Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
File 009
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 009. 2000-01-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2570.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-28). Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2570

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 009, 2000-01-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2570.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript VOICES AND ECHOES JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE EDITORIAL Gaydarflap zeroes in on 'Don't Ash, Don't TelV STAFF Associate Publisher Mike Fleming mike&houstonvoice.com Editor Matthew A. Hennie editor©houstonvoke.com Production Bethany Bartran - Graphic Designer Mike Swenson - Graphic Designer Contributors Rich Arenschieldt, Kay Y. Dayus, Trayce Diskin, Earl Dittman, D.L. Groover, Robert B. Henderson, Gip Plaster, Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart, Kim Thompson, . Terry Sullivan Advertising Sales Richard 8 Hayes Ken Burd Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Classifieds & Directory Carolyn A Roberts Carolyn White National Advertising Representative Rivendell Marketing Company, Inc 212-242-6863 A WindowMedia Publication Publishers Chris Crain Rkk Ellsasser MEMBER d CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 Lovett Blvd.. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713)529-8490 (800)729-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1999 Office hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length We will withhold names upon request, but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Please send mail to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200. Houston. Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editor@houston voice.com Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. Take a few moments for this Campaign 2000 pop quiz: Which of the following would be the most reliable (not to be confused with predictable) tool to make sense of the U.S. policy on gays in the military? fa) the gaydar of a 60-something candidate for the GOP presidential nomination; (b) the PC-dar of the nation's largest gay rights lobby; (c) the brownnose-dar of gay Republicans; or (d) none of the above. If you guessed (d), then you were more than likely bemused, and a little annoyed, by the mini-drama involving GOP presidential candidate John McCain that unfolded last week in New Hampshire, which holds its ftrst-in-the-nation primaries on Tuesday. It all started when McCain's campaign bus—ironically named the 'Straight Talk Express'—made a routine stop at Calef's Country Store in Barrington, N.H. While McCain, a Vietnam ROW. and genuine war hero, purchased a block of extra- sharp cheddar, he made some especially cheesy remarks about the gays he's convinced served alongside him in the Navy. His point was that these honorable gay sailors never felt itjiecessary to reveal their sexual orientation, and so would have thrived under today's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. Asked how he knew they were gay, if they didn't "tell," McCain promptly stepped in it. "Well, i think we know by behavior and by attitudes," he said. "I think that it's clear to some of us when some people have that lifestyle. But I didn't pursue it, and I wouldn't pursue it, and I wouldn't pursue it today." Asked again if he can really tell when someone is gay, McCain grabbed his latrine shovel and started digging. "I said I had suspicions, and I think that—I was told that they were," he said. "But, look: That, to me, was something—and still is something—that is private. It's very different from a manifestation of that behavior in the line of duty." Smelling the foul odor of a campaign gaffe story, an intrepid reporter from the Washington Post called the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay rights lobby, and asked for a reaction to McCain's claim to aim. "He has one up on me, because I can't tell just by behavior and attitudes," said David Smith, HRC's communications director. "He is clearly stereotyping based on mannerisms. This is a form of prejudice and illustrates the struggle that gay people face," Smith added gravely, though he stopped short of blaming McCain's rhetoric for the murder of Matthew Shepard. To balance the story, the Post reached Kevin Ivers, the sound-bite ready public affairs director for the Log Cabin Republicans, a gay GOP group. "If there's a gay person anywhere who says they can't walk into a room and tell who some of the gay people are, they're lying," Ivers told the newspaper. "[At least McCain] has been thinking about his entire life and when gay people may have played a role in it. He has reached across and said he wants to understand gay people, even though he doesn't always agree with them," noted Ivers, reaching for the large box of Log Cabin easy-wipe hankies, always at the ready. Since then, McCain has vowed he'll say nothing more than the words "Don't .Ask, Don't Tell" when asked for his views on military service by gays. .And Post columnist Geneva Overholser, siding with McCain and Ivers, cited the brouhaha as an example of this country's inability to deal honestly with the issue of homosexuality. As is often the case when knee-jerks at I IRC and Log Cabin lock legs, the messy truth got pummelled somewhere in the mushy in- between. Smith, from HRC, is fooling no one when he claims no ability to at least sometimes tell who is gay and who is not. Like Ivers, from LRC, rightly points out, every self-respecting homosexual has a functioning gaydar, even if it occasionally misfires. But John McCain is not a homosexual, and to imply as Ivers did that sailor John relied on extended eye contact and subtle verbal and visual cues—the prime evidence ol gay-operated gaydar—is as laughable as Smith's overreach. It js far safer to assume, as Smith did, that like most straight men in the Navy some 30 years ago, McCain guessed which of his comrades-in-arms were "that way" by their limp- wristed mannerisms. That's a stereotype that is sometimes right, sometimes wrong, but almost always used to degrade and deride, especially in the testosterone-charged ranks of the military. In that sense, it's no different than guessing that the money-gnjbbing, big-nosed sailors in his unit were Jewish. Quite possibly true, and quite possibly not; but quite definitely prejudicial. For that reason alone, Ivers ought to be ashamed of himself for lauding McCain for engaging in an honest inquiry into the complex issue of gays in the military. Which brings us back to McCain himself, who was arguing in favor of the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy by claiming that he already knows which of the men (and women?) who served alongside him, risking their lives and limbs, were homosexual. True to form in today's controversy-happy press coverage, no reporter or pundit has broached the merits of that line of argument, which was alter all the serious policy issue under discussion. If McCain believes most gay service members couldn't hide their sexual orientation if they wanted to, then why for First Amendment's sake can't they be open about it and why would we kick them out for blowing their non-cover? The "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy has always been a bastardized compromise in search of a rationale, and McCain's unexamined notions are typical of those used to justify it. Even more popular is the privacy argument: Straight Army privates don't want gays peeking at their privates. That one makes even less sense, because under DADT, closeted soldiers and sailors (at least those stealth enough to slip underneath straight-operated gaydar) may peek at will. It's the openly gay service members who no doubt wear blinders in the barracks and the showers, for fear they'll be accused of leering. And the more gays who self-identify, the easier it would be for shy heterosexuals to shield themselves accordingly. These counter-intuitive justifications really add up to one conclusion: We can't serve openly because anti-gay bias would undermine "unit cohesion," the other buzzword in the surface-missile debate. Catering to prejudice is no more acceptable a justification for discrimination against gays in the military today than it was to segregate blacks into separate units'a half-century ago That's the kind of plain talk we shouldn't expect to hear from the Straight lalk 1 or the sycophants .it Log Cabin who've contributed $40,000 to a campaign opposed to every base gay rights position. But it is the type of honesty that (X erholser was correct in pointing out is glaring in its absence without leave.
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1005_008.jpg