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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 016. 2000-01-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2577.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-28). Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2577

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 016, 2000-01-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2577.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 LOCAL NEWS 15 Insult to gays, theater defended as 'political satire' by MATTHEW A. HENNIE A jab leveled in a Houston magazine column at gay men and lesbians and a gay-friendly movie theater has drawn criticism from some gay activists, who call it "insulting." The column suggests young gay men and lesbians have "sensual relationships" with small vegetables and asks whether a local theater should change its advertising campaign to tout a permanent gay film festival because it shows gay-themed movies. Freelance writer Roger Gray's "In Your Face" column in the January issue of Inside Houston includes the mention in an item titled, "The Love That Won't Shut Up." In the nine-line paragraph, Gray takes Greenway Theater to task for showing gay and lesbian films, and suggests the theater adopt an all-purpose advertising slogan: "The story of a young (man's/woman's) exploration of (his/her) sensual other self, expressed in a tender relationship with another (man/woman/small vegetable)..." Greenway, operated by Landmark Theatre Corp., takes part in the city's annual gay film festival and schedules a gay-themed or gay-friendly film at least every month, or for about 30 percent of its offerings in a year, said Sarah Gish, Landmark's city manager. Gray also wrote that he hopes Log Cabin Republicans, a gay group, wasn't planning a fund-raiser at the theater, because Texas Gov George W. Bush wouldn't attend. Bush said recently that he wouldn't meet with Log Cabin, in part to avoid a Cf^& "political nightmare." vTy_)^' But if Republican Dick \ «, Armey stepped into the presi- V*Mft* dential campaign, Gray contin- * ued, "the punchline to this story would write itself." Gish and the leader of Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus said Gray's column was out of line. "The whole thing is a poorly written joke," said Sean Carter, president of the caucus. "The small vegetable part was kind of insulting. It is, unfortunately, at our expense." Gish said Houston's gay and lesbian community is very supportiye of the theaters she manages—Greenway and Landmark River Oaks Theatre—and that both venues offer movies that larger theaters ignore. Landmark's River Oaks was the only theater in Houston to show "Boys Don't Cry," a critically-acclaimed movie about the murder of transgendered teenager Brandon Teena. Hilary Swank, who portrayed Teena in the film, won the Golden Globe for Best Actress on Sunday for her performance. "We work hard to showcase gay and lesbian films. It's if that's a problem, and it isn't to me," Gish said. "We have found the community here to be very supportive of whatever we play. I am just a big believer in not The Love That Won't Shut Up IS fl just me, or ft there * permanent cjay and lesbian IJt fen** goma art -K #* ore*nwj> IrvMie:' I seems ai itvootjn they etwU lb* one Ji-p-Jpcse «a Lie fc» r*,i features "The .lory ol a young IpwiUwx'w'U fjcjwwawr-r ol (►«&*-*•> se-nuaf o*he« ->(". r.p.'issej in a l*nr»j re'a'.*or>*.lup *.\r, *n'U*t \*i\*i\w?rtinfv?'&i **$>*Vto*i ■ At any raie, one hopes iheie an? no Log C*bm Recwofcari funk-tain c**-tj (to-weei (hew because [*<e fjcveirvK wv'* •i'-o.v fi W nb-iv-Jy no! « touch »*tih "ft PC**** M****** self, s*d on "Mec-I the Press" that he would tcfcoc » tnee4 w»rh gay f-fc-pgMca-ns heiatae il would c.itdie a 'puii'xa' litjhlman " r«-w *M< a-iuC-a- ftv-uubkan ■we <r> the race, Ihe punchline IO Ihn SKSfy wouM wnte use.' kit 0*t *.*mey oM.1 IV» putting out negative information about groups or communities. I just didn't think [the article] was necessary." Laurette Veres, president and editorial director of Inside Houston, dismissed the criticism of Gray's column as misplaced. "In Your Face" is political satire, she said, and should be read that way. Besides, Veres said, the column pokes fun at Bush, not gay men and lesbians. "This whole column by Roger Gray is definitely a political column. We, in our political columns, openly poke fun at everybody and don't pick at any one group of people Nothing is targeted," Veres said. Asked if the magazine would treat African-Americans, Jews or Muslims in the same manner in its columns, Veres said it would, if it was in the "context of what a political figure had done." "It is political satire and that is the context people should judge it in," she said. But Carter said the satire goes too far. "This is another good way for people in our community who want to pick up a phone or write a letter and tell them that even the smallest of jokes, you don't stand and let them go by," Carter said. "You have to be the one that stops and says that you don't appreciate it." Grav could not be reached for comment. I Inside Houston 5959 Richmond, suite 410 Houston, Texas 77057 713-784-7575 www.insidehoustonmag.com Radio jocks pull no punches in festival debate > Continued from Page 1 But Parker also called on Ihe city's gay and lesbian community to flood the station with letters and e-mails to protest the comments. "I've tried to deal with it in a business-like manner, but I've had a hard time in getting the station at all. At this point, people who heard the comments should call and let them know their opinions," Parker said. "They need to apologize to me and say it won't happen again. Anything less than that is unacceptable." The station should also allow a member of the gay community on the show to respond to the anti-gay comments, said Sean Carter, president of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus. "Let us have a voice and at least come back at the comments," Carter said. "We do need to let them know that they can't go on making stuff like this happen." The alleged anti-gay comments and discussion of the Westheimer Street Festival came just days after a city hearing officer refused to issue a permit for the 26-year-old festival, scheduled for May 6-7. In media reports this week, Parker said the festival is "tix> big for a residential area," and recommended to festival organizers that the event be reduced in scope or moved to another location to address public safety concerns. City officials cited widespread illegal parking, traffic gridlock, littering, noise and disorderli- ness in refusing to grant the festival a permit. The event, which draws an estimated 300,000 people to a 10-block strip of Westheimer near Montrose, pits some neigh borhood associations and local businesses against supporters of the event. During three days of testimony during a recent permit hearing, 14 people—including police officers—spoke against the festival, while one person spoke in favor, according to the Houston Chronicle. Festival organizer John Florez told the newspaper that the hearing process had been biased. "We're not going to sue the city, but we are going to appeal to cooler heads if we can,' Florez told the Chronicle. "There were no fights or urinating or defecation. These are just normal people hanging out having a good time." Parker said she is attempting to broker a compromise between Florez and opponents of the festival to avoid a confrontation before City Council. Florez had 10 days to appeal the permit denial. He can take the decision to City Council, or make changes to the event to address the public safety concerns of city officials The permit denial, by Assistant Director of Public Works George Bravenec, was the first under a revised city ordinance governing parades, festivals and other public events. The new ordinance requires that a public hearing be held on "major" events before permitting, according to the Chronicle. Parker said her sense of City Council colleagues is that it won-'t support the festival until changes are made by its organizers. "We are working with the festival organizer and the neighborhood associations to work out a compromise. I don't know if that is pos sible," Parker said. But regardless of the outcome of the festival, Parker, who won a second term on City Council last November, said the alleged anti- gay slurs on KKRW took a public issue and personalized it to her in a negative way. While she has encountered gay baiting in her political campaigns, Parker said she's never faced anti-gay slurs. "Calling me a lesbian in a political sense is gay baiting, but it is not derogatory. Using slurs is a completely different situation. It has not happened to me before. It is really surprising," Parker said. KKRW 93.7 3050 Post Oak Blvd., 12th floor Houston, Texas 77056 713-830-8000 www.kkrw.com "The Dean and Rog Show" dean&rog@kkrw.com keven@kkrw.com Take doY £ 1^- -*- cc a. n cv i=^ to •r2 12. HMJlMlWlillIt Taking Pride The Pride Committee of Houston unveiled its logo for Houston Gay & Lesbian Pride 2000 during a community-wide party Thursday. The logo, an interpretation of the theme of this year's event—"Take Pride, Take Joy, Take Action"—was designed by local graphic artist Diane Jolley. The logo will be used on Pride 2000 ' merchandise and publications related to the event. The Pride parade is set for June 24.
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