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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
File 015
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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 015. 2000-01-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2576.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-28). Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2576

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 015, 2000-01-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2576.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 LOCAL NEWS JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Fill erup. >- Continued from Page 1 crimination policy, and for dropping domestic partner benefits Mobil once offered to its employees. Cirigliano said Exxon Mobil doesn't want to limit its policies to specific groups and doesn't offer domestic partner benefits because they aren't required by federal law. As organizers of Equality Rally spread the word about today's protest, they encouraged people taking part to bring their Exxon Mobil credit cards, destroy them, and let the company know it lost their business. The rally was also scheduled to provide a way for protesters to apply for credit cards from more gay-friendly gas and oil companies. But with gas stations on almost every corner, gay and lesbian consumers face a variety of choices. Some of those stations bear logos of companies that don't protect gay and lesbian employees or recognize the buying of gay consumers. To help consumers, the Houston Voice surveyed major oil and gas companies to see where each one stands when it comes to gay men and lesbians. The gay friendliness of companies can be gauged by looking at five criteria, according to Kim Mills, education director of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay civil rights group. Mills said companies should have a nondiscrimination statement that specifically includes sexual orientation, offer insurance and other benefits to same-sex partners of employees, include sexual orientation in diversity training, contribute to gay and AIDS related charities, and have a gay employee group. Offering the benefits is the most dramatic step a company can take to show that it understands gay and lesbian issues, Mills said. It is not unusual to see several companies in an industry begin offering domestic partner benefits as soon as one steps out, she said. San Francisco-based Chevron Corp. was the first oil company to offer both a non-dis crimination policy that includes sexual orientation and domestic partner benefits. The policy became effective in 1993. The benefits, available to same-sex and opposite-sex partners, were made available in 1997. Chevron is the nation's No. 3 integrated oil company, behind Exxon Mobil and Texaco. Chevron operates 8,000 gas stations and employees about 40,000 people. Susan Guerrero, co-chairwoman of the company's gay and lesbian employee group, said she considers the company gay friendly, although the atmosphere for gay employees varies by department. "Within Chevron, the overall company has very open and accepting policies, but that filters down to individual attitudes," she said. Like in many industries, the manufactunng plants at Chevron are generally less gay friendly than the offices. Guerrero said. The company's charitable donations to gay causes are mostly in the San Francisco Bay area, where the company is headquartered. Guerrero, who is based in Houston, said she is somewhat disappointed by the lack of donations by Chevron here. Houston-based Shell Oil Co., now part of Royal Dutch/Shell Group, has had a non-discrimination policy that includes sexual orientation since 1996. The company began offering same-sex and opposite-sex domestic partner benefits in 1998. Diversity training at the company is still somewhat spotty, but sexual orientation is included when the training is offered, according to Rick Schroder, a diversity consultant for the company and one of the co-founders of Shell's gay and lesbian employee group. Shell's contributions have helped hind the Lesbian Health Initiative, PFLAG's national organization, the Greater Houston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce and other gay and lesbian causes. The company has participated in Houston's AIDS walk and has sponsored gay pride events in Atlanta. Shell also received a corporate citizen award from HRC in 1998 and has sponsored national events for the organization. "The attitude is one of inclusion," Schroder said. "Shell's policy is to value all people. We're making progress in that area." A third company that has led the way on gay and lesbian issues is in transition, but its progressive policies appear certain to stay in place. The 1999 merger of British Petroleum and Amoco created BP Amoco, a London- based company that is among the top integrated oil companies in the world. The company, which owns more than 28,000 service stations worldwide, is also looking to buy Atlantic Richfield Co. The former Amoco's policies provided for a non-discrimination statement that included sexual orientation and for same-sex and opposite sex domestic partner benefits. The merged company plans to continue those policies, according to company spokesperson Hugh DePland. Diversity training that includes gay and lesbian issues is also likely to continue, DePland said. He said he did not know what plans the company has regarding charitable donations. Wriile not leaders in their industry, Texaco and Sunoco have some progressive policies in place. Texaco, based in White Plains, New York, is the nation's No. 2 integrated oil company and sells fuel at 38,000 gas stations worldwide. Its 25,000 employees are protected by a non-discrimination policy that includes sexual orientation, but domestic partner benefits are not offered, according to spokeswoman Kelly Mc Andrew. The 11,000-employee Sunoco operates about 3,700 gas stations in 17 states, mostly in the Northeast, under the Ultra Service Centers and Aplus names. Sunoco is not a full-service oil company like Exxon Mobil, Chevron, Shell, BP Amoco and Texaco. Instead, the Philadelphia-based company is the nation's No. 3 refiner and marketer of oil products. The company does not offer domestic partner benefits, according to spokeswoman Shannon Breuer, but its non-discrimination policy and diversity training include sexual orientation. Tosco Corp., based in Stamford, Conn., is the only company contacted that refused to answer specific questions. The company, the leader in the oil refining and marketing industry and No. 2 in con- Gay organizers of a rally against Exxon Mobil, including Dan DiDonato, were scheduled to meet with company executives early today to discuss its employment policies. venience stores (behind 7-Eleven), owns Circle K. It operates 2,400 gas stations and convenience stores and another 2,600 under license from BP, 76 and Exxon, providing a presence in 36 states. Two other companies answered "no" to all live benchmark questions: CITGO Petroleum Corp., which employees 5,000 people, does not operate any of the stations that bear its name. All 15,000 of its outlets are independently-owned franchises. Some 1,900 of those are 7-Eleven stores. Ultramar Diamond Shamrock Corp, based in San Antonio, is No. 2 in the oil refining and marketing business and operates 5,300 gas stations and convenience stores in under the Diamond Shamrock, Total, Ultramar and Beacon brand names. It employs 24,000 people. Spokesman Jodie Carlson said the company complies with all laws regarding non-discrimination, noting that sexual orientation is not a class protected by federal law. i < >■ 2 < I f- oil & gas company Does your nondiscrimination policy include sexual orientation? Do you offer domestic partner benefits? Does your diversity training include sexual orientation? Do you make donations to gay or AIDS organizations? Do you have a gay or diversity employee group? contact information BP yes yes yes no answer no answer 200 E. Randolph Dr., Chicago, IL 60601 312-856-6111 * www.bpamoco.com III yes yes yes yes yes CLGEA0aol.com 575 Market St., San Francisco, CA 94105 415-894-7700 • www.chevron.com A no no no no no 1 Warren Place, 6100 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, OK 74136 918-495-4000 • www.citgo.com 1 i no no no no no 5959 Las Colinas Blvd., Irving, TX 75039 " 972-444-1000 • www.exxon.mobil.com ■ © yes yes yes yes yes S£AShellG>aol.com One Shell Plaza, Houston.TX 77002 713-241-6161 • www.shell.com yes no yes no no 10 Penn Center, 1801 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19103 215-977-3000 • www.sunocoinc.com 1 ymacn± * 1 ~~ yes no no no no 2000 Westchester Ave., White Plains, NY 10650 914-253-4000 • www.texaco.com Tw no answer no answer no answer no answer no answer. 72 Cummings Point Rd., Stamford, CT 06902 203-977-1000 • www.tosco.com *0P*»*i***r\N* ■•-..»*■■ v\iR. i s no no no no no 6000 N. Loop 1604 West, San Antonio, TX 78249 210-592-2000 • www.udscorp.com ... m -» ■. • * * 1
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