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Houston Voice, July 7, 2006
File 010
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Houston Voice, July 7, 2006 - File 010. 2006-07-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2641/show/2629.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2006-07-07). Houston Voice, July 7, 2006 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2641/show/2629

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, July 7, 2006 - File 010, 2006-07-07, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2641/show/2629.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, July 7, 2006
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Ervin, Eric
Publisher Window Media
Date July 7, 2006
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 7, 2006 9 ^^ dint K. PEARSON BROWN IK?*, l-sSL With my long rap sheet, they'd be ^BC^-If say'ni3' Put ^e diamond ring down and step away from the U-Haul.' Call the lesbian love police women in front of you. You have the right to a lover who does not announce to everyone that you need to work out more when you are in a bikini at a pool party." But there is no lesbian police force, and the West Hollywood sheriff's department doesn't count. MAYBE IT WOULD SAVE US ALL SOME frustration and heartache if there was such thing as lesbian love police. I imagine members of the force looking like Angelina Jolie in "Tomb Raider," strapping and taut, commanding our attention and our obedience. They'd carry handcuffs dangling from their belts to use in particularly dicey cases. Officers would step in when a wrongful courtship begins and order, "Stop! Back away from each other before somebody gets hurt." An intervention from the lesbian police would have halted me years ago from my pursuit of "Jane," a lesbian DJ with a cache of come-on lines, a closet full of steel-toed cowboy boots and a babe-ready Yamaha. After a spin around the city with me riding bitch and a few fuzzy navels — the drink we found ourselves arm wrestling in a dark bar. When she wooed me with, "Go on with your bad self, girlfriend," I realized not only were our styles worlds apart, but 1 needed an interpreter. Nevertheless, next thing I knew, I was in a two-year tumultuous affair that should have never happened. Same thing with "Barbara." She was a burly TV camerawoman who could hoist a 55-pound camera over her shoulder with no sweat. Like the Harley Davidson she rode in on, she was loud and imposing, but she could make me laugh like no one else. My first impression and my first rebuff was, "You're too butch for me." But a few jokes and Jell-0 shots later, her wisecracking ways were irresistible. Before I knew it, it was two years later, and we were separating because, after all, she was too butch for me. Did I mention I left her for "Jane"? PRECEDING THE DYKES ON bikes was "Marty," a decade my senior, who even without a motorcycle had a penchant for leather and roughing it up. After eight months. I finaUy threw in my whip, deciding I preferred a kindler, gentler love. Had a love cop stood between me and these and other doomed dalliances, perhaps I might have sooner met my match. If only someone had read me my rights a Long time ago: "You have the right to a relationship that does not require therapy after three months. "You have the right to a partner who does not flirt shamelessly with other SO WHAT DO I DO, NOW that I am in love? The kind of love that makes me want to jump on a sofa. She's beautiful, smart, sexy and sweet, and I want to be with her forever. I have to wonder what a lesbian love cop would be advising me now: "Slow down. Put the diamond ring down. Step away from the U-Haul." The reality is that lesbian love is a lawless place. The best we can do is to write our own rules and govern ourselves accordingly. So as I plan to move in next month with my soul mate after a three-month romance, I realize the author ities would probably say we should wait. But by now, I'm a repeat offender, a felon with a long rap sheet. I've done hard time and learned my lessons. I deserve to be put away for life, with the woman I love. (. K. Pearson Brown is a Los-Angeles based *' writer and public relations director. She can be reached at LezTaHcWeHo@aol.com The country recently celebrated its 230th birthday. Do you think gay Americans are better off than those in other countries? nno Yes. We are able to live ours lives free to be who we are, which is not true in many other countries. T0RRGY MASON, 24 Houston Club promotions We are blessed to be in America. Many of our brethren live in conditions far worse than we do, yet we still have a long way to go to enjoy the same rights and privileges as other Americans do. J0HANEVERS1TJN,38 Houston Financial advisor Yes. This country has more resources for GLBT people. We're lucky because we are a young country with many people who have progressive ideas, and we are not persecuted and pun- ished for our ideas nearly as much as people in many other countries. We could be better off, but we are slowly winning more and more rights UZWA1DEH57 Houston College professor We are better off because 1 think most Americans believe in equality for all We do have a lot of room for improvement. We need to elect politicians that believe in equality for all, also. NORMAN SALVATO, 56 Houston Event/party rental Yes. In this country, we have a lot more freedom and can generally be who we really are. In some other countries, people are subject to very harsh punishment for being GLBT STEVEN GOMEZ 34 Houston Travel agent Sound off about what's happening in your world at www.houstonvoice.com/soundoff. Interviews and photos by Dalton DeHart
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