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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
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Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 001. 2000-01-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2562.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-28). Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2562

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000 - File 001, 2000-01-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2595/show/2562.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1005, January 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 1005 Inside Page S The killing of James Tolbert. a 24- year-old Mississippi gay man, led to a massive, nationwide manhunt for his alleged killers, and has shaken a quiet gay community. Page 15 A magazine publisher calls it political satire; some gays call it offensive. See what a columnist for Inside Houston meant when he wrote that young gay men and lesbians have tender rela­tionships with small vegetables. Page 17 Actor Jonathan Taylor Thomas, who has discarded speculation that he is gay, takes on a chal­lenging role in Showtime's 'Common Ground' as a gay teen in the 1970s who turns to a gay teacher for help after he is sexu­ally assaulted. Got the midwinter blues? Whatever the cause of your mal­ady, here's the cure: the arts. Take a look at our sampling of the highlights to hit Houston in the coming weeks. Page 17 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE . Christine Burchette wants more d iversity and more volun­teers for the Texas Lesbian Conference, which comes to Houston in May with a variety of noted speakers. Page 25 JANUARY 28, 2000 Radio station quiet after alleged slurs As debate about annual street festival heats up, a producer for KKRW allegedly describes a city councilmember using anti-gay terms by MATII IEW A I IENNIE The producer of a local morning radio pro­gram has come under fire for allegedly u."mg anti·gay slurs to describe lesbian City Councilmember Annise Parker dunng a broadcJst bst Wl'l'k. Kl•\·cn Dor.;ey, producer of "The IA-an and Rog Show" on KKRW 93.7, allegedly called Parker a "dyke" ,rnd "carpet muncher" dur­ing the morning drive-time show on Jan. 21 during a discussion about Parker's involve­ment with the Westheimer Stn.'C't Fl>stival. And three days J,1ter, the show infw,cd new lyrics to a Crosb); Stills and :--:ash song that allegedly used ilnti-gay slurs and called homosexuality a "strange lifestyle." "While it is insultmg to me, it 1s an .iffront to thl• lesbian communitv," Parkl'r said "There are equi\\1lcnt term~ one would use for othl·r minoritil>s that no other r.id10 station in 1 louston would use. We don't h\'e ma city that toll'rates thosl' kind of remarks." Parker said shl• has rnntacted officials at KKRW, but they ha\'l'n't met her rL"qUl'St for a Fill 'er up? anvone at KKRW. \1ichael Hughes, KKRW's operations d.rec­tor, said that the station has fielded a few phone calls about the commenb, but he hasn't listened to the Jan. 21 "Dean and Rog Show." "I ha\·e no idea of what, if anythmg, was said. All I know is something was said that offended people," Hughes said in a bncf inter\'iew with thl· Houston Voice on Wednl-sdav. I lughl-s"callcd the comments "dISparaf;ing remarks" and said the matter would be im·es· tigated. But Hughes could not bl· rl'ached for furthl'r comment at pn•ss time Thursday. Dorsey did not respond to a request for comment. Keven Dorsey, procber of 'The Dem cnl Rog Show' on KKRW 93.7, has come lllller fire for cl1ft-gay sb-s he c6!gecly mode cmout City Colninan Allise Peder ckmg a broadcast last weel Parker has callrd on the station to b~ue a public apology and an assurance th.1t the show will not air anti-gav comments m the future. :;.... Continued on Page 15 As gay men and lesbians prepare to rally today against Exxon Mobil, a survey of the nation's major oil companies shows mixed results when it comes to gay employees and customers by CIP l'LASTFR Organizers of a proll-st against l\xon :-..1obil Corp. Wl'rl' scheduk·d to meet with company officials early today, just hours before a rally in downtown I louston to criticize the company's dumping of policil•s that specifically protected its gay and k'Sb1an emplO)'l'l'S. A ml'l'ting bdWl'<'n company executi,·es, Equality Rally organill'rs ,md elected officials, includmg openly bb1an City Councilwoman AnniSL• Parker, was sl'I for 10 a.m. toda;: though both sides downplayed expt'Ctations for thl• g.ithcrmg. By-t p.m .. gay art1\·ists were cxpl'Chng hun· drl'ds of pl'Ople to 1om a rally ag,1inst Fxxon Mobil 111 a city park and then a march to the company's Houston offices. Equality Rally organizers said latl' Thursday that today's meeting will open thl' door to better communication with faxon Mobil. The company adopted E\\on's employment policies and benefits during ib rl'cent merger with :-..1obil. which had poli­cil ·s that specific.illy protcctl•d gavs from discrimination and offered s.ime-sex domestic partner be.1efits. l'ohc1es of the new company, m.l' E\xon's before it, don't specifically includl• gay men and lesbians, nor docs the nl'wlv-crL·,1ted oil giant offer doml·stic partner benl•fits. "Company officials said they cannot guar,rntee there will be any outcomt.' from the meeting, but that it will at kast open up the dialogue," said Dan DiDonato, .:in organizer of today's rally A company spokesman said Exxon :\lob1l often meets \\'1th community orgaruzatmns, and wants to ckar up any misinformation about its policies sinn• the merger. "Our policy 1s dl'ar and :;traightforward \\'e do not d1~cnmmate on sexual orienta­tion and ha\•e establbhed a comprehens1\ e training program to bl' sure this pohcy ts followed throughout our worldwide organ­ization," said company spokl•sman Tom Cirigliano. But local and natmnal gay nghts group~ ha,·e cnhCJzl'd thl' company for fa1lmg to include sexual onentahon m Its non-dis· :...- Continued on Page 14 2 SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking By Pregnant Women May Result in Fetal ln1ury, Premature Birth, And low Birth Weight. Inexpensive Small Business Networks Competitive Prices Old Fashioned Service Sharp, Speedy Repairs JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 WHAT YOUR PROTEASE INHIBITOR CAN BE: " VIRACEPT IS POWERFUL It's tough on HIV. In many people, VIRACEPT lowered the amount of HIV in the blood to levels below the limit of detection of the test used, and substantially increased CD4 cell counts after 24 weeks of triple combination therapy. (The clinical significance of changes in viral for the treatment of HIV infection when anti-HIV drug therapy 1s warranted. It is not yet known whether taking V1RACEPT will help you hve longer or reduce the number of infections or other illnesses that can occur with HIV. Some common medications and some HIV related medications RNA levels in blood has not been established. The virus may still be present in other organ systems.) VIRACEPT IS EASY TO LIVE WITH Take it three times a day with your normal meals or light VIRACEPT nelfinavir mesylate should not be taken with VIRACEPT. For some people, protease inhibitors have been associated tahlct.5 and o al powdier with the onset or worsening of diabetes mellitus snacks. VIRACEPT IS GENERALLY WELL TOLERATED People treated with VIRACEPT may experience some side effects; the most common is diarrhea of moderate or greater intensity in 20% of people in clinical trials. VIRACEPT WORKS It's indicated *IMS NPA Prescription Data 8198 - 5/99 and hyperglycemia, and with increased bleeding in patients with hemophilia Ask your doctor. For more information, call toll free 1-888-VIRACEPT or visit www.agouron.com {Refer to the important information on the next page) 3 4 VIRACEPI nelfinavir mesylate •be-ts and oral powde-r Information for Patients About VIRACEP'r (Vl-ra-cept) Generic Name: nelfinavir (nel-FIN-na-veer) mesylate For the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Please read this information carefully before taking VIRACEPT. Also. please read this leaflet each time you renew the prescription. just 1n case anything has changed This is a summary and not a replacement tor a careful discussion with your doctor You and your doctor should discuss VIRACEPTwhen you start takong this medicalion and at regular checkups You should remain under a doctor's care when taking VIRACEPT and snoold not change or stop treatment without first tallong with your doctor. WHAT IS VIRACEPT AND HDW DOES IT WORK? VIRACEPT is used on the treatment of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Infection With HIV leads to the destruction of CD4 T ceDs, whoth are unportant to the immune system. After a large number of CD4 cells have been destroyed, the infected person develops acquired immune defJCJency syndrome (AIDS). VIRACEP1 works by bloclong HIV protease (a protein-cutting enzyme). which is requ11ed for HIV to multiply VIRACEPT has been shown to s1gnof1cantly reduce the amount of HIV in the blood You should be aware, however, that the ef!ect of VIRACEPT on HIV on the blood has not been correlated with Jong· term health benefrts. Patients who took VIRACEPT also had s1gnifocant Increases m their CD4 cell count VIRACEPT Is usually taken together with other antlretroviral drugs such as Retrovt,. (Zldovudme. AZT). EPM,. (larruvudme, 3TC), or Zent- (stavudme, d4T). Talo119 VIRACEPT on combination with other anbretroviral drugs reduces the amount ol HIV in the body (viral load) and raises CD4 counts. VIRACEPT may be taken by aduns. adolescents, and children 2 years of age or older. Studies m infants younger than 2 years of age are now taking place. DOES VIRACEPT CURE HIV OR AIDS? VIRACEPT IS not a cure for HIV mfection or AIDS The fong·term ef!ects of VIRACEPT are not known at this lime. People taking VIRACEPT mar still develop opportunistic 1nfeclions or other cond1hons associated with HIV infection Some o these cond•tJOns are pneumonia. herpes virus infections, Mycobacfenum avium complex (MAC) mtections. and Kaposi's sarcoma It IS not known whether VIRAC£PT will help you hve longer or reduce the number of ontect1ons or other illnesses that may occur. There IS no proof that VIRACEPT can reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to others through sexual contact or btood contanuNtJon. WHO SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT TAKE VIRACEPT? Togetner with your doctor, you need to decide whether VIRACEPT 1s appropnate tor you In malung your decision. the foDowing should be considered Allergies: ti yo1 ~ave had a serious allergic reaction lo VIRACEPT, you must not take VIRACEPT. You should also mtorm your doctor, nurse. or pharmacist of any known allergies to substances such as other medocmes, f00cl6, preserva!Jves, or dyes If you ara pragnanl: The ef!ects ot VIRACEPT on pregnant women or their unborn babies are not known. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. you should ten your doctor before !along VIRACEPT. ti you are breast·teed1ng: You should discuss w11h your doclor the best way to feed your baby You should be aware that If your baby does nol already have HIV. there is a chance that 1t can be lransmrtted through breasHeedong Women should not breul·leed If they have HIV. Children: VI RACE PT 1s ava~able for the treatment of children 2 lhrough 13 years of age with HIV There is a powder form of VIRACEPT that can be mixed wrth milk. baby formula, or foods like pudding Instructions on how to take VIRACEPT powder can be found on a later section that discusses how VIRACEPT Oral Powder should be prepared If you have liver disease: VIRACEPT has not been studied In people with liver disease If you have lover disease, you snoold tell your doctor before taking VIRACEPT Other medical problems: Certain medical problems may af!ect the use of VIRACEPT. Some people taking protease 1ntub1tors have developed new or more senous diabetes or high blood sugar. Some people With hemophliia have had increased bleeding It Is not known whelher the protease inhibitors caused these problems Be sure to tell your doctor d you have hemoph1ha types A and B. diabetes memtus, or an lllC!ease in thirst and/or frequent urination CAN VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER MEDICATIONS? VlRACEPT ma'/ mteract with other drugs. including those you !alee wltllout a prescription. You must doscuss w.lll your doctor any drugs that you are taking or are planning to lake before you take VIRACEPT. Drugi you should !IOI take wltll VIRACEPT: • Se dane" fterfenad ne, for allergies) • H1smanal" (astem1Zole, for illerg•es\ • Propulsilr (cosapnde, lor heartburn • Cordarone" (armodarone, for Irregular heartbeat) • Ouinidine (for Irregular heartbeat), also known as Ou1naglute~Card1oqum~ Ouin1dex~ and others • Ergot denvatoves (Galergot- and others, tor migraine headache) • Halcion" (triazolam) • Versed9 (m1dazolam) Ta mg the above drugs with VIRACEPT may cause senous and/or life·threatemng adverse events • Rifampm (for tubercutos1s). also known as R1mactane", Rrlad1n•, Rotate,., or R1tamate" This drug reduces blood levels ot VIRACEPT Dose reduction required ii you take VIRACEPT with: Mycobutm• (nfabutm. tor MAC): you will need to take a lower dose of Mycobutin. A change of therapy should be considered ii you art taking VIRACEPT with: • Phenobarbllal • Phenyto n (Oitantm• and others) • Carba:nazepuie (Tegretol" and others) These agents may reduce the amount ot VIRACEPT In your blood and make It less ef!ectrve • Oral contraceptiVes ("the pill1 11 you are !along the p' I to prevent pregnancy, you silould use a different type of contraception since VIRACEPT may reduce the ef!ecWeness ol oral contraceptives. HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER AHTl·HIV DRUGS? Tak ng VIRACEPT together with other anll·HIV drugs increases their ability to fight the virus. It a!so reduces the opportunity tor resistant viruses to grow Based on your history of !along other anti·HIV med1cme. your doctor will direct you on how to take VIRACEPT and other anti·HIV medicines These drugs should be taken 111 a certain order or at specific tomes. This will depend on how man~ times a day each medicine should be taken. U wtll also depend on whether rt should be taken with or without food Nucleoside analogues: No drug 1nteract1on problems were seen when VIRACEPT was given w1t1i: • Retrov1r (zidovudme. AZT) • Ep1w (lam1vud1ne. 3TC) • Zent (stavud1ne. d4n • Videx9(d1danosone, ddl) 11 you ara taking both 'lldu (ddl) and VlRACEPT; Videx should be taken wrthout food, on an empty stomach. Therefore. you should take VIRACEPT with food one hour after or more than two hours before you take Videx. Nonnucltosldt renr'H tranmlptase lnhlbttori (llNRTb): When VIRACEPT is taken together with: • Vonmune- (newaptne) The amount of VIRACEPT in your blood may be reduced Studies are now taking place to learn about the s.ifety of combining VIRACEPT With Virarnune • Diiier NNRTis VIRACEPT M5 not been studied wrth other NNRTls. JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Other prot1u1 Inhibitors: When VIRACEPT IS taken together With. • Cnxiv.m• (1nd1navir) The amount of both drugs in your blood may be increased Currently, there are no safety and ef!1cacy data available from the use of this combination. • Norvir"' (rrtonavtr) The amount of VIRACEPT m your blood may be oncreased Currently, there are no safety and ef!1cacy data avarlable from the use of this combination. • lnv1rase• (saqu1navtr) The amount of saqu1navor m your blood may be increased. If used m comb1nat1on with saqu1navor hard gelatin capsules at 600 mg three limes daily, no dose adjustments are needed Currently, there are no safety and et11cacy data available from the use of this combination. WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS DF VIRACEPT? Uke all medicines. VIRACEPT can cause side ef!ects Most of the side ettects experienced with VIRACEPT have been mild to moderate. Diarrhea is the most common side ettect in people taking VIRACEPT, and most adult patients had at least mild diarrhea at some point durinq treatment. In clinical studies about 20% of patients receMng VIRACEPT 750 mg (three tablets) three times daily had tour or more loose stools a day In most cases. diarrhea can be controlled using antid1arrfleal medicines, such as lmod1um• A·D (loperarnide) and others. which are available w1th0ut a prescription. Other side ef!ects that occurred in 2% or more of patients receiving VIRACEPT include abdominal pain, asthenoa. nausea, flatulence. and rash. There were other side effects noted 1n cllniCaJ studies that occurred In less than 2'f. of patients rece1v1ng VIRACEPT. However, these side ef!ects may have been due to other drugs that patients were taking or to the Hlness rtself. Except for diarrhea. there were not many d1f!erences in side ettects in patients who took VIRACEPTalong wrth other drugs compared with those who took only the other drugs For a complete hst of side ettects, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. HOW SHOULD I TAKE VIRACEPT? VIRACEPT 1s available only with your doctor's prescription. The hght blue VIRACEPT Tablets should be taken three tomes a day. VIRACEPT should always be taken with a meal or a hght snack. You do not have to take VIRACEPT exactly every 8 hours. Instead, you can take 1t at normal times when you are eating. Take VIRACEPT exactly u directed by your doctor. Do not increase or decrease any dose or the number of doses per day. Also. take this medicine for the exact penod ot tome that your doctor has instructed. Do not stop laking VIRACEPT without flrit consulting with your doctor, even If you are feeling better. Only take medicine that has been prescnbed spec1hcally tor you. Do not give VIRACEPT to others or take medicine prescribed tor someone else. The dosing of VIRACEPT may be di He rent tor you than tor other patients .. Follow the dlraclions from your doctor, nactly as written on the label. The amount of VIRACEPT on the blood should remain somewhat consistent over tome. Mossing doses will cause the concentration of VIRACEPT to decrease; t11erefore. you should not min any dons. However. 11 you miss a dose, you should take the dose as soon as possible and then take your next scheduled dose and future doses as ong1nally scheduled. Dosing In adults (Including children 14ltars ot age and older) The recommended adult dose of VIRAC PT ts 750 mg (three tablets) taken three tomes a day Each dose should be taken with a meal or light snack Dosing In children 2 through 13 years of age The VIRACEPT dose on children depends on theorwe1ght. The recommended dose is 20 to 30 mg/kg (or 9 to 14 mg/pound) per dose. taken three times daily wrth a meal or hght snack. This can be administered either in tablet form or, in children unable to take tablets. as VIRACEPT Oral Powder Dose 111structJOns wm be provided by the child's doctor. The dose will be given three times daily using the measunng scoop provided, a measunng teaspoon, or one or more tablets depending on the weight and age of the chffd The amount of oral powder or tablets to be given to a child is descnbed in the chart below Pediatric Dose to Be Administered 'fhree 'flmes Dally -- -- Body Weight Number Number Number of l"'el of l "'el of Kg lb Scoops' r, . ,poonst T.bl•ts to < 8.S 15.5 to <18.5 4 8. ~ 10 <10.S 18.5 10 <23 s "'· 10.S to <12 23 to <26.S 6 ,.,, 12 to <t4 26.S to <31 1v. 14 to <16 31 to <35 B 2 16 to <18 35 to <39.S 9 211. 18 to <21 39.S to <SOS 10 2'h 2 ~23 :!50.5 15 J ~. 3 In measuring oral powder. the scoop or teaspoon should be le.-el. • 1 level scoop contains 50 mg of VIRACEPT. Use only the scoop prolllded with your VIRACEPT bottle. ' 1 level teaspoon contains 200 mg ot VIRACEPT Note: A measuring teaspoon used for dispensing medication should be used tor measuring VI RACE PT Oral Powder. Ask your pharmacist to make sure you have a medication dispensing teaspoon How should VIRACEPT Oral Powder be prepared? The oral powder may be mixed with a small amount of waler, milk, formula. soy formula. soy milk. dietary supplements, or dairy foods such as pudding or ice cream. Once mixed, the entire amount must be taken to obtain the full dose Do not mix the powder with any acidic lood or juice, such as orange or grapefruit juice, apple juice. or apple sauce, because this may create a bolter taste. Once the powder ts mixed, it may be stored at room temperature or refrigerated for up to 6 hours. Do not heat the m•xed dose once it has been prepared Do not add water to bottles of oral powder. VIRACEPT powder os supplied with a scoop tor measuring for help m determ1mng the exact dose ot powder tor your child. please ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmaast. VIRACEPT Oral Powder contams aspartame, a fow-caJone sweetener. and therefore should not be taken by children wltll phenylketonuroa (PKU). HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE STORED? Keep VIRACEPT and ao other medicines out of the reach of children. Keep bottle closed and store at room temperature (between 59°F a~d 86°F) away from sources of moisture such as a sink or other damp place. Heal and moisture may reduce the ettectoveness of VIRACEPT. Do not keep medicine that 1s out of date or that you no longer need. Be sure that 11 you throw any medicine away, rt 1s out of the reach of chlidren Discuss all questions about your health with your doctor. It you have questions about VIRACEPT or any other medication you are taking, ask your doctor nurse or pharmacist. You can also call 1.888VIRACEPT (1 888 847.2237) toll free. ' ' The following are registered trademarks of their respective manufacturers Retrovor, Ep1vrr/Glaxo Wellcome Oncology/HIV: Zent. Videx/Bnstol·Myers Squibb Oncology; lnvirase. Versed/Roche Laboratories Inc. Seldane, R1tad1n, R1famate, R1tater/Hoechst Manon Roussel; H1smanal. Propuls1d/Janssen Pharmaceutica Inc; Halc1on. Mycobut1n/Pharmacia & Upjohn Co, Rlmactane. TegretoVC1baGeneva Pharmaceutitals, V1ramune/Roxane L.aboratones. Inc; 01lant1n/Parke·Dav1s; Croovan/Merck & Co, Inc; lmod1umA·DIMcNe1I Consumer Products Co. Cordarone/Wyeth·A.1yerst Laboratories: Ouinaglute/8er1ex Laboratories. Card1oqu111/The Purdue Frederick Co, Ou1nidex/A H. Robins Co. Inc; Cafergot/Novarhs Pharmaceuticals Corp Norvir is a trademark of Abbott Laboratories. I Issued t 1113197 A......_..... CAU 1.aaa.v1MCEPT ~""' L YlllACEPT 11 1 l10iSllfM-al AGooronl'llartnateutic. 1tw; l'I - ho. ~ 01999,,_...~. lnc. Mnghll rt.......i La .Iola. ~--;;;~ HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 NEWS 5 INSIDE NEWS Around the South .• . •... .7 Gore meets with gay Houstonions ....... .7 Texas executes mentally ill gay killer ..... .7 Give Rocker a chance, Turner soys • . . . •.. 7 Georgia bases discharge gay soldiers . .. .. .7 Defense may test evidence in chnd killing .. .7 Around the Notion .................. 11 Sponish~anguage ads favor Prop. 22 ..... l l Anti11ay remark unleashes campus debate . l l Hearing set for 67 Methodist minmers .•.. l l Murderer suspecl in three more killings ... l l Colo. board votes to keep teacher ..•.... l l Post Out: Brutal lesson in bathhouse etiquelle .13 VOICES & ECHOES Editorial: Gaydor flop zeroes in •......... 8 Forsten: Self -love and a little sag .......•. 9 Sincere: Why gays should support Boy S<outs 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Weathering the winter blues . . ........ 17 Coming together on 'Common Ground' .... 17 Out in Print 'Breakfast with Scot' ....... 18 Bestsellers .. .. .. .. .. . .. . . ....... 18 Eating Out: A sublime old world .•.... ... 23 On Stage: A seat with an artistic view ..... 24 COMMUNITY Lesbian conference needs volunteers ..... 25 Community Calendar .•......•.... . .. 26 Occasions • . .... 27 My Stars! . • .. . .. .. .. ........... 29 DIRECTORY CLASSIFIEDS . CARMART •.. Issue 1005 .... 28 .. .. 30 .. 31 A. matenal In Houston Voice Is protected by federal copyright law and may not be repro· duced without the wntten consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers. photographen;, wnten; and cartoonists pub· hshed horaln Is neither Inferred or 1mphed. The appearance of names or pictorial repre­~ entation does not necessanly indicate the sexual onentat1on of that person or persons Houston Voico accepts unsoOc1tcd editorial m\.tertal but cannor take responsibility for •ts rerurn. Tho editor reserves tho right to accept, reject or ed1I any submission All nghts revert to authOrs upon publlca11on. Gutdellnos for freelance conrnbutors aro avallable upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. TX 77006 713 529-8490 Brutal killing shakes up Mississippi gays Prosecutor says there's 'no evidence' of a hate crime, but activists say it may be too early to tell, and area gays say they remain afraid by I.Au RA BROWN J.:imie TolbL•rt, last ~n New Year's fa·e at a Mbsiss1pp1 gay bar, was found dead Jan. 16 near Mobile, Ala. His bod\' was discov­ered on a rural road after a lO~day manhunt that ended when two suspects were arrest­ed in C.1hfornia. TolbL·rt, 24, dit•d of strangulation and "multiple blunt force in1uries" to the hl·ad, authonhes s.1td The Cahforn1a I lighway Patrol arrestL·d Brt•nt Dil\ id Kabat, 19, and Jeremy Shawn BL•ntley, 22, driving Tolbert's 2000 Nissan XtL•rra. Investigators who tracked the two men across the country as they used Tolbert's credit cards s.11d they bl'l1eve thL' motm.' was robbery "We feel strongly the sole motJ\·e was robbery," said ~1obile County (Ala ) Sheriff's Department spokesm.:in Chad Tucker, asked if Talbert's murder may have been a hate crime. "They v. ere lookmg for this particular \-chick and waited for him." The prOSC'Cutor who v.ill handle the Tolbert case has s.11d she Jgn.'<'5 with that conclusion. But Tolbert's friends and Jcqu.:imtances SJtd lolbcrt was gay, and they fear his sexual ori­cnt, 1tion may have txoen a factor in the crime. I hl• possibility has prompted fear from gay residenb along the Mississippi and Alabama coast, and concern from activists who s.iy police may have dismissL'CI the possibility of a hate cnmc too easily. "Ihe Mtss1ss1pp1 gay community is not likl' '111 your fan" gay, but we do stick with c;Kh other," said Jody Renaldo, who main­tains the web-site for joey's on the Beach, the Biloxi gay bar where Tolbert v. as last S<'<'n on New Year's [·ve ''Withm our community, whether you are m Gulfport, Jackson, Biloxi or even f\lobtle [Ala.I .... we are all fam1.y, and 1t has hit us pretty h.1rd " Rl•naldo said Police and prosecutor: 'no evidence' of hate crime Local prL"" rt.'Porb have not mentioned that 'folbcrt w.1s ga}~ or that Joey's on the Beach­which fcaturt'S rambow flags on its wd>-~lte, and a regular ~hedule of dance music and drag shows-GJtcr.; to a gay clientcle. Acquaintances ~d Talbert's parenb, who pressed police for help and mounted their own st'.ln:h for their missing son, may not have known he was gay until after the crime. "The family did not know and they arc finding out aftl'r the fact, and 1t must bt.• rral­ly h.ird for thl'm to find out like that, but the fart is, he is," said Renaldo, who postL><l a ml'monal to jamtl' Tolbert on jocy's wl'b-site. "l.ucl•d,1lt•, the little town \~·here J.:imie was from, is really Chrbtian, re.illy H1blr­totmg pl'ople," Renaldo s.11d "So [the fami­ly I is h,1\·ing to deal with that issue on top of the I.id thl'V have lost thm son" l~<'naldo said he "defm1teh believes" 'lolbert's death is a possible hate crimt The two suspects, both from orth Cnrnhna, "said thev weren't familiar with the area, but they ended up at the gay club," he said. ''Why Joey's on the Beach? It just doc.sn't make any sl'n~." But investigators said they belie\·e Kabat and Bentley targeted Tolbert for hb new Nissan Xterra, a car friends s.1y he had only had for about four months. "The information we have is thq had been in the area looking for thL" parhcular vehicle," said Tucker, the Mobile County Sheriff's department spokesman. Th<' two men were seen at othl'r loc,1tions in the arc.1, apparently discussing stealing a car, he said. Tucker dl'Clined to giH' drtaib on l'\'i­dt: ncc for that condus1on, atmg the ongo­ing m\'l'stigahon He also declined to answer questmns on \\hat mve. tigators behew to be the timehne of the cnmc­whl'lher Tolbert met his assailants at the b.ir, and how they were able to get mto his car "It was not a \'1olent car-jacking, but at some porn! in the evening he was kid­napped, and taken out of Mbsbsippi into i\ labama whcJ'L' he was killed," Tucker s:ud George County Shenff George ~tiller, whose offin· worked with Mobile County on the inveshgahon, told the Bilo>.1 Sun-Herald that investigators have talked with ~omeone who claimed to ~e Tolbert talking with two men at joey's the night he dis;ippcart:'CI Tuckt·r declined comment on thl' theory, but stressed that "nothing we have" mdi­CJtes Tolbert knew his assailants before the night he was killed. Prosecutor JoBeth Murphn'C declined to answer any <]Uesbons relalL'CI to e\1dence or the "facts of the cnrne," mduding when or how police believe Tolbert met hb accused kill~. '11wsc are two bad guys, and I don't want to do anythmg that mtght jeopardize thl• prosccu!ton," said ~1urphree, assistant district attorney m Mobile C.ounty, Ala. But \turphree said at thr:. pomt, e\•tdcncl.' docs not i.uggest that Tolbert was the victim of a hate cnme. "Right now, there is nothing m the e\'1- dence to mdirate that," she told Houston Votee. "Howe\'er, as the investigation pro­grL'SSC:>, tf we SC\.' anything that points m that dirL'Ction, we certainly v. ill acknowledge 11." Sheriff's departments in Mobile County, Ala, and George Count), Miss., worked together on the case, tracking Kabat and Brntley across 18 states, from North Carolina to California, as they used Tolbcrt's credit cards. California Highway Patrol officers am~t­ed the two men dm·ing Talbert's Xterra and carrying a large amount of weapons, the Mobill' Register n·ported. Kabat and Bentley told police wherl' to locate Talbert's body, on a rural road off of U.S. 90 in Grand Bay, Ala Both suspl'cts arl.' being held in the S1sk1you County jail m California, awaiting an extradition heanng before bemg returned to Alabama. They are chargL'C! with capital murder and could rcce1\e the death penalty f com JCtt:d, Murphret. said Jamie Talbert, 24, was last seen at a Mississippi gay bar on New Year's Eve. His body was found two weeks later, and some say they fear the killing may have been a hate crime. Whtie Tolbert has been found and tht' I\\ o suspects h~\e now been arrested, the caS<' continues to pro\oke contrO\crsy among Gulf coast law enforcement 1unsdictmns. Mobile Countv ::,heriff Jack Tiiiman and George County Sheriff GL'Orge Miller blast ed the Biloxi police department for allegL'Clly not following up on the ca~ when Talbert's family contacted BPO to report him mis mg. "If thL')''d ha\'C put out a mbstng person rL·port, wed have been aflt'r thL'm faster," Tillman told the Mobile Register. "In the meanltme, you've got a momma and .:i daddy and a family that\ upSL'! because their boy's been mi'<:>mg for h\ o <la}"'·" ~hller ic.<ud Tolbert's fanuly then contact­ed his department, '' hich put out a m1ssmg person report on Jan 5. In an inter. IC\\ \\ th Houston Voice B1lox1 Police Capt \\ 1lliam R Kirk den ed that lus department did anything '' rong '.!l its handling of the case "When the) first came to ilS, the mforma­lton they had did not :.>JY that [Tolbert] had made 1t to B.lox11 so therefore the famih wa~ told to file the report hack in Georgt Count\'," Kuk ~1d . "It was later delt'rmmed that he had bt't.'n here m Biloxi, but at that time the rl'part had alrcad) been filed m George County" Kiri.; de:,cribed Joe) 'son the Beach as "a gay bar," but joined other law enforcement offinab m stating that the k1llmg doc.,, not appear to be a hate crime. Asked whether the fact that TolhC'rt was la.,,1 5('Cfl at a gay bar contributt>d to the Biloxi police's reluctance to ime-.t1gatt' thL• case, "not at all," Kirk said Activists divided on approach \\'hen Renaldo, the Wl.'b-master for th<.' bar, found out Tolbert was r<'ported mb-.ing in CeorgL' County, he forwarded information about the case to atmna!Ga} Lobby.org. an on-hne ad\"OCJC)' group. '\GL Fxecuh\ e Director \1Jchael Romane1lo 1mmed1atelv branded the mca­dent .1 hate cnme :.... Continued on Page 12 6 JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE GRAND OPENING 50°/o OFF ( ( Leather Leather is where it's at. Experience the luxury that sets you apart from the croivd, (especially if you like what vou see at Hoche Bobois, Cantoni and other chi chi stores; what a moving experience! Cutting edge designs at prices you can afford. ) 'j Sue Goldstein I he Underground Shopper, Dallas, Texas 300 World Class Leathers 2 to 4 Week Delivery SALE ENDS MONDAY 8:00 P.M. LEATHER 1721 Post Oak Blvd. at San Felipe 713-355-9393 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 NEWS Around the South Gay Democrats from Houston meet with Gore over policies WASHINGTOt\i-Three Texans, includ­ing two from 1 louston, were among 20 gay leaders of the National Stonewall Democratic Federation who met pri\'ately­with Vice President Al Gore at his residence on Jan. 20. Gore, who had invited them IJst month to discuss ci\'il rights and other pol­icy issues, and Btll Bradley, his lone ri\'al for the Democratic presidential nommJtlon, ha\'l' been fiercely competing for the gay \'Ole in early primaries this year. Bradley is to ml·N with the Stonewall federation's le.1ders next month, according to the Neu York Times. The group, which has about 10,000 ml•mbers <Kross the country, was formed two years ago to counter the efforts of the mon.' visible Log Cabin Republicans, another gay group. Stonewall Democrats Stonewoll officials Michael Milliken (left), Francisco Sanchez and Ron Ennis (far right) met with Vice President Al Gore last week in Washington, D.C. as both Democratic presidential contenders try to woo the vote of gays. ha\'e yl't to endorse a candidate for president. The Vice President's campaign is considering supporting a measure to grant two delegate seats to gays in Texas, Stonewall officials said. During the meeting, Gore was also Jsked to look into an Immigration Naturalization Service policy that doe, not recognize same--sex relationships. Stonewall officials from Houston included Ron Ennis, the group's treasurer, and Francisco Sanchez, Jr., secretary of the Harns County Democratic Party. Texas executes mentally ill gay man who killed lover, four others HU\ITSVIU.E, Texas (AP)-A gay man who killed his lover and four neighbors was exe­cutt'Cl Jan. 21, ending a case that death penalty opponents SJy they used as a test of Go\'. George W. Bush's "compassionate conser\'atlsm." Larry Keith Robison shot, stabbed and decapitated his lowr, Rickey Lee Bryant, 31, then shot and stabbed a neighboring fa mily of four in 1982. Death penalty opponents lobbied Bush to grant the 42-year-old Air force veteran a one--time n·prieve bl>cause of his mental illness and called it a tl-st of Bush's presidential campaign theme of "compassionate conservatism." But a Texas appeals court spared Bush from making the deci­sion by canceling the exl'Cution and ordering a competency exam. Robison was ruled compl'­tcnt and the l':l.l'(ution was rescht•duk•d. Robison, who was diagnosed as paranoid schizo­phrl'mt', pk•a<k<l innocent b~· reason of insanity but was com·1ct<'Cl. The verdict was O\'t.>rlurnl'Cl, but .1 1987 rl'tn;il also ended with ;i death sentence Give embattled pitcher a chance, suggests Atlanta Braves owner ATl..Ai'\1A (Al'} Atlanta Br.iH. owner Tl•d lurner said pitcher John Rocker should be gi\•en ;i chance to redeem himself over his d1 paragmg comments about immigrants, minon­tics and gay men with AIDS. "I ll''s 1ust ,1 kid," the C'\J;\.' founder and Time Warner vice chair­man said j,rn 19 on C'.\N's "~1oncyline" ol the 25-ycar-old Rocker. "J think he was off his rock­er when he said thOSl' thmgs. I !e's apologized I don't think we ought to hold it ag.iinst him forl'H'r. I d's gin• him another chance I le didn't commit a cnmc," Turner said. Bra\'l'S man­agement h.i- s.11d 1t is awaiting J dl'<:is1on from Ma1or League Baseball on Rocker before detcr­minmg its own disciplinary actions. In an intl'r\'iew in Sports Illustrated last month, Rocker said he would nl'\'l'r play for a New York te,1m bl>causc he didn't want to nde a tram "next to some qulw with AIDS." I le abo said, 'Tm not a very big fan of foreigners." South Ga. military bases discharge 42 last year for being gay SAVJ\l\NAI I, Ca.-\11htarv bases in south (;eorgia discharged 42 soldiers and Mannes in 1999 for being gay. the Sazmrna/r Morning New~ reported Jan. 23. It's unclear how many of those ~ervice members openly acknowledged their homosexuality or whether com­manders inwstig.1ted their sexual orientation. Soldiers li\'e in fear of disco\'ery and expul­s10n said ,m unn.1med soldier, from I luntcr Armv Airfield, who had been tea~d for ha\­mg ~lkmm.1te mannerisms. "There's so many g.iy"soldiers who would do a good job af they didn't ha\'e to hw in fear," he told the newspaper. "I'm not scared to go into combat, but I'm sc.rn.>d of the soldiers I scr\'l' with " fo ma kl· m.1 ttcrs wor~c. the !->Oldier said, the policy prerents them from n'porting harassment "If we say soml'lhmg. we're going to be m\·es­tigntl'd," ht' told the ncwsp.1per. Defense may test evidence in rape and killing of Arkansas boy If you are seriously ill, money houldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. As one of the oldest viat1cal settlement brokers, we have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. M. 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(i\l')-Attorner for one of two gay men charged with the rape ,md rnunh·r of ,1 Ji'-yt'<lr-old boy want tests pl•rforml'd on bodily fluids gathered as l'VI· dl'nll'. ·1 he ,1ttorncys for J),n 1s Don C.1rpentl'r Jr :ilso 5,1id Jan. 19 that they want more time to im·pare .1rguments against presenting evidence to a 1ury. Carpenter, 18, .ind Jo,hua ~1.icave Brown, 22, are both chargl'd with \,1p1t,1l murdl•r and six counts of r.ipe m ksse Dirkh1,ing's deJth Sept 2o. The boy \\'as allegl'dly druggl·d, bound and gagged, and raped repeatedly at the men's ap.irtment m Rogl'rs, 1\rk. i\ coroner said the boy suffoc,1tcd because of the po ition m \\hich he w,1s plact>d Detcnse attorney Tim Buckley s motion asks the state medical exJmmer'<; offKe to sa\·e and prt-ser.l' bodily fluids from the autop­705 East Houston St. • San Antonio, Tx 78205 • 210.225.8486 S\ c;o an mdepel'dent analys s c.in be conducted. From staff nnd wire reports 8 VOICES AND ECHOES JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE VOICe. Gaydarjlap zeroes in on 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' 1· if ii I tA td I 'I EDITORIAL STAFF Associate Publisher Mike Fleming m1k eOhoustonvmce com Ed itor Matthew A Hervue editor@houstonvo•ce com Production Bethany Bartran - Graphic ~ner M1 e Swenson Graphic Designer Contributors RICh Atensch1eldt. Kay Y Dayus, Trayce D1slon, Earl Dittman, D l Groover. Robert B. Henderson, Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart K•m Thompson, • Terry Sullivan Advert1S1ng Sales Richard B Hayes Ken Burd Office Adn11nistrator Marshall Rainwater Classifieds & Directory carolyn A Roberts carolyn White National Advertising ReprHentat1ve Rivendell Marketing Company. Inc 212-242-6863 Publishers Ovis Cram RICkEl~r rnllllti·- ~ =, ., ., MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (7 Bl S2'H1490 (800) 729-8490 Fax (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1999 Office hou's; 9 a.m to 530 p.m. weekday\ To submit a l•tter letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the r ght to edit for content and le,.gth We will withhold names upon request. but you must mclude your name and phone number for venficat1or Please send ma I to Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd Suite 100, Houston Texas 77006, lax (713) S29--953• or e-ma1 to ed1torOhouston vo1Ce com Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Vo1Ce Take a few moments for this Campaign 2000 pop quiz: Which of the following would be the m~t l'l'liable (not to be confu..;ed \\ith pred ctable) tool to make ~ense of the US. policy on gays m the military? (a) the gaydar of .i 60-something cand1d.ite for the WP presidential norrun.it1on, (b) the PC-dar of the nabon':. largest g.iy nghts lobby; • (c) the brownnose-dar of gay Repubhcans, or (d) none of the above If you gues...;ed (d), thrn you were mol'l' than likely bemused, and a little annoyed. by the mim-drama involvmg GOP presidential c-.md1date John McCain that unfolded I.isl week in New 1 lampslure, which holds ib first-m-the-nahon primancs on Tuesday It all started when McCain's campaign bus-1romcally named the 'Straight Talk l:.xprc:-.s'-made a routine stop at Calef's Country Stol'l' m Barrington, N.11. While ~kCain, .i Vietnam P.0.W. and gen­uine war hero, purchased a block of cxtra­sharp cheddar, he made some cspeaally cheesy remark.~ about the gays he':; convinced served alongside him in the Navy. I lis point was that these honorable gay sailor; neH·r felt it necessary to reveal their sexual oncntahon, and so would have thrived under today's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. Asked how he knew they were gay, if they didn't "tell," McCam promptly stepped in it. "Well, I think we know by behavior and by attitudes," he said. "I think that it'~ clear to some of us when some people have that lifestyle. But I didn't pursue it, and I wouldn't pursue it. and I wouldn't pursue it today." A~kcd again 1f he can really tell when some­one is gay, McCain grabbed h1~ latnne shovel and started d gging. HI said I had suspicions, and I think that-I was told that they wen'," he said. "But, look. That, to ml', wa" somNhing-and shll is something-that IS private. It's very different from a manifestation of that behavior in the line of duty" Smelling the foul odor of a campaign gaffe story, an intrepid reporter from the Washington Post called the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay rights lobby, and asked for a reaction to McCain's claim to aim. HHe h.is one up on me, because I can't tell 1ust by behaVlor and attitudes," said David Smith, I IRC's commurucabons director. "He ts clearly stereotyping based on man­nensms. This is a form of prtjud1ce and illus­trates the strui;gle that gay people face," Smith added gravely, though he stopped short of blaming McCain's rhetoric for the murder of Matthew Shepard. To balance the story, the Post l'l'ached Kevin Iver!>, the sound-bite ready public affairs director for the Log Cabin Republicans, a gay GOP group. "If then'' s a gay person anywhere who says they can't walk into a room and tell who some of the gay people arc, they're lying," Ivers told the newspaper "(At least McCain] has been thinking about hb entue life and when gay people may have played a role in it. He has reached a~ .md said he wanb to understand gay prop le, even though he doesn't always agrre with them," noted Ivers, reaching for the large box of Log Cabin e.isy-w1pe hankies, always at the ready Since then, McCain ha'i vowed he'll say nothing more than the words "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" when asked for his views on mili­tary service by gays. And Post columnist Gene\'a Overholser, siding with McCain and Ivers, cited the brouhaha as an example of this country's inability to deal honestly with the issue of homosexuality. As IS often the rase when knee-jerks at I !RC and Log Cabin lock legs, the messy truth got pummelled somewhere in the mushy in· between. Smith, from HRC, is fooling no one whrn he claims no ability to at least sometimes tell who is gay and who is not. [jke Ivers, from I .RC, rightly points out, every self-respecting homosexual has a functioning gJydar, even if it occ.is1onally misfires. 1 (~tJUI~Jl~AT.1 . \l:MACI-IISMCJ' FERTILIZERC2· . But John McCain is not a hom~ual, and to imply as Ivers did that sailor John relied on extmded eye contact and subtle vcrbJI and visu­al cues-the prime evidcnc.'\' of gay-<iperated gaydar-is a'i laughable as Smith's over!'l'adl. lt;s far safer to assume, ,1s Smith did, that like most straight men in the Navy some 30 years ago, McCain guessed which of his com­rades- in-arms were "that way'' by their hrnp­wn~ ted mannCfl!>m.s That's a stereotype that is sometimes right, sometimes wrong. but almost always used to degrade and deride, especi.illy in the IL'Stos­terone- charged ranks of the military. In that SC'l'\.'iC, it's no diffen.'1'11 than guc-.'iing th.it the money-grubbing. big-m~J SJilors in his unit were Jewish Quite pos.sibly true, and quilt.' p<~;sibly not; but quite definitely pn.iudici;il. For th;it reason alone, Ivers ought to be ashamed of himself for lauding McCain for engaging in an honest inquiry into the com­plex is.sue of gays m the military. WhICh brings us back to McCain himself, who was arguing in favor of the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy by claiming that he already knows which of the men (and women?) who served alongside him, risking their lives and limbs, were homosexual. True to form in today's controversy·happy press coverage, no reporter or pundit h.is broached the merits of that line of argument, which was after all the scnous policy issue under discussion. If McCain believes mO!>t gay service mem­bers couldn't hide their sexual orientation if they wanted to, then why for First Amendment's sake can't they be open about 1t and why would we kick them out for blowing their non-cover? The "Don't A~k. Don't Tell" policy has always been a bastardl/.ed rompromise in se.:irch of a rationale, and McCain's unexamined notions an' typical of tfiac,c used to ju.stify it. Even more popul,1r is the privacy ,1rgu­ment: Straight Army privates don't want gays pecking at their privates. That one makes even less sen~. because under DADT, closeted soldiers and sailor.; (at least those ~tealth enough to slip undl·rm•ath straight-operated gaydar) may ped.: at will. It's the openly gay service members who no doubt wear blinders in the barrad,s and the showers, for fear they'll be acnised of llX'T· ing. And the more gays who self·1dmtify. the easier it would be for shy heterosexuals to shield themselves accordingly. These counter-mtu1bve justifications really add up to one conclusion: We can't St:'r\ e openly because anh-gay bias would under­mine "umt cohesion," the other hut.zword in the surfacL~m1ssile debJte. C1tl•nng to prqudice is no more ncceptahlc a justif1c.ition for d1scrimin,1tmn Jg.1inst gays in the miht,1ry today than it w,1s to segregall' black.~ into :>4.'parate units",1 half""(entury ago. Th.it's the kind of plain t,1lk Wl' &houldn't expect to hear from the Straight Talk faprcs.'i, or the syooph.inL'i .it Log Cabin who've con­tnbuted $40,CXXJ to a campaign opposed to C\ery ba5ic gay rights position. But it islhc type of honesty that O\erhol<>er was correct in pointmg out is glaring m 1l~ absence without leave. HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT Self-love, and a little sag, help elude the booby trap by MICHELE FOR~TEN I wasn't surpn!i<.>d when my cousin callt'CI to inform me that his 54-year-old sis­ter':; breasts were larger than they us..'<i to be and nl'Stled in her bikini top at a gravity· defying angle. What shocked me \\las when he .idded that her 25-year-old daughter also had had her brt>asts enlarged. I can better under· stand my middlL'-aged cousin's decision to alter her breasts-to counter physical signs of aging and provide an illusory hl'Clge against mortality-than I Ciln her daughter's actions. When I was the daughter's age, back in the late '70s, the only women who had their breasts enlarged, or so it seemed to me, were models and movie stars. Being well-endowed in the mammary department had its drawbacks in real life My full·breasted friends talked about having back problems and being harassed by men on the strel'I who thought their ample chests were an inv1· talion for slt~azy comments. Glad to be an "AC upper," I didn't have ,1 dl'Slre to be more voluptuous, nor did any of my flat<hcsll'CI friends, for that matter But, thl'n again, I hung around k>sb1ans. We <Jccepted wh<Jt we were given in the milmmary gland depilrtment-l<Jrge or small-and made the most of it. We knew VIEWPOINT there wa~n't a correlation between breast mas.~ and breast sensation; nipples got erLxt whether they were the apex of gentle riSl'S or m<Jjor mountains. Things are different now, at least for straight women. Peg it to the bull market or the cooling of the controversy o\·er the safL'­ty of silicone implants, today it\ your awr­age young straight woman and her mother who are going under the knife. During 1999, more than 120,000 American women, many in their teens and early 20s, gave breast implant.~ a try. accord· ing to a Ntw York T111u~ report. It's not as though I don't do stuff to improve my appearance, like pluck way· ward eyebrow hairs. Still, this superficial kowtowing to our society's \ision of beau· ty, doesn't carry the possible repercussions of breast "enhancement": painful scar tis· sue, the unnatural feel of the enlargl>d breasts, loss of sexual sensation, infections, the llft.>d for additional surgery, leaking sili­cone, to name a few. 1.ooking deeper into what wa~ !\'ally both· mng me about young women h;mng breast augmentation surgery, I realill>d that the courting of potential health problems and the vanity of it all mel\'ly scratched the surface. At the core wa~ why women like my cousin's daughter, with so much of life ahead of them, would elect to "deform" their body whm other women, including my mother, are radically and brutally scarred by breast surgery they didn't want to have. In 1972, my 42-year-old mother had a mastectomy and opted not to have n'Con· struchve surgery. Where the fullm.>s.'i and :;moothncss of her breast once was, there was flalnl'Ss, broken by a long. thick angry scar. The skin surrounding the :.car was taut and thin, with the outlmes of her ribs \'l~i­ble. The plateau became a shallow concave bowl near her armpit, v. here her l)mph nodes had been scooped out. Four years later, she died from the cancer th.it had metastasi.zt.>d. Dunng the la.~t days of her life, 1 remember rubbing Alph.1-Keri lotion into the area where her brt·ast had hl't.'n, feeling some compassion but also revulsion in seeing her chest so ravagl>d by the cancer war she was about to lose. Tree:; have rings that reveal their age; I have visible marks that tell the storv of the six surgeril':> (some to remow mt)rt· than one growth-all, so far, benign) that I've undergone since 1970 when I was 16 ymrs old. Scars al\' etched around both of my nippk>s and fadl>d incisions line the surfan' of other parts of my breas~ In the late '80s, with scn:ral of the,e sur· gml'S behind me and another looming. I wmt for a second opinion. The doctor asked, "I lave you thought of ha\ing pro­phylactic mastectomies7 You'rt' at high risk. Why take a chance?" I lis flippancy about taking such a radical skp that was, at best, of questionable value, hornfied me \Vhy would 1 want to protect myself from a di.Sfil~ I might never con· tract? It was like deciding to commit suicide now becau:-.e eventually I'm going to die. Recently, my longtime breast doctor cummented that my breasts ~l'CI less dense and thu..s easier to examine. Th.is was the nice, medical way of s<1ying that at the age of 45, they haw started to sag. Instead of getting dl'pre...'>t.>d and starting to re.carch plastic surgL'Ort.s, 1 was elated by thl' news. Breast exams will be easier and I'll gL>f more accurate mammogram readings I've liwd long enough to understand that happiness is much longer la~ting if it is ach1e\"l>d by developing self-love rather than through my chest. It "II.ill take a couple of dL>cadl'S for my nipples to reach the \icinity of my belly but­ton. If I he that long and still have my breasts, I think I'll throw a big party to cele­brate their reaching bottom. And tf I live mto my 70s, m dt'Cellt health, and don't have one or both breasts, I'll cele­brate being a crone, hopefully surrounded by people 1 lO\'C. Arc there any other "gravity embrac­er!>" out there who might v.ant to cele­brate with me7 Midiele Farstcn i.; a CDIJesc ad111111istrator lw­mg 111 New York City. Hcr play, "Winning'# was staged last .;ummer by t/ie Luna St'll Women':; Perfomumce ProJL'CI m San f mnosro. Why gays should def end the Boy Scouts' ban by RICI JARD I~ SINCERE, JR. The U.S. Suprtme Court has aa:epted an appeal from the Boy 5.-outs of America ma New Jersey case that made natioml headlines last summer. In a unanimous decision, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the Boy Scouts could not exclude James Dale, an assistant scoutmaster, and other gay men and boys from membership or employment. Dale is being represented in the case by the Lambda Legal Defense&: falucation Fund. The Garden State court rejected the Boy Scouts' claim that such exclusion was rt>quin.'CI by their moral code, and thus pro­ll> ctl>d by the First Amendment. Liberals abhor the Boy Scouts' policy of discrimination. Conservatives tend to believe that discrimination against gay people is justified regardless of the circumstances. Yet almost every commcnt<Jtor st'Cms to miss the point of why the New Jersey d('C1s1on is pernicious, and why 1t is important that the U.S. Supreme Court he.ir this case and, ultimately, rule in favor of the Bov Scouts. In a plurahsti~ society, there will never be pcrfl>ct agr('('ment about qu tions of pt•r· ~onal morality, particularly sexual moral­ity and intimate associallons. There is still not universal appro\·a), for instance, for religiously or racially mixed mar· riages, even though no legal impediment to such unions exists. So regard les.s of whether we approve of the Boy Scouts' ban on gay members and leaders, we should acknowledge their right to act in ways they feel helps fulfill thm aim to teach certain values. The problem with the New Jersey court's ruling is that it tries to establish the principle that the go\'crnment can define for a private organization what that organization's beliefs are, and then decide for that organization how it may or may not act on those beliefs. The New Jersey decision erodes the liberties of everyone-gay or straight, conservative or liberal, believers or non­believers- who wishes to associate with people who share certain values, beliefs, or points of \'iew. It extends government power that already dictates who we may (or may not) l'mploy, what wages we ma: accept from an employer, whJCh cu,tomers we may choose for our products or services, and whom we may marry. The Boy Scouts of America is a private organization that should be allowt'CI to set its own criteria for membership. Uke many of my friends and colleagues, I dis· agree with the Boy Scouts' policy that excludes gays from membership and leadership positions. This is why it is important to encourage the efforts of those individuals and groups, such as gay former Scouts, working to per­suade the BSA to change its membcr.Jiip requirements voluntarily. Some argue that regulation of the Boy Scouts is justified because the group relics on taxpayers' money to subsidize its activities. But the Boy Scouts' reliance on government varies widely from place to place, and m most cases uses predom­inantly "private" space. More than 60 percent of Cub Scout packs and Boy Scout troops are spon.<.ored by churches. Direct government sponsorship of the Boy Scouts constitutes only a small fraction of the BSA's acti\1tics The question of whether taxpayers may or should subsidize the Boy Smuts i.' Sl'pa­rate from whether the Bov S.:outs ha\,. a right to engage in expres.,~ve conduct pn>­llxll> d by the First Amendment If taxpa) crs who are dissatisfied v.;th the Boy , :outs' policies wish to end their limited subs1· dies on a community-by-community basis, that is their privilege as the ones who hold the pur.>e-strings. We should also note that the ew Jersey Court's expansive definition of the Boy Scouts as "a public accommodation" could have detrimental effects on all citiz.cns. We should protect the pri\'ilte agamst the intrusion of the "public." L~ privacy to be respected only in our homes? Where is the limit at which we will be forced to a_'soaate with those who disagree with us, or with those WC find disagreeable? If we do not stand up for the principle of freedom of as..-.ociation, soon we will see a homogeruzed avil soacty, m which every group looks like every other group, m which robust debate cannot take place lx'<'au.~ dL'iagrcement is forbidden. Gay men and lesbians, who remam a permanent minority in ttus country, cannot afford this kind of assault on liberty and pri· \ acy. Although it may St.'ffil countcnntu- 1tiw, we ~hould support the Boy Scouts in their fight for freedom or e>.prt>s.~ion and fr,'C'dom of a'sodation. R1dU1Td Smcere 1.-; prrsulent of Gays and l..t-:-bians for lndrrodual Liberty and om be reac1U'd tfirougli t/ii, p11blu:at10n 10 Chat Personals News I Travel I Entertainment I People ~Out:com www.planetoutClllTI MY.. Key.Yool. PlanetOut engage enjoy THE LOVETT INN D1sti11ctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Call us for your next out-of-to1.un guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities •Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • Lovettinn.cvm YOU'LL LOVE IT! JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Come visit us in our new location this Sunday at 1311 Holman across from HCC-Downtown Campus For more info ••• 713-528-6756 or maranatha@ev1.net MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC HAS MOVED ••. we will be sharing the home of Central Congregational Church at 1311 Holman (across from the HCC-Downtown campus) this Sunday, January 30, 2000 NEW! Worship time 6:30pm Super Bowl party 5pm. Offices are located at 117-A Tuam. This week's message: "Show Me Your Glory" l~iKilOliL BE PROJECT Kolbe Prayer Line 713-861-1844 e-mail: Kolbe@neosoft.com or visit our website at www.neosoft.com/-kolbe Pll.(713)861·1800 • 1030 Heights Bl\1!. Houston, TX 'i'i008 No Dues, No MC>mbership With Frandsran Hospitality CALENDAR Friday Jan. 28 Morning Prayer I Oam Movie Night 7pm -J 'an : Arc" Monday Jan. 31 Euchar .t 7 30 pm Thursday Feb. 3 Potluck 7pm Annise Parker Speaker. Friday Feb. 4 Morning Prayer 1 Oam Monday Feb. 7 Eucharist 7 ·30 pm Friday Feb. 11 Morning Prayer l Oam Movie Night 7pm Out of Africa" Wednesday Feb. 16 Hospital Visitation Workshop for New Volunteers l - 4pm For Auto, Home & Health Regina I Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Ru1lnr l:i "~antr " Worlf'...-• Cnmprn• at ion Group llralll1 • U/r lnsurancf' & nr11rh mor' 6575W.LoopSoutli,Suite185 Bellaire, TX77401 I HOUSTON VOICE •JANUARY 28, 2000 NEWS Around the Nation Spanish-language ads favor california anti-gay marriage effort SAN FRA'.'JCISCO (AP)-Sponsors of a b<1llot me;:isure banning recognition of same-sex marriages began airing ,1 Spanish­langu. ige ad Jan. 20 stressing family and tr.i­dit1on whill' not mentioning the subject of the intti.ittve. The 30-second spot is runnmg on '>p.intsh-language stations around the state, s.iid Robert Glazwr, spokesman for the campaign backing Proposition 22 on the \farch 7 ballot. A recent Public Polin• Institute of Cilifornia poll showed I lispanics favoring the ballot measure by more than 2-1, while voters overall support­ed it by about 3-2. Meanwhile, openly gay rock star Melissa Ftheridgt' is set to join a celebrity line-up fighting Proposition 22. Etheridge will per- Melissa Etheridge and Lily Tomlin are among those slated to perform next month at a con­cert to raise funds to light a canlornia ballot measure against gay marriage. form at a llt'verly I fills fund-raiser on Friday aimed at bringing in $250,000 to help defeat thl' <1nti-gay ballot measure. She will be joined by Lily Tomlin, who acknowledged being g<1y in a recent mterview. And in San Diego, four leading Republican mayoral candidates joined forces at .i JOtnt news conference to announce their collecti\·e opposition to the Knight initiative. Two other candid.itl's, one Democrat and one Republic<1n, support the measure Oregon professor's anti-gay remark unleashed campus debate ORI GO:--: CITY Ore AP <\ remark about ga} s attributed to an instructor at Cl<1ck,1mas Community College has prompted a formal complaint and sparked a campus debatl' about academic freedom. Donald Epstl'in, a \'l'leran instructor of history and rl'li­gious studies, was giving an O\'ervicw of Judaic studic~ when he began discussing the his­tory of anti-Semitism, the relationship between Greeks and Jews, and tensions the two groups l'\pt·rienced O\W homosexuality, student Joshua Alexander said. "Then ht' iust jurnfWd in and said, 'You arc better off being dead than homosexual,"' said Alex.rnder, 21, of Beavercreek. "1\nd he said, 'You can write that down."' Alexander has filed a complaint against Fpstein and requested that he not be permitted to h.'Jch Judaic studies. The student s.1id ht' made the request afll'r visiting Epstl'in's office to talk about the complamt. Alt'xander said Epstein showed him a p<issage from the Bible supporting his opinion. Fpstl'in rcfust'd to commt'nt about thl' complaint or the remJrks, which allegedly took place in his course on the Holocaust. Hearing set for 67 Methodist ministers who blessed gay marriage SACRA\1F:--:TO-llcanngs will begin nl':>.t month Jgainst 67 United Methodist minis­ters who arc chargt'd with violating church l.iw by bkssing last year's "holy unton'' of two ksb1an church lradcrs, the S.icrammto lkl' rl'ported Jan. 22. The Committee on Investigation h.is called the unorthodox hr,1rings for ft'b. 1-3 to glean testimony from cxpL·rts on biblical iuipturr, Unitrd \1ethodist law, l'thics and other topics related to the s.imt'-sex ceremony, said Re\' Ron Swisher, committre chairman. Swisher and six clergy wlll'agu('S will decide the fate of the pastors, who could, face church trials and remo\·al of tlwir ministries. Some 95 United Methodist clerics took part in the January 1999 service. Convicted murderer suspected in killings of three gay men DI TROIT (AP)- Wayne County, Mich. prosecutors plan to chJrge a Detroit man who ,1lre.1dy h.1s beL•n convicted of two murdl•rs with thl' murdl·r of a gay man. WilliL• Brown, ·H, was pilrolcd tn 1994 despite two murder connctions. Police now suspect Brown in the Fl'bruary 1999 slaying of Eddie :vfatthl'Ws, 37, a Detroit nursing home employee. Inspector Wilh,1m R!Ce, chief ot the Detroit Police Department homicide unit, silid Brown', DNA con­mxted him to \1atthews' murdl'r Poltn• s.1id ~fatthcws was strangled with a telephone cord .111d a neck scarf, and that monev ,rnd othl'r ttems were missing from his .ipartment Both of Brown's previous \'icllms werl' str.mgll·d in a s1m11Jr fashion. "The murders arc 1dl'!lt1c.1l," s.1id Rice. I lom1L,de dell'<'hws .md prosecutors said they also arc looking at Brown in connection 1\lth two other unsoln·d killings. "I think he targets gay men, and he may h.l\'c done more for all Wl' know, but at this point we cJn link him to three," SJ1d Wa} m• County Assist.int Prosecutor Roht'rt Spada. Colo. board votes to keep teacher under attack for test on sex IWX:WAY, Colo. (1\1')-Biology tl'.Kher l),w1d Kl'nl1l'}', aiticizcd for a test th.it indudl•d rdcrl'IKl'S to .in.11 SL'\, will keep his job. Tlw srhool bo.ird \'Oted 3-1 on Jan. 17 not to accept his res1gn.1tion Kenne} I\ as rcprim.mded ,ind srnt ,111 .1pology to parents. "The boJrd .it this time docs not feel that it is 111 thl' school's best tntl'rl'St to .JCcept the resignation of Dr Kenney," aid ~hlhelle Kvnc>, bo,1rd pn•sidl•nt, reading .i statement prepared by the boJrd I ht• wntro\ ersy empted Jan 6 I\ he11 Kc>nm•v g.n e his 10th grade b10logy students a test th.it 1nduded tn1s queshon " 1} brother (an \1 I>) focls thJt one of the main rc,1sons AIDS spreads 1s the \anous forms of ,mJI sex Dt•scnbe ho1\ vou would protect yourself .iga1:ist tlus t\ pc of transm1sswn, as um mg that vou en1oy this tvpe of sexual bch.i\ 1or" fr.mi st.1ff 1111d r .n r port ... , ... ' I . t t I 11 Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer WESTHEIMER R A ..... a0 : N z * w a: 0 z 0 LL. RICHMON 12 NEWS JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Activists say Miss. killing may have been hate crime ,.. Continued from Page 5 "Any posihon being taken by authontics that tlus wasn't a hate crime, we feel to be a smoke ~recn and a cover-up," Romanello told Houston Vozre. "It wal> :'\ew Year's Eve---not 1ust the tum of the year, but the tum of the decade, the cen­tury and the millennium-and to say that two straight guys went to a gay bar and picked up and murdered a gay guy, on that evening, and it wasn't a hate crime, is bull~hit," he said. Other local and national activists said they arc very concerned. but taking a more cautious approach. Tolbert's body was found in Alabama, and his alleged killers will be prosecuted in Mobile. But the Alabama Gay & Lesbian Alliance isn't currently pursuing the case as a hate crime, said spokesman David White, although the group is continuing to moni­tor press reports and ralk with activists about the ISSUC. "Until I really know that for sure, I don't want to pubhaze it and be embarrassed later on," White :;aid The National Gay & LesbLlll Task Force 1s "very closely following the lead of the local [activ1Sts]," said spokeman David Elliott. "We don't have any independent information that would suggest it is a hate crime, but we are staying m contact with the local groups because they arc the ones to make that dcter­m1nabon and that will need our support. "We want 1t fully m\ csbgated, but we are not brashly iumpmg to .:my conclusions," he said. The ational Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs 15 also monitoring the case, said board member Jeffrey Montgomery, who also ;.crves as executive director of the Triangle Foundation, Michigan's statewide group addressing anb-gay violence. "This looks a lot like an anti-gay moti­vated crime, although I'm not saying it is or it isn't:' Montgomery said, listing the fact that Tolbert was killed-and the e<;pecially vmlent way he was killed-as warning signs prompting his concern. Insisting that Tolbert was only killed so Kabat and Bentley could steal his car appears "wrong-headed," Montgomery said. With most car-jackings, he said, "the perl>On wants the car and doesn't want to spend a lot of time with the victim." In Tolbert's case, in contrast, "we have what is typical of most gay killings-this overkill aspect. where m this case he was bru­tally beaten and strangled," Montgomery said. "It takes time to do that, and car-jackers don't take that much time." If prosecutors take these factors into account and still don't believe Talbert's death was a hate crime, they owe the area's gay resident.~ a more complete explanation of "hy the pos::.1ble motive has been ruled out, Montgomery said A 'kind-hearted' friend Almost three weeks after he went out to celebrate New Year's with fnends ill Joey's, Tolbert was buried last Thurs­day in M1ss1ss1pp1 You_ doh't know f Those who knew Tolbert remembered him as an open, canng person who would do any­thing for his friends. "lie was always so kind-hearted to everyone," said Jon, a gay Gulfport, Miss., resident who asked to be identified only by his first name. Speaking with Houston Voice the day of Talbert's funeral, Jon recounted how he and many friends fell too "shaken up" to attend the memorial service. 'They buried him an hour ago. . . We were hit pretty hard, and we decided to let them spend that time with family," he said. "We're going next week to visit him at his grave." Jon said he first met Tolbert through mutual acquaintances, and the two had grown to be dose friends over the last year and a half. "I le was a very caring person, very open-hearted. He had a large circle of friends on the coast, and he would go out of his way for anybody," Jon said, his voice filled with emotion. At the time of his death, Tolbert was liv­ing with his parents while his home in George County was being renovated, according to Jon. Renaldo, who is from Jackson, Miss., said he met Tolbert and saw him several times at Joey's, where Tolbert was a regular. "lie was really always smiling-he had good vibes about him, fun vibes," Renaldo said "I le was always laughing and stuff. and he didn't say anything negative." With Jamie Tolbert, 'we have what is typical of most gay kilr.ngs-this overkill aspe<t,' said Jeff Montgomery, a spokesman for the Natianal Coalitian of Anti-Violence Proje<ts. Both Jon and Renaldo said Talbert's death had a profound effect on the area's discrete but tight-knit gay community. "Everyone is talking about 11, and every­one is concerned, but in the same sense, there is a spirit of support," said Renaldo. Renaldo predicted Tolbert's death could be the impetus to drive the community to greater visibility. "We all looked at the Matthew Shepard thing, and it was shocking, but now 1t has happened to one of our own," he said. "We've dealt with a lot of stuff in Missis~ippi, like the comments Trent Lott made about homosexuals, and we sat here and kept our mouths shut about 1t. I think right now everyone is very upset and tirl•d of it," Renaldo said HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 Past Out 1981 GAY AND LESBIAN HISTORY by DAVID BIANCO Brutal lesson in bathhouse etiquette What were the Toronto bathhouse raids of1981? It wasn't the first anh-gay police action in Canada's history, but ii was the biggest and most brutal On Feb. 5, 1981, 150 plainclothes and uniformed police officers staged violent raids on four gay bathhouses in Toronto and arrested almost 300 men. City politics played a major role in the raids. In the elections of November 1980, right-wing municipal candidates for the first time played the "gay card," raising the threat of gay power to win \'Otes. Toronto's gay-friendly mayor lost his bid for reelec­tion to an arch conser\'ative. The City Council, too, shifted to the right. The Body Po/1tic, the city's gay newspaper, anticipated in December 1980 that "the police [will) feel more comfortable" with the new mayor and that would lead to increased harassment of gays and other minorities. On reb. 5 of the following year, the prediction came true. Al 11 p.m., police simultaneously raided four of Toronto's five gay bathhouses-­Barracks, Club Baths, Richmond Street I lealth Emporium and Roman Sauna Baths. At Richmond Street, undercover offi­cers arrived first and asked for a room and a locker. After they paid, they arrested the cashier and the manager. At Barracks, "a guy in plain clothes ... shoved me up against the wall," one bath­house patron reported. Besides bloodying the man's nose, the undercover cop repeatedly punched him in the lower back while taunt­ing him verbally, "You're disgusting, faggot." Physical and verbal abuse of patrons was reported at all four bathhouses. Police also used crowbars and hammers to smash through doors and walls, causing sig­nificant damage to the premises. Many of the plainclothes policemen never bothered to show their badge.. Police at the Richmond Street baths allegedly answered the phone dunng the raid with quips to callers such as, "Michael's tied up right now" The raids lasted three hours and caused $.15,000 in damage. Canadian "bawdy house" laws permitted the arrest of bathhouse patrons on charge:, of prostitution or indecen­cy, and a total of 266 men were taken were chargt'CI. Twenty employees were also arrest­ed, as well as a medic from a clinic that gave free VD cht'Cks to bathhouse patrons Community response was fast and furious. By noon on Feb. 6, concernt'CI and angry rep· rescntativcs from Toronto's leading gay organi?.1tions bt'gan to slrateg1ze. In 1usl four hours, ,1 coali tion of activists had rounded up J sound truck and marshJls and had pro­duct'CI 4,000 flyers calling for a demonstration that night against the police raids. At midnight, at a busy intel'Sl'Ction in the ht'Jrt of Toronto's gily neighborhood, protest· t'rs bc-gan gathering. A few hundred led tht• The steamy confines of fow Toronto bathhouses were cSsrupted ii 1981 when po&ce rcids r~ed ii 266 arrests, ignitilg a wave of gay protests. way, blowing whistles and chanting "Stop the cops!" Others soon arrived, and patrons of gay bars joined the angry crowd. Within half an hour, a crowd of about 1,500 surged toward the police station where the men arrested the night before had been held. As the crowd neared, protesters met with re:.istance from the police, who once again resorted lo brutality. Several people were injured and 11 demonstrators were arrested. "It was our Stonewall," one participant later declared. But, in fact, Canadian gays had been forging a liberation movement for 10 years Two weeks after the raids, community anger had nor died down. On Feb. 20, the largest gay demonstration in Canadian histo­ry up to that point took place in Toronto's Qut>en's Park, with at least 2,000 people. The events of February 1981 mobilized gay Torontonians to renewed and radical political action. "I finally got angry," wrote Ken Popert, editor of 11te Body Politic. "As long as sooety continues to demand us as its victims and its human sacnficcs, that anger is going to be there, waiting to get into us, again and again." The City Council later voted for an independ­ent inquiry into the raids. In the months that followed, Toronto's gay organi1.1tions grt·w in size and strength. New ones formed to keep applying pressure to local government. Anti-violence street patrols werl' initiated. A print ad was created for US. newspapers and travel agents, discouraging vacationers. By the summer, the city had fundl'CI a report on how to impro\'e relations between gays and police. "We finally may be getting ~mething we've bt'l.·n s.1ying we've had for the la~t 10 years," one activist nott'CI: "a gay community." Darid B11111co 1s the author of #Gay E:~~cntmls,'' a collecllon of his history columns. fie ran be rcaclred nt DmieBumro@aol.com. 13 Selling your life insurance I is a · decision. When you're gay. iving "'~h HIV end lhirbng of ~ ·ng rou ife 1n1Ll'once. shOvldn'I you be g•ven o foce-to-foce cornullohon"' o no-p-~Ll'e. no-obigohon en"' ,..,,menti Shouldn't this option be •scussecl Unked V(ltco1 Senefts is p-oud to be lhe only gay owned ond epe<ated viotical b'aker wijh a IOCOl office on HOuSton. After a~ "'e beieve111 p-oVlding you the penonal attention \'QI. dele<Ve and ge!tng you the 1"1()1; ,,.,,,,. ' ~the Shortest time! 37 Krb) Dnve Suo•e 1036 Houston. rx 77QQ8 713 528 6777 e-mail: itxfijhotmo~.com Regis~~ in Texas Member of Nallonol Vla11col A.noclollon Call 1·800-275·3090 today! LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS City of Houston Community Enhancement Meetings ch year, the City updates its r- - - - - - - - - - - - .- - , long-range plans for installing I District A Bruce Tatro I new sewer lines, streets, police I February 3• . 7 • 9 p.m. I d fire stations libraries and Scarborough ~tgh School . . • . I 4141 Costa Rica I therproJectsmthecommuruty. I D. . t. t B Carol Mims Gallowa·v# I I h I 'd ify . 1s nc _ ease e p 1 ent projects I February 8, 7 - 9 p.m. I d city service needs in your Francis Scott Key Middle School ea for the City's next Operat· I 4000 Kelley I ing Budget and Capital Im· I District c Marl<' Goldtierji rovement Plan (CIP), the five I February IO, i- 9 p.m. ear schedule for constructing I The Rice School - Auditorium d financing projects. I 7550 Seuss Council members are holding a ries of meetings on the annual perating budget and the Capi • Improvement Plan (CIP). Come learn about City programs d funding, and tell us your ideas for improving your com· munity. District D District F Comment fonns- ~ill be avail- I District G able at all meetings, the I .Mayor's Citizens Assistance I Office, Council offices and the I Planning & De\·elopment De- I District H partmcnt. Tu requo1 a form by mail, call 713-837-7862. 1 Bilingual, sign language and/ 1 or captioning services are available on request. Call 713-837-7831,oneweek February 29, 7 • 9 p.m. Braeswood Assembly of God 10611 Fondren February 15, 7- 9 p.m Dobie High School • Cafeteria 11111 Beamer Rd. February 21, 7 - 9 p.rn. Creckwood Middle School· J 36Q~ W. ~.e Houston P~. I Mark Ellis I February 28, 7- 9 p.m. I Sharpstown Recreation Center I 6600 Harbor Town Bert K~llN ·· · .... .. · I Ftbru•I') 24, 6:30- 8:30 p.m. I Frostwood Elementary School I 12214 Memorial Drhe I Gabriel Vasguez I February 22, 7· 9 p.m. Jeff Davis High School· Auditorium I I IOI Quitman I John Castillo ' I Febru•I') 17, 6:30 -8:30 p.m. I Cape Center 4501 Leland I before tbe mcetingyouplanto L - - - - - - - - - - - - - .J attend. {TI'Y 713-837-7702) 14 Fill 'er up? ;.... Continued from Page 1 rnmmahon policy, and for dropping domestic partner benefits Mobil once offered to its employees. Cirigliano said Exxon Mobil doesn't want to hmit its policies to specific groups and doesn't offer domestic partner benefits because they aren't required by federal law. As organizers of Equality Rally spread the word about today's protest, they encouraged people taking part to bring their Exxon Mobil Credit cards, destroy them, and let the compa­ny know 11 lost their business. The rally was also scheduled to provide a way for protesters to apply for credit cards from more gay-friendly i;as and oil comparues. But With gas stations on abn~t e\'ery cor­ner, gay and lesbian consumers face a variety of ch01ces. Some of those stations bear log~ of compa­nies that don't protect gay and lesbian employees or recognize the buying of gay consumers. To help consumers, the Ho11sto11 Voice surveyed maior oil and gas comparues to see where each one stands when JI comes to gay men and 16bians The gay fnendliness of companies can be gauged by looking at five criteria. accord­ing to Kim Mills, education director of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's large.~! gay civil rights group. Mills said companies should have a non­discrimmation statement that specifically includes sexual orientation, offer in~urance and other benefits to sam~x partners of employees. include sexual orientation in diver­sity training, contribute to gay and AIDS relat­ed charities, and have a gay employee group. Offering the benefits is the m~t dramatic step a company can take to show that it understands gay and lesbian issues, Mills said. It 1s not unusual to see se\'eral companies in an ind us try begin offering domestic partner benefits as soon as one steps out, she said. San Francisco-based Chevron Corp. was the first oil company to offer both a non-dis-oil & gas company BP Amoco ' : I' I' Ii LOCAL NEWS JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE crimination policy that includes sexual orien­tation and domestic partner benefits. The pol­icy became effecti\'e in 1993. The benefits, available to samMeX and opposite-sex part­ner.;, were made available in 1997. Chevron is the nation's No. 3 integrated oil company, behind Exxon Mobil and Texaco. Chevron operates 8,000 gas stations and employees about 40,000 people Susan Guerrero, co-chairwoman of the company's gay and lesbian employee group, 5a.Jd she considers the company gay friendly, althou~ the atmosphere for gay employees varies \;y department. "\Vithin Chevron, the O\'erall company has very open and accepting policies, but that fil­ters down to individual attitudes," she said. Like m many industries, the manufacturing plants at Chevron arc generally less gay friend Iv than the offices. Guerrero said. The rompany's charitable donations to gay causes arc m()';tly in the San Francisco Bay area, where the company is headquartered. Guerrero, who JS based in Houston, said she 1s somewhat dL-;appomted by the lack of dona­tions bv Chevron here. I louston-based Shell Oil Co., now part of Royal Dutch/Shell Group, has had a non-dis­crimination policy that includes sexual orien­tation since 1996. The company began offering same-sex and opposite-sex domestic partner benefits in 1998. Diversity training at the company is still somewhat spotty, but sexual orientation is included when the training is offered, accord­ing to Rick Schroder, a diversity consultant for the company and one of the co-founders of Shell's gay and lesbian employee group. Shell's contributions have helped fund the Lesbian Health Initiative, PFLAG's national organization, the Greater Houston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce and other gay and lesbian causes. The company has participated in Houston's AIDS walk and has sponsored gay pride events in Atlanta. Shell also received a corpo­rate atizen award from HRC in 1998 and has sponsored national events for the ~tion. 'The attitude is one of inclusion,' Schroder said. NShell's policy is to value all people. We're making progress in that area ... A third company that has led the way on gay and lesbian is.sues is in transition, but its progressive policies appear certain to stay in place. The 1999 merger of British Petroleum and Amoco created BP Amoco, a London­based company that is among the top inte­grated oil companies in the world. The company, which owns more than 28,lXXl service stations worldwide, is also looking to buy Atlantic Richfield Co. The former Amoco's policies provided for a non-discrimination statement that included sexual orientation and for same-sex and opp<r site sex domestic partner benefil~. The merged Ii< company plans to continue those poliaes, ffi according to company spokespen;on llugh ~ DePland. ~ Di\'ers1ty training that includes gay and les- ~ bian 1ssuL'S is also likely to continue, DePland said. I le said he did not know what pl.ms the company has regarding charitable donations. \'vhile not leaders in their industry, lexJco and Sunoco have some progressive policiL'S in place Texaco, based in White Plains, New York, 1s the nation's 'o. 2 integrated oil company nnd selb fuel at 38,lXXl gas stations worldwide. Its 25,000 employees are protected by a non-dis­crimination policy that includes sexual orien­tation, but domestic partner benefits arc not offered, according to spokeswoman Kelly McAndrew. The 11,000-employee Sunoco operates about 3,700 gas stations in 17 states, mostly in the Northeast, under the Ultra Service Centers and Aplus names. Sunoco is not a full-service oil company like Exxon Mobil, Chevron, Shell, BP Amoco and Texaco. Instead, the Philadelphia-based company is the nation's No. 3 refiner and marketer of oil products. The company does not offer domestic part­ner benefits, according to spokeswoman Shannon Breuer, but its non-discrimination policy and di\'ersity training include sexual orientation. Tosco Corp., based in Stamford, Conn., i~ the only company contacted that refused to answer specific questions. The company, the leader in the oil refining and marketing industry and No. 2 in con- Gay organizers of a rally against Exxon Mobil, including Dan DiDonato, were scheduled to meet with company executives early today to discuss its employment policies. vemence stores (behind 7-Elcven), owns Circle K. It operates 2,400 gas stations and con\'enience stores and another 2,600 under license from BP, 76 and Exxon, providing a presence in 36 states. Two other companies answered "no" to all five benchmark question~: CITGO Petroleum Corp., which employl'\.'S 5,lXXl people, does not operate any of the sta­tions that bear its name. All 15,000 of its out­lets are independently-owned franchises. Some 1,900 of those are 7-Eleven storl'S. Ultramar Diamond Shamrock Corp, based in San Antonio, is No. 2 in the oil refining and marketing business and oper­ates 5,300 gas stations and convenience stores in under the Diamond Shamrock, Total, Ultramar and Beacon brand name,. It employs 24,000 people. Spokesman Jodie Carlson said the compa­ny complies with all laws regarding non-dis­crimination, noting that sexual orientation is not a class protected by federal law. ooes your noo­diset1m1naaon policy Include Do you offer Does your d1Vers1ty Do you make ""''-•Pr «dllllral&J contact information Plffl ClomestiC partner sexual orientation? benefits? yes yes yes yes no no no no yes yes yes no yes no no answer no answer no no tramu~ Include donatlOllS to gay or sexual orientation? ~OS organczations? yes no answer yes yes no no no no yes yes yes no no no no answer no answer no no no no no 200 E. RM!dolph Dr., Chlcll&O, IL 60601 312-8156-6111 • www.bpMloco.com 575 Market St., San Francisco, CA 94105 415-894-7700 • www.chevron.com 2000 Wntcllnter Ave., White Plllna, NY 10650 914-253-4000 • www.texaco.com 72 Cummings Point Rd., Stamford, CT 06902 203-977-1000 • www.tosco.com 6000 N. Loop 1604 Wt1t, s.n Antonio, TX 78249 210-592-2000 • www.udscorp.com HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 LOCAL NEWS 15 Insult to gays, theater defended as 'political satire' by MATII IEW A. f l[\J IE A jab leveled in a I louston magazine column at gay men and lesbians and a gay-friendly movie theater has drawn criticism from some gay activists, who call it "insulting." The column suggests young gay men and lesbians have "sensual relationships" with small vegetabb and asks whether a l()('al theater should change its ad\·ertising cam­paign to tout a permanent gay film festival OO:ausc it shows gay-themed movies. Frrelance writer Roger Gray's "In Your Face" column in the January issue of in>1tit' /1011>/011 includes the mention in an item titled, "Thr Love That Won't Shut Up." In the nine-hne paragraph, Gray takes Greenway Theater to task for showing gay and lesbian films, and suggests the theater adopt an all-purpose advertising slogan "The story of a young (man's/woman's) exploration of (his/her) sensual other self, e\pressed in a tender relationship with another (man/woman/small vegetable) ." Grl•enw,iy, operated by Landmark Theatre Corp., takes part in the city's annual g.1y film festival and schedules a g.1y-theml'd or gay-friendly film at least every month, or for about 30 percent of its offerings in a year, said Sarah Gish, Landmark's city manager Gray also wrotl' that he hopes Log Cabin Republicans, a gay group, wasn't planning ii movies that larger theaters ignore. l..Jndmark's Rh·er Oaks was the only the­ater in I louston to show "Boys Don't Cry," a critically-acclaimed movie about the murder of transgendered teenager Brandon Teena I hlary Swank, who portrayed Teena in the film, won the Golden Globe for Best Actress on Sunday for her performance "We work hard to showcase gay and Jes· bian films. It's if that's a problem, and it isn't to me," Gish said. "W<' haw found the com· munity here to be very supportive of what­ever Wl' play. I am just a big believ<>r in not The Love That Won't Shut Up llAjvSt"'l,O'l\thtlt•~~--._,~,...ft!MtianilftM .. lGt•.,-..a ·yn.-...1... ,•.-,•.W _>J_g0"_"7cc_wl,< ,. !_ ___ .,__M j l1N_b- .. ,.~ ... -.... -----~ .... ., . ._ .......... b«_ ... __, _1 t\.W o9ca.~---- ~,.,. ___ ..,........,_ ..._Mod on._, h ,.,.,. • ..., i.. - - "'-"""" M - brcJUW 11war.*:tCl'Nft'• '"Pt&u'~ • ...,_._.auw ~-RMit C' tNr«t ._pvncNint., .. SDy""°"*'Wl"CtClillf MOdA/flltllf~'~ putting out negative information about groups or communities. I 1ust didn't think [the article] was necessary." Laurette Veres, president and editorial director of /11s1de J/011slon, dismissed the crit­icism of Gray's column as misplaced "In Your face" is political satire, she said, and should be read that way. Besides, Veres said, the column pokes fun at Bush, not gay men and lesbians. "This whole column by Roger Gray is def­initely J political column. We, in our political columns, openly poke fun at c\·erybody and don't pick at any one group of pt.>opll' Nothing 1s targeted," Veres said. Asked if the magazine would treat AfricJn-Americans, Jews or ~1uslims in thL• same manner in its columns, \'cres said it would, if it was in the "context of what a polihcal figure had done." "It is political satire and that is the conic\! people should 1udge it in," she said. But Carter said the satire g~ too far. "This is another good way for pL'Ople in our community who want to pick up a phone or write a Jetter and tell them that c\·en the smalle:..t of jokes, you don't stand ;ind let them go b);" Carter !'aid. "You ha\·e to be the one that :..tops and ~rs that you don't apprt'Ciate 1t." Gray could not be reached for comment. Inside Houston 5959 Richmond, suite 410 Houston, Texas 77057 713·784-7575 www.insidehoustonmag.com Radio jocks pull no punches inf estival debate .- Continued from Page 1 But 1',1rkl'r ,1lso calkxl on thl•aty's gay and lt-:;­b1an n>mmunity to nood the station with Id· ters ,ind e·ma1b to protest the rnmml•nts. "l\e tned to dl'al \\1th 1t ma busme>s-like manner, but l'\'l' h.1d a h.ird lime in gl'tting the st,ition ,1t .111. At this point, ~X'(>ple who hL•.1rd the romml'nts should call and let them know thCJr opmions," l'arkl'r sud. "They 1wed to apologizl' to mC' and S<l\' 1t won't happen agJin. Anvth1ng ll..,s th.111 th.it is un.icceptabll'." Tlw st.illon should ,ilso allow a ml'mlx•r of till' g.1y community on thl' show to respond to the anti-gay comments, SJid Se;in C.irll'r, pre ... 1dmt of the 1 louston Gay & Ll'sbian Politic,11 Ciucus. "l.d us h.iw .i \'OICl' ;ind at lmst come b.Kk ,it the comments," C.1rll'r said. "We dolll'l.'d to let thl'm know th.it they can't go on mak· 111g stuff like this h.1ppen" fhl' alll');l'd .inti-gay comments and dis· cussion of tlw \\'l'Sthl·iml'r Strl'et Fcsli\«il Cilml' 1ust d.1ys aftl•r .i city hearing officer rl'fuf.l-d to 1ssm' ,i permit for the 26-year-old fl'..,ll\'al, sclwdull·d for ~1av 6-7. In nwd1a n·ports this w~'l'k, P.1rkcr said the fl•..,ll\',il 1s "too big for a n·sidential area," .ind rL'(Omml'nd\·d to fl>stival organizers that thl' l'\'l'nt bl' rl'U un•d in St-opl' or mo\·ed to anoth­l'r Jo.:ation to ,idd rl'SS public safety concerns. Citv off1ti.ils citl'l.l widl'Spread illq~.11 parking, traffil: gndlock, litll·ring, noi~ and disorderli· ness in l\fo.-.ing to grant the fl..,.,ti\'JI a pcnn1t. fhl' l'\'l'nt, which draws an cstimatl•d 300,000 pl'opll' to J JO-block strip of \\'L•sthl'iml'r m'ilr \1ontnisr, pits some neigh· borhood ,N .. ooahons and local busme...,~ ag.iinst supportl'r:.. of the event. During tlm'I.' davs of IL'shmony during a recent pt'rmit heanng, 14 peopll'-!Ilduding policl• officers-!-poke against thC' fe..,tival, while <>nl' per~in spoke in favor, according to the llousto11 Chromcte fostiv.:il organizer John FlorC'z told the news­papt ·r !11.it tlw hmnng procl~ had been biased. "We' re not going to sue thC' city, but we arc gomg to appe;il to cooler heads if we can," l'lo1w told thl' C/110111de. "Therl.' were no fights or u1inating or defecation. These arc 1ust normal people hanging out ha\'lng a good time" l'arkl'r s.1id she 1s attempting to brokl'r a compromise bdween Florez and opponents of the fest!\ al to a\·oid a confrontation before Citv Counnl. Flon·z h.1d 10 d;ip. to appe;il the permit deni.11. Ill' can take the dl>cision to City Cou111.;J, or m.1kl' changl'S to the e\·ent to addres..., thL· public safl'ty concerns of city officials. The permit denial, bv Assistant Director of Public Works Gl'orge 13ra\'l'nl'C, was the first undl'r ,1 rl'\·1scd city ordinance go\·eming paradl's, bhvals and other public c\·cnts. The new ordm.:incC' requires that a public hearing be hdd on "ma1or" events before per· milting, ,iccording to the Chro111cle. Parker said hl'r :;ense of City Council col· lmgues is that it won't support the fcsti\·al unlll changl's are made by its organizers. "Wl• .ire working with the fe:;ti\·a] organiz· er and the neighborhood associations to work out a compromise. I don't know if that is pos· sibll·, Parker said. But regardlr..,s of the outcome of thl' festt­v. 11, Parker, who won a ~ond term on C.1ty Council last :-\owmber, said the alleged antt­g. iy slurs on KKRW took a public 1s ..-. uc and personali1L'<i 1t to her m ,1 negat1\·e way i\ hile she has encountered gay bailing in her po! tic.ii campaii;ns, Parker s..11d 'he's ne\'t'r f.Kl'd anti-gay slurs. "Calling me J bbian in a political sense 1s gay baiting, but it is not derogatory. Lsing slurs is a completely differl.'nt situa· tion, It has not happened to me before. It b TakeJoY really ~urprbing," Parker said KKRW 93.7 P· st Oak Blvd., 12th floor Houston, Texas 77056 71H!308000 www kkrw.com "The Dean and Rog Show" dean&rog@kkrw.com keven@kkrw.com Taking Pride The Pride Committee of Houston unveiled its logo for Houston Gay & Lesbian Pride 2000 during o commu­nity- wide party Thursday. The logo, on interpretation of the theme of this year's event-"'Toke Pride, Take Joy, Toke Action" -as designed by local graphic artist Dione Jolley. The .Jogo will be used on Pride 2000 ' merchandise and pubrKotions related to the event. The Pride parade is set for June 24. 16 Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Ed Kinser BSMI, CRS Director: Kinetic Sports ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • "Fun· - The Advocate • "CHI Siter - Ylhll • "Best online matchmaker" • - HX Magazine •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE THIS YEAR I will set out to do something great for myself. MUSCLE MECHAN ICSSH THE PLAZA AT RIVER OAKS ~ 1920 W. Gray • 1945 W. Bell 713-528-5277 SEE THE CLA&5IFIED SECTIO\ Paving the Way in Y2K I have a11 oppo11c11t a11d we arc kicking off Danb11rg Campaign 2000. I appreciate a11d look forward to your co11ti1111cd support. Please call (713) 52-Dcbm a11d sign up to volr111tccr. I need your help! 713.520.8068 District 512.463.0504 Capitol tfie winter blues The weather outside might not be fright­ful, but use our guide as a run­down on some of the upcoming highlights in Houston's arts scene to beat Depn•ssl•d? In the Bayou City it's difficult to haw the mid­bl.: ihs sl..it>s clear blul' With tlw no-show of the , Y2K bug, m.1ybt> you're m ,1 lunl.. bel-.HISl' vou'n•' stuck with all of that dm·d corn ,ind l~ing you bought Or maybe your p.irtm•r just appe.ired on "Who Wants to Ill> a f\1illinn,1irl'" ,ind Rl•gis didn't intmdun• you as tlw companion. Wh,1tl'l'l'I' tlw c.1usl' ol your malady, lwre's tlw nm•: tlw .irb. It':. gl>ml for you. ,ind you c,rn't O\'l'r­dose. SC'l' ,1s m.rn1 .is 1·ou hl..l• ,111d you'll bl•gin to ll'l'I beltt>r imnwd1.itl''>· HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME A dance combo to put you right back on your feet: Houston Ballet's Sargeant Early's Dream WIT by Margaret Edson (through Feb. 12). You might think th.it .i play about a caustic professor ol metaphysical poetry laced with 01«irian cancer would hasten you right mto your own sickbed, but this mostlv adult drama is lull ol brittle humor with life-allirming sensibility. It's no surprise that Edson's end-of-life play gi1·es us all a reason to 1i1·e. The lesbian and kindcrgartm teacher won the Pulitzer Prize last year for the worl.. and it's easy to see why. THE COMEDY OF ERRORS by William Shakespeare (Feb. 9 to March 5) The most famous and rel'l'rl'd playwright ol all can m.ike you laugh out loud m his youthful ad.iptahon ol two ancient plays by Plautus. With Its dual sets of twms, the complications of mistaken identity nse exponentially, as should the laughs Upon its pre­miere at the Chnstmas re1·el, for the randy gt•ntry studying for London's law courts, Shakespeare's grl•at comedy was stagt'<I following much drunken debauchery. One participant said this: "it was thought good not to offer anvthing of account." Critics. HAY FEVER by oel Coward (March 1-25) II you hear the sweet sw1shmg of silk smoking 1acl..e-ts, coupled with crackling wit bracing .ind dry as a line martini and tlw high polish ol Deco throml'-Wcar, vou know you're Mrived in th,1t ultra- .- Continued on page 21 (/oclcwise: Donna Deitch, director of 'Common Ground'; Jonathan Taylor Thomas plays a gay teenager in the 1970s; Andrew Arlie and James Le Gros portray a longtime couple having a gay wedcing; Jason Priestley, Brittany Murphy and Mimi Rogers play three gays in the Navy. Coming together on <V~®MM®rffi (f/;(f ®J(g!J{ffjJ(jff A Showtime movie premiering Saturday spans six decades of hurt and healing for gays in one small town by DAVID GOLDMA 1 \Vh.it do you Jo \\hen you're gay and \Ou're stud, m Sm.lit Town, U.S.A ? For generabons of gay people, there's been 1ust one ans\\ er· 'Jou leave home to settle ma big city. The new movie "Common Ground " wh1..:h premieres on Showhme tomorro\\, offers graphic evidence why so man} small to\\ n ga\ s and I sbtans ha\ e for grnerallons quit the country;rdt:> for the a hes. \\e see a } oung girl ostr.lnzed b\ her 111oth r and unable to fmd \\ ork bcc.luse she 1s susp<'Ctcd of lcsb1.imsm \\c sa .- Continued on page 22 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU Out In Print BOOK NEWS 'Breakfast' breaks below stereotype's suif ace by DEBBIE FRAKER \\ow. Sometimes 1t"• hard to say much more than that about a book that touches you as profoundly .is this one did. But a reviewer has to give it a shot. On the surface, BREAKFAST WITH SCOT is about a gav couple who find them· seh-es the guardians of an 11-year-old boy when his mother die~. Several years before, Ed and Sam had agreed over dinner and many glasses of wme to take custody of the boy, Scot, if anything should happe~ to hLs p.irents. Uke most people who make rash prom1SCs on the spur of the moment, they didn't .ictually believe they would ever be expected to make good on their word But they were, and they did. Ed and Sam ne\ er planned to be parents, and the ex pen· ence doesn't exactly fit into the lives they ha\ e established. They are a fairly conserva­tive urban gay couple-not flamboyant m any wa}. not sissies by any means. They are accustomed to a sophisticated life.style that includes small dinner parties with fnends and quiet visit' to the local art gallenes. When Scot comes mto their hvcs com­plete with make-up kit and pant}'hose, they arc forced to face queer issues thev have never addressed head-on. · Michael Downing forces his reader to look squarely in the face of a sissy boy-child and respect him for the fact that he is the stereotype plus a whole lot more. "Having a child, I soon learned, is like having an open wound," muses Ed. "People ask you about it. They give you advice and secret remedies. Friends tell you to ignore it for awhile and ~ee if it doesn't heal itself Everyone assures you that it won't kill you And then thev show \'OU their scars." • But Scot isn't like their friends' kids, and parenting him 1s a unique challenge \\"hat do you tell a cluld who is being harassed at school for the way he looks and acts if the way he look.s and acts embarrasses you? And what if you are embarrassed by the fact that he embarrasses you' What do you tell his teachers when they know you are If e\er)one is different. then why are all banks the same? ln1roducmg a nC\\ \\.!} 10 bank \1a lhe lnttmet al ~,glban k._COIT! or on lhc phonc, l 117/565 (, & L lmemet Bank 1s designed for )OU, or )'OU an<l your p;Utntr - whclhrr busmcs' or pcr..onal ll:t\-e you C\cr \\ondcrcd \\ha! II \\Ou Id lie like to bank \\11h someone \\ho undcNand' \OUr life> \\c prm1dc ha~slc-frcc mongagl', checking, s;l\lngs, consum!·r loan.~ and more ~ \\1lhout ll".l\1ng \our home \\c m:n 1u,1lic1hc al1rma1nc )OU\e been looldnP for __:.___ ~ () IN"TSRNST •ANtC \\c ll C\~n pa~ your monlh~ b1lh for )OU on ume just one mon· thmg · 111111 you won I h:nc to WOO) about at G & L lnttmel Bank G l Internet Blnk The bank \\1thout \\:tl.ls r'miii;IWija11tj§0e'; \\c re not only~ fnt.'lldl} lfr ·re J'Ollr 011~)" gay ba11k! Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender Check us out on the web at www.glbank.com. or call us at (888) 226·5429 ~ O 2000 G & L .,,._,.. S-. gay and might th ink he 1s responding to vour influence? What do vou tell vour friends who don't hke finding their" son playing cheerleader with your son? To add another level of difficulty, Scot's mother died of an overdose. As a result of growing up with her, Scot has gathered enough knowledge on needles and syringt's to share with the neighborhood children He shares other thmgs, too, but that can be a surprise (it's not what you think). Ob\·iously, Ed and Sam's lives becoml' much more complicated in the wake of Scot', am\al. Ed 1s forced to look more closely than he 1s comfortable with at some deep s1ss1fied tendenaes of h1~ own. S.1m 1s forced to deal with some family problems that he had pre\ musly been .:ibll' to avoid fairly well But they both realm' at some point that they lm·e Scot deeply as hl' becomes an integral part of their hves. 0.o book 1s perfect, and this one could use a bit more character development Sam in particular, 1s not as well devdoped as Ed, who is the narrator of the story, and that fact leaves you wantmg to gl't to knm' him a httle better. But overall, 11 1s one of the best books to come out in the p.1~1 year Michael Downing forces hb reader to look squarely tn the face of a sissv bov· ch1ld with all of his most embar;assi~g stereotypical habits and respect him for the fact that he Is the stereotype plus a whole lot more. The novel is funnv and ht•art· warming as well as complex a~d layered It ts entertainment with an edge. Breakfast w ith Scot by Michael Downing Counterpoint, S24 JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE What your neigltbors are reading . .. Whole Lesbian Sex Book by Fehce Newman, $21.9S 2 Don' t Get Me Started by K,ite Clinton, $14 3 Cybersocket 2000 by Gayne! Directories, $9.95 4 Men on Men 2000 ed. by Da\1d Bergman, $12.95 5 Best Little Boy in the World Grows Up by Andrew Tobias, $12 6 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 7 Welcome to World, Baby Girl! by Fannie Hagg, $7.50 8 Cay Spirit Warrior by John Stowe, $15.95 9 The Talented Mr. Ripley by I'atnc1a I 1Ighsm1th, $13 JO Pussy's Bow L \J~1r Dr:n.i: $23.95 Crossroads Market BOC,KSTORE & C'AFr- 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 Best of the Superstars 2000 l'd1tcd b) John Patrick, $11 9'l 2 Legends- Men of Falcon Bruno Gm under, $42.95 1 Steven Underhill- Jeff by B"Uno Gmunder, $17 95 4 Cybcrsocket 2000 bv G.wnct D1rcctoncs, $9 95 5 The !lours by Michael Cunnmgh,1111, $11 6 ·1 he Book of Lies b) Fl'hce 1'1cano, $24 91 7 I he Whole Le~bian Sex Book b\ I d1lc l'\cwm.in, $2195 8 Outfoxed bv Rita Mae Brm,n, $24 9 Don't Get !\.1e Started by Kate Clmton, $14 10 This is What A Lesbian Looks Like by Kn; Klcinrnenst, $18.95 LOBO ~i'"''' 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 some SUSTIVA" is the first HIV drug approved to be taken once-a-day as part of your combination therapy. Just take three 200 mg capsules together oni:e da11y. with or without food; high fat meal ohould be avoided.Your doctor may suggest taking SUSTIVA at t.~1me to reduce "'Y ~1de effect. > >u may expeneni:e. SUSTIVA, an NNRTI•, must be used in combination with other just did! Once Daily SUSTl"*A efav irenz Pregnancy should be avoided 1n womel" recetVJng SUST1VA because birth defects have been seen 1n pnmates dosed with SUSTIVA Barrier contracepuon should always be used in combination with other riethrxls 'cont:acer•<0n. Talk to your doctor when you start taking SUSTIVA. SUSTJVA may change the effect o he r"' ines (Inch for HIV). Afw¥ tell your doctor rf 19 HIV drugs. SUSTIVA is tough on HIV. I r-~uces the amount of virus 1n your blood and ~· the numb! D4 ells. SUSTIVA can even be used in young children. 3 year.; of age or older. This rs based on results from COl"trolled clinical trials at 24 weeks. Presently. there are no results from controlled dinical trials ii ""' t. 1e ng-term effects -' "iUSTJV A N<)w listeq among : 1pr~fe~r~danti~'HIY ·drμg~ Jtniovernmept ~· ::guid~lines.1 - you are taking. starting or changing any prescnption or non-prescnpt:on medicine when taking SUSTIV A Your doctor may change your l"'ledlCllleS or change thl!lr dose You should dlSCUSS your pnor medical conditions (such as mental 1 ness, substance abuse. hepat.t:s. etc.) With your doctor before taking SUSTIVA We know that coping with HIV IS difficult enough. Your treatment doesn't SUSTIVA has manageable side effects. Most side effects are mild to have to be. Ask your doctor about SUSTIVA For more rnportant 1nformatJon 11' der .ile .md can be manag cJ. The most significant side effects associated wrth SUSTIVA therapy have been nervous system symptoms (dizziness. trouble sleeping. drowsiness, trouble concentrating and/or abnormal dreams) and rash. These usually subside within the first two to four weeks of treatment. In a small number of patients, rash may be senous. Taking SUSTIVA at bedtime may help make nervous system symptoms less notlceable. •NNRT' - non-nucleoslde reverse transcnptase inhibitor. fC< ,,.,,. lnlommion on SUSTIVA. al l-I00-4f'HAllMA or ¥lsO( ow wobsrte at ~-sustm.com FC< ,,.,,. ll1lormWoo on cht ...,.t.ted OHHS Guodolinet • POf lie ol cht p!ollt>es " ~ at hapllwww hMos ors see the next page for Patient Information about SUSTIV A. FOR HIV Finally, a once daily medication to treat HIV. SUSTIVA. It's about time. www.sustiva.com I ~ forUloU.. ol-Af!rWs r> HV.WecfedA<lA!sinl-f>nlonQrcal Pr1ClicesforT,..,,_alttV r*<tion ~ olHU:ll n..,,,., ~ :>e:errber m SUSTh'A'" and the~ Logo~ nclomlrlG olC>J\n ~ ~ ~c 1m DulQit PNrmaceuta1s ~ ~ ~ DuPont Plwmattuucals 20 SUSTIVA™ (efavirenz) capsules Patient Information about SUSTIVA · .. ,. TEE-vah) tor HIV (Human lmmunodefic1ency V-rus) Infection Genenc name. efavirenz (eh-FAH-v1ll-rehnz) Please read !Ills .nformation before you sta~ tak1~ SUSTIVA Read It aoam each t!?le you refill your prescnpUon. n case !here IS any new infonml;on [knl treat this 1ea! et as your only source ol inlonmtion aboUI SUSTIVA. Al~ disalss SUSTIVA Wl!h your dodOI when you start tak no your med cme and at fMfY VISil You should rermin under a doctor's care when using SUSTIVA. You sl1ou d not cllar.ge or stop treatment w thoul I rst ta;king to your doctor What is SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA •s a medlCllle used to help treat HIV the VlrUS that causes AJOS (aar. red unmune def11:.::T( S'/lldlome) SUSTIVA IS a type ol HIV d"-~ called a "noo-nucteostde reverse transcnpt!Se inhibitor" (NNRTI) How does SUSTIVA wort<? SUSTIVA workS by lov;enng the amount ol HIV In the blood (called "Vllal load") SUSTIVA ITlJS! be taken with other anti-HIV medicmes Whe!1 take!! with other anti-HIV medicines. SUSTIVA has been shown to rewce Vlral oad and increase the number of CD4 cells (a type of mvnune cell m blood) SUSTIVA iray not have these .... ,. - ~ patient. Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SUSTIVA is not a cure lor .Al People taking SUSTIVA iray still develop Oilier •n!cct1ons associated w tr HIV Because 01 UllS. 11 is very impOrtant that you remam under the care of your doclor Does SUSTIVA reduce the risk of passing HIV to others? SUSTIVA has not been shown to reduce the nsk of passmo HIV to others Continue to practice safe sex. and do not use or share dirty needles. How should I take SUSTIVA? • The dose of SUSTIVA 1or nits IS 600 'Ilg (tt>iee 200 mo capsules. taken togel!le!) onre a day by mouth. The dose of SUSTIVA IOl ch ldren may be lower (see Can children take SUSTIVA?) • Take SUSTIVA at the same ~me each day You Should take SUSTIVA at bed!Jflle dunng the f11st few wecl'.s or K you !:ave Side effects, such as dimness or trouble concentra11ng (see What are the possible side effects ol SUSTIVA?) • Swallow SUSTIVA w::ii WJler, JUICll, mdk or soda You iray lake SUSTIVA wilh or w tlloul meats; however, SUSTIVA should not be taken with a high lat meal • Do not = a dose of SUSTIVA. II you forget to lake SUSTIVA. lake the missed dose nght away W you do fl1ISS a dose. do not double the next dose Carry on with your regular dosing schedule If you need help 111 planning lhe best times to take your mediCJne. ask your doclOI or pl!arfl13Clsl • Take the exact amount ol SUSTIVA your doctor prescribes Never change the dose Oil YOUI ~Ml Do not stop llus med cme unless yc:.r doctor tells you to step • When your SUSTIVA supply starts to run low. get more lrom your doctor or pharmacy T~1s IS very llllpOl!ant because the ar.iocnt of Virus m your blood iray Increase II the med are IS slopped 'or even a short ume T'le VlrtlS iray develop resislance to SUSTIVA and become liar~ to treat Can children take SUSTIVA? Yes. childrm who are able to swallow capsules 131 take SUSTIVA Rash may be a senous problem m some ch tlren Tell your ch d s doctor r ght 11<ay II you l10lice rash or any ottler side effects while your child IS tJking SUSTlVA. The dose ol SUSTIVA tor ch ldren IJ\1y Ile ~ L'!an the dose lor arutts. ~es ccnta rnng lowef doses of SUSTIVA are available Your chi d"s doctor wi I de!err.- ne t'le rght dose l1ased on your child's weight. Who should not take SUSTIVA? Do not lake SUSTIVA " you are alleflJIC to SLSTIVA or any ol its Ingredients, ·susTIVA- and lhe SUNBURST LOGO ... Jrademarks cl DuFall PllarmaceuOcall Company ~ ~ 1999 DuFonl PliarmaceuliCal Company ""Tho br.lnds lisled ... Ille regos!etod Jrademarl<s of their mpoclNe ~.,.., - .... - of Du!'bnl PtlannacelJtica Company JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? Talk to your doctor right OWO'f II you· • Ale pregnant or want to become pregrant • Ale breast-feeding • Have problems w1th your liver, or have had hepat1t1s • Start or change any medicine • Have side effects while lai:mg SUSTIVA (e!avirenz) • ~ve a history of mental Illness, substance or alcohol abuse What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? Many patients have dizziness, trouble sleepmg. drowsiness. trouble concentrating, and/or u~usual dreaf'IS a few hours alter startmo treatment with SUSTIVA These leehngs may be less noticeable II you take SiJSTIVA at bedtime. •hey also tend to go OWO'f after you ve taken the med1cme lor a Jew v.eeks Rarely, patients have more senous side effects thaf iray affect mood or ab1!1Jy to think clea~y These side effects occur more often 111 patiems with a ~1story of menial illness or substance abuse. Tel! your doctor promptly d any of these Side effects continue or 11111ey bother you There 1s the poss1b1lify that these ~ may be more severe tt SUS11VA IS used with alcoho or mood altering (street) drugs. You should avoid dr v111g Of cperat:~g machmery ii you are having these side ellects. One ol lhe 'T10SI common side effects ts rash These ras.IJes usually go away without any change 1n treatrrent.1~ a small number Gl pal1en1S. '3Sh may be serious II yt;u develop a rash. call your doctor promptly Other common side ellects include tiredness. upset stomach. V011111ing, and d1arr~ea However, this 1s not a complete list of side effecls •eported with SUST!VA wller! take'.! w11h ott::1 anti-HIV drugs Do 'lOt rely on this leaflet alone lor m!orrnat1c~ about side effects Your doctor can discuss a more complete list of side ellects with you Please contact )'C>!r doctor 1mmed1ate y before stoppmg SUSTIVA because ol side effects Tell your doctor or other healthcare pcovuler 1f ye;; notice any side effects wtute takrng SUSTIVA. What about birth control, pregnancy, or breast-feeding? Women should not become pregnant wh1 e tak ng SUSTIVA Birth defects have bee.- seen m animals treated with SlJSTIVA. It 1s not kncwn whether 1~1s could happen m rumans You should use a condom or diaphragm 1r addition to other methods of birth control while lak1rg SUSTIVA. Inform your doctor lllllV!diatefy II you are pregnant. I you want lo become pregnant. ta'k lo your doctor Do not lake SUSTIVA 11 yO!j are breast-feeding Talk to your doctor 11 you are breast-feeding your baby Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA IJ\1y change the effect ol other medicmes (mclud1ng ones lor HIV) Your doctoi may change your medicines or change their doses. For lhlS reason. 1t 1s very Important to • Let all your doctors and pharmacists know thal you take SUSTIVA • Tell your doctors and pharmacists about all medicines you take This includes lhose you buy over-the-counter and herbal or nalural remedies Bnng all your medicines when you see a doctor. or make a list of their names, how much you lake. and tww onen you take them. This will grve your doctor a complete picture ol the med1c1nes you use. Then he or she can decide the best approach tor your snuauon The lollOWJng med anes may cause senous aro 11fe..lhrea1e111ng side effects when tat.en with SUSTIVA You should not lake any ol lhese medianes .,.~,re taking SUSTIVA •• • Hismanal® (astemizole) • Propulsid® (osaprlde) • Versed® (midazotam) • Hataon® (lnazolam) • Ergot medicatioris (for example, W1grame® and catergot®) The lollowmg mediQnes may need to be changed or haV!l ltleir dose changed when taken with SUSTIVA •• • Cr1xrvan® (indinavir) • Fortovase® (saQUmaw) • B1ax1n® (c111i1 ~r~oiyr··' How should I keep SUSTlVA? SUSTIVA IS va 1an a :ig 100 mg, and 200 mg capsules Keep SUSTIVA at room lemperature (77"F) i~ Ille bottle given to you by your pharmacist The 1emperature can range trOlll 59°·86°F Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children How can I learn more about SUSTlVA? TJ • to your doctor or Olher healthcare provider 1! you have questions abou1 either SUSTIVA or HIV For add1t1onal mtormatlC'.l you can VIS I the SUSTIVA Nllbs teat hllpJ/wwN sust1va com This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use it for any other condition or give it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. H you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. <QUID DuPont Phannaceuticals Wllmlng!on. DE 19880 Issued Seplombaf. 1998 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 28, 2000 ,_ Continued from page 17 sophisttcated fantasy realm known as Cowardland. In this comedy, the oh-so-chic gentility falls on its face, tripping over its own blissful attitude. If you've got to sneeze into your worn handkerchief, make sure it's monogrammed. Houston Ballet WINTER MIXED REPERTORY (feb. 24 to March 5) Now, here's a dance combo to put you right back on your feet. Something old, "Les Patineurs," and something new, "Sergeant Early's Dream." Something bor­rowed: Meyerbeer's music from his epic opera "Le Prophete" to set the scene for the ice skating couples in Sir Frederick Ashton's joyous "Patineurs"; and lnsh and American folk songs to guide the immi­grants into the American promised land by choreographer Christopher Bruce in "Dream." There's also something blue: the glittering, spinning role of the Boy in Blue as he twirls and leaps m the winter won­derland; and in the sad yet stirring theme of lrbh immigrants leaving the known for the unknown. CLEOPATRA (March 9-19) Arguably the mo~t f.imous woman in the world, the Sirm of the Nile arrives in l louston by b.irge, b.ith, palanquin, rug and, of coursl', on her toes. Accompanied by thl' oriental exoticism of Rimsky­Korsal..: ov'~ mu~ic, this eye-popping ballet should out·Dc..,1ille them ,111 with its splen· did evocations of ancient Alexandri,1 ,ind Rome. Surrounded by evil courlll'rs, haughty Senator!t' wi,·es, sla,·c girls, Caesar, soldiers, Vl'ngcful Romans, an 1mpass1oned Marc Antony ,md an apprl'Cla· live audienrc, Egypt':. last queen will sur­vi\• e kidnapping, an assassm.1ted lo\'er, an orgy sccm•, ,1 world war and a fablcd love affair to end her destiny by her own hand. Houston Grand Opera THE ELIXIR Of LOVE by Donizetti (through feb. 12) In thts bu bbl} ,11 fresco romp of an opera, the poor peasant (the tenor) loves the rich rc•sour(rful girl (thc sopr.ino) who owns the farm on which lw works. :-\othmg will gt't her ,ittenllon until he buys the snake-oil m.1g1c love potion from the traveling sales­m. m ,rnd beg111s ,Ktmg like a bantorw Although the potmn's a fake, aftl'r m.my complit\itions ,md the bl'ltmg of thl· JUstly famous ,1ri.1, "Un.1 f'urt1\'<l 1A1gnma," till' tl'nor':; ardor ,md sinreritv win the d.iy, .rnd thl' girl !'his sunny, brl't'7)' Italian conll'r­hon 1s ,1 stt•rl1ng t'x.1mple of opcr.1's l'\Cf· green powl'r to ~l·duCl' TRISTA ' Al'D ISOLDE by Richard Wagner (through feb. 11l A much more potent, cxy cl xir flgurt•s m \V<1gncr's mustvdrama Any stagmg of OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 this great masterpiece is rare (singers who can survive and prosper from the intense five-hour ordeal don't grow on trees), so expect the Wagner-heads to be out in force. In an acclaimed production designed in pri­mary colors by David Hockney, Danish hcldcntenor Stig Andersen and Austrian soprano Renate Behle debut in the taxing lead roles, conducted by Christoph Eschenbach. The lush chromaticism of Wagner's tone poem to sex is not for the uninitiated, his murky philosophy of "love as death" is penny-dreadful, but the music is, in a word, sublime. Nothing compares to it-full of lust, passion and eroticism. UTILE WOMEN by Mark Adamo (March 3-18) If you have any fond memories of RKO's Victorian valentine filmed in 1933 by George Cukor and starring the youthful, over-the­top Katherine Hepburn, this contemporary opera will shred them up and spit them out. Edgy, spiky and dissonant, Adamo's treat­ment gives Louisa May Alcott's beloved middle-class, family-values' posterior a swift East Village kick and sends her scream­ing. Unlike the warm comfort the original supplied, this version, with its neo-feminist spin, is unsettling. This musical shock thera­py iust might be the tonic you need for a post-modern pick-me-up. Stages Repertory Company SHAKESPEARE'S R&J by Joe Calarco (through feb. 13) In this version, four young men at a parochial school sneak into an unused room and pt·rform "Romeo .ind Juliet," play111g all the parb REFUGE by Jessica Goldberg (Feb. 23 to March 19) Where would drama be without the um· vcrs,11 conflict in dysfunt lion.ii families? 'o whl·rc. Think Adam and Eve, the I louse of Atreus, that particular kmg of Dcnm.irk and his ~on 1 lamlet, all those Little Foxcs, evl'rything by O'Neill, and most work by almost any contemporary dramatist. Goldberg, one of the youngest voices in tlwall'r, gets her turn to strut her literary stuff l ler play, the struggle to build a fami· ly after Mom and Dad have abandoned their trio of misfit children and hightailed it to M1,1m1, h.1s rt>cc1ved the 1999 Sus.in South Blackburn ,1ward for outstanding quality. VVith a he.ivy metal mJC'Clton dirt>ctly into the bram, the manic, pill-poppmg, spastic, kts-do-anvthing-to-prove-we're-alh·e jolt shc gives this Gen X familv from Hell is lib­l! r.1ting and, ulhmately, it:.' saving grace. Theater LaB Houston DIE! MOMMY! DIE! by Charles Busch (through Feb. 13) llw first 111 th!! theatcr's three-part ''C1mp Alamo." I he pecrbs Charil's Busch mixrs the genders .1nd his ml'laphors-but tht' seams in hts stockings .uc al\\ ,1ys stratght-111 tlus scrcamingl~· funny colh­smn bctw(!('n "Mcctra" and e\Cf\ m0\1e Bdtc DJ\ 1s made aiter 1960. A mght out at the theater will ne\ er seem the same agam. THE BLAIR FELL PROJECT by Blair Fell (Feb. 23 to March 26) Commissioned by Theater LaB Houston to supply it with a world premiere, Blair Fell, who wrote "The Tragic and Horrible Life of the Singing Nun," obliged. What he has wrought is anyone's guess, but you can be sure it's gomg to be wacky, wicked and witty. ZOMBIES FROM THE BEYO D by James Valcq (April 12 to May 28) James Valcq's musical satire skewers 1950s paranoia, cheesy sci-fi flicks, female aliens in D cups and Milwaukee, but not necessarily in that order. The 'ew York crit­ics gushed rhapsodic and gave 1t better notices than any other musical in years Houston Symphony AN ALL-AMERICAN EVENING (Feb. 4) The conductor of the Boston Pops, Kerth Lockhart, who has set hearts and tongues wagging ever since his lithe fig­ure stepped onto the Beantown podium to replace the rotund John Williams, comes to town. Check him out yourself, and as an added bonus, hear and sec the dapper Andre Watts perform the ultra­romantic MacDowell "Piano Concerto No. 2." Other notable concerts include Bruckner's SYMPI IONY NO. 7, conduct­ed by Eschenbach (Feb. 12-14), Carl Orff's CARMINA BURANA, conducted by Ii.ins Graf (March 17-20) Verdi's REQUIEM, conducted by Claudio Abbado (May 20-22). Alley Theater 615 Texas Avenue 713-228-8421 www.alleytheatre.com Houston Ballet Wortham Theater Center 713-227·ARTS www.houstonballet.com Houston Grand Opera Wortham Theater Center 713-227-ARTS www.houstongrandopera.com Stages Repertory Theatre 3201 Allen Parkway@ Waugh 713-52-STAGES www.stagestheatre.com Theater LaB Houston 1706 A1amo 713-868-7516 Houston Symphony Jones Ha 615 Louisiana 713-224-4240 office@houstonsymphony.org For expanded coverage· www.houstonvoice.com CBring CJJour OtD'2alhaarl lo !he 9ldam J 9'11arlc 9f olel and enjoy a Valen line J eof2nlng you 71 rgmf2mhf2r for a /ifol/mq/ Spend Saturday, February 12th in the luxury of Houston's premier hotel. Enjoy a romantic dinner, complimentary rose for the ladies and dancing to van Lang in Tiffany Rose, then retire to the privacy of your deluxe guest room. s l cm per couple. indusi\l' For rc·st'rV<lt1ons c1nct i11ton11<111011. cc1ll 7 l 3·978-7400. Dinner begins: 6:30 pm • Entertainment: 8:00 pm Ar. adamsma12k Ch<! hotol ol t>O<Jmon 2900 Briarpark Drive • ·www.addmsmark.com 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Coming together on /g~®MM®n ~(/@@jJ(fW~/g .- Continued from page 17 a !ugh school .ithlete who's believed to be g.iy brutally beaten .ind sexu.illy a~aulted mthegym. But we also 'cc progres,, and in the third of the movie's trilogy of stories, two men m.ike a public decl.iration of love right m their hometown-though !>Orne there take to the streets m protest. uwe see cl change for the better, definitely, through the course of these 'tones," said Donna Deitch, the movie's director. "We see a progression m gay rights, and it does end on a happy note " !Jnowtime as~mbled a powerhouse team of writers for its look at small-town gay life. Gay playwrights Paula Vogel ("I low I Learned lo Drive"), Terrence \k:-..ally ("Love! Valour• Compassion!") and Harvey Fierstem ("Torch Song Trilogy") were brought m to wnte the movie's three sepa­rate stones. Then: was no shortage of big names in front of the camera, either, including Jason Pne<;tley, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Enc Stolz, Ste\·en \\eber, \'!argot Kidder, Ed Asner ilnd Bnttany Murphy. De1tch's directing credits includt• Oprah Winfrey's "The Women of Brt:wster Place" and numerous episode.~ of "0: Y.P D. Blue," "ER." and "Murder One." But in the gay community she's best-known as director of 1986's "De:.ert Hearts," its bold depiction of love between hvo women making it a les­bian favorite Deitch, 48, was involved in last-minute post-production work on "Common Ground" when she was interviewed recent­ly by Houston Vorce. She lives with her part­ner, writer Terri Jentz, in Santa .'vlomca, Cahf. "Clearly. I was right for the sub1ect mat­ter," Deitch said of taking the as~ignment to direct "Common Ground." But as a native of San Francisco who attended college and graduate school in California, Deitch knows she was spared many of the indignities borne by the characters in the movie's ficti­tious I lomer, Conn. Jn Paula Vogel's "A Friend of Dorothy," the character played by Brittany '.\1urphy rl'lurns home from a shnt in the :"\avv in the 1950'. But after it becomes common "knowl­edge that 'he was booted out with a S{'chon 8 discharge for sexual deviance, ~he finds ht•rself unemployable and disowned by her mother. A kind fr1{'nd (Helen Shaver) helps her escape to :-Jew York. In Terrence ~c."\allv's "~r Robt·rts," set in the '70s, a torment~ gay teen Oonathan Taylor Thomas) turns for help to a teacher (!'lteven Weber) he believes to be gay. The teacher at fir~t shuns the boy's friendship, preferring the bitter security of his own clos­et. But after the boy is sexually aSS<rnlted m the locker room, the teacher finds he must take a stand. Final!}, in Harvey Fier~tem's "Amos & Andy," two gay men in .1 long-term relahon­sh1p plan their union ceremony. But they didn't plan on prote.sters, including one It's a jungle out there! LET STERLING MCCALL TOYOTA'S Diana The Huntress BE YOUR SAFARI GUIDE For start to finish easy car buying, phone me at 713-398-7827 or begin your fun-filled joumey by emailing me at dhuntress@sterlingmccalltoyota.com "I'll protect you ana hunt down the best aeal!" man's veteran dad (Ed Asner). The movie's three ~tories each stand alone, though united by the image of the town square and Johnny Burroughs (Enc Stoltz), a disabled veteran who raises th
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