\as also made for gay families· rights as well. In New Jerse); a judge ruled that same-sex parents should both be listed on their bab) ·s birth certificate. Arkansas started removing questions about sexual orientation from its foster parent applica· tion. And in Illinois, the state Supreme Court ordered a 5-year<>ld boy returned to his lesbian foster parent. A lower court had ruled the boy should be given back to his allegedly abusive grandparents. In Florida. a federal judge dismbsed a lawsuit that challenged the Dcfen.~e of :\iarriage Act. A same-o;e.x couple had asked the court to force Florida to recog. nize their .Massacllusetts marriage. The plaintiff~ will appeal. Scott J. Bloch, head of the US. Office ci Special Cotm.o;el, announced last month that he would not protect federal employees from bemg fired because they were g3j: An e)\11Iosive fight grew in the legislature over President Bush', nominees, SC\'eral of who were anti.ga)'. Tu preserve the filibuster. a compromise was reached that allows an up or dmm vote on three nominees. One of those noltlIJlC('S, \\illiam Pryoi; has been called the most anti.gay nominee In history Wlu.le Pryor was attorney general in Alabama. he wrote a bncf that argued con· stitutionally protecting consensual sex between homose.-..11itls would result In pro­tections for mcest, necrophilia. pedophilia, prostitution and adulter)'. 4 JUNE 10. 2005 free yourself Core FS LTD Co ri , n. CIAL SERVIC ES FOR SMALL BUSINESS • Taxes • Finanual Reporting • Full Accounung Servico • Governmental Compliance Coruulwuon • Processing of Pn)TOll, Accounts Payable & Receivable • A~ists m Filing for C'.orporauons, including Inc., PA. LP & LLC 832.978.4841 • merlin@corefslc.com you deserve the time to enjoy your business cc~ &:nt tll- Of:J ·1101y &pg.. ~~ ~ 111( Off e1~! 0 r ,a ~~ Ei.-. t f!alebt11tlng Rev. Cs10lyn Uoblay R IE y1111~ In Ulnl~hy/ f:tiday, June 24-th ~~" ~' 7 prn -12 arn ~eraton Brookhollow Hotel Tlckern t50 - lnclut/u Ila~ D'OQu~, Dum-t & ~5000 In ~Ina Chi~ tedsem11bla for Ptlzu/ Buy Yout Ticket~ Today! (71g) ~81-914-9 Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church 2025 W. 11th St. - Houston. TX 77008 - 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I local news Randall Blis executive director of the lesbian/Gay Rights lobby of Texas. said the governor's actions help place Texas at the top of the list of intolerant states. Perry's comments anger gay rights activists nationwide PERRY, continued from Page 1 prohibit gay marriage and civil unions. At the same time, Perry also signed a measure that would restrict abortion by requiring girls under 18 to get parental consent before they can have an abortion. The choice of Calvary Christian Academy for signing the measures echoes Perry's campaign plan to celebrate with ''Christian friends." Gay activists describe Perry's signing of the proposed constitutional amend· ment on same-sex marriage as grand standing, since the measure required no signature from the governor before being placed on the November ballot. "Once again, Texas leads the way in deny ing civil rights by being so backward," said Randall I-:llis, executive director of the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas (LGRL). About 100 protesters lined up outside the school during the event, according to published reports. While LGRL objected to Perry's choice of a venue for the signing ceremony, Ellis said it was what the governor said in a press conference following the event that concerns him the most. Fort Worth Star-Telegram columnist Bud Kennedy reported on June 7, 2005 that when Perry was asked what he would say to gay war veterans who come home from Iraq to learn they've lost all hope of being able to get married. the governor was quoted as saying, "Texans made a decision about marriage and if there's a state that has more lenient views than Texas. then maybe that' · a better place for them to 1 ive." Ellis called Perry's comments "shame· ful," and added, "Rick Perry should apolo· glze to all veterans for suggesting that Texas docs not honor their service. When injured soldiers are coming home every­day from Iraq, we should honor everyone's service to our state and country, not judge them and tell them to get out." 'Beyond the reach of activist judges' As Perry signed the marriage bill, he noted that because Defense of Marriage acts have come under legal attack in recent years. the proposed constitutional amendment places the issue, "beyond the reach of activ isl judges." Perry added, "History tells us. and most Texans believe, that marriage exists for more than the convenience of consent· ing adults, but also for the eternal benefit of our children." Ellis said he wonders how much Perry's upcoming re-election fight played into his choice of a Christian school as a venue for the bill signing. It is anticipated that Perry will face U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison in his bid for the Republican gubernatorial nomination in 2006. Perry's spokesperson, Kathy Walt. had this to say about protestors oul~ide the school who carried signs about thr separa lion of church and state, "The critics arc generally those who object to people of faith participating in government or the electoral process. There are a number of critics who would object to this bill signing if it were in a public school, a library, a Wal-Mart park· mg lot or any other venue because they oppose pro-life. pro-family issues." Those who voiced opposition to the bill s igning were not all from Texas. Gay rights activ1sb from around the country commented regarding not only the choice of a venue but also Perry's comments. "No family should have to leave their home to be protected under the law," said Joe Solmonese. president of the Human Rights Campa11,'ll. 'i\lmost 43.000 same-sex couples live in Texas. and Gov. Perry should be treating !hose families with the same amount of respect and dignity that h gives other constitucnl~." HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I national news briefs Defense switches focus in Calif. transgender killing case Sylvia Guerrero. had her son's name legally chanqed after her death as a sign of respect. (AP photo by Anda Chu/Fremont Arqus) HAYWARD, Calif. (AP) Darkness descended the night a transgender teenager was beaten and strangled to death, the attorney for one of the men accused in the killing said as he laid out his case for the jury. In a surprising departure from the first trial in the ca~e which ended with a hung jury last year. attorney Bill DuBois said his client, Jose Merel. would take the stand and talk about his genuine attachment for 17·year­old Gwen Araujo. "He will tell you about the horror of that evening, about seeing into the heart of darkness that descended over that house on the fourth of October 2002," DuBois said in his opening statement last week. Merel, Michael Magidson and Jason Cazares, all 2:i. face charges of first-degree murder. Prosecutors say Araujo, who was born a boy named Edward but came to believe her true identity was female, was killed after her biological gender was revealed in a confrontation at Mere l's house in Newark. a San Francisco suburb. Merel's attorney, meanwhile. said his client cared for Araujo and did not do her serious injur): Public policy branch of Focus on the Family raises $9M DENVER In its frrst six months of cids­tence. the public pol icy branch of the conser­vative Christian group Focus on the Family rai.S('<i funds equivalent to $50,(XX)a cla:i: records reviewL'<i by the Denver Post shov.: the Summit Daily News reported. Focus Action brought in almost $9 million since it was started by James Dobson.founder of Focus on the Famil:i; a non· profit group that, as such, is barred from back­ing or opposing political candidate:;, the Daily News reported. From April to Scptl'mlx•r :n». Focus Action garnered $8.8 million. all from individuals, according to the newspaJl('r The group then spent almost $2 million to distrib­ute ncwc lettPn;, e-mail aJKI articles to prompt involvement in issues including gay mamagc 'l'he action group now wants to revive a pro­posed ~(,'Ciera! Marnage AmendmC'l1t to him gay unions. according to the ncwspaJl('t: Colo., Hawaii schools react differently to bullying videos LAKEWOOD, Colo. (AP) Officials in the ~hool district that indudes Coltunbine High School have nixed the filming a movie at anothC>r school in the county because it deals in part with bullying. Jefferson County ~ool officials said they were concerned that film· ing "The Sensei" at Alameda High School would reopen the wounds of Columbine, where 12 students and one teacher were fatal· ly shot by two students in 1999 who had com· plained that they were bullied. The movie by writer-director Diana Lee Inosanto is about a gay teenager who l<-arns martial arts after bPing bullied by high school athletes in the early l!ms, at the beginning of the AIDS epi­demic. Stevenson said the board dC>nial had nothing to do with thl' film's treatment of homosl'xuality and AIDS. In Wailuku, Haw.iii, about ~ &tudents at a Maui school have been shown a video encouraging toler­ant behavior toward gays. Officials at King Kekaulike High School had planned to show but decided to require parental permiS5ion after some parents and residents objected. Navajo Nation Council overrides veto of same-sex marriage ban ALBUQUERQUE (AP) The Navajo Nation Tribal Council has voted to override a veto of a law that bans same-sex marriage on the nation's largest Indian re;ervation. The coun­cil voted 62-14, with 12 delegates abstairung or absC'l1t la~t week. to override the decision by Navajo President Joe Shirley Jr: last month to veto the Dine Marriage Act of :nx>. Dine is the Navajos' name for themselves. The act dE·fines marriage as a relationship between a man and a woman and prohibil~ plural mar­riages as well a~ marriage between parents and children. grandparents and grandchil­drm. brothers and sisters and other close rel­atives. "In the traditional Navajo ways, gay marriage b a big 'no. no."' said Kenneth .\la11·bo}: a delegate from :-.tontczuma Creek, Utah, who voted in favor of the ban. "It all boils down to the circle of life. We v.ere put on the Earth to produce ofI,pring." Zions Bank pulls sponsorship of HRC fund-raiser in Utah SALT LAKE CITY (AP) Zions Bank pulled its sponsorship of a gay rights group's fund­raiser last week after receiving anon3mous phone calls saying the event supports same­sex marriage. The event is to support the Human Rights Campaign, a national gay rights advocacy group. Zions Bank spokesperson Robert Brough said the spon­sorship was pulled to "avoid any misinter­pretation related to the controversy around this issue [same-sex marriage]. We signed onto this thinking it was a Democratic Party human rights event to promote equality in the work force, particularly single mothers," he said. Brough said the sponsorship was request<'<! by philanthropist Bruce Bastian, who is hosting the fund-raiser at his Orem, Utah, home. "Without being intimately familiar" with the HRC, Brough said. bank otncials agreed to sponsor the event framed a~ a fund·raiser for work force equalit): From staff and wire reports JUNE 10. 2005 5 Cheri A. Post, M.D., offers the following services: • Laser Hair Removal •Acne & Acne Scar Removal • Botox® and Restylane® • Facials and Peels • Vein Therapies • Microdermabrasion • Waxing and Tinting ·Permanent Make-Up Derma Health LASER ASSOCIATES 713-270-6505 6363 Woodway Dr., Suite 850 • Houston, Texas 77057 Sall with the a--6winling LEADER #I GLBT group cnb1ng offering,.,_.. celebrity~comblnedwltltani1e1..-.._.c*• o1,_._,,. 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Acconling to Assembly member Rudy Bermudez (D·Los Angeles), the power of the Catholic Church in the Latino community was a factor in why several Latino Democratic Assembly members did not sup­port the bill. Burmudez said that he voted for the marriage bill, though his office was visit­ed by several religious groups that expressed opposition to the measure. Burmudez said that although he sees same-sex marriage as a civil rights issue, he is concerned about the backlash that AB 19 may provoke. "When the Latinos were pushing hard for immigrants' rights for chil­dren, the radical right came in and pushed actions that eroded affirmative action for all," Burmudez said. "The radical right, who sells bigotry and racism, they are going to attack in an initiative process. ... We are going to lose rights we shouldn't be losing " Monica Taher monitors the Spanish language media in California for its por­trayal of gays as a media coordinator for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. "The media in California has evolved," Taher said. "They have been covering the issue from a human standpoint interview­ing couples about how [AB 19) would affect them. This is an obvious difference from how gay and lesbian issues were covered 10 years ago." Taher said that the Latino social con· servatives. like social conservatives in general have promoted fear, ignorance and confusion with statements like, "If we let gay and lesbian people get mar· ried today, next they are going to want to marry their cats." The religious messages against same­sex marriage in California are coming not so much from the church directly as from outside groups that are using religious language to urge Latinos to oppose same-sex marriage, Taher said. Log Cabin blames Dems for loss The vote on AB 19 took place in the con­text of broader legal battles over marriage in the state. Assembly members said that their offices were besieged with calls both for and against the measure up until the moment of the final vote. Assembly member Mervyn Dymally CD· Compton), one of the co-sponsors of the bill, was absent on the day of the vote. AB 19 proponents speculated that the absence of a key supporter dissuaded a few unde­cided Assembly members from voting for the bill. Dymally's office did not comment on his reasons for not voting. "I think that the vote on AB19 shows that the LGBT community has a Jot of work to do here in California to educate the public in general," said Jeff Bissiri, director of the Log Cabin Republicans of California, a gay GOP group. Bissiri said that the bill failed because it lacked support in the Democratic Party. "The simple math is that if Democrats want a bill to pass the Assembly it will pass." John Marble, spokesperson for the National Stonewall Democrats, a partisan gay rights group, said that the bulk of the blame should be laid at the feet of the Republicans. "There are a dozen Log Cabin Republican chapters in California, Marble said. "They failed to convince even a single Republican Assembly member to stand up for gays and their families in one of the most progressive states in the country." One reason given by those who opposed AB 19 is that the people had already spo­ken on the definition of marriage when they adopted Proposition 22 in 2000. which said that marriage should be between and man and a woman only. Laws adopted by voter initiatives in California cannot be changed by the Legislature. The idea that Prop 22 and AB 19 would conflict was strengthened when a Ford boycott bombs By EARTHA MELZER Less than a week after the American Family Association, a Mississippi·based social conservative organization, declared a boycott of the Ford Motor Company, it called it off, saying that it would put the boycott on hold till December pending talks with the company. The boycott was started on May 31 in response to Ford's support of gay groups, advertising in gay publications, inclusive workplace policies and sponsorship of Pride festivals. According to the AFA, Ford has donat· ed hundreds of thousands of dollars to gay civil rights groups such as the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and the International Gay & Lesbian Human Rights Campaign. On a Web site created for the boycott the AFA argued that people should not buy Ford products - including Lincoln, Mercury, Mazda, Volvo, Jaguar and Land Rover - because profits from those sales would go to organizations that favor same­sex marriage. The boycott suspension was declared soon after the owner of a Ford dealership in Dallas, Jerry Reynolds, was alerted to the boycott and grew concerned that it might effect his business. Reynolds contacted AFA judge upheld the California law expand­ing domestic partnership rights. In that case, conservative groups argued that California was violating Prop 22 by "creating marriage under another name" with expanded domestic partner­ship rights. The judge found that the law did not conflict with Prop 22, because it did not create marriage in that marriage is limited to a man and a woman in California. In reaction to the ruling that upheld the domestic partnership laws, a coali­tion of social conservative groups pro­posed a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. In California, consti­tutional amendments can be initiated either through the legislature or through petition. The marriage amendment failed to pass the House or Senate, and amend­ment proponents filed paperwork to begin a voter initiative. A constitution­al amendment to ban same-sex mar· riage is expected to be on the ballot in June of 2006. Pam Chamberlain is a researcher with Political Research Associates, an inde­pendent non-profit research center that studies social conservatives. Chamberlain said that the Massachusetts case that established same. sex marriage happened because the lawyers involved in the case chose a strate­gic time to make their arguments. "Whenever there is an attempt by a social group to advance, according to social movement theory, there is always a backlash, that is part of the process." Chamberlain said. "Abortion used to be the touchstone issue that could unite disparate segments of the right," Chamberlain said. "But it turns out now plenty of people who might have an abortion are still against same-sex marriage. Homophobic messages really resonate now." Religious groups divided Executive Director Tim Wtldmon, arranged a meeting between AFA and concerned deal­ers and struck a suspension deal. An article in the online Automotive Business Review, which ran while the boy­cott was in effect, said that the AFA boycott Religious groups were divided over AB 19. The California Council of Churches, which represents 31 mainstream and pro­gressive Protestant denominations. has been supportive of AB 19 and of the right of churches to support or refuse marriages. Elizabeth Sholes, communications direc· tor for the Council of Churches, said that California's domestic partnership laws established secular rights for same-sex cou­ples and that marriage is a faith issue that should be left to individual congregations. Sholes said that the Council of Churches believes that the Bible rails against abusive relationships, not gay relationships, and that committed rela­tionships strengthen society. "Religious support for same-sex mar­riage has not received much media atten­tion. Sholes said, because it makes better news when people speak with venom." Carol Hogan, communications director for the California Catholic Conference, said the attempt to pass AB 19 was a "fool's errand," because of Prop 22 and California's law against overturning voter-enacted legislation. Hogan said that the Catholic Church was not the lead organization opposing AB 19. She said the church opposes dis­crimination against gays and is not averse to domestic partnership benefits. Hogan said that the Catholic Church believes that the state should have a role in defining marriage. The conflict between religious and civil rights perspectives on same-sex marriage was exemplified during the Assembly vote by the struggle of Assembly member Alberto Torrico CD-Newark), a born-again Christian and civil rights lawyer. Torrico was initially among tho~e who abstained from the vote, but after inten­sive consultations \\ith religious groups and direct lobbying by a gay family from his district Torrico ended up voting for AB 19 in the final round. "Render onto Ceasar that which is Ceasar's. Render onto God that which is God's," Torrico said in explaining his vote. was unlikely to generate a problematic level of negative publicity for Ford and might even increase sales by gay customers. Dan Sturgis of Pride at Woric, the gay and lesbian caucus of the AFl.rCIO which repre­sents the United Auto Workers, said that when the boycott was announcl'd. workers were reassured about their own standing. Sturgis said Ford officials told him that they .were receiving an equal mix of support for and against the company's gay policies. The Human Rights Campaign and the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force released statements celebrating the quick end to the boycott. "Ford has made it very clear that they will not respond to AFA demands and the AFA has backed down," said Roberta Sklar, communications direc­tor for the NG&LTF. "We have no reason to be concerned about Ford having a conver­sation with the AFA." HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 10, 2005 PAGES Partners in life and partners in Pride Todd Amdor and Matt Stone have created a new and improved Pride Festival for 2005 By DAWN RORIE After almost a year of planning, the Pride Festival is back. While the annual bash before the parade JS always a popular ewnt for those who wtsh to drink, dance and be merry before the parade begins, festival eo<hatrs (and partners) Todd Amdor and Matthew Stone have been working to make this year's event bigger and better than ever. This is the fifth year that Amdor and Stone have volunteered for Pride Houston, and the second year that they been involved with coordinating the festi· val, which has evolved considerably since its inception. Houston's Pride Festival began as a Pride rally after the parade, back when the parade was held in the heat of the day. \\'hen the parade made Its switch to the nighttime, the festival moved to the Garden in the Heights. In recent years, the Festival has found a home in Montrose, finally landing at the intersection of Westheuner and Yoakum. With Yoalnun closed to vehicle traffic on Pride day, festival goers can now celebrate all afternoon and continue mingling and partying as they gather in a special pri· vate viewing area to watch the Parade. Other than location. what makes this Pride Festival different than last year's or the year before that? According to Amdor, more community involvement has grown the festival into what organiz. ers hope will be "the epicenter of gay Houston before the Pride celebration." Thanks to approximately 75 business· es and non-profit organizations, the 2005 Pride Festival will feature plenty of food, drinks, booths, and tons of entertain· ment. In addition to food and drinks provided by the Montrose Diner and Slider's Bar and Daquiris. festival-goers will be able to buy merchandise and find information about various gay friendly businesses and non-profit organizations at the many ()MORE INFO Houston Pride Festival 2 p.11t until parade time June 25 Yoakum and Westhenner WWW pridehouston.org Matt Stone and Todd Amdor are the chairs of the 2005 Pride Festival that takes place the afternoon of June 25. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) booths that v.ill be set up at the event. The Hollyfield Foundation, which pro­~ ides funding for many mv I AIDS and non-profit organizations that serve les· bians and gays, will be showcasing 40 groups such as AIDS Foundation Houston, the Montrose Clinic, and the newly formed Houston Equal Rights Alliance. According to Amdor, the festival is "trying to highlight some of the local non-profit groups that aren't as visible as some of the larger organizations." This year, festival attendees will be able to test their pitching skills at Ounk'd-a dunking booth that will fea· ture "GLBT community leaders. muscle boys, and drag queens." says Stone. Pride Houston president Nick Brines. activisVlawyer Jerry Simoneaux, bottles from Muscles in Action and divas from the Miss Camp America Foundation arc among the people who v.ill brave the icy waters of Dunk'd in order to entertain the rru1sscs. A wide variety of musical entertain· ment will rock the audience from two stages. Local acts such as the Houston Pride Band and skyblue72 will perform on the Community Showcase Stage Sophie B. Hawkins performs The Bud Light Stage features a lineup of artists that includes festival headliners Sophie B. Hawkins and Pansy Division Grammy-nominated singer Sophie B. Hawkins 1s known for her chart-topping singles "Damn! I Wish I Was Your Lover" and ''.As I Lay :\1e Down." "Sophie is excited about the opportu· nity to perform for the gay community in Houston," says Stone. Pansy Division, "the original gay punk band," came crashing out of the closet in the 90's to develop quite a fol· lowing. They have performed more than 800 live shows and opened for Green Day's World Tour. After partying for hours in the heat, cooling down is a must. The Red Bull Energy Dance tent will be cooling down bodie while keeping the party hot, hot, hot. The 1,000.square-foot, air-conditioned tent will feature music spun by some of Houston's hottest DJ's. "The key word here is 'air-conditioned!'" says Stone. Although the Pride Festival will be an entertaining event for adults, Amdor and Stone emphasize that the event will be fun for families. as well. All entertainment wJll be family.friendly, and the festival will feature children's activities. includ· tng R blow-up moonwalk and an exhibit by the Houston SPCA Children under the age of 6 get into the festival for free. Amdor and Stone hope that hcterosex uals wUI attend the event, as well. "Events like this change people's minds about what the gay community is and who its members are," Amdor says. Stone agrees. explaining that the fcsti· val is not only a way for the gays and les­bians to reconnect, but also a way to edu· cate heterosexuals. "This is a chance for all people to have fun and celebrate our com· munity, our culture, our music, and learn more about our organizations," he says. Festival tickets, costing $10, can be pur­chased at Houston Buyers Club, 3224 Yoakum; Montrose Counseling Center, 701 Richmond; Montrose Clinic, 215 Westheimer; and The Assistance Fund, I 116Jackson or online at the Pride Web site. Aller organizing such a huge festival for this year's Pride, Stone and Amdor can't imagine how they will top it in 2006. but they are determined to try. Planning for next year's Pride will begin just a month or so after the last bits of this year's parade paraphernalia are swept off of Westheimer. Somehow, between working full time jobs and volunteering at various organi· zattons-Amdor is an attorney for Bracewell and Giuliani LLP and serves on the board of the Hollyfield Foundation, and Stone is assistant d1rec· tor of sales for the Hilton Westchase and a board member of the Houston Black Tie Dinner the pair manage to make every year's Pride celebration one of their top priori Iles. The celrbration and festival, says Amdor, ts "Prtde's gill to the community" HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com out in houston (Photos by Dalton DeHart) At the recent Lesbian Health Initiative health fair. (from left) Deborah Bell and Lucy Watson look on as Pat Hilton signs in. Ricley Comeaux (left) and Jerry Atwood reunit • ed recently for a concert benefiting Bering Omega Community Services. Performers from the cast of Disney's ·on the Record' mcludmg (from left) associate conductor Rick Bertone. Randy Meyer, Josh Franklin Joanne Booasso and Kyte Greer showed up recently for Musical Monday at Meteor JUNE 10, 2005 9 SKIN" ~a· a.nee LASER CENTER See before and after ictures at WWW skinrena1SS11nce.net Fort Lauderdale Real Estate ANDY WEISER Put Coldwell Banker's Top Producer to work for You Entertainers (from left) Sharon Morrtgome!y, Jerry Atwood. Ricley Comeaux. Glynda McGinnis and Steve Dixon sang their hearts out recently in a show that benefltted Bering Omega Community Services. 954-560-9667 Artist John Palmer (right) celebrated another opening recently with (from left) A. David Carlson and Teny Neffendorf. Groove G1t1z Productions founders Yvome Feece (left) and Rebecca Mimffey welcomed DJ Farrah Cox (right) during the recent Groove Girlz Pride event COLDWC!LL BANl(eRC www.AndyWeiser.com BETHEL EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (UCC) No matter who you are. or where you are on life's journey, you're welcome at Bethel, the ~ Church with Open Arms .~ Visit our ~pen and Affirming community this Sunday! 1107 Shepherd Drive @ Center Str'Mt Houston, TX TT0'17 • 713-111-M70 www.ti.tllelhouston.llfll Sunday School Sunday Worship Wednact.y Worship 9:00AM 10:30AM 6:00 Pit EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive Elitor CHRIS CRAIN Elitor BINNIE FISHER Cmespotldents BRYAN ANDERTON. DYANA BAGBY. LOU CHIBBARO. JR. JOE CREA MUBARAK DAHIR. LAIJRA DOOO.AS-8ROWN MIKE FUMING. MATTHEW HENNIE. JOHNNY HOOKS. PHIL LAPAOULA R'l'AN LEE. BRIAN MOY· LAN. KEVIN NAFF YUSEF NA.WI, KEN SAIN RHONDA SMITH. STEVE WEINSIDN. AJj!J'(ZEfFER CcnlrtullJIS DON MAlNEs. DAWN RORIE. EUA TYlER. SHANA NICl!Ol.SON. JA CHAPMAN. RICH ARENSCHIElDT ANO ANAS B£N.MUSA f'hotx9aphets DALTON DEHART, KlMBERLY THOMPSON PndJction Manager JAMES NEAL Webmaster ARAM VARTIAA SALES & ADMINISTRATION General~ JASON WILSON jwilson.a.houstonvoice.com Classified Sales I Office Mninstriltor JOHNNY HOOKS - jhookS<a.bcuston'IOice.com Nalional Mmtisilg R2presaltaliYe RiWf1dell M<'lfia • 212-242-61163 Nmsher- WINDOW MEDIA U.C Pmident· WIWAM WAYBOURN Elitolial Di'ectllr· CHRIS CRAIN Corpont! Cootroler- BARNITTE HOl5TON Art Dir!ctor- ROB BOEGER Dir!ctDr of Oper31ions· MIKE KITCHENS De:tar of Sales STEVEN GUERRINI De:tar of Clmified Sales· NATMAN REGAN MWll1g ~·RON ROMANSKI ra • .G• .ll.f..._._ .. _ GOllllf ME MB Ell CHARTIR MEMBER Established 1974 as the Mortrose SIJ/'. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 71006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 www.houstonvoice.c Office hours'. 9 am.-5:30 p.m. weekdays To siW a letl!r Letters sin.id be !ewer thill 400 words. We reserie the rqt ID elit for cool!lt nt lerw,itli. We will witll­hcld l9l1l5 ~ reqiest. but you llllSt nilde YIU name nt ~ ruliJer for verification. Please send mil ID lbls!oo Voice 500 LIM!tt Blwf., Slite 200, Hoostoo. Texas TIOOb. bx (713) 529-9531 or Hnail ID e<ilDr iitoostroioice. Opnoos ~ tlmin do rot reflEd llllSe of the Ha.tston VQa'. IJlllWrialm-l"*"~P'Qtecl!dt.,fodml ..:9"....:i-:=~~=:.. of~~_,.nl_ potilsllod-~-infomdoriqlied. Tiit _.....,_,,..pictonal~ *"-'ool~==.-..iion -11111.....-. ~tM:o-~lor-ib-.. Tht-mmntboripll!IO""'llloftjodll'l!llt '-:..~cr.i. 1->-1!."_";:i..= ' m editorial Singing the right notes for the choir Looking for motive in Gov. Rick Perry's signing of anti-gay and anti-abortion legislation last Sunday at an evangelical Christian school in Fort Worth By BINNIE ASHER HE INK HAD BARELY dried on the signatures Gov. Rick Perry affixed to two pieces of legislation last Sunday - one of them a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage and civil unions - and specula­tors began reasoning why he chose to stage the signing ceremony at an evangel ical Christian school. The most common reasoning was that he was playing to his base, died-in-the­wool conservative Christians who oppose same-sex marriage and abortion, the sub­ject of the other piece of legislation. The head of an organization working toward equality for gays and lesbians had another thought. Maybe Perry wanted to upstage a potential opponent in the race for the 2006 Republican gubernatorial nomination. U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison would be a formidable opponent for Perry, whose approval ratings of late have not been exactly stellar. Although legislation to require girls under 18 to gain parental consent before getting an abortion needed Perry's signature, the amendment to ban gay marriage that will be presented to voters in November did not need the governor's John Henry. But, signing those documents sur­rounded by other conservative Republican legislators and evangeli ­cal Christians made for the kind of photos that should appeal to Perry's constituents. Perry's spokesperson said there would be complaints regardless of where Perry chose to sign the bills, and she shrugged off the JOO.member opposition that gath· ered outside the school carrying signs about separation of church and state. It was all so perfect for Perry. And when asked what he would say to gay vet­erans coming home from Iraq regarding the marriage amendment, the governor suggested that if they don't like the laws in Texas. they should find another state in which to live. That statement was denounced by gay activists from around the country, but it was likely applauded by those who gath­ered at the school for the signing. They're all for helping returning veter· ans and displaying those yellow ribbons on their cars, but that's for heterosexual veterans. Gay veterans can go to wherev­er. Hell, maybe. IT WAS SUCH A NASTY THING TO say that one has to wonder if perhaps there was a motive beyond grandstanding or singing to the choir or even upstaging Kay Bailey Hutchison. Thinking back, what in Rick Perry's not-too-distant past might prompt him to disassociate himself from gays to the extent that he would suggest gay veterans coming home from Iraq not come back to Texas? Ah yes, there were those rumors early in 2004. They were nasty little rumors about Perry and another male employed at the capitol that began being e-mailed around the state early last year. At one point, a group of demonstra­tors gathered outside the Governor's Mansion wielding signs with slogans Like, "It's OK to be gay." A story in the Austin Chronicle men­tioned the rumors but also indicated that no real evidence existed to substan­tiate them. At the time, Perry's spokesperson, Kathy Walt, dismissed the rumors this way. "These are false, malicious and hurt· ful rumors, and the Chronicle's own investigation acknowledges that fact." Perry and wife, Anita, denied the rumors m an interview with an Austin television station. The rumblings eventu­ally quieted. The point to be made here is that whether there was any truth to the rumors, publicly denouncing gays in a ceremony at a Christian school might be considered preventative medicine. Fear causes us to run as fast as possi· ble from that which worries us the most. A perfect example is Alan Keyes. the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate who HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 10, 2005 PAGE 10 lost in 2004 to Democrat Barack Obama. Keyes is adamant in voicing his opposi­tion to gays. He has a lesbian daughter. And then there's the mayor of Spokane, Wash., Jim West. Could there have been a more vocal opponent of equal rights for gays and lesbians? After an investigation by the Spokesman Review, the mayor admitted recently that he'd had sex with men. In his zeal to prevent such rumors from surfacing, as a state legislator he backed an unsuccessful measure to ban gays and lesbians from working in schools day care centers and some state agencies. As the incoming mayor of Spokane, he opposed offering domestic partner bene­fits to City Hall workers. This is not to suggest that the rumors about Perry were true. But, let's face it, those rumors could do some damage should they surface again just in time for what is shaping up to be a hard-fought campaign to remain as governor of Texas. Maybe snuggling up to the base and letting them know that you really are opposed to equal rights for gays and les­bians is a good thing. Signing a piece of legislation that doesn't need your signa­ture, well, that's just icing on the cake. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JASON VICTOR SERNIUS Marriage equality came up four votes short in California last week, no thanks to Bible-quoting pols from both parties. Painfully close to victory in Calif. FOUR VOTES SHORT. YOU COULD LOOK at it as a body count. You might practice reciting the fig. ures as would a TV news anchor: eyes wide open, voice authoritative yet dis· passionate, accents on key syllables. offering bare-bones information while leaving room for the commercials that pay the way. Except this time, detachment is not an option. The count is about us. On June 2. the California State Assembly came up four votes shy of pass· ing ABl9, a bill that would have sane· tioned same-sex marriage in California. Introduced by gay Assemblyman Mark Leno (D-San FrancL<;c0), the bill would have changed the state's definition of marriage to a union between two persons instead of a union between a man and a woman. Even though the final tally was 37-36 in favor of the bill, it was four votes shy of the 4l·vote majority needed to pass. For the minority Republicans, voting was a no-brainer. They followed the party line, which thanks to Daddy Bush is far more clearly defined than Dorothy's Yellow Brick Road to Oz. Faced with choices about life, liberty, and the pursuit of property, they chose the latter, cited the Bible, and voted no as a solid, I·know-where-my-next-meal·is· coming.from bloc. Leno, lesbian Senator Carole Migden (D-San Francisco), and other members of California's gay Assembly caucus did their best. They even enlisted the help of lesbian couple Orzu and Ramona Gatto and their 17·year-old daughter Marina. The Gatto family of San Carlos. Calif., approached Assembly members on an individual basis. Among their questions: "ls this child less equal than another child? Does this child"s family deserve to be treated differently from another?" SOME DEMOCRATIC ASSEMBLY members also consulted the Bible. Some thought of their constituencies. others of future elections and the money they need­ed to keep their children in private school, safe from the ruinous influences of California's abysmal public school system. Some even changed their minds. But it was not enough. After the final vote. 41·year old Ramona Gatto expressed shock at the out· come. "After talking to a lot of members face to face," she said, "they would not look me in the eye and say they would not support equality." Leno was more direct. "If this body can't pass AB19, .. he declared, "it should clarify its position and say we do believe that gay and lesbian couples are second· class citizens." IN RELATED NEWS, ON MAY 31 California Attorney General Bill Lockyer filed notice to appeal San Francisco Superior Court Judge Richard Long-tenn friends who Ciln live with each other's bitchiness and laugh about 11. Big hair. witty sarcasm and the revelation that they weren't the only ones wearing '80s shoulder p.1ds. MIKE EVANS, 33 Houston Dog Trader ANDREA LA VER. '19 Houston Costume designer JUNE 10. 2005 ll Gay Assemblyman Marie Leno (0-Sam Francisco) sponsored AB 19. which would legalize same-sex marriages in California. (Photo by AP) A. Kramer's March 14 ruling that California laws restricting marriage rights to opposite-sex couples violate equal protection guarantees in the California Constitution. Lockyer, as the California official responsible for defending state laws that have been challenged in court. has no choice but to appeal Kramer's rul· ing, but his act guarantees a ruling from the California Supreme Court next year on the constitutionality of California's current prohibition of same-sex marriage. So after the California defeat, is our glass half full or half empty? The answer may depend upon viewing the question from a blue state or red state of mind. From my vantage point in California, cracks are appearing in the monolith, and neither words nor mis· siles nor Fox News barrages are enough to patch them up. Beyond ex-pressing our outrage at yet another refusal to honor our love, the only viable response is to deepen our relation­ships with each other and press on. IJ!. Jason Victor Serioos is an Oakland-based ~ freelance writer and can be reached at jserinus@planeteria.com The campy one-liners. Everybody knows I love a ba-da-boom joke. It takes place in a beauty shop, and the girls are all purty. Gay boys love strong Southern women with attitude and sass. DANNY KAIID\ 45 Houston District manager PAm ALDREDGE, 49 Houston Social worm BRYAN HLAVINKA. 31 Houston Engineer Sound off about what's happening in your world at www.houstonvoice.com/soundoff. Interviews and photos by Dalton DeHart GAY HOUSTON NIGHTLIFE, ARTS & CULTURE Kiss and Tell Brittany Murphy tells a British mag that her favorite cinematic smooches were with women. Page 17 ~-~~~~~~~~~~~ JUNE IO, 2005 .-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ .. ~.-::.:..._~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ what's old is new FROM JAMES DEAN AND JOAN CRAWFORD TO JOHN WATERS AND BETTE DAVIS, SUMMER DVD RELEASES STARRING SOME OLD FAVORITES ABOUND. By MATTHEW FORKE OR MANY DVD COLLECTORS, MYSELF included. empty shelf space has become an unaffordable luxury So, how to ease the keep-case clutter. Trek to Ikea? Call California Closets? Sell used DVDs on eBay? Of little help to gay pack rats are movie studios that continue to churn out supplement-rich special ed1t1ons of TV favontes and multi-disk superstar collections. Herc ls a sample of y, hat's available this summer. "The Best of Ewrythi1ij(: Or as one Amazon.com cus­tomer calls rt. "When Breasts Were Everything." Glossy melodrama perfectly captures the excitement of '50s New York as three ambitious secretanes (Hope Lange, Suzy Parker and Diane Baker) brave the "llpstJckJungle" of a major publishing company, each threatened by boorish lovers, lecherous executives and Mildred Fierce hersclf, Joan Crawford as an embittered editor. (1959, Fbx Home Video, 19.95) "The Golden Girls Season Two": Shoulder pads and blue hair in place. "Glrls" hit the ground running in its sopho­more yror (which won an Outstanding Comedy Senes Emmy Award). Guest stars Include Burt Re~11olds. George Clooney, Rita Moreno and Nancy Walker. (100&.ai, Buena VISta Home Video. $49.99) "The Detective": Mia Farrow should thank her lucky stars for choosing to work with Roman Polanski In "Rosemary's Baby" instead of then-husband Frank Sinatra in this homophobic museum piece. Worth viewing for pre-Stonewall historical purposes onl}: Also stars Robert Duvall, Lee Remick and Jack Klugman. (1968, Fox Home Video, $14.96) "The Doris Day Collection": Ready to take a "Sentimental Journey" with the top female box office draw of the 1960s? MISS Day's radiant new &di~ set Includes "Young Man With a Horn" (1950, \\ith 1.auren Bacall as Kirk Douglas' lesbian wife); "Lullaby c/Broadway" (1951); "Love Mc or Leave Me" (195.5); "Billy Rose's Jumbo" (1962); "Please Don't Eat the Daisies" (1900); "The Gia! Bottom Boat" (1966); "Calamity Jane" {19:53) and "P-.ijama Game" (1957). Also recommended for Day fans: Alfred Hitchcock's ''The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956) or anything with frequent co~tar Rock Hudson. (Warner Home Video, S66.9'l) "The Complete James Dean Collection": In honor of the 50th anniversary of his death, Dean's three major films. "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955). "East of Eden" (1955) and "Giant" (1956), are now available in a six-disc, boxed set from Warner Home Video. ($49.9'l) "Dead Ringers": "Separation can be terrifying." reads the tagline, an observation that doubly applies to the bizarre sib­ling bond between identical twin gynecologists Elliott and Beverly Mantle. Beware of the chill-inducing "Instruments for Operating on Mutant Women." (1008. Warner Home Video. $19.97) "Wonder Woman: The Complete Third Season": Signaling the death knell for everything great and glmi­ous about the 'iOs, the third and final season of Wonder Woman bounds into stores just in time for summer. (197S 79, Warner Home Video, $39.98) "A Dirty Shame": The latest talc of suburban dysfunc­tion from Baltimore director John Waters pits crazed sex addict Sylvia Stickles <Tracy Ullman) and her unwhole­some brood (Selma Blair and Chris Isaak) against the prudish residents of Pinewood (the "Neuters"). A Weirdsmobile, to be sure. (2005, New Line Home Entertainment. $27 95. Available June 14) ",Jaws:3oth Anniwrsary Edition".Ju t when you thought it was safe to pkk up "Jaws: Th(' Collector's Edition," along comes its new 2- disc ":nh Anniversary Edition." This edi tion features a new lYl'S soundtrack and a two-hour produc­tion documentary, expanded by one hour from its previous DVD release. (1975. Universal Home Video, $22.96, Available June 14) "The Joan Crawford Collection": The TCM documen­tary "Joan (,'rav.ford: The Ultimate Movie Star," is includ· ed with this collection. For those unfamihar with the actress outside of her character-assassinating "Mommie Dearest" persona, Warner Home Video's new fivc-dlSC set offers a terrific Introduction to Cray.ford's body of work: "Mildred Pierw" (1945): "Humoresque" (1946); ''The Women" (1939); "Possessed" (l!J.17) and "The Damned Don't Cry" (1950). ($49.9'.l, Available June 14) "The Bette Davis Collection": Although it includes three previously released titles, Bette Davis fans will be pleased to Sl.'C pristine new transfers of several not.1ble films: landmark weepers "Dark Victory" (19.'39), "Now, Voyager" (1942) and "Mr. Skeffmgton," noir classic "The Letter" (1940) and camp melodrama "The Star" (1952). (Warner Home Video, $49.9'.l, Available June 14) "Bewitched: The Complete First Season": Arriving in stores the same week Nicole Kidman's remake is released in theaters (a coincidence?), Season One of the long-run­ning sitcom starring Eli1.abeth Montgomel"); Dick York, Agnes Moorehead and Marion Lorne may be purchased in either black-and-white or colorized versions. (1964 6S. Columbia Tlistar Home Video, $39.95. Available June 21) ''The Macy Tyler Moore Show Season Tuo"': f'inally, "Love is All Around ..• " Again! lncXPlicably delayed for more than two years, the kind fairy godmothers at Fox Home Video have grant1.od M'l'M fans a generous wish: the complete second season Co-starring Ed Asner, ValeriE' Harper, Cloris Leachman and Ted KnighL (1971 72, Fbx Home Vidro, $29.96, Available July 26) JEWEL IN MONTROSE: The newly opened Aladdin I Mediterranean Cuisine is a jewel in Montrose. Page 14 ALL THAT JAZl.: The weekend is packed with events including Jazz and a birthday party for Kofi. Page 15 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com Onginal movies, series Whenever you want JUNE 10 2005 13 heretv.com 14 JUNE 10. 2005 wwwhoustonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE J.A. CHAPMAN Wafer-thin baked pita, intoxicating baba ganouj and hummos that passes the litmus test, make the new Aladdin Mediterranean Cuisine a jewel in Montrose. A Mediterranean Jewel ALADDIN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE is a jewel in the heart of Montrose. The folks who nm Fadi's have recently opened Aladdin on the corner of :\tontrose and Westheimer. It offers many of the same Items as the original Fadi's, in a casual cafeteria-style setting. Aladdin has an opulent feel, but the price. are reasonable Arched doorways, tile floors, hand painted murals and bead­ed chandeliers all contribute to the exotic ambience. An alcove-sized room in the back v.ith two tables and a fireplace offers privacy for small groups. All the dishes are on display in the serv· 1ng line. It's worth perusing the offerings before ordering, as the variety is stagger· ing and many of the items are unusual. The set up is simple. The menu is hanging above the trays at the start of the line. Choose a combination plate, a sand w1ch, or just order a la carte. Grab your silverware, fill a basket with some deli­cious wafer-thin baked pita bread to snack on, and tell the server behind the counter your menu choice. They'll walk you through the rest of the line. The Aladdin's platter combo plate ($8.99) is a good place to start. It comes with a meat entree and two veggie orders (three veggies for $9.99). The braised lamb shank is one of the house specialties and definitely worth a try if you're a lamb fan. It's cooked slowly so the meat just falls off the bone. One lamb shank is a huge por· tion, as are most servings at Aladdin. The falafel dish ($7.99) is another good option. Three falafel balls are served with tahini and accompanied by a dip and salad of your choice. The falafel is made fresh when you order it, so you'll have to wait a few minutes for it to arrive. But it's crispy and warm and worth the wait. Hummos is the litmus test for a Mediterranean restaurant, and Aladdin delivers in spades. The dips are the first items m the serving line, and await your selection on large, tantalizing platters. The hummos is a bit thin, but boasts a bold lemony flavor and is a zesty accom· paniment to any meal. The server will top it with paprika and olive oil, if you like. THE HIDfMOS JS EXCELLENT, Btrr MY personal favorite ts the baba ganoUJ, a garlicky eggplant dip. Aladdin's version possesses a deep, dark smokiness that conjures up visions of cooking over an open flame. When accompanied by some of the thick, hot pita bread, fresh from the brick oven, it's intoxicating. Don't miss the eggplant stuffed with a spinach and feta cheese sauce. A few pinenuts add texture for a rich, exotic treat. Standards such as tabouli and a chopped cucumbC'r salad are expertly executed, with fresh ingredients and bright, bold flavors. Not everything is top notch. The ulti· mate shawarma sandwich (SS.49) - a mix· lure of beef and chicken proved disap pointing as the beef was unfortunately tough, The chicken was tender and tasty though, and the tangy yogurt sauce and pickles added flavor: It came wrapped in tin foil, perfect for lunch on the go. The chicken kabob which, like the falafel, is prepared when you order it, so expect to wait was tender and spicy and worth the extra time. But the spinach I selected as a side dish was limp and unimpressive. Go with the tender fried cauliflower or the tangy eggplant instead. A meat and two veggies plus a soft drink were offered as a lunch special ($8.49) an exceptionally good value. Don't forget to save room for dessert. Aladdin has a wide variety of baklava ($1.59), including both walnut and pista· chio versions without the sticky honey, and a cream baklava ($1.99) that melts in your mouth. They're the perfect end to your Mediterranean meal. The service is prompt and friendly, and Aladdin is open until 3 a.m. on weekends. With an outdoor patio overlooking all the Montrose action, Aladdin is the perfect spot for a late-night nosh. "'CJ Aladdin ~ Mediterranean Cuisine 912 Westheimer 713-942·2321 Food ... ••• Service ,. ,. 191 lei Value:•••• Scene: !elfellel l/2 "=St ay home and eat cereal • 191 = Well, if you really must 191 191 191 = Fine for all but the finicky ••••=Worth more than a 20-mmute drive ••••:.=As good as you'll find in this city HOUSTON VOICE www.houstoovoice.com A birthday for Miss Kofi, Bombay Jazz, 'Purple Reign' at DiverseWorl<s, all about Eve at Sippora and a Pride edition of 'Featured at the Center' Happy Birthday l<ofi HEY KIDS, WHAT TIME IS IT? IT'S Ho Vo on the Go-Go time! This week we take a look at a tribute to Prince, a rib­bon cutting at Metro, a bit of Jazz and a birthday party for our own Kofi! TffiS IS A BUSY FRIDAY, SO GET ready. "Purple Reign" will be a part of the Diverse Works "12 Minutes MAX!" series. You have to love DiverseWorks, always on the cutting edge bringing amazing talents together in Houston. For this show, six local artists and musicians will each share their interpretations of the Purple Rain soundtrack in pieces that last no longer than 12 minutes. THE SHOW HAS A LINEUP THAT IS TO die "4," but HotGG is most excited about two performers. One is fave local DJ Sun spinning a Prince-themed set and the other is queer video artist (and FOJC: friend of Jonathan Caouette) Atton Paul, unspooling a psychedelic, pixilated video work using Prince images. Friday at 8 p.m., $10. 1117 East Freeway. For tickets and information, call 713-223-8346 or visit www.diverseworks.org. IF PRINCE IS NOT YOUR TmNG, THE Houston GLBT Community Center is hosting a special Pride month edition of its performance night, "Featured at the Center." Beginning at 7 p.m., gay men, lesbians and transgendered individuals present music, dance, poetry and other spoken-word performance, stand-up com· edy, film or display works of art. "FEATURED AT THE CENTER" TAKES place on the second Friday of every month at the GLBT Community Center, home base for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people and their allies in the metropolitan area and Southeast Texas. There is no admission charge, but dona· !ions are welcomed. Coffee and wine are served. Performers and artists interested in participating in any program should contact Aaron Coleman in advance at 713-522-0712 or aaronssongsra yahoo.com. You can also contact the Center. The Houston GLBT Community Center is located at 3400Montrose Blvd., Suite 207. The Center phone number is 713-524- 3818 or via the web at www.houstonglbt· communitycenter.org. NOW FOR THE LADIES AND THOSE who love them, Sippora Gallery unveils "EVE The Identity of Woman!" Twelve women artists have captured their unique vision and experiences in art. Whether done collectively or alone, HOVI on the go go long ago or right now in our own age, they have translated their religious, social, spiritual, and political selves into outward expression and beautiful form. Friday from 6 until 9 p.m. Sippora is located at 234 West Gray. Call 713-520- 1085 or visit www.sippora.com SATURDAY CHECK OUT "BOMBAY Jazz: An East-West Fusion" at the Wortham. Jazz greats Larry Coryell and George Brooks join forces with Indian music maestros Ronu Majumdar and Vljay Ghate to explore the melodic rich­ness of raga and dynamic rhythms of Indian classical music, while pioneering a new musical form. Part of the concert proceeds will benefit AIDS Foundation Houston These performers have worked with everyone from George Harrison to Etta James to Jimi Hendrix, so expect a fabulous evening. Tickets range from $20 to $.50 and can be had by calling Aids Foundation Houston at 713-623-6796 ext. 249 or online at www.iaahouston.com. WITH IT BEING SO HOT, WHY NOT take a day to pamper yourself or your sweetie at METRO-His Spa. Owner and local Houstonian Raul Guzman invites you to a reception and ribbon cutting at the spa on Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m. in the evening. A special IO-percent savings (in addition to any other current promotion) will be offered for all gift certificates pur­chac; ed exclusively at this reception! A Father's Day gift certificate is the perfect idea for the special men in your life, and they are available simply by phoning METRO· His Spa at 713-52-METRO (52.&- 3876) or visit them at www.metrospa4men.com. 2606 Grant Street across from the new Baba Yega Cafe. FINALLY, GET OVER TO JR'S AND wish Miss Kofi a Happy Birthday. I'll let you ask her which one honey! Wednesday at 11 p.m. Ill II JUNE 10. 2005 15 SPRING CLEANING II II Ill s49· GETS YOUR MEMBERSHIP STARTED Felling good about yourself and how you look 1s the key We can help you get there with a program iust for you. Call today! 1501 Durham Street 713-880-9191 www.houstonom.com Ill Ill BE A PART OF THE houstonVOICE elll PACIE! THE HOUSTONVOI IS OFFERING SPECIAL DISCOUNTS FOR MEMBERS OF THE CHAM­BER, AND EXHIBITORS AT EMPOWER! FOR AS UTILE AS $75 YOU CAN HAVE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT PLACED ON THE SPECIAL EM Owr'.RPACE! THIS SPECIAL SECTION IN THE JUNE 17TH EDITION OF THE HOUSTON VOICE WILL BE THE PERFECT PLACE TO SPREAD YOUR MES­SAGE AND DRIVE VISITORS TO YOUR BOOTH! FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT PLAC­ING YOUR ADVERTISEMENT PLEASE CON­TACT JASON WILSON AT 71~529-8490 II lifdlt:4tdd voice II II II II II 200I Ill Ill 16 JUNE 10. 2005 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE .. . alm Springs Sty HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com There's a Fine Line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash Forever blue no more Erasure gets its due, actors describe gay kisses and 'L Word' hires directors You couldn't break the chains of love for ERASURE Tuesda); June 7, during the band's sold out show at O.C.'s 9:30 club. The capacity cro\\d (filled with equal parts women and gay men) was definitely feeling the music and even Capital Pride organiz· ers showed their gratitude by giving the> gay-straight electronic duo its first ever Lifetime Achievement Award in the Arts. "Erasure has been around for man}; many years. A lot of us came out to Erasure," said Ro!K'rt York, director of Pride. who presented the award onstage before the band startc>d its encore. "They're one of those groups that crosses boundaries and edur.ates people." The band received the Gay Pride honor e\ en though only singer ANDY BF.LL is gay. "What straight man could you get to wear gold lame'?" York joked about straight musician VINCE CLARK, the other half of the group, who was wear­ing a tuxedo made out of the flamboyant fabric. "How secure can you really be?" Bell graciously accepted the award and said, ''Thank you," along with some· thing else that was drowned out by the screaming crowd. Then he launched into a song no one knew. (Must have been from the new album.) During the performance. the duo played all their big hits and Bell, who dis closed his HIV·positive status in December, looked and sounded as good as ever, dancing about the stage in a num­ber of glittering outfits (including just a pair of diamond-studded briefs). The real highlight of the evening came from a pair of covers, a slowed· down version of BLONDIE's "Rapture," with Clark doing the rap, and Bell's solo, an a cappella version of "Ave Maria." Kiss and tell Two young actors, both with careers on the rise, have two different reactions to their same·sex kisses onscreen. JESSE BRADFORD, the wholesome· looking stud from "Swimfan" and "Bring It On," says he turned down a chance to play a gay character in the film "Rules of Attraction" and always wondered if hP turn!'d down the 1iart because the character was ga): Jesse Bradford Well, he felt bet· ter about himself after accPpting a gay role in the u1>eom tng movie "I !eights." until it came time Gay·straight duo Ardj Bell (left) and Vince CM better known as Erasure. received a Lifetime Achievement Award m the Arts as part of this year's Capital Pride Director's Awards at D.C.'s 9:30 club this week. for his big same-sex kiss. "There are certain risks involved," he told the New York Daily News gossip columnist Lloyd Grove. "But it was one of the most heterosexual reaffirming moments of my life. Like, 'Oh, that's why I don't like this. That's why I always fig ured I wouldn't like this.' Now I know. Now I know for sure.'' Good for you, .!\fr. Bradford. Meanwhile, BRI'ITANY MUR· PHY tells the British edition of men's magazine Maxim that her Brittany Murphy favorite cinematic smooches were with women. "I will admit that my most memorable onscreen kiss was with REESE WITH· ERSPOON in 'Freeway,' just because we were laughing so much," she says about her role in the 1996 independent movie. ·~nd my longest was with Joanne Vannicola for this (2000 television] movie called 'Common Ground.'" Casting couch Showtime's lesbian drama "THE L WORD," has sign<>d up a number of prominent directors to film episodes for its impending, but still unscheduled, third season. Those behind the camera in the third season will include: lesbian director Angela Robinson of "D.KB.S." and ~oon· to-be-released "Herbie: Fully Loaded" fame, "The Laramir Project" creator Moises Kaufman. Hose Troche of "Go Fish" fame, and "Roys Don't Cry" dircc tor Kimbo:>rly Pio:>rce I 'm Send comments. suggestions to \Yo! Dish@houstonvoice.com 1220 Taft Street Houston Texas 77019 713-529-6255 info@MyCateringCompany.com JUNE 10. 2005 17 Full Service Catering Corporate Events Carry Outs & Delivery From Breakfast to Late Dinners 'R~55~V~R \llfT5 WWW.CROSSOVERGIFTS.COM • 713.523 5201 CROSSOVER GIFTS • 415 WESTHEIMER RD • HOUSTON Your agent. Your advocate. Rob Schmerler Insurance Agency 6575 West loop South, Suite 185 Bellaire, Texas 77401 713.661.7700 www schmerlerogency com 18 JUNE 10. 2005 Free Giveaways Cocktails Door Prizes Sports & Outdoors Entertainment Great Food Shopping and morel lW&raB Continental. 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Up to 25 words only $12.50 per week. 50¢ each additional word. Fax toll-free 1.888.409.6768, or call toll-free 1.877.863.1885 Deadline for online ads: 8am Wednesday. For other submissions: 5:30pm Tuesday. REAL ESTATE SERVICES STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD Is your home special' T eH our readeis abollt 1t G . r.mtee they.' 11 >ee 1t w th our new features. Bold < box ye r od for added anractoo. Contact our customer sel\'lce reps for more det.!ils. (877) 863 1885 SALE I HOUSTON THE TIME IS RIGHT ... ADVERTISE NOW!! Adwlt1se with the HOUSTON VOICE a.ASSIAEDSI C..11 to place your Mil 1 (In) 163-1US. RENT I HOUSTON 3 MONTROSE APTS For Rent! IJle your ptckll I t BR/t BA or 2 BR/t BA. Both Jll quiet neighborhood. Hwd floor~ appliances, WiD 28Ri2BA near the dubs with fabulous Gourmet Kitchen I I New carpet, (/AH, W/D Call Jason: (832)54t 9801 CHARMING AND GREAT locatool 5 ffiJll to downtown. 2- t w d connectron. 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DEADLINES: Barn Wednesday for online submissions only. 5:30pm Tuesday for all other submissions. I ADULTClASSIFIEDS'oos WEBSITES --1-888-7-BOYSGO Gl:Glldm~=ll!lXl!lilr>liiED- . . ....... 776-•746 .........._ .... ESCORTS BODYWORK BE ALL YOU CAN BE! Beauty from within. Daddy Blad< J: ,J .; Maver rd www OaddySlade corn (713) 864-2233 ADULTS ONLY WWW.SPANKTHIS.COM BAD BOYS being spanked. !!!al d&!pl.nt for yoong p-.;: ;.s. "lew Mmie eac'i mor.m nstant access or purchase WWW.HOTSTUDS.COM New !lot 011gl!la BareBad vid· eos Hot Studs. Sexy Twrnks & la~i ~ doing 11 a raw View onlrne or purcha;e drsaeetly TME TIME IS RIGHT •• ADVERTISE NOW!! bu i ldyourbusiness CONTACT OUR SALES TEAM 713529 8490 21 22 JUNE 10. 2005 buildyourbusiness CONTACT OUR SALES TEAM 713 5298490 litd lt1M1i VOICe EXO.USIVE Prints Posten Portraits 1tevenunderhiU,com www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I bitch session If you are young, good-looking and can get any man you want, then why are you still single? I'M TIRED OF PEOPLE WHO HAVE A list of requirements for dating but don't fall into any of their own categories. Why don't you look in the mirror and start with yourself? If you wouldn't date you, what makes you think I would! I CANNOT STAND MY PARTNER RIGHT now He is always asking why I spend so much time with my family. It drives me freakin' crazy Why can't he just be like any other boyfriend and like my family? WITH SUPPOSEDLY SO MANY QUEERS in suburbia, why do all the social clubs and events still revolve around the city? It's hard enough commuting to and from work without having to rush downtown for fun. WHY CAN'T A STRAIGHT GIRL WEAR a rainbow and not be considered gay any­more? From a Str8-up Beeyotch PLEASE. LIITLE TWINK. REALITY check: Gyms are for exercising not fash· ion analysis, or at least they were before cute fluffy, perfumed. perfectly styled lit· tie gym bunnies invaded the place. DEAR STRAIGHT GIRL: You arc not cute. WHY IS IT THAT EVERY LESBIAN I meet is in recovery for some kind of addiction. or is plain ole crazy? FACE IT GUYS. EVEN ~1EN WHO SAY they don't belong in any category have their own category I GO TO THE GYM TO WORK OUT. IT'S the only time in the day when I'm able to do something just for myself. If you want to talk to someone, go talk to the women. They seem to be there mainly for social reasons. IF YOU FEEL THE GAY WORLD IS shallov.; well welcome to the gay world. If you don't like it, go back to the real world. TO THE GUY WHO BITCHED ABOUT those who wear "mindless fag uniforms": It's so hypocritical to assume those who wear certain brands and styles of cloth· ing are "buying attitude." TO THE CUSTOMER WHO STOLE MY briefs when I took them off to dance at the club the other night, I hope you had a good time that night sniffing them. Oh, by the way, I have crabs and a staph infec· lion. Enjoy! ALL OF MY BITCHING HASN'T changed a damn thing! YOU SAY YOU WANT TO BE SEEN FOR the real you. and not just as a beautiful body, yet you keep playing on your looks. and the only people you make even the slightest effort to befriend are other beau· tiful people. IT DOESN'T BOTHER ME THAT you're in your 50s. It bothers me a lot that you chose to lie about it. In doing so. you sold both yourself and me short. I'M TIRED OF YOU FOLLOWING ME into the locker room every time you see me at the gym. We broke up years ago, we're not getting back together. and I'm not stripping in front of you. Go stalk somebody else. TO THE PERSON QUESTIONING THE phrase "men of color": It's an historical phenomenon created by the racism that undergirds American society Funny enough, that same racism is as prevalent in the gay community As a man of color. I've experienced it firsthand! WHY ARE GAY BARS HIRING straights anyway? Our bars should be the one public place that should be declared straight·free. TO ALL THE CUTE GUYS WITH attitude: I have one thing to say. Beauty is temporary, but dumb is forever. IT'S REALLY FUNNY TO SEE GAY MEN trying to define what constitutes a real man. OH, PLEASE' JUST BECAUSE I PREFER smooth to hairy does not mean subcon· sciously I am a pedophile. I'm just a man with taste who knows what he likes. There are thousands of hairy men who are very attractive. I just happen to prefer smooth or shaved. so deal with it. A.\1 I THE ONLY GAY GUY WHO IS NOT either a wannabe thug or a junkie? Is there anything as a normal gay male any· more'! Someone who works, does not sleep with everyone in sight, does not shoot themselves up with dope, or try to hid1 beneath a blanket of self.hate ma~querad· ing as masculinity! Elitm' rote These are real bitches. sent in by real~ about gay fife's little amoyaoces. arxJ the big ooes. too. Got a bitch? caU 1-800-858-8088 or e-m;ul bitd@expressgay HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com Gay Mens horus ot Houston James Knapp rti tk Dirtttor ·www.gmch.org Saturday, June 18- 8:00 PM Sunday, June 19 - 3:00 P~1 Wortham Center - CuUen Theatre Rodgers & Hammerstein with a GMCH twist. S?ulh P~u-ific, The Sound of Mu.sic, Cinderella, The Kmg and I, Oklahoma and more like you've never heard them before. JUNE 10, 2005 23 Seuon Sporuo" Continental ~J Airlines d JHANEBARNES ....._. ~~•n•ur a..H.&.a.•.•..•.•.•.• ·.• . )l- ;j1/ - ' ~ N lit THE WORTHAM illfl FOUNDATION -r.r-.JUT"""sr-1;=J~r-1 U.tJDEI~GIU. D wHh DJ .t~fuU 5~Y~li ptvvjillJ1g Wl e!pJo-.jjy~ UW! LI~ ~1lf J-fop llr.Lcl .UJ~ Hm.m~ cl.di~ ilP"'I"·: :WwJcl up . .Dt~.J:) w~ :J!:.rll"fly ~lfur.ne.irl. Aclullir.iw11 iw! ~!.W.i~~
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