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Montrose Voice, No. 141, July 8, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 141, July 8, 1983 - File 001. 1983-07-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/275/show/250.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-07-08). Montrose Voice, No. 141, July 8, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/275/show/250

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 141, July 8, 1983 - File 001, 1983-07-08, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/275/show/250.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 141, July 8, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date July 8, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Houston, L.A., Kansas City win top spots in Lone Star Classic It was Dirty Sally's (shown here) first, Greg's Blue Dot of L.A. second, the Galleon third and Kansas City Cabaret fourth See sports, inside The Newspaper of Montrose July 8. 1983 Issue .. 141 Publisned Ev~ ry Friday GPC Seeks to Overcome Summit Event Losses By Hollio Hood Plans to raise some $19,000 to offset a deficit incurred from the Gay Political Caucus' Gay Pride Week rally in the Sum­mit June 26 were brought to the member­ship in the organization's meeting at the Holiday [nn on Main St. Wednesday night, July 6. Alsodiscussedattheregular meeting were pla ns for candidate screen· ing for the November elections. According to Larry Bagneris, president, the Summit event cost approximately $.56,000 to produce and ticket sales offset that cost only $37,000. The caucus was able to pay the vendors and part of the advance loans, but still has two near $10,000 debts outstanding. However, Bag· neris assured mt'mbers that a $6,000 pledge has been received making the deficit a livable $13,000. With this figure in mind, Terry Harris, coordinator of the Summit event that starred singing artists Tina Turner and Pamela Stanley, said that the production coHt no more than the previous rally in Spotts Park. "Doing the rally cost us $14,000," he said, "so the negative is about what it would have cost us to do the rally as free to the public." Tickets to the Summit sold for $9.65. The board voted to return to the Summit for a similar event next year, and Harris noted that several things had been accomplished by being there this year. "It helped give GPC and gay Houstoni­ans a greater sense of credibility in Hous­ton. We were dealt with on a professional level and the Summit people saw that we prod~ced a high class event," he said. "It's the first time 4000 gayo gathered to cele­brate . .. there was no violence .. . no vande­lism ." Violence and vandelism were reasons dted for moving the event from Spotts Park to the Summit. Bagneris reminded the membership of the growing sense of political power that gays are gaining in Houston. "The recent event reminds people of the political clout of gays and that we can deliver a powerful bloc vote." Politicia ns who were presented on stage at the Summit event included Houston Mayor Kathy Whitmire, councilpersons George Greanias, Anthony Hall a nd Elea­nor Tinsley, state representative from the Montrose area Debra Danburg, statR Senator John Whitmire, plus video recorded messages from Ann Richards, state treasurer and Gary Mauro, state land rommissioner. Kathy Webb, national secretary of the National Organization of Women, was present and addressed the Summit audience. Performers for the Summit included. Pamala Stanley singing "This ls Hot" and "I Don't Want to Talk About It;" legendary mistress of rock and soul Tina Turner and her review, local entertainer Donna Day and group who lip synced "United We Stand" and John Day and Company who gave the title theme of Gay Pride Week 1983, Unity Through Diver­sity Bagneris said that a recent meeting with Police Chief Lee Brown was gratify­ing a nd that Brown has placed a person sensitive to the gay community in charge of internal affairs, the division that inves· tigates citizen complaints against offic­ers. "I sat outside Mary's the night of the a nniversary raid to see if there would be any problem with the police," said Bagne­ris. "At least 20 police cars went by . .• and the next morning I received at least eight phone calls" about harraSBment and cars being towed. "I knew the week wouldn't last without trouble" so Brown was summoned from an out-of-town trip to handle the conduct of the "homophobic officers." Citing several instances lately in which officers have been penalized for inapprop­riate treatment of gays, Bagneris said that the tide is turning in police administrative attitudes. The Politica l Action Committee reported that the screening questionaire for November elections is needed and that it will include questions from the floor. It was voted that the questionaire committee be made up of 10 caucus members elected from the floor and that individual input be encouraged in formulating the questio­naire. Bagneris announced. that the Walt Whitman Republican Club has been formed and any interested Republicans may contact that organization. Some 518 persons were registered by caucus members to vote during the Sum­mit and Gay Pride Parade festivities, a committee spokesman said. Ray Hill, verbally active proponent of free speech, told the membership that something needed to done regarding the "serious charges" made by member Gregg Russell in the May 18 GPC meeting. The interchange referred to as reported in the May 20 issue of the MONTROSE VOICE read " In a final, emotional interchange prior to adjournment, member Gregg Rus· sell attempted to accuse president Larry Bagneris of not honoring the intent of GPC'1 commitment to the recent AIDS Candlelight Vigil at City Hall. Before spe­cific facts were given, Rusaell was ruled out order and Bagneris ordered those remark.a 'be stricken from the minutes' of the meeting. Board member Ray Hill said continued page 3 Listen to the Sounds of Montrose Recording Studios in Our Neighborhood, inside ~l We're Having a 'Montrose Cookout' Save your appetite, story inside The Local AIDS Support Group Where They Meet, Who They Are, inside The SOB Hearings News, page 5 2 MONTROSE VOICE/ JULY 8, 1983 402 LOVETI-HOUSTON JULY 8, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 GPC Studies Ways to Retire Summit Debt Montrose Mouth Whew! A Normal Weekend continued from page I that such serious accusations would have to be made in writing and submitted to the board for study." The incident referred to the rumor that Bagneris had called persons and encour­aged them to stay away f'Tom the vigil because such events were being discour­aged by the national gay lobbyists. Hill said that a committee should he formed to investigate the matter and either censure Bagneris if it discovered a violation or censur Russell for the accuse· tions. "I would hate that the incident would ~ass, '' said Hill . Acommitteeoffive was formed and given 30 days to investi­gate. "Do you have proof," asked Hill of Ruti· sell, who replied "It is an ongoing investi· gation." "I was not consulted about this, I didn't know this was going to happen so I am not prepared. The questions that l raised were nothing that several people, and some of them are here, had not had doubts about. At least I had the guts to confront Bagne­ris instead of going behind his back. The problem is the people who don't have enough guts to stand behind the rumors they spread," said Russell. The room at that point became both quite, amazed and accented with cough­ing and "ahems." One person who identified himself as a new member said that the incident that just occurred reflected that the "leader­ship is afraid of criticism from the citi· zens. '' Bagneris said he was not afraid of criticism, and Hill said that the integrity of the organization must be maintained at all costs. "This appears to be a loose witch hunt," one member said. After the formation of an investigative committee was approved by a 27 to 17 hand count vote, Bagneris said they nN'ded to procE'ed with the meet­ing because they hud "real stuff to deal with." In other business, it was announced that there will be a fundraiser and mem­bership drive directed toward women on July 23 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Swim Club. It will he a cooperative effort between many women's groups. A formal banquet is being planned, pos· sibly at the Meridian Hotel for September, and the Montrose Jam, celebrating GPC's anniversary in September, will be Sept. 18 f'Tom 1 :00 p.m. until dark. Sue Lovell noted that a case had been decided in Judge Henricks court that day for a DWI offender who is gay allowed for a plea bargain and sentenced the defend· ant to do public service. "This is the first time a judge has allowed public service to go to a gay organization ," she said fol ­lowed by applause. Rob Wharton announced that the Hous· ton Tenant's Organization has been formed and is seeking funding and volun· teers to inform and enforce renter' landlord rights. Following a brief announcement about the MONTROSE VOICE Gourmet Coo­koff on July 17 at the Officer's Club in which Dale Beverly was volunteered to cook, the meeting adjourned. United Church of Christ Debates Gay Issue Some 705 delegates to the United Church of Christ's 14th General Synod in Pitts­burgh recently used a show of hands to approve a document stating that a per· son's sexual orientation is not a moral issue, but that sexual behavior does have moral signficance. As reported by AP, the policy makers of the 1.75 million U.S. members issued a statement that applies to homosexual men and women in the church saying that sex· ual perference should not by itself be grounds for denying ordination. The report also applies to discrimination in hiring for church staff and volunteer posi· tions. "It is far more than a homosexual issue," said Everette. Parker, church spo· kesman. ''It is a statement on the morality of sexual behavior." New York Bishop Denounces Prejudices Rt. Rev. Paul Moore Jr., bishop of the Epis­copal Diocese of New York, has denounced discrimination against homosexuals and Haitians, two oftheprimaryt.argetgroups of AIDS. The New York Times News Service reports Moore said that underlying the panic of AIDS is "unresolved anger and fear and a looking down upon the gay com-munity and indeed the Haitian commun­ity. I do not know of any two communities in our New York area and in the nation who are in worse shape in terms of general discrimination." Chief of infectious disease service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering, Dr. Donald Armstrong, said he considered AIDS "one of the least contagious diseases I have seen." Just Out and Already the Force is Loose Some lucky folks aren't standing in line to see the latest Star Wars saga this summer. They're sitting at home, watching Return of the Jedi on a private videocassette, reports Variety. The word in Hollywood is that, despite stringent security measures, the latest George Lucas epic has already been pirated, with bootleg copies selling for up to $200 each. Lucasfilm officials say they aren't too worried. Security chief Alan Trosklair claims the technical quality of the pirate tapes is so bad, "You could go blind." Last weekend was the Lone Star Classic end the two before that were Gay Pride Week weekends. Finally, we're going to have a normal Montrose weekend A "normal" Montrose weekend? Of course. We"ll have our normal happy hours. after hours and beer busts Our normal hookers and hustlers on the street. Our normal Houston cops-most friendly, but many not-all over the place. Our normal masses of gays. straights and others. Our Guardian Angels and gospel singing evangelists on the corner. And our nor­mal parade of surburban1tes here gawk­ing at everything Yes, back to a normal Montrose weekend. -o- Local Houstonian Oouglas Holt. recently featured in Out in Texas magazine in a article about his collection of Marilyn Monroe memorabilia. will be the guest on "Wake Up Houston." on Channel 2. August 5. He will be discussing the topic, "Was Marilyn Monroe Murdered" and will be promoting his book For Marilyn. Douglas' collection will be featured in the August issue of '"Houston City Magazine." -o- The Health Department will be conduct­ing free VD screening at the following locations this week: M1dtowne Spa, 3100 Fannin, 9pm-1am Friday; Wild Bill's Cor­ral, 2212 Converse. 6pm-10pm Monday. and et the Club Baths. 2205 Fannin. next Saturday. the 16th. 9pm-1am. o- Array of Solar a Solar Energy I nforma­tion Fair. will be presented at the Fire­house, 1413 Westheimer, Monday through Friday, 9am to 4pm and on Sun­days, July 17 and 24, 1-5pm. It is spon­sored by the Citizen·s Environmental Coalition Educational Fund and will fea­ture a slide show on July 24 about insula­tion. sunscreens and window coverings plus brochures and displays illustrating solar energy's technology and use in the Houston area. -o- The Neighborhood Revitalization Div­ision of the Houston City Planning Department has several publications that may be of interest to property owners in Montrose. Single copies of ""How to Run an Effec­tive Neighborhood-based Organization" and "20 Questions and Answers About Deed Restrictions" are available on request. Also there are summaries of five NAO workshops •·Problem-Solving for Neighborhood-Based Organizations,' ""Renewing Deed Restrictions.· ''Effective Meet1ngs1Comm1ttee Structure." .. lead­ership Styles Motivating Members'' and ''Resolving Group Conflict." For your copy call 222-4851 . or go by City Planning at 900 Baqby. fourth floor -o- The Rice Gay/Lesbian Support Group is having a ice skating party this Monday For info. call David ,a,t_ 5 24-0724 The Roman Haircutting Salon raised $405 for the KS/ AIDS Committee recently with its "Haircut for AIDS" prpo- ' motion. Frank. the owner, says thanks to • all who helped -o- Two gay business owners have gone "straight' for each other Rita of Special Touches and Bill of Wild B111"s Corral were reportedly to be married last weekend 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8 , 1983 CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR WINNERS H 0 U S T 0 N T E X A S First Place Second Place DIRTY SALL Y'S (Houston) GREG'S BLUE DOT (Los Angeles) Third Place THE GALLEON (Houston) Spirit Stick Sportsmanship Award Cafe Sn. Marcus (San Francisco) Fourth Place THE CABARET (Kansas City) Plus a special thanks to those below and all others who helped in some way to make the 1983 Lone Star Classic the success it has come to be! •A-Cut-Above Engravers • Avante Garb T-Shirts • Baja's •The Barn • Brazos River Bottom •Briar Patch •Club Houston •Charlotte's •The Copa •David Bennett Graphics • Dirty Sally's •The Galleon• Jim's Gym •Mary's Lounge• Montrose Glass & Mirror• Montrose Mining Co./J.R.'s •Montrose Voice• Numbers• Officers Club• The Drum• TLC. • TW.T. JULY 8, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 Sexually Oriented Business Ordinance Hearings Close By Hollio Hood The second series of public hearings on the proposed ordinance regulating sexually oriented businesses closed Tuesday night with the hope that the new ordinance "reflect faithfully and wisely," according to Councilman George Greanias. Counci lpersons Christin Hartung (dis· trict G), Greanias (district C) and Adam Silverman of the city legal department who sat for Dale Gorczynski (district 0), made up the committee that has been developing an ordinance to regulate sexu­ally oriented busineSBes. The process began in the fall of 1982 with a series of hearings and an ordinance draft was introduced in May 1983. The ordinance addresses itself to citizen concerns more than from the aspectofreg­ulating criminal activity, Police Chief Lee Brown told the panel at the hearing in City Council chambers. "Citizens are concerned about the exist­ance of these places in residential areas," said Brown. He said he viewed the ordi­nance as primarily administrative and that it "would not have a significant impact on police resources." He said the police department would try to address reoccuring criminal activity in SOB high concentration areas, "not encouraging harrassment." The ordinance would regulate the Joca­tion, signage, color and permitting of "adult" establishments acknowledged as bookstores, cabarets, encounter parlors, nude modeling studios and motion picture theaters. Lower Westheimer is often noted as having a proliferation of these busi­nesses, and was termed a "classic exam­ple," during the hearing. Brown said that complaints came in reg- Montrose Voice The NewspapM of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McCturg publ11hwwMor Acel Clark gr1pllia Sonny Devis KCOUtlflntil Hollis Hood m•naging«:/ltor Eddie Ch•vez spotts «Mor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee contribulmg wflrtKS Bob Jones. Mary Cadena. Julie Hollmgsworth, John Cooper. Larry Popham coritr1but1t1g prtorogr•phtKs Lyt Harns •d\-tKt,.,ngd.rector Mark Drago MJv.,,,,Jflg Jon Cheetwood c1usd1«/"'1\<.,.f•Jing Found•ttg M•'"'-' Grut91" Motilro .. Butll'IMI Guild. G•y Pf•• Auocl•l•on .N.•.w..s. S. er"'IC•• lt1Mol'n•t10NI G•y Newt A~y. P•ohc News Aull/II 811tHU C•JMI<>' N"""' Service Srt1cHC1I«/ F .. 1vr• S•'"''CN ' w,,,.,, jS.n Fr1nca1CO) Ct1ronlc1e FNtur•. Un1tl<I FNtur•Srrid1c11e. Jel11ey W•laoo Fl•ndy Allrff. Sloriewll FHturn Srnd•C•I•. Br11n McN1ugh1 J~ B•kfll" POSTMASTER 5-nd addreN correchon1 to 3317 Montroae I.JOG. Houston_ TX 77006 Sub4C1ipt1on ,.,. 111 US in , .. 19d wi,,.IOfM $•9 per yNr (52 ~HuH). $29P9r1111 month1(26111ues).or$1 25perweek(lal t~n28•1111 .. I N•t1ort•I «/119#FIS1tlfl r•prHwil•l1"'e Joe OoS.~10. Ao"'endell Me1k•tmg, &ee 61'1 A"'enue. New YOt"k 10011. f2121 2•2-6863 Ad"'-.rf•sing d9edlm• Tuudey 5 30pm. lor 1asue r9'N!Md Fn­dey 9"'9ftmg NOf•C• ro ~.,,, .. ,. Local •dv•rl•l•rtg rete lciledU .. Ft~A ,., .. el!ect•"'• Ocl 1. 19112 Locel Ml¥9'rl•l•rtg "" ICl'leclu•e S·•·A w•ll be •fleet•.,. July 1. 1983 Rnponl1l:uliry · Moflt•OM v..,- doe• not uaume res.poris•­blttty lor 1dverlis1ng cle•me RNdt1rt should 11ert Montrose Vole• to •ny decept<v• edvertllU'l>Q ularly about the area of Westheimer, as well as other locations in Houston, and stated that a cluster of the businesses "intensifies the problem. You draw people there and it constitutes a greater prob· lem." Chief Brown also said he could not fore­see any problems working with the finan­cial department which he stated was responsible for administering the ordi· nance. Dale Beverly, representing the Gay Pol­itical Caucus along with several GPC board members who attended, requested that the committee keep in mind that "the gay and lesbian community will be affected," by whatever changes the ordi­nance intitates. He did not elaborate on what kind of changes. Representing Citizens Against Sexually Oriented Business, Barbara Elenore told to the committee that the southwest Hous­ton organization believed it was unfair for an SOB to open in the shopping center adjacent to a residential subdivision. "It is an injustice when a sexually oriented business is free to open in an area where people moved never dreaming they would be exposing their families to some-­thing like that." She noted that several merchants said their family-oriented busi­ness were hurt because of the presence of an SOB near them. Ray Hill, a GPC board member, said he would like to commend the committee for its methodology and hard work, but that he would like to remind them that inclu· sion of first amendment businesses such as bookstores and movie theaters would o.nly cause problems regarding prohibi­tion of free speech. "As a frequent visitor and resident of that area," he said, "I am not impressed with the whorehouses in our neighborhood." He also said that the process for securing six convictions in such establishments almost regated any viable possibility that the ordinance would actually do anything to deter them, and asked the committee to require fewer offenses of a lesser degree offense for clos­ing of the houses. One owner of a house in the first two blocks of Westheimer said that she is stuck with her property. "I can't sell it unless I sell to someone who wiU open a modeling studio because no one else wants it. I can't rent it, and I certainly can't live in it. Men come to the door and ask me if I am a prostitute because of the location. And they are angry because the places charge too much. They ask me if I know where they can go to get it for less. It's a real sick, sick atmosphere down there." The committee voiced its support for try­ing to clear up the problem. Another draft will be out later this month. Written com­ments and questions are still being accepted, Group Wants to Organize National March on AIDS The organization Americans for Demo­cratic Action has announced that it is Thanks, But No Ted Kennedy recently got a surprise in his mail-a free membership in the Moral Majority. The New York Times reports that enclosed with the senator's memnbership card was a letter from Rev. Jerry Falwell talking about the "suffering, anguish and physical abuse inflicted on me by liber­a ls." After reading the letter, the liberal Kennedy rema rked, "] knew they were get­ting unhappy with Ronald Reagan, but this is ridic ulous." A Moral Majority spokesman says it was all a mistake, but Kennedy's member­ship will not be revoked. "No man is beyond redemption," says the spokesman working on a national candlelight vigil on AIDS for this October in Washington. A press release from the group said that this vigil, "sponsored by a bipartisan and broad·based coalition of Congressional leaders, consumer organizations and health professional associations, initiates an intensified national public awareness campaign" on the syndrome that already has claimed 1500 victims. They said cur· rent members of the coalition include Rep. Ted Weiss, (D-N.Y.), Barbara Boxer (D­Calif.) and Bill Green (R-N.Y.), as well as the National Gay Task Force and the Gay Rights National Lobby. "The vigil will draw attention to the fact that our country is facing an imminent health crisis for which the Admjnistration is totally unprepared," said ADA Execu· tive Director Leon Shull. Referring to Assistant Secretary for Health Edward Brandt Jr.'s assessment of AIDS as the number one health emergency in the nation, Shull said, "It's like giving the patient first-aid when he should already be on the operating table. Because of the Reagan Administration's resistance to increased research funding for AIDS, our nation is facing a health crisis of unimagi­nable magnitude." Since December 1979, nearly 1500 cases of AIDS have been reported, and 600 mean, women and children in the United Stat.es have died from the syndrome. By 1985 an estimated 20,000 AIDS cases will have been diagnosed in the United States. Eighty four percent of all AIDS patients die within three years after diagnosis, and a number of those who survive beyond three years suffer irreparable loss of sight. Local candlelight marches have already occurred in New York. Houston, San Fran­cisco and Washington, D.C. "Not only are we just beginning to see the tip of the iceberg of this awesome epi­demic," said Shull, "we are just beginning to see the genesis of something as terrible as the syndrome itaelf: fear, hate, bigotry. Discrimination against AIDS patients and suspect groups is unconscionable." 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 DO YOUR FRIEND, AND YOURSELF, A FAVOR. INTRODUCE HIM TO C . Crabs are. not the end of the 100% effective. m removmg world, but they can certainly dear! hce and nits. So the make 1t unpktasant. RIO next time you or your lS a hqwd treatment that fr.end discover crabs, 1s ava1labte without pre- do yourselves a favor scrtptoon. Ifs safe and rt and get RID. II'•-· kills crabs m ten minutes. H: '• evallable without Each package includes a o pr .. crlptlon ot your patented fine-tooth comb th local plwmKy. And k - · Responsible, Dedicated Service to the Texas Gay Community The Montrose Voice Publishing Company DAUAS GAY NEWS The Weekly Gay Newspaper for North Texas MONTROSE VOICE The Weekly Gay Newspaper for South Texas OUT IN TEXAS The Weekly Statewide Gay Entertainment Guide 3409 Oak Lawn #109 3317 Montrose #306 Dallas, TX 75219 Houston, TX 77006 (214) 528-1838 (713) 529-8490 Bagneris on the Rally From Larry Bagneris, president, Gay Political Caucus The Gay Political Caucus would like to respond to various published remarks appearing in the gay press regarding the GPCelebration '83 held at the Summit June 26. The caucus as a body voted to hold the annual rally at the Summit for various reasons. Vandalism and harrassment oct'uring during and after the traditional Spotts Park rally were the prime concern. The caucus decided on an admission cost of $9.6.5 to cover the expenses incurred at the Summit. We also hoped to raise the monies necessary to help fund caucus activities as we come into a very difficult election season, As had been reported in the press, we made no money on the event. Although we covered all expenses for the event, we still assumed a debt stemming from loans made to help sponsor GPCele­bration '83. We feel that the decision made to hold the celebration at the Summit was a good one. We have produced a professional event that can be expanded and used in future years to bring the community closer together at the conclusion of Gay Pride Week. We are proud that the GPC has the leadership necessary to make such an event happen, and we are confident that the event will be even better and more suc­cessful next year. GPC is an a ll volunteer organization that depends solely on the generosity of the community. Unfortu nately, in acityof more than 1.5 milJion people, the commun­ity's ability to support such a large gay organization has been severaly strained. GPC members realized that only a project as la rge as the Summit could provide a Letters sound financial base and prevent the com­munity Crom being "nickel-and-dimed" any further. We would love to be able to produce a free extravaganza for the com­munity. Jn fact, the free rally at Spotts Park in 1982 cost in exce88 of $14,000. A successful Summit event next year will guarantee the Gay Political Caucus will be able to expand its activities for the benefit of the entire gay community. Switchboard Gets Computer From Board of D1rectors and Staff. Houston Gay Switchboard The Gay Switchboard of Houston is pleased to announce the acquisition of an Apple II computer. This computer will greatly enhance our ability to handle com­munity resources and information , ena­bling us to keep complete up to date listings on services and events available to the gay community. The computer was a gift from Al McClerren, owner of t h e Fitness Excha nge. Many times, behind-the-scenes generosity by gay businesses allows non­profit organizations like the Gay Switch­board to function at increased efficiency. We would like to taketh is opportunity to focus recognition on Mr. McClerren and a ll the other gay businesspeople who help us to provide our commui nity with a com­plete range of services. Let us hear from you. Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 Protect your most valuable possession For glowing skin that looks Younger & Younger A complete skin care treatment formulated for those special people who care about how they look 1. Cleansing Milk Creame-8oz.-$8.25 The cleanser can be used on the most tender skin 2. Honey & Almond Scrub-2oz.-$9.00 The treatment refreshes. unclogs pores, cleanses and brightens the texture of the Skin 3. Skin Toning Lotlon-8oz.-$8.00 This lotion improves the skin tone. closes the pores and stimulates the skin . 4. Solr De Fete Mask-2oz.-$15.00 The beautifying results of this mask are in:imedtate· ·even on the most sens1 t1ve skin It soothes as tt renews tired complexions 5. Aloe JoJoba Creme with Vitamin E- 2oz.-$10.00 _A creme that softens & helps prevent premature aging 6. Creme de Excellence-4oz.-$14.50 This special formula rs ennched with collagen. truly a creme of excellence ----------------------- Younger & Younger Please send me the Mail to Younger & Younger, PO Box following 42809 dept 352, HoLoston, TX n242 Name Address City State ITEM Z•P Sales Tu Postage & Handling Total Enclosed PRICE Include $2 00 per order for postage and handling Include 6% sales tax for Texas addresses Allow 2-3 weeks delivery Visa & MasterCard accepted 0 Check or Money Order 0 VISA exp. date 0 Mastercard e11p dat~ Credit card • JULY 8, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 ARE You PROTECTED AGAINST AIDS? Hospital costs could wipe our your life's savings! Call today for information on our new catastrophic major medical plan. Y IC TorCHO 893-1044 A complete line of personal & commercial insurance-auto (fleet or personal). liability, workers compensation, life & health 2327 Grant at Fairview- 528-8342 Open 12pm-2am Every Day KRAZEE HOUR NITELY 9-10pm 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer KRAZEE TUESDAY 9pm-2am 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer A People's Place to RockeneRoll with your bartenders: Jack, Ronnie, Andy, Morrie, Daniel Patio Bar Open Weekends 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 Feature A Family Created by Adversity: The AIDS Support Group By David Muiener There is probably not one of us in recent months who hasn't thought about AIDS. We may have joked about it, ignored it, or spent a sleepless night worrying that we had il For most of us it has loomed as a distant threat, clouding the horizon. Everyone. it seems, knows someone afflicted with it. In truth, few of ua really know anyone personalJy afflicted with it. It hasn't really touched us. Like plane crashes or tomadoe, it's something that happens somwhere else or to the other guy. We often talk of commumty, but still find it po88ible to ignore a tragedy in our midst. What happens to the AIDS victim once he has been diagnosed? How does he tell his family, friends or lover? Will he lose his job due to illness? Who will be there when he needs help? Fortunately, some segments of our com­munity have responded. In October, 1982, an AIDS support group was formed to deal with the devasting emotional side of the disease. The group's purpose is to handle the guilt, fear and anger that accompanies any disease that is often terminal. Gary Treese. MSW, a psychotherapist, and Mar­garet Weld, MSW, a medical social worker, are co-leaders of the group which meets on Monday evenings. Each brings professi­ons} 1kill, dedication. warmth and com­pauion to the group diBCussion. What would it be like for an outsider to 1it in on the discussion? The group's wil­lingness to share their experiences and reach out to the community allowed me the privilege of attending a session. Would they be uncomfortable having me there, or would I feel out of place not sharing their situation? I walked in as they were diBCussing a former member who lay in the hospital dying. I waa impressed with the calmness with which they approached the subject. As they spoke, it was evident that the members of the support group had a close­ness only shared experience can bring. They spoke with affection and concern for the man who could not be there because his condition had worsened. Each perhaps conscious that it might have been him. Don't think for a minute that this was a depressed. morbid gathering. There was laughter and joking at appropriate moments. Sometimes traces of bitterness, anger and frustration broke through to the surface. In the course of the session, a wide range of topics were covered. The practical wa1 dealt with, spanning such issues as communication skills with doctors and medical personnel so that they could understand the various treat­ments involved. The handling of wills, the name of a gay lawyer was provided who would be willing to help in the preparation of one. Wills are something all gay people should think about, especially if there are friends or a lover to whom you would like to leave aomething. How to deal with par­ent. I, particularly if they are not already aware of sexual perference. The question of sex-from the initial lack of desire upon first learrring one has AIDS, to the fear of spreading it, once the desire has returned-all must be reckoned with. Weld and Treese fielded a variety of questions. When one member wondered aloud how many in the community would have changed their lifestyles if we had advance warning about AIDS, the exam­ple of Hepatitis B was offered. Even though it was known to be transmitted sexually, it did not change things. At another point, someone complained of not being able to get all the answers he wanted. Treese pointed out, "Sometines there aren't answers, if there are, they might not be the ones you want to hear." Several things crossed my mind as I sat in silent observation. Had I expected to see people who were somehow different from me-quite obviously sick? The members of the group looked no different than anyone else. These men who lived my lifestyle and who were in my age range were sick, yet I sat there in good health. It was so unfair. Then my father's voice echoed from some­where in the back of my mind, telling me as a child, "No one ever said it would Qe fair." I was also amazed at how positive the attitude among the group members was. Could I have that much determination or courage, if I was sitting in their place? When a new man, a little shaken and confused walked in, during the middle of the discussion, the veteran group members immediately strived to put him at ease and make him comfortable. They rallied around him exchanging phone numbers so that in the difficult days ahead there would be support available to him day or night. The group is a model for the gay community in their willingness to reach out and show concern. The new man expressed what is perhaps the greatest irony of the AIDS syndrome when he said, "Theworstisnotknowing." Not knowing if you'll get better or worse. Not knowing if the limitA!d forms of treat· ment will help. Not knowing how you got it. Not knowing if you've already given it to someone else. There's a lot of not know­ing with AIDS. There is no drug of choice, it's all experi­mental. There isn't even agreement on whtat constitutes an actual AIDS case among medical authorities. The statistics we keep hearing can even be unreliable or deceiving. It is a very frustrating situa­tion . The group attendence varies from a hard core of aix to as many as twenty. At times some members are too sick to attend. Sadly, some of the original members have died On the second Monday of each month, group members are allowed. to bring someone, a friend, lover or relative. Anyone diagnosed as having AIDS can belong, but they should first contact Gary Treese at his office-522-9816. After the ae88ion, which runs about an hour and a half, there was socializing. I spent some time talking to the members. It was impossible to meet these men and not be affectA!d. That may be what is needed by all of us. If each one ofus had a close friend or lover who was sick, it would be impossi­ble for us to ignore or joke about AIDS, Hopefully it will never come to that. Per· haps by beingmademoreawareofitin our community, each one of us can in some way reach out to help. Treese stre88ed the need for volunteers in all the organiza­tions which are working on the AIDS cri­sis. The AIDS support group shows that our community will not let its people down. The group will continue to function as there is a need. Dedicated volunteers like Gary Treese and Margaret Weld will con· tinue to give of their time freely. Generous "The Bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other's life. Rarely do members of .-0ne family grow up under the same roof." -Illusions, Richard Bach "Don't be dismayed at good-byes. A farewell is neces­sary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes is cer-tain for those who are friends." ' organizations like the Montrose Counsel­ing Center will donate meeting space. We can take pride in the fact that, in Houston, we are responding to the AIDS problem. The evidence that the AIDS support group -Illusions, Richard Bach is fulfilling its purpose, was summed up by the remark made by the man who attended for the first time that evening. "I haven't laughed this much in two months," he said. Houston Natives Sta)' Cool in Air Conditioned ... OLDENGUSH FURNITURE OldEng sh F •tu * Wide Selection Urnl re * Reasonable Prices Customer Service * Major Credit Cards 1138 W. Gray, 521-9145 *Delivery Available FREE GLASS OF WATER TO FIRST 5000 CUSTOMERS July 10 SUNDAY SHOW starring Naomi Sims, Hot Chocolate, Donna Day JULY 8, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Plus "A Salute to the Southwest" starring Mr. & Miss Gay Southwest Tuesday-Talent Night All Night Long Every Wednesday 25¢ Bar Drinks, 2 for 1 Canned Beer Thursday Special- 50¢ Bar Drinks Keith Mitch el I & Miss Jerry Harper Upcoming Events July 17 Kandi Delight July 24 Lady Shawn July 31 "I Love Rock n Roll" starring the Copa's own Gary Jones 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 Commentary Behmd these u:alls is where all the excitement Ulill happen July 17, J-5pm, when the Montrose Voice presents the first Montrose Gourmet Cookout on the Officer'• Club patio. 2700 Albany Montrose Voice Cookoff Slated By Hollia Hood The first annual tastefully wondership (oopa) wonderful, Montrose Voice Gourmet Cookoff is acheduled for July 17 and is shaping up to be a one of a kind event at the Officers Club patio, 2700 Albany. Some eight teams and individuals have already signed up to cook their speciality from banana treat to cornbread and beans for all the folka that come out to get free beer and goodies for a $3.50 donation that benefits the Montroae Sports Association and the Media Fund for Human Rights of the Gay Preas Association. If you are interested in cooking something-this is how it works. You bring a dish for yourself and 200 intimate friends. (Now don't get hysterical, that's not that much when you consider its just a taste for 200 we're talking about, not a full portion. Approximately 2-4 oz. times 200js all you need.) There is no entry fee, just bring your djsh, method of warming or cooling, chair and table to serve on. You can be as fancy or plain as you choose. Decorate a booth, decorate yourself, decorate the food-or don't. In return the cooking team will receive a certificate furnished by Cut­Above- Engraving on Westheimer, and a goodie bag stocked with an assortment of treasures and junk stuff for possible enjoy­ment. Thecookoffwill be from 1:00to5:00p.m. (serving times of free beer), so if you are serving (bring the dish prepared at home unleSB you have made special prior arran­gements) you need to plan to arrive between noon and 1:00 p.m. If you are coming just to partake, come 88 you are at 1:00 p.m. with $3.50 in hand. Bring your friends and acquaitances and we will drink, eat and so on until. ... There will be entertainment and sur­prises, 80 mark it on the calendar. It's an original! L MEN & WOMEN'S SPORTSWEAR Opening Friday, July 8 In the Pink Building off Montrose 1004 California 524-5555 (adjacent to MONTROSE HAIR DESIGN) -COUPON- , f3()()f31~ ~ s 10°/o OFF REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE 1004 California (in the Pink Building off Montrose) 524-5555 _J COUPON Gay/Lesbian Volunteers Urgently Needed to conduct a very important survey. Requ irements: Good telephone skills plus dedication to the gay community essential. Call 757-7093 NOTICE To offer his GAY clients the personalized service they deserve BRUCE WOOLLEY has left TravelTech. For personalized gay travel or all your travel needs, call Bruce Woolley (713) 524-7324 ~1'..1T'ROs.:r; . ~~ '~~ ~ ~"Y ' ~· . ' .. MfN1~ COMPAt~Y . 805 Pacific For a Man's Man Happy Hour Daily to 8pm ~ Sunday Beer Bust Noon to 8om ( $1 cover with Happy Bour) ~ NOW By Popular Demand JULY 6, 1963 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 ~T·RQSF ~~ '~~ . ~ >llr."Y MfN1NG · · COMPAt~)~, 805 Pacific Monday Happy Hour Wednesday Happy Hour 11am-2am 11am-2am All Day. All Night All Day. All Night 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 Montrose Art Art Dealers Host New Show On July 9, MonlTosians will get their fifth annual look a fresh art talent on a cit­ywide scale, with the concurrent openings of Introductions '83at12 member galleries of the Houston Art Dealers Association. For the first time, HADA is donating a portion of the sales of works from the show to the Museum of Fine Ario and the Con­temporary Ario Museum. "Our aaaociation and the visual arts community in Houston are growing together," eaid Meredith Long, HADA president. Moel of the galleriee will be open approximately 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. this Saturday, July 9, and serve refreshments. The show will run through August 13. Galleries participating in the Montrose area are Archway, 2517 University; ltachel W. Davis Gallery, 2402 Addison St.; Davis-McClain Galleries, 2818 Kirby; Dubose Galleries, 2960 Kirby; Harris Gallery, 1100 Biseonnet; Hooks-Epstein Galleries, 1200 Biaeonnet; Kauffman Gal­leries, 2702 W. Alabama; Jack Meier Gallery, 2310 Bi88onnet; Moody Gallery, 2015 J. West Gray; Robinson Galleries, 1200 Bi88onnet; and Wateon-DeNagy and Company, 1106 Berthea. TOTAL ANIMAL CARE CENTER FLEA CONTROL SPECIAL! 10% off on all flea products for your pets, home and yard PLEASE PRESENT THIS COUPON AT TIME OF PURCHASE 1640 Westhelmer 521-9277 Stanford Square Frr1m tfw 4fr1 · J\fontmst arta A private way of life. TOWNHOMES The twenty-four !Ownhomes at Stanford Square afford the convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a carefully-planned, secure environment. These one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minutes of the downtown business and cultural dis!Tict, Greenwav Plaza, the medical center and the speciality shops, galleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and River Oaks areas. Careful anention has been given to security requirments. An automatic enu-y gate permits con!Tolled access IO the townhome community, while au!Omatic garage doors and well-lighted parking areas extend security within the perimeter of the properly. As an additional feature, each home has been pre-wifed for its own security system. Stanford Square Townhomes offer a variety of amenities, including: • Woodbuming fireplaces • Private patios • Kitchen appliances (refrigerator & m1uowave oven) • Washers & drvers • Smoke detect~rs • Pre-wiring for cable T\' Cathedral ceilings. skylights, attics, studies, porches and balconies also are included in many of the floor plans. A swimming pool and sun deck are located in the center of the cour1yard. w g"' z 0 ALLEN PARKlll AY >: ~"' Ill GRAY oz zt----- i:iL ~~ W-OREW UNIV OF T THOMAS S Ill FRlllY·S9 OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KITTRELL REALTY 529-5981 Cond11mm111m1 n.o STRATi!ORD ~lfl&.fw1 7/J ,'6:.?J-HOO r··~·1 • M~SE • •TRAVEL CLUB• • Located in the heart of Montros:. • at 1506 W. Alabama serving all I • the community's travel needs • •• AM ONTR°sS,,~S:S°o':tS ASSOC •• • SPRING AND • : SUMMER SPECIALS: • • Sunny Jamaica. 8 • • days, 7 nights, air, hotel • .. . . . from $259 per person, .. • double occupancy • ! . • Southern Callfornl(l. 5 ! • days/4 Nights, air fare, ,... • hotel and rental car . . . W • from $359 per person • double occupancy • • • • EUROPE TO • HOUSTON DELIVERY • • BMW 318 trom $13,250 • • • Mercedes Benz 2400 • from $18,790 e Peugeot 505 from $10.945 • • • • Located in Travel • • Innovations Bldg. • : 523-3051 : ••••••••••••• JULY 8 , 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 (baby) JUNE POINTER SUNDAY JULY 17 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 Montrose Live Samantha Better Than Ever at Rascals By Jon Cheetwood A few years ago, I had the pleasureable surprise of working with Samantha Samuels when she was first breaking into the New York Club scene. She was then a unique and disarming singer displaying a rather startling class. Well, she hasn't changed a little bit, she's changed a lot. She has made quan­tum leaps with her talents. Lordy, now she's nothing less than astounding. Her Callas-Piaf overdrive type voice is even richer. It has matured beautifully with riviting exotic strength and grace. From her Bette Midler voiced delivery of monologues to the dying swan contenance. she is all grace, all on stage recently at Raacals, 2702 Kirby. We talked about her first U.S. tour. "We are hoping to start sometime in September and October. This is what I needed to keep going. There was a time I needed someone or something to say you're on the right track. Sometimes I'm just too sensitive." But she is opening for Joan Rivers in Los Angeles in August and a show is being written for her in L.A. "If the show goes in L.A. then we'll do a cast album of that, definately of that. There are some very good things happening to me, it's just that I'm non-stop tired. I never plan a time to re8t." Unless her album would be picked up or promoted by a major record company, she said she would prefer to do a Broadway show and continue entertaining in clubs. "I feel at home there. I get a different kind of energy and I'm not nervous. I don't see the sunlight much. l"m compulsed by try· ing to gt't better work. trying to get a better range, look better. dress better-it's always better, better. better. Every minute is spent thinking how can we make it bet­ter. "Erik Vitro is my vocal coach and music director and has helped me tremendously. When you f'irst knew me, every word that came out of my month, a little voice would say, oh you sound bad.Oh,Oh,Oh.Sothat by the end of one song I would have myself lit.era Hy hating every sound that came out. I had never had any training," Sam said. But the training and working every night have certainly made a difference. "I really enjoy working here," she said. In her progression to better and better houses she has driven herself in pursuit of vocal perfection. "I want everything good, with lots of money attached and friends and family. I told the audience that being poor was very art.By the first couple of years, but now I'm ready for something more. My fantasy diamond keep getting bigger.'' If the diamond would be as big as her talent it would be incalculable. Certainly many real sparklies are in her future. o Artists, Poets to be Presented Gail Guidry. poet, will again be the guest at A Place in the Sun, Gracielynn Gallery's focus night for arts and artists, on July 12. Tuesday at 704 Fairview. Following Guidry, will be the Court Players on Wednesday, July 20. This group, through the use of drama, music and dance, will recreate a portion of the 16th century. Admission is $2; reservations are not required . o 'Peter Pan,' a Happy and Joyful Musical Treat By Joseph Lee Peter Pan is alive and welt and flying magicaJly all over the stage at Houston's Muaic Hall thru July 10, brought to town by Pace Theatrical Group and Houston Grand Opera. Sir Jamee M. Barrie'• classic tale of a boy who refuses to grow up, Peur Pan in its recent Broadway revival rendition is here to delight audiences of all ages with its wonderful songs and winning staging. It contains such zesty tunes as "I Gotta Crow," "Neverland," "I'm Flying" and the national anthem of all good fairies, "I Won't Grow Up." Rip Taylor (Capt. Hook1 Mr. Darling) is a funny, funny man. A regular comedian on the Vegas Strip and frequent talk show guest, his off-beat, charming-campy qual­ity with Peter, the children and pirates works well and is a real treat. Nana the Nurse (keeper of the kids) played by a man playing a dog (Andy Hos­tettler) is a touch of delightful character acting, full of old-fashioned love. · Ann Marie Lee's Wendy was cute and doll-like, but her speaking voice a bit much (sounding like a cross between Minnie Mouse and a Munchkin still looking for Oz), but her solo singing number "Distant Melody" was very beautiful. Karyn Cole as Peter Pan (Sandy Dun­can's standby on Broadway) soared not only in the air, but on the ground. She possesses a wonderful speaking and sing­ing voice and her flying, mannerisms and emotions made for a perfect Peter Pan. The Pirates and Indians were really on their planks and up on their moccasins, respectfully, and flared with some very good dance numbers. The flying was excit­ing, and acting wonderful. Plenty of fine elements make this Peter a class musical for all to enjoy, especially if you've decided to never grow up. o Hastings to Perform at Stages Ruth Hastings, long a favorite of Mont­rose audiences, will perform two cabaret revues entitled Brel1Piafand Sondheim! Maltby/Shire from July 21 to August 6at Stages, 709 Franklin. Hastings, with her musical director, pianist Barry Lloyd and vocalist/ songwriter Craig Jessup, combines a seven year career of continuous appearan­ces in San Francisco nightclubs with con­cert performances {plus several engagements in Montrose). She is recognized for her performance in the off-Broadway musical Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris. Hastings, with husband Jessup, were in repertory last year at Stages. Revues will be on alternating nights: Brel t Piaf on Friday, Saturday and Sun­day; SondheimJMaltby/ Shire on Thurs· day and Saturday (early show). For ticket information call 225-6210. o Museum Presents Films The Museum of Fine Arts, 1001 Bissonnet at Main, wiJl feature special movies dur­ing July including Shakespeare's As You Like It and The Taming of the Shrew as well as Scarface and Das Ganze Leben. As You Like It. the 1936 film directed by Paul Czinner and starring Laurence Oliv­ier and Elizabeth Bergner, will be shown on July 14, Franco Zeffirelli's 1967produc­tion of The Taming of the Shrew starring Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor and Michael York ia scheduled for July 28. Other films scheduled throughout July include the 1932 classic gangster film Scarface starring Paul Muni, George Raft and Boris Karloff on July 9 at 8:00 p.m. At 2:30 p.m. that Saturday will be Das Ganze Leben, the story of a 50-year-oJd lesbian. This film, German with English subtitles, traces the story of a woman through correction homes, prisons and prostitution weaving pictures of life in the SO.. Tickets are $2 for museum membf.rs and $3 for non·memben. Ruth Hastings is to appear at Stages July 21 ·Aug. 6 in two cabaret revues of the music of Jacques Brel and Stephen Sondheim Susan Fox and Harriett Reynold share the party Wlth Akxandra Haas and Michael Bailey for the release of the neu.· record "Rumor Has It" at Rascals last u.·ePk Jolar Cinema, downtown, present• "male dancers" Wednuday nights 3100 FANNIN AT ELGIN HO~;:;:~g '+lt:r.·• ~\-- /: l,··· ~~~rz• ;J,u:>··'l/,04' JULY 8, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Linda "Lulu" Simpson's 109TUAM 528-9128 HAPPY HOURS 7am-7pm 7 Days a Week Le Hole extends a sincere apology to Charlotte's for the inconvience caused by the person we hired for trash disposal but who instead dumped the refuse at Charlotte's. Our Happy Hour Prices are Hard to Beat! 10am-7pm 75¢ Beer, 75¢ Well Drinks, 50¢ Schnapps, 75¢ Wine, $1.75 Call Drinks THIS FRIDAY, July 8, from 7 to 10pm, Special 2 for 1 Well Drinks Where Hot Men Meet & Listern to Hot Music by DJ Lary Thompson Open Daily 10am-2am 1318 Westhelmer 521-3475 16 MONTROSE VOICE/ JULY 8, 1983 Listen to the Sounds of Montrose By Hollis Hood Some of the beet musical sounds happen­ing in Montrose will never be heard through live entertainment in the club or on stage, but you will hear them on the record or the album recorded at one of the two studios located in ihe area-Heritage Studios on Montrose at Hwy. 59 and Music Resource Services on Richmond. Phillip Looney, also a local entertainer, is the chief engineer for Heritage, a studio with space for traveling musicians to stay the night just up the stairs. "We hope to eventually have the whole building 80 we will have space for people who are on the road, or who come into town just to record with us," he said. Most of the recording in the eight-track studio is done at night, he said, because "that's when musicians seem to come alive." Currently he is working with Terri Ann Melton, familiar to Montrosians, on recording her first record. Other per· formers who have used the facility are Buxdelux. Blind Ambition, Ab and the Rebel Outlaws and several rock bands. There is ample rehearsal space in the stu· dio and it is rented by the hour. Austin Baker and Randy Horan are partners in Hertiage which began in busi· ness in 1982. Baker said, "It's really just getting off the ground. This is something that I've always wanted to do. Eventually we will have our own photographer and media people so we can serve the entertainer totally in recording and promoting their releases." Staff musicians on call at the studio include Chunga Garcia who played drums on many of Micky Gilley' a records, Barry Corow, former bass player for Dr. Rocket and Percy Sledge, Randy Love (related to Mike Love of the Beachboys) (who does guitar work:) and Looney, who also plays keyboards as well as the instrument panel. Looney went to the University of Texas at Austin majoring in the technical aspects of recording. Just around the comer and down the street in a very non..<fescript and unlabeled building is Montrose's other recording stu­dio, one that has been in business six years and which president Bill Wade says can rival "anything on either coast when it comes to recording." "We found that artists wanted a place in the inner city to record, they wanted to be able to record in Houston because of its central location in the U.S. We now have a 24-trac capability, state of the art facility and are attracting national artists." Jim Dandy, formerly of Black Oak Arkansas, was recently through to record his new album Still Street Wise. On a more local scale, the studio cut Alexandra Haas' new recording "Rumor Has It" and the theme "Unity Through Diversity" for John Day and Company. The studio also works with Dr. Rocket and the Sisters of Mercy and Volumatix. Wade became interested in music by playing the guitar some years ago record­ing his songs on a tape recorder. Interest grew in recording more than guitar how­ever, and led him to UT Austin picking up all the courses he could applicable to his field of interesL That, coupled with work­ing anytime he could in recording, caused him to quit school, seek a partner, and begin his own studio in 1976. "We just went around to the folk clubs and began telling people we were in busi· ness and it grew." And grow it did, from 4 to 8 to 12 and now 24-track equipment. So next time you buy a record, check the recording studio. It could be a neighbor around the comer or down the street. Phillip Looney, head engineer at Heritage Studio, mixes tape Bill Wade, president of Music Resource Services, adds personal touch to equipment Country stars are also u·elcome m Montrose recording studio E.li.D:U~ J.)j '\ ~~' ~ H.£.J):m;JMJ 'Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 713/52~9767 Every Friday, All Over Montrose, the Voice Informs and Entertains -- 1..I To the Montrose Community: [[]} OLD HOUSTON DINER We're open 6am-midnight Serving breakfast, daily hot lunches, beer & wine Breakfast Special 2 Pancakes, 2 Eggs, 2 pieces of Bacon­$ 2.00 NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS Bring in this ad for a COMPLIMENTARY DRINK with any food purchase Now Open Sundays 9am-5pm 914 W. Alabama 524-2318 Orders To Go TravelTech would like to clear the air concern­ing an advertisement stating "Bruce Woolley has left TravelTech to provide the service which his gay clients deserve." TravelTech, in fact, dismissed Mr. Woolley as a representative. TravelTech has always been, and remains, an agency especially geared towards the Montrose Community. The management and staff are members of the gay community here in Montrose and will continue to serve our friends and clients throughout the Montrose area. TravelTech is NOT a "gay" travel agency. We welcome's everyone's business. We dislike discrimination against any segment of the community, straight as well as gay. We CAN offer our gay clients the answers to travel questions which provide the details on just what he or she wants, because of our contact with the gay community. We are a small and growing agency and appreciate everyone's business. We will be moving soon to new, larger offices but our telephone number will remain the same, We look forward to serving you. COWBOYS COME AND GET IT! from $299 Round Trip NATIONAL RENO GAY RODEO & COUNTY FAIR August 4-7, 1983 Contact Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 or your Travel Agent 9EASTERN America's fawriteway to fly .. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 Houston, L.A., Kansas City capture Texas Gay Softball Tournament By Eddie Chavez The Fourth of July weekend has become a traditional weekend for gay invitational softba1l tournaments in Minneapolis, Atlanta and Sacramento-and now Hous­ton, with ita Lone Star Classic. This year 20 teams entered the double­elimination event, making it one of the large~t. They came from coast to coast, from New York's Eagles Nest to Greg's Blue Dot of Los Angeles. Winning the tournament for the second year was local team Dirty Sally's, with Lo~ Angeles taking second place, Hous­ton 'a Galleon third and Kansas City's Cabaret fourth. A special "spirit" award was given to Cafe Sn. Marcos of San Francisco. Other out of town teams included two others from Kansas City (Fox Trax and the Rangers). one other from San Fran­cisco (Trax) plus Tulsa's Tim's Outlaws and four teams from Dallas: Dallas Steel, Throckmorton Mining Co., Dallas Gay News and the Round Up. AB in the year before, heat was a major factor, with temperatures during both days of play in the upper 90s. Dirty Sally's had managed to go all the way without a defeat to what they hoped would be the final game-a match up with the Blue Dot-who had already suffered one lou and would be eliminated with another. But L.A. exploded in the first inning, getting a dozen-run lead that the Houston team could not win back. That left both teams now with one loss each and all the other teams eliminated. But the Los Angeles team was exhausted with several injuries and wound up losing to Dirty Sally's 18 to 9 in the final game, the exact opposite score of the first game. The 20 teams of about 300 total players ended up playing 39 games spread out among four fields and attracting several hundred other spectators. Final four games: Houston Galleon 10, Kansas City Cabaret 8; Los Angeles Greg's Blue Dot 15, Houston Galleon 13; Loa Angeleo Greg's Blue Dot 18, Houston Dirty Sally's 9; and Houston Dirty Sally's 18, Los Angeles Greg's Blue Dot 9. Awards were given out Sunday evening at Charlotte's, where Sally's manager Jerry DeSale was asked how he thought before the tournament his team would do. "If we can get by the Neu: York Eagle's Nest, I be/it?ue we can go far " o Lambda Bike Club Divides Rides, Slates Name Contest By Carol &uerage The Lambda Bike Club has decided to divide their rides between Saturday and Sunday. Chris &hueb will be leading the Sunday rides from 2212 Dunlavy, apt. 20. at 12:30 p.m. the second and fourth Sun· days of the month. The first and third Saturdays of the month the bike club will meet and tour from 210 Fairview, apt I, at Sp.m. The club is initiating yearly member· ship dues of $10. This wilJ cover mailing notices to members and printing flyers to be distributed throughout the area. This necesaitates election of a new coordinator bookkeeper, Rae Sloan. With the change in status, the club has decided to change its name. There will be a "Name the Bike Club" contest open to the pubhc. To enter, submit the name of your choice to Carol Beverage, 210 Fairview, apt. I, Houston, TX 77006. Deadline is July 30. The winner will be announced on Aug. 15 and awarded a plaque, free club mem· bership and $25. Plans to divide the group into "social riders.. and ''profe88ional bikers" are being made and they are looking for a coordinator for the ••profe.sRionals." TOP: L.A. player from Greg·s Blue Dot atarta to su:ing against Galleon pitch CENTER: Second place Greg's Blue Dot of Los Angles LOWER: Dirty Sally's finally win~ it, 18·9, and ex.chang~s handshakes on the field with L.A. ON FRONT COVER: Champion Dirty Sally's team at awards ceremony at Charlottes later Sunday evening Sports JOLAR CINEMA presents live from Las Vegas ALL MAJLE REVCE Live Stage Show Plus private showings featuring Hot Men Every Wednesday Nigh!, 6pm-2am 308 Main (between Preston & Congress) 25¢ XXX Arcade All Over Montrose, the Voice Informs and Entertains More People than Any Other Publication The Voice is the Choice NEFl~'POIJN GR~RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 223-8259 Live Girl Shows 7 Days a Week '' n JULY 8, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 RESTAURANT SPACE AVAILABLE Will furnish restaurant equipment. Beautiful location in 1912 Mediterranean-style building. Veranda and patio dining space available adjacent to night club. disco. cabaret and swimming facilities. Call this week for appointment to show. 523-6900 2702 Hirby 524-6272 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 Happy Hour Entertainment 6 to 8, Monday-Friday, Linda Hefner at the Piano 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 UNICORN EXPERIENCES UNLIMITED Exotic locations offering renewal of body and mind Places to be alone or be together. For information. call (713) 522-3799 COMPLIMENTARY DINNER with purchase of one or equal or greater value nUtl.l,lOlTU~ C. ~~ DIVESITl' HOUSTON uAY Pl\10[ WHll 19&3 OPEN 24 HOURS Spanish Flower MEXICAN RESTAURANT Wed 10am 3921 N. MAIN thru Tues 10pm COUPON in the Heights near 1-45 Tuesday Movie Special Surprise Film Tuesday, July 12 Summer Drink Special 112 Price Drinks to All Arriving at Mary's on a Motorcycle! Al Doy Wed & Thurs. Happy Hour Pnces to otl in Mary's T-Sh1rts Sot & Sun. Special noon to 8pm Eye Openers JULY 8, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Classified Seven Day Calendar NOTICE BUSINESS OWNERS The Montrou~ tr. MCh weeti 11'1 the MontrOM Cl•u1f..cl bu11- neu fft1bh1t11nent1 serving u d•llnbu1ion potnts tor the Voice Ind community org1niu- BAR FOR SALE Piano bar for sale or investors_ Cell 529-8369 & leave message Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES JULY JULY JULY 10 11 12 JULY JULY 13 14 JULY JULY 8 9 '""" ~ti.ttng111MontroHVok:;dlttrt­butlon point For •<kl•t1on•t 1nlorm•tion or pt'lorie numbef1 for events ltsted below. look tor the 1ponaonng organi Ht1on under ·org•nizat1on1" m the Montra&e Clus•lied COMMERCIAL SPACE RESPONSIBLE GWM NEEDED Share Richmond-Montrose apt 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Need bedroom fur­niture only. $250 month_ All bills paid_ Contact Brian Forgery. 524- Selected Events 6900 (home). 522-7130 (work) . through 7 Days • SUNDAY: Metropolitan Community Church general conference, Toronto, opens, 1ast. ing to July 17 "8UNDA Y: Montrose Tennis Club plays !0:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park mMONDA Y: International Gay Assoc. Conference opens in Vienna, Austria, lasting to July 16 •MONDAY: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont· rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 mMONDA Y: MSA Summer Season Bowling, 9pm at Sta· dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain TUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets • TUESDAY: Lutherans Con· cemed meets, Grace Lutheran Church , 2515 Waugh • TUESDAY: Hou•ton Data Professionals meet 7:30pm, East Room, Holiday Inn Cen· tral, 4640 South Main •TUESDAY: Montrose Sym· phonic Band meets at Bering Church , 1440 Ha rold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stem gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPF'l' Radio, FM·90 • THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •JN J WEEK: Montrose Voice Celebrity Car Wash, benefit for Montrose Sports Association, July 16, location to be announced •IN 1 WEEK: Choice's Les· bian Mothers' Group meeta 6:30pm J uly 16, 210 Fairview, •pt. 1 •IN 1 WEEK: Montrose Voice Gourmet Cookoff, noon-5pm, July 17, Officers Club, 2700 Albany, benefit for Montrose Sports Association a nd Media Fund for Human Rights •IN 1 WEEK: GayRun '83, !Oam, July 17, San Francisco Golden Gate Park UN 1 WEEK: Choices meet8 July 17, !2:30pm, YWCA, 3615 Willia UN 1 WEEK: Unitarian/ Univenaliat Gay Caucus meet.a July 17, lot Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin UN 1 WEEK: Familieo & Friendo of Gayo meet8 2pm July 17, Preobyterian CenlA!r behind Fint Preebytenan Church, 5300 Main UN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucua meeta 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm, July 20 •IN 2 WEEKS: Full moon , 6:28pm, July 24 •IN 8 WEEKS: Greater Mont· rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm Aug. 2, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei­mer •IN 8 WEEKS: 8th lnterna· tional Conference of Gay & Lesbian Jews opens Aug. 4, lasting to Aug. 7, Miami •IN 8 WEEKS: Reno National Gay Rodeo opens Aug. 4, last· ing to Aug. 7 U N 8 WEEKS: Sixth Biennial International Convention of Dignity, Seattle, Sept. 2-5 •IN 8 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Chicago, Sept. 3-5 •IN 8 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 5 U N 8 WEEKS: "Come Out and Sing Together," 1st North American Gay Choral Festival, opens Sept. 8, lasting to Sept. 11, Lincoln Center, New York •IN 11 WEEKS: Autumn beg· ins at 9:43am Sept. 23 •IN 11 WEEKS: Human Rights Campaign Fund annual dinner, Wa ldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, Sept. 27 UN 12 WEEKS: Texas Rena issance Festival opens near Plantersville Oct. 1 and 2, a lso running Oct. 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5 & 6 •IN 18 WEEKS: Oct. 8 dead· line to register to vote in November elections •IN 13 WEEKS: Columbus Day, Oct. IO •IN 16 WEEKS: Halloween, Oct. 31 •IN 17 WEEKS: Houston city elections, Nov. 8 •IN 19 WEEKS: Thanksgiv· ing, Nov. 24 •IN 20 WEEKS: Gay Aca· demic Union 9th National Con­ference, San Diego, Nov. 25-27 •IN 29 WEEKS: Gay Press Associa tion Southern Regional Convention, Jan. 27-29, Hous­ton The Law A Matter of Status By Henry Walter Weiss Via Gay PreH As80(.'iation Wire Service The complete lack of status for gay relationships is painfully high­lighted by Joseph's story: Joseph and Allan lived together as lovers for five years in the house Allan had purchased some years before he met Joseph. One evemng last October Joseph came home from work to discover his lover's body on the living room floor, the victim of a murderous trick. For Jm;eph the shock ofloss was painful. The violence of his lover's death made it even more pamful. That he had to undergo police interrogation about the matter increased his pain further. Still, such interrogation was inevitable and underistandable. He was the one who reported the crime and had the closest contacts with the victim. A wife or husband would, in s1milarcircumstances, be subject to similar questioning In foct in the course of the interrogation. the New York City police were tturprisingly sensitive, caring and concerned. Joseph could not fault th~m for the way in which he was handled both at home and at the station house. But then something else happened. When the interrogation was concluded, Joseph was advised by the police that he could return to his home only to take his clothing. The house, he was told, was the scene of a crime and he could not continue to reside th('re. Here was a man who lived together with another for five years. In the space of an evening he lost both lover and home, without warning or preparation While griev~ng for the person wit~ whom he had shared his lift.> he was left without even a place to hve. A shocking injustice! I reported the story at the Police Council for Gay and Lesbian Concerns in New York. This council, established by Mayor Koch, provides an often useful dialogue between police and members of the gay community. But in this case, I was advised by the Chief of Operations of New York's Finest that the local officers had performed according to the rules! I was told that since Joseph was not a lef?&l owner or tenant of the property he had no right to continue to reside there after the death of the owner. I don't agree with the police analysis. Even though there was no written lease. I believe Joseph should have been permitted to stay, since he could provide evidence that the residence was his home (e.g. he had identification card" 1:1howing that address, etc.). But the police gave him no l·hoice. They spoke with authority and being law­abiding, Jost-ph obt.>yl-d The clear lesson of the story is that lovers living in a re~idence owned by only one oftht•m must have a written instrument giving the other a legal right to live in the residence, else they risk Joseph's fate: being evicted at a mome~ of gTtat personal los_s. _ _ 1982 HENRY WALTER WEtSS Weiss is a New York City attorney His column appears herepenod1callyand appears 1n other gay newspapers across the country UN 44 WEEKS: New Orleans World's Fair opens May 12, .I lasting to Nov 11 ,.- -1 \.'\~, uN 49 WEEKs: 19s4 Gay I= ~\"?- , -..:. Pride Week begins, 15th enm- :::::=- --:._ : .~ \ ~ '\~ ?JJ versary of Stonewall upnsing, .::=- ..: _ ~ ' J June lf>.24 - -~ \ •IN 60 WEEKS: Hou•ton 1::=::-::: ~ '1\1'-' t/C.. • h08to 1984 Gay World Serieo .:.. ~ ~ ie.\-;, ~~baJ1 Toumament, Sept 1:2m ...........__., \ e\~ d'\Q{ r;,_;: "~'\ 1~---0-- . e"' €. ' 0 ~- \ o'-1 \h0 ·ce \& i._\ i-- .. t..\ 0 v \0 '' \)O\ i-11o0° A ~ ~,,. t\0{5 os0 o~·-11 <~/ ' 0 ~AO!'\{ y..ol}s" ::::."~ - ~A """ '"' *?Joi.'>· <~ . /.~;::.~- ;~~ ~ ~o~\tose /'-\;---1 v~ ' ~ ---;z-.., ?,?J\1 ... /~ . -..; y ) >~ - ' "} Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 NEED TO SELL Cozy httle duplex. perfect combina­tion office/residence. Unrestricted Richmond at Shepherd. We listen to any reasonable offer 464-0465 MONTROSE: MUST SELL Distressed sale Priced below market Totally remodeled 211 and 2/2. 2 homes: office & home: rental property. Call for details Angteton Assoc .• 984-8440 eve 789-2365 ROOM FOR RENT Very large. m pnvate home 1 '2 block off Richmond {3 blocks west of Main). Completely furnished. all bills paid No kitchen but a refrigera­tor 1s provided Air conditioned Couple will rent to select singles. couples or roommates No children Call 524-9092 APARTMENT FOR RENT 3 large rooms, living room. bedroom & bath. Unfurnished (has stove & refrig) , air cond1t1oned, water paid 1/2 block off Richmond {500 block) New pamt. quiet and secure amid friendly neighbors. Call 524-9092 No kids please MONTROSE ATHLETIC PROFESSIONAL male to share unique 2 bedroom stu­dio. Pool, washer. dryer dis­hwasher. $265•. 523-3223 An estimated 24,400 HOUSTON readers each week-the Voicel EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED EASY MONEY Fantastic deal for the right person Short hours. public rel ations. Must like people and fun m the sun. Car~i­bean. Spam. Costa Arco. Trammg m Montrose area. Call 987-0186 PUBLIC RELATIONS TRAINEE Needed immediately. Experience not necessary Creativity a must Will tram for publicity and promo­tion Unicorn Experiences Unlim­• led. 522-3799 SALES Need immediately. Earnings based on ability Paid weekly Unique and exciting gay recreational concept Training provided Rapid advance­ment for nght person. Unicorn Experiences Unlimited. 522-3799 SEE FOR YOURSELF Local Amway distributors are en1oy­ing extra income. We show you how. Phone for interview Gene at 859- 0418 anytime Kent Naasz 5~6541 (M-F 5-7pm). Honk at (W) 5~7525 or (H) 523-6598 Trish & Phyllis at 723-8368 WHAT ARE RETREADS? Retreads for folks who {like us) didn't make the above business work initially but want to try again. Call us GAY BARS =·-402 l°"9tt-S27-11196.. dllllf"IQ. - e e.m-110 Pliclfic-53-9427· country eeruo. A......- aottoftl-2400 Bru:ot-52t­l112: country ••• PMch-~w ~•11 eea~1 01sco---4M5 Martitl Luther King- 141-2521 •Chica.., Coop-535 w.thel"*"-526-2240 -•C-os--2131 RlchmoNJ-53-2251" dlecc wttn eDtrty S.ly"t-220 Awonca'9--!21-7$25 eC>outN9 fll s.toor-5731 Kwby-521-1444 •EIJ"t-1213 Rdl"'*'6--S27-eo71 • E.11r1e-1011~53.c:ounlry e Q.1111eon-2303 AIChmoncf-622-7111 eJ R "t-IOl l"ac!JIC-621-2511 • Ju« Manon l Lynrl"s-117 Fea~-529- 1110~ 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 8, 1983 " Darlene is going with some new guy . . . And HE'S got a shell." [] - " Wail a minute here, Mr. Crumbley ... Maybe it isn't kidney stones after all.'' " Sally, thi• i• Larry and hi• brother, Eddie •.. Larry u.ed to be an only child until the gardener hacked him on half." The Far Side by Gary Larson " Waitl a minutel Isn't anyone here a real sheep?" " Oa! Watch out! ... The wall• are pointy!" " Okay . . which of you is the one they call 'Old-One-Eyed-Dog-Face?'" e Keybolord-3012 M•••m- -52~ e l<-•ndr9d Sp.rlts 5245 BullalO -5PeedWay­~ 9756- p!'&dol'Tunantly le.btan e LiZY J- 312 iuam- 528-93'3 9 Lol ... o9Pol=-i32-7 Gr.-nl- 528-8342 e Mary·1.":-1022W.;thet-mer:-s~1 eMell'iOn1I Pant Motel B'ir--50 Waugh Or - &ei.1311 •M•cinue-Sun-534 -Wes1he1mer- :m:75,-9 disco. ahow1 •M•u Cnar10tte'l-911 Vi Drew.:slS::-8&40 country iMonlrOH M1nmg Co -&05-Pac1i1c--529=7488 eNUmbe71 2--300 Wei1he;m.~.:5~51 --- "'""' . -611tcer·1 ciUb-2100-Atbeny-523-408.4 e cine on -One-1018 W GfiY--528=850.f - • The Out1aw1-1.t19 R1ehm0od:.:52&-89ro • P•nk Elephan1-1218Lee1and~59-0040- w•lh 1hows e Aanch ~\Ii "41.n--52&-iiJO :R1 1 :•11-2702 Korby-524-627f dir11.11g. b'/$ e 1 •y eua,,.,.... 2100 Albany-52S-Ji11 e T8ll Rwi.oadel· 1318Wee.lheome< opening • Tw1 S35 Wftl"91mer 520-02« i8iib••n e /elv81 Hamn r .J33 W 11th- -M&-589' • V•riture-N "913 Mam 522.ox>o e wi1ct 9, I >rr•I ..lackson •• -Gr1nt- 522· ne1 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ORGANIZATIONS SiLECTEO NATION.Ai ORGANIZATIONS 01y Pr- ANoc••h• -POB IJ&'li5. Wut'ongton DC 20033--!2Q71387·2'30 G•t A.ghll N11101111Lobby-P081192_ Wlll>ongton DC20013--C202)$41IOI Humln A.{IMI Carnf>9•1il'"' Fund-POB 1311. W-11- ~on. DC 20013-1202'! s.a&-202S l""bdlltig110....,..__132W 43rd. NewYQrtl.NY 10039. a121 tou-MM Med•• Fund IOI' Hutnln A.ghts !Gay Press AIMC1ll1onJ-P08 33605. WUf"f'lillO,.,, DC 200»- ao21381·201) Nil~ A.oc•ll•Ol'I of ,._,_, Cour>a•-·Bo• 1~1-'S_ $#1 frln(:ieco. CA IM11S---1•1S) ~ N1t'°"9! Aledc"''°"' of Gay & l-.b•lf' O-ra1ic: Ck.bs--1142 Mll9 ....... SE, w .. t11ng1on DC 200Q3..(202JS47-310f Nll<On&l Gly R.ghts Advout•· -5'0 Cutro. Sin Frltl0k.0.CAIM11' 14151113--3814 Nlt<OftllG1yTN1tforce--tOSt,.,Awe NewYork.NY 10011- (212) 741-5*)() NOTF's Cn11si.111 1eoo1 ?21-10'4 (OUISode /'IHtw 'f"or11S111"'1 Tex• Gay1lnb<I,., THk Force--P08 AK. o.nto,., 76201-(817) 317-8218 A c.,Mtua Cnoru•· I Montr0M) Church 01 Chroll 777-9286 A Place,., lhl StJn-~o Gracdynn 800111. 704 Fa•f'l•ew -521-7895 11.Jbgroup ol l1H Im: COfl· oer11 7pm Tues ACLU 1236 W Gray· ·524-5925 ~·~-~o~--c10Gat_ 5..,,~~~§.~_:-5~~~11 Am«ICln l .. ,,,...rnen faoc•al club!· .,,_,, •I 011tereo1 Orum_ 1132 W•tf191mer--521-8528 dubnOQhtWIMI Aauo Ra1l'ltiO; AU1ance~20-9's1 (wooce). 52o- 05Sl (TIY} Bay~ e~ - MOl'll•OH c-horale ~~.~~'"':"s'~~o"1.~.a..:!.~"s'o.c~~- B1ac11 & Wh•!• Men ToQet,,... IBWMT)·-c/o G;y Sw1lchD01rd_ 52e-3211 C.1vary P.,,teem111 Church--5210 Fann•n- 520-5437 S.f'loc• 12 30J>m Sul'I ~~~~0 .x:~i\lr::::~r~;~.:- ?r:p'r!i 5~ Sun 11so ... lnb1an Mother• Crv1111an Church ol the Gooct Shepherd -1707 Montroae MrV•ces 1 pm Sun , B•ble study 730pm Thu,_ 1Mont1otel Church ot Christ- 1700 MOl'ltrose 711-921M1 Ml••Cff 1 lam Sun CriurCh ol Chr•11111 F11tl\-217 Fa•N•ew-.529- ~ Mf'l•CM 10 •Sam Sul'I & 7 15pm Wed B•ble 111.IOy 715pm Tues & Sun ctloor prach<:e Wed l!lf'terMTV•l;ll Cui1..-.1 lor Human Equallly !CHfl «>9 F.,nm •1301 2~8608 ~rd fT!MllnO 2nd Tueld•y• Cott 45 1 fsoclal CIUbJ ~II It B•UOI Rower Bottom 2'•00 Brazoa 1523-9192 Community Go"* Cen1e1 1700 MONroh !23-8018 C:ng Aytz Chaysm rneell at '-ffCA 1919 O.Q1Ur- &52-1340 $81-&997 servlC9 & aoc11t lpm 2nd & 4th fr tavs Conroe Aru .. ambdl loc.ety ... ari ll 156-0354 OI R..y It 7S6-4Q97 Cn1J1 Hotline- 178- 505 0 at-a-(..Jiy-Alhelll ·~ -6860: Amer!c.n Gay Atheists l)la,,.Fl 'td.lt1 2700Muo, S24-'791 Dt;nlty 'f!eet111C&ttlollcSh.lden1 et1ter. 1703 Boll0¥9r 52G-9Z89 528-78'4 tNel•"lgS 1ptl'I Sllutdlyt F1m1tles & fnendl ol Gays 464-666 meel~ lpm 3rd Su"ldlY• at P1e1by111rl1n Center. 41 011kdal1 behndF1r11Prnbyter1anChurch 530Cl M..., 111 Un r11n Church 52'1-0 Fa.-.nin-52&-1!'71 aerv•ce 11 5a>m &n frOl'lll'\>l'IM,. '-20-9258 G1y & Ahwe St'larlng fllperience iGASE' 521 1311.5.2&-0891 G.'Y Nu;f.1 Al111nCe :--880-9486 - - - - ?:~~~;·~~:xx,c:,!~~~1~~~11~ 111 l 3rd WedOMdlyl G1y Pnde We.k '83 Com"1111.e- ·Clo M1r10n Coleman. HouM ol Coleman. IClt w Al1blim1 523-2521 G1y Sw•tchbo.rd--::-PO·e 3624 5~3211 1nlor­m1t10". counMhng. referrala. TTY. AJOSHotllne Gre1ter MuntroH But.nets Guild- ecmtact ~h~:3:ys~c°:.:::,1~o;:m~~: ~~~·1~11 Wntheo~r ~;~=•l'll·FM1960 Arei Far-Aw1y Friends .H,o,m..o.p.h.1 le lnterl11th Alhanc• 1-29 M11nor Hou11on Ar.. G1y & lffb11n Eng,,_,. & Sc•enhsts -526-7386 meets 7pm 4th Wedoe1- d1y1 ~~10~ ~mun'.~E!eiw~ -162:8.ii• Houston 0111 Prol•••OOllS--mMIS in EHi Room. Hohd1y Inn C1ntr1I. 4640 S M11n- 523- 6922 meeln'IQ 7 30pm 2nd Tuesdays Hou1.too-Moiore)ic1e ·c;.ub (toe11I- club) -Clo M1ry1. 1022 Wfflhe•mer-528-8851 HouslOn-North p;o11u10iiii1- -PoB 3&.o.-Hum bl• 77338--B•ll 111121-7129 iiH -.nc-~POe · 1eo..1. 1122i--694·i732. 529: 7014 alfrhated groupt ire lnter1c1. Grac1elynn Ga11ery·1 A Place 1n the Sun. MontrOH Ar1 ~~.~~~,? ~~~C::.ns~~~;:~~:~a~~:1~ roM Clogger1. board m .. Mg 7 30pm 1 SI Thura­dayt jvaned toc1t1ont). educ1t•on11 forum 7 JOpm -~d Thurtdavs ~~':t'.'Y~::~~ ~==~~lia~)2n~fu=i 11 Autry Houte. 62&5 Main~ 4th Tuad1y1 at vamt<l loclt•ont intMacl9duc1t1on11 subgroup OI J 'H Inc POB 18041. 77222 529-7014. 694-1732 9KPFT A1d10. FM-90- 419lovett Blvd - 526- 4000 W•tdl; ·n Stem" gay radio lh(>w ThU!"lday1. 7 J0.900pm - KS/AIDS Founda!IOn- -1001Westhenner111193- 524-AIOS L1mb(l1 -B1cyc1e-Ct\.b--01v.d-682-i:Msfl~ Caro. 529-4975 mMll loura 1 llm SthJrdaya, t.1nieu r11n1rig_ 11 210 f11rv1ew 1pt I l1mb<l.i C.nter Gay AICDhohCI & All>'IOO· 1214 JoAnn•e--521-9772 ~b;:,~~~R~~·n.~,~~~·~·~~4~ 1253 L.b11ns " Gay Peopl. m Med1C1oe ~~9'8' mMl•f!O 7 JOpm 111 S11urdaya L•b•tn- Molhert~bgroUp ol Cno1Ce.. mee11 111 and 3rd SI!. 530pm 210 Fairview 1pt 1 lv1het'1oa Conc9ffl.d- meets -at Gr.ie4t lu1r.e­r1n Church. 2515 Waugh-52H)863. 45.3-1143 meeting 2nd & 4th Tuu even•ngt • Melropotot111 co,,,,nun,,y Church ol theR•ut­rec: hon !MCCR)- 1919 Decatur- 151-9149 pot­'_, 1ek donnM 7 30pm 111 Sat monthly. tenrocu 10 45am & 7 15pm Sun & 7 15pm Wed. mem­berth• p 1nqu1rer1 clast 7 JOpm Tues edueati 1n C1atHs Tua & W9d - MOOlfOM Ar1 AJ.11nee-521:-f451 all1li1ta l/H Inc rneet1 2nd Thurtdayt MootroM- Chor11e-And Bayou e·1u Robtor1 Moon. dor _ 521·200e ret'IMruJ 7 3°'-10prn Wed at Bering Church. 1440 Harold MoniroM Clog~rt 1H.1111eOt f;H-lnc meets Friday..,_ Bet1ng Church Achv•hH Bldg ~ Mulb!f..!!_ MontroM Cw•c Club '" Naar1own Att0e1111on • M~fOM C1on.1c:.. 104 W•lh•im.-;=Sza.5!31 open -kdays 1()9m-5pm (••Clpl Wed ) Ind weellday evea 6 30-9 30pm. women·a "1flf)h1t11 program 1-5pm Sun Mon-IFO.e Counffiong Centet- -900 Loven •203- -529-0037 AIDS v•ct•m 1uppor1 group rneel1 6 JOpm Mondayt Mor;lrOM S1ngers-Joho-M1ch1el Albtort at ,,. .. =•nd:., e!i~~~:4~u=~';?,,.O ~=drul Mon M~i .. S~• A.-.0011.on (~S_AI -e22.'33cM Montroae T•nr111 Club-Jim 1t S27·9l78 p11y1 Sundays. 10.30a;m-1 30pm. MacGregor Park MSNMon<1iYN1ght eo;...1.ng---PllY• i1Si1d1um Bow!, 8200 Braetma1n- 52&-4578 Of 499-9036 ~~~~~:::~~~~~·~~:~~;1~;. 1523 MSA1Un•led Aacquetblll LN909 MsA:ar •• ,;, Hou,,on <Men• 1 SoltNlt- -52 8802 d1y1. 523-0413 ev• MsA ;Womeii~Sottblil ldvu9...:.12&-93i1 MSAiv011eYbau -88-o=-2930 gamet 7-30pm Tua, Gregory·L•ncoln tchool, 1101 Taft Monlr0u--Sy"1i)hon~c-Band-mflets it BeroOQ Church. 14'0 Harold-527-9669 m"t' ,g 7_~m T~·- a_lh"1_t1_ll_!l l11e MonlroM Watch- tubgroup Near1own Auoc MUii1inQl 1.oCialCiubi--=m99tS.i1-1he8arn_ 110 Pacilic--526-9'27 club night Thurt Near1o;.n ~aoc•11~or;-1.:.iontt°"C ivic CiubJ mee11 at Benrig Church. 1440 Harold--522- 1000 mRhf!O 7pm 41h Tuesdays New-F~Ma<mi-c-hro1i;;fi-ChuFch-=-912 w 11tt1- 591-13'2 Mr\llCff IO•m Sun. 7 30prn Wed P1.:k P1opl8=C10 -Nearto..;n-CommUn11y FirehouN-741-2524 Paz y l•bet'acJon F'OB-eOi.iiil. niW--~ """' Recre111on1TL1nd -fifnci Comm1tt"- Mus11ng Clubproiecl Rica -Unov Gayil .. b••n Support Group-524- 072'4 Te•llS B1y Alu Geys- 332-3737 meet• og Thutt evening Te•1tB1yArffG1yY0uth- 332:J737 meet•r­bo- weekly Te • .,-Gayll•b•an Tukforce--869-723~ 6901 T9ua Human Rightt Foundition-1-915 Commonwetlth- 522-2824 T .. u R1dM1---c/o M1ry·1. 1022 Wetlhe•mt 52&-8851 Um11naNUmver111111 Gay C1ucu1--Clo 111 Umt1r11n Church. 5210 Fannon- -520-9767, 528- 5842 rfll9tmg 3rd Sun 1'1ernoont ~~yan ~81~1~·~--=&64--- We11he1m1r Colony Arlt A11oc11t100--908 Wetlheimer--521-0133 Your dependable, unbiased source of community news in Montrose-the Voice PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS USED VCR WANTED Also blank tapes. 526-9112 GAY BOOKS VIDEOTAPES Current, collectibles. Cheap. 526- 9112. Contact, fantasy, fun, wrestling & more. 500 members nationwide. Info $3: NYWC, 59 W 101h. New York, NY 10011 BODY MASSAGE In or out. Bruce, 521-2009 MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advert1smg rate: o $2 for up to three bold words and o 30¢ for each remain­ing word 1n regular type_ Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates Advertisers who wish something different should consider running a display advertisement._ o Deadline for ~II advertising is 5:30pm Tuesday for newspaper released mid-day Friday o Bhnd box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad 1s run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office c .Deduct 15% if you run the same ad 4weeks or more and pay for the full run 1n advance o Bring or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to 3317 Montrose 11'204, Houston, TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper '"" 10 3 t'IOlffUl·llZI bold c1ptr1/ words. IOfll C08/ $2J ..... Add1•n Nu~ o/ w .. lfl Mi to run Amc>unl endOlle<I O C/te<:lf C Money Ordet C Cah /n()f by m.,I} 0 VISA clYrg• 0 MHl•rC11d ctwge cred•/cardl TENSION EASING MASSAGE Licensed, certified, in or out. Phone for appointment Chase. 527-0876 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment The Voice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising Gary Larson's Cartoons­Exclusive in Houston in the Voice PRIVATE GAY CLUBS eo;b~tton-88~1--2205Fan'-!~--:&st=..~ e Fr~cn Quarter Thetlter--3201 Lou•••• 11 527-0782 e M+ct.Owne Spa---3100 F1nnm· -522--=-231il­e iio&Club- 2306G~52M235 RESTAURANTS · ~!II• -402 Lo~ -527-9886 e cn llapei;. -813 A•t:l'lmon~--512·2'36_ e F •k1 ·s-Mon"trose It Wtt11he1rner-5:N-- "' • Gyrc "Gvro1 Sin<1w1ch Shop· 1536 Weat"••rnet-526--<t655 e HOu" ol-P•ea-3112 Kirby-52&-3816 .e,H,.O u.e 01 Sh•.., Kabob.:.:-2042-M1rlhi1'1--521-­9W. r1-1JOO-w.the1mer_:S2S::B123 • Old Houston Oioer-914 W- Altblma-524- 2318 e ~y·1-Richmond II K•rt:iy--524-0075 i RucalS--2702 K--;-rbY--524~72 • Spuci=°U-=G'k.- ,. ,5-w .. ,he;m;.-=. 52o-oss4 • St1r-P1U1-2111 N°'1oik-523-0iOO-­e S-1Nii ·n: EgQ-'231 MonlrOM-S2S:8135 e i;m-1 COuN--Sriop-·1525 WettM•rner-529- 2280 SERVICES, ETC. ROBAIRES HOME SERVICE Apartment. house cteanmg Experts at mildew We try harder Your apart­ment fit for a queen. Call Bob at 520- 5777 while we work JOHN'S TRUCKING Light moving. trash hauling 524- 7203 MONTROSE PIANO INSTRUCTION Beginners thru advanced, specializ­ing in adult beginners. Teacher has BM m keyboard Lessons scheduled at your convenience. Call 5~6563 before 10pm RELAX A ENJOY the Bodyworks massge. Evenings and weekends Call Bill, 526-2470. Gift certificates available BODY MASSAGE Alcohol rubs Coconut butter mas­sages. In or out. Call John Owens after 1 pm. 630-0809 HYPNOTISM-THERAPY-COUNSELING Weight. smoking. body buitdmg. stess. depression. past lives• Per­sonal & professional Jay Carby, Ph.D. Associates (713) 440-4667 PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 ASTROLOGICAL CHART INTERPRETATION Professionally prepared. over 8 page printout. Send $10 & birth info lo Astra Forcast. 9593 S. Main 11'159. Houston 77025 AMWAY PRODUCTS MEAN quality-& personal service. Try us & see. Phone Kent Naasz 5~6541 (M-F 5-7pm). Gene at 859-0418 any­time. Hank at (W) 529-7525 or (H) 523-6598 Trish & Phyllis at 723- 8368 FOR GUARANTEED PRODUCTS & dependable service. call you local Amway distributors at above numbers GAY TRAVELERS WANTED Grand Central Pipe/me is expanding its operations to include complete travel agency services. "High on ser· vice & low down fares• 523-3223 JULY 8, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 23 9 F1tnna bch1ng11- -3307 A•~-52'.i- 9132 i Franc1aco·1 Hiir O..gn -901 A!Chmond 52:>-0<38 • Hous10,,-Guea1 HQ.JM -lodrg,rog-108 A~Of>­dale- 520-9767 e 1c9"how91'-89auty-sCnoot 327Weatl'le1mM- 5~1972 Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month only in the Voice • t999" Har Dnion-906 we1ln.1me-r -52"1: e i c"1el Hair O'e.ign-3220Y01kum-526-"9' e Moritrnse Ha1rCie.1gn-1004-C.illorn11--5-22- 2822 • Morotrote Vooca ,_paper- -3317 MOfl!roM •305---529-&490 • Neanown GaiaQ.-1901 f1'1-sii-2794 e Out "' T .. a- m.ga.Z,,,.__3311 MOtltroM •JOB--529-&490 e Pr1vat1 P09l1I Sytten'll m11I bo•e1- 1713 W•lhe•ITl9r-529-3020 t=l-;;-eartier 5~2154 Po111rnouth-iTr- 1--;el1ri~at1on1-1S06 W Alabam1- Mon1roee Travel Club 523-3051, commerc111 l(;)Ul'lts5L~ SHOPS & STORES THE ANTIQUE CORNER Glassware. knick-knacks. furniture 1921 Westheimer. 522·6087 By Tycho Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 e A1 tr ACiuct News-1-«'7 Ricrimond- ·~ """ • Asylum AOt.1h Boolosl.,,._ 1201 Rienmono e 8i1iParliAdun 8ook11or..-"1i3o W ~:iib;m1 e 'Cot>wetl LfQuof1- ·203e-Wet1haome~526- 298i 9o;r;.,, Adun Ne;.--240 Westhtumer- ~ 6950 9DOUbra~1-Jonea. the Manhole ctott·urog. 1983 w GrlV-522-loet .e,'O..o ..nbMt RecorOt· 21'7 Aictirnonct-52). 9tir9m11lka gtfta-3224 Yotkum·-528-5'57 • Grec:;;fy~ BookS-704 F;;;r;, ___ 522.1885 • G•ee11nolPhJ1::.::i411wes1he~met'~1ae • K•rby Ne...s11nd--31i'S Kirb).~520-02'6 - e 0n80)1 LMt~~-912 we.i~r- 524-7159 iCiidEn;11irl -Furn1~r;.: 113e-w-G-rai-521- 9145 e R.c~-Rk11; tr>u&oc~iiiS ~----:__524- 1002 ~z A.~11-N9ws-1132 w A18bami e TLC·-eo2 W Aiabemi=-.52~586() - e u-,,---;"JK11-ctotn~---=-1212westr..rner- 528- ""° • Up One W111ern1luther -BRB. 2400 Brazos-524-5737 iw-9.itteomer Flea Mtrkel-1733 Westhe<mtt- 9 WettM,mer nteriorS~-1-i27w11ih.7mer- 5.20-1357 ew toe & Stem bOOk ttore-802 weslheuner- 529-7014 Fortunes syTycho For Fflday trtemng. July 8. 1983. lhrough Friday evening. Juty 15. 1983 ARIES-You'll meet someone soon who seems to be a soul mate but let time and understanding take their course before you make this person a larger part of your life. The danger of illusion 1s all around, but at least it provides relief from all the work you've got to do TAURUS-What is it with your lover or close one these days? The more positive and lovmg you are, the more negative and distant the relationship. You're doing what comes naturally to you, so there's no point in trying to make drastic changes. Be yourself and listen for clues GEMINI-The Moon continues in your sign until early morning Satur­day. Summertime . and the livin' is easy. Somebody's rich. and some­body's goodlookin', and you're en1oy1ng every minute of it Don't forget to spread some of that esp/ff around. All the signs of the zodiac aren't having that kind of good luck. Show ·em how it's done CANCER-Mars and the Sun remain in Cancer all week. Mercury wlll leave your sign next Fnday afternoon, the 15th. And the Moon will pass through from this Saturday morning through Monday mornmg. The heat is on; body heat and mental heat are high, and so are you. High, hot and somewhat more outrageous than your usual self. you can learn a lot and teach some things too. Don't let the heat get you down; it should be getting you up. up, up! LEO-Venus leaves Leo Sunday morning while Mercury enters next Fr1day afternoon. the 15th_ The Moon will pass through from Monday morning to Wednesday mornmg. You made a promise. You said you would or could, and now, you're not so sure Your flair for making things a little more than they really are may have gotten you into a bit of trouble Can you deliver? Beware of those whose interests are the same as yours VIRGO-Venus enters V1rgo Sunday morning to stay tor about three weeks while the Moon enters next Wednesday mornmg, the 13th, only to leave the fol!ow1ng Friday morning. Loving you is easier than a~ything your lover will ever do again. You're sooo receptive and easy-going that you might be mistaken for a Cancerian-happy. and w1llmg to take it as it comes Don't let that little thmg on the side interfere with all this easy loving LIBRA-In your sign all week: Pluto and Saturn. The Moon will pass through start mg next Friday. the 15th. Do you know where you're going? Knw where you've been? Confused? I imagine you are. If you'd stop pushing yourself so damned hard, you'd fmd some answers to all this craziness_ Let up and let the summer take its course At least try' SCORPIO-You're not usually known as the fun sign of the zodiac You're a bit too dark and secretive for that. But let those warm beezes get to you. and if there's a party. tfs at your place. Entertain. Envelop others with your loving soul. Bright and beautiful Scorpio. yest SAGITTARIUS-In yours1gn this week: Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune The changes just don't stop. You're moving at incredible speed. Every­thing seems to happen instantly, alt of a sudden. Someone unequipped for this would feel frenzied and exhausted But admit it, you love 1t! Don't stop now CAPRICORN-While this may not be the dark night of the soul. ifs no bed of roses either It 1sn·1 really that things are so bad. more that you have some important and d1fhcult decisions to make when you'd rather go out and play_ Sorry. Cap Take care of buiness AQUARIUS-Christmas 1n July? You've got a present coming that wtll make you feel like it It's something you deserve. but also something unexpected Untie the ribbon and open the box. Can you believe this one? Happy holidays' PISCES- Everyone should have a Pisces for a partner nght now You've got the kind of mind and energy that knows how to give anyone the best The danger is that you may want to grve everyone your best One at a time. please. one at a time •11183 STONE'WALL FEA TUAfS S'l',.,OICATE 24 MONTROSE VOICE / JULY 8, 1983 N W+E w s (/) 0 WELCH .a..:. > z • ,.. 0 ~ ::;; z 2700 -< TUAM FAIRVIEW > ""<' "' Weekly Show Times Thursday 8:30pm Friday 8:30 and 11pm Saturday 8:30 and 11pm Sunday 8:30pm CALL FOR INFORMATION Talent Nite 1st place $100 2nd place $50 Tues., July 19, 9pm 50¢ Draft Call to Register WESTHEIMER TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR 2700Albany~528-3611 4 pREMIERING JULY 1 Appearing Wednesday, July 13 Steve Espinosa on Sax and Randy Lilly on Keyboard Direct from Boulder, Colo 1/2 Price Well NOW THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT!!
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