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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 001. 1983-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/0.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/0

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983 - File 001, 1983-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/25/show/0.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 159, November 11, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Kennedy Urges Spotlighting AIDS By Larry Bush WASHINGTON, D.C.-Sen. Edward Kennedy (D .• Mass.) is spearheading an effort to give AIDS more polit­ical visibility before the Senate and the Reagan administration. Kennedy, who was part of a team effort that added $30 million to the Senate appropriations bill to fund the Public Health Emergency Fund-only to have the extra money dropped in a Senate-House confer­ence committee in early October-now has garnered the ~ signatures of 14 senators on a letter requesting that Sen Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) hold AIDS hearings in the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources Among the senators cosigning Kennedy's letter are three of the four Democratic senators seeking their par ty's nomination for the presidency in 1984: Alan Cran­ston (Calif.), John Glenn (Ohio) and Ernest "Fritz" Hollings (S.C.). Only Gary Hart (Colo.) is missing. Republican heavyweights on the letter include Sen Lowell Weicker (Conn.), who is chair of the appropria­tions subcommittee on health issues, and Mark Hatfield (Ore.), chair of the full appropriations committee. In all, seven of the 17 members of Hatch's committee signed the letter, but observers noted that among the missing Democrats was Tom Eagleton, the Missouri senator who was McGovern's first vice presidential nominee in 1972 and later party to a lawsuit against his niece for charging that he was involved in homosexual vacations in Key West, Fla While Kennedy's staff suggests that the letter primar­ily will help keep politic81 visibility on the need to moni­tor the Reagan administration response to AIDS, others such as the Federation of AIDS-Related Organizations lobbyist Gerald Connor and National Gay Task Force Washington repre8entative Jeff Levi are hoping that Hatch will decline the request for hearings The key concern is the make-up of the Hatch commit­tee, which is controlled by Republicans who are on the New Christian Right side. Those include Jeremiah Den· ton (R-Ala.), the ex-POW; John East !N.C.), a Jease Helms protege; Paula Hawkins CFla. ). a Mormon like Hatch; Don Nickle• (Okla.), outspokenly anti-gay; and Charles Gra.sley (Iowa). Kennedy pitches his hearing request with that make­up in mind, noting that "Senate hearings would focus national attention on the health concerns involved in this i68ue, rather than involving the Committee in a moral dispute." Overa1l, Kennedy raiseis many of the issues that were also aired in the Weiss hearings in August in the House, and the Waxman hearings in Los Angeles in 1982. Now, Free 'Personals' in the Voice MONTROSE See Classified Form inside back cover V 0 I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Nov 11, 1963 Issue ... 159 Published Every Friday itmire Wins Community; GPC Not Totally Pleased By Robert Hyde Houston's municipal elfftion is over, but in its wake remains tteveral scars and many quei;tions brought on by tht sensi· tive and somewhat strained. relationship between the city's mayor and Houston's Gay Political Caucus which has left a bad taste with many members of the gay com· munity. The past week has seen what some have called a ''radical confrontation" between the GPC and Kathy Whitmire, a popular mayor dodging gay issues for television cameramen, a vocal GPC president trying to whip a crowd into political abandon· ment and a mayor pausing in the secrecy of her election night hotel suite to address and dodge the sensitive questions that have ariRen over the last few days prior to election eve. Reports of events begun last Friday evening, when Mayor Kathy Whitmire tourt>d the community's gay bars with At­Large Position 4 candidate Anthony Hall in tow, have been conflicting and will, ulti mately, call to account the good faith of some of the more vOC'al m(>mbers of the community, as well as the GPC's relation­ship to the commu'?ity as a whole. Ques­tions will also be rmsE'd as to just how fer will Houston 's mayor go to support the gay community whiC'h has so overwhelm ingly endor~ed her. For the last f'everal years, the mayors of America's largeRt cities have courted the gay vote, and San Francii:;co's Diane Fein­stt- in, New York's ~;dward Koch and Los Angeles' Tom Brudley o;et precedents to be mirrort'd two years ago by Kathy Whit­mire in her firi;t bid for the city's top man· agem(•nt ?«>Hit.ion-that of visiting gay bars near f'lec'tion day. Last yf'ar, Mayor Whitmire made the tour of the bars under the umbrella of the community's Gay Political Caucus. This Year, 1he did not, even though GPC membcra rontRnd that she promised to do Montr<Me·a,rea <'ounf'ilman George Greanias (center), an easy, non -controvers~al winner m .Tuesda~· ·s election, addresses GPC Elt>ctwn Ct•ntra/ uou'd. Mayor Wh,tmire, foreRround, ln;tens. GPC Presldent BaRneris. far right, had rarlwr u·orki'<i crowd up with RlatPments unfatiorable of Whitmirf'. PH01oev11LUEDl.~CAN so up until the lafit minute. "We rontartC'd ovt•r five people in the mayor's office," t-;aid n GPCmemberand a reported aide to statt- representative Debra Danburg, "who told us that she would go on tht' tour_ Then at the last min· ute, we were told that we had not been properly scheduled." Whether or not this scheduling diffi culty regarding GPC'a bar tour coincided with GPC's failure to endorse Mayor Whit­mirf'' A favorite in the council race, Anthony Hall , over Nikki Van Hightower is a matter of conjecture, but it did set up a confrontation lM>tween the GPC and Mayor Whitmire m Mary's Lounge, at 1022 Wetoitht·imer, that brought the com­munity face to face with problems the GPC and Mayor Whitmire have regarding their mutual pohtical interests. [twas nf'ar midnight laRt Friday when the mayor and Hall entered the popular MontroBt> bar-after visits to the Brazos River Bottom, Miss Charlottt''s and Rich's-preceded minutes beforf' by their touring scouts who are wen known to ~he politically active in the gay community The mayor's visit had also been preceded by several membtrs of the GPC who plas-continued page 6 2 MONTROSE VOICE/ NOV.11, 1983 ALEXANDRA HAAS and MICHAEL BAILEY 2702 Kirby - 524-6272 Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 ... ,.....--.... ~ ... r-....._., JOIN US FOR HAPPY HOUR N\onday thru Friday 4 to 8pm Complimentary hors d'oeuvres in the lounge with Linda Hefner at the piano IN THE CABARET Appearing thru Nov. 26 itl~ -...,••r- 1••1 - ............. ,.A r--....,_.,.,, , .•. .... ·~ ~· ,, .... , , . ••• ••• I •• ·""'- , ~·· ·~ I ~II~ 1111 111 'I ... .... .., I , •• ~ ...... ... ' ..... ,'111111··· .. .--...., ... L_ •• , ""•••••••• I ••• ••• I ~·· ~ -.... ••n•• I ••• 1•••' _llL ~!!!~L 2702 Kirby-524-6272 ··~ 1.,, •• ' 1 -'·~~~-~'~ ~-~~~- Dimer MM-Thus 6-11 Frl&Sot6-12 reseM>tions requested -•,•.l. 1i••1•11 A -~•• , •• ~ 1• I ' ~ .•• ___:11l.JlllL:t1!111• ..... _ _.)., Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 Nov. 11, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 Hundreds Attend GPC Election Central By Hollis Hood Hundreds of voters gathered to cheer their Gay Political Caucus endorsed winners, comfort the losers and repledge support to their run-off contenders amid dancing and laser lights at GPC's election central, Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer, last Tuesday night. As election results were televised on the wall-screen monitor, and as several GPC­supported candidates' victories were assured, GPC president Larry Bagneris said "Let's give ourselves a hand. It's time to understand and reflect on GPC. It has existed for eight years. We have realized that for any minority to get anything done, it takes a team effort," he said, refer­ring to the GPC gay bloc vote. "We're talk ing about human rights, not just gay rights." "There was a 'gay' issue in 1983," said Councilman Jim Greenwood, the first of several public officials to address the gathering that evening. "But hopefully it will mark the last time there will be; there shouldn't be. "My hat is off to GPC on yet another issue," he said, referring to the GPC con· vention center endorsement. "We need it for jobs, to diversify the economy and to strengthen our downtown." Also he mentioned that the $80,000 in the Houston budget for the AIDS tracking project was not enough, but "it's more than was in the budget last year. Thie needs to be treated as any serious cpi· demic. That needs to be done-and that will be done," he said over cheers of appro· val from the crowd. Greenwood introduced the members of his family to the crowd, shook a round of hands and left for another 'thank you' stop. Early in the evening, it became clear that Anne Wheeler, the GPC endorsed candidate opposing Jim Westmoreland in the At·Large 1 race, had gleaned only about one-lhird of the vote. But at Election Central, she was greeted with applause and hand shakes, not unlike the reception given to persons who had won their races that evening. "I want you to know that this lady has never been a loser in Montrose, and the results show it," exclaimed Bagneris. "She took on the biggest turd at city hall, and we'll get him next time. Westmore- Larry Bagneris, GPC president, at GPC Election Central land will retire in two years." A tearful Wheeler said, "I am very proud of your support. To me, Montrose is the center of the universe." She went on to say that most of the coun­cilpersons are supportive of human rights and of anyone who "is sensitive t.o all human needs and all communities." Regarding her defeat, Wheeler said that the incumbent was elected on name identi­fication . "There is no question that if they knew my opponent's record, they could not possibly have voted for him." Bagneris assured Wheeler of the con­tinued. support of the gay community "150 percent, anytime, Montrose is behind you." Lee Harrington , proponent and liaison to the gay community from Texas East­ern 's convention center project, told the crowd that by gay support of the success­ful center vote that the community 04has arrived" in the eyes of downtown busi­ness. "By the political pawer of the bloc vote, we got their attention, and once they met us, they found out they liked us besides. We just blew them (top Texas J<:;aetern management) away.'' He said that the issue has enabled gay corporate personnel to "come out" as never before, and that building the con· vention center on the eastside will "help clean up lower Westheimer." Referring to repeated comments about liking gays when getting to know them, Bagneris said, "People learn that we are not out to molest their kids; we are not interested in their husbands or their wives. All wewantisourjobs and the right to raise our kids. All they have to do is meet one of us, see how we walk and talk , and they are satisfied about the kind of folks we are forever. We are interested in the quality of life, in getting potholes repaired and that buses run on time." Nikki Van Hightower, the GPC endorsed candidate, and Anthony Hall will be in a runoff for the At-Large Posi­tion 4 spot, which was a~urprisetonoone, with both candidaU>s garnering approxi­mately one-third of the vote. Figures representing Montrose, however, indi· cated this area went for Van Hightower by 62 percent to Hall's 20 percent. In reference to Hall's position on gay rights pertaining to the employment anti­discrimination issue, Bagneris said that he authored the first rights ordinance. "Where was sexual orientation then?" he asked the crowd. Van Hightower addressed the group saying that she knew the community had granted her great support and had been fractured in time and money, but that.the campaign would continue for the three more weeks of the runoff. She asked for continued support saying "looks like there will be a runoff and I think we have the strategy for victory. We'vehadalotofhelp from gays. I can't do it without you." State Rep. Debra Danburg and Sherry Valentine were on hand to support Van Hightower as well. See related story, page 1. Montrose Mouth Cover Boy Guess who's on the cover of the just­released Advocate? Houston's own Colt Thomas Inside are several articles on Texas, including the lead article. "In Search of the Average Gay Texan" by Joe Baker Joe. of Dallas. frequently has articles appearing here in the VOICE -o- Lola's owner Marilyn Arnold is planning on making lots of changes in the bar­just like she's always making lots of changes to her hairdo •. Wayne Barton, the new DJ at Mary's, 1s keeping the place jumping nightly. And Mary's is celebrat­ing its 13th Anniversary this Sunday all day, all night. with keg beer and cham­pagne -o- More good bar news: The 611 opens r-e­a- 1 soon with Steve and Ken. They're at 611 Hyde Park. -o- Danny Villa has fmally figured out when he's going to hold that Zapp Clap Two, Too. It will be Nov 21and22, a week from now. at Numbers. benef1ttmg the Mont­rose Clinic and the KS.' AIDS Foundation -o- The City of Houston VD people will be at Midtowne Spa tonight (Friday). 9pm- 1 am. for free blood tests and gonorrhea screening Then they'll be at JR's and the Mining Company Sunday afternoon, 4- Bpm. with the VD Buggy for more tests . And next Wednesday night they'll be at the Copa, 9pm-1am -o- Here are some important events that occurred this week in past years­excuses to throw a party Friday. Nov. 11 David Ignatius Walsh was born today In 1872. So that means you can celebrate that your middle name 1s not Ignatius Actually. old Iggie was a U.S. Senator from Massachusets that became involved in a homosexual scandal in 1942. Seems police raided this New York "male bro­thel" (bathhouse? questions CA Tripp in his book, The Homosexual Mafnx) and arrested manager Gustave Beekman. They then offered Beekman a deal for cooperation and he named Walsh as a customer Newspapers plastered Walsh's name on their covers for weeks-and the Senate conducted a sensational investigation-but it cleared Walash Police then prosecuted Beekman on charges of .. sodomy, .. found him quilty and sentenced him to 20 years in prison. He served every day of it And special thanks to Martin Grelfs The Gay Books of Days. from which we gathered some of this information Friday is also Veterans' Day Monday, Nov 14: Herman Melvllle's Moby Dick was published today in 1851 .And. good God'. Joseph McCarthy was born today in 1908 But on a more refresh­ing note. Arthur Bell. gay columnist for New York's VIiiage Voice. was born today ,n 1940 Tuesday, Nov 15: Pike discovered his peak today in 1806 Wednesday, Nov. 16: Al Capone was released from jail today in 1939, three years early for good behavior The Voice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising 4 MONTROSE VOICE/ Nov. 11, 1983 COUNCILMAN ANTHONY CITYWIDE AT LARGE POS. 4 Thank you Montrose for your support and hard work! We need your continuing commitment to complete the task. ~I/di f- NBC Crew Covers GPC By Hollis Hood Political clout may soon replace AIDS as the major gay-related newsmaking issue during the coming national election year, and NBC's Nightly News was in Houston recently to film a demonstration of bloc vote power which gays seem to be exhibit­ing in politics. When Congressman Gerry Studds came out of the closet, he brought with him a new era of gay political recognition, which is now becoming organized to the point of being a viable force in local, state and national elections. Key West elected a gay mayor, Richard Heyman, a 4~year-old businessman And all the Houston Gay Political Cau­cus endorsed candidates in the city elec­tion, including Mayor Whitmire, acknowledged the impact of the gay vote in last Tuesday's election In an effort to document this flux and new-found voter resource, Washington D.C. reporter Lisa Meyers of NBC Nightly News dispatched a crew to film the GPC in action during the election. The crew was at Numbers 2 disco, GPC Election Central, Tuesday night. "We picked Houston because, one, we had a crew hcrt'," said Bob Abrahamsen, cameraman, "and because they (GPC) are a good example of the political influence gays have; they are very organized." The staff, field producer Clarence Ren­shaw and two technicians fi1med GPC members doing a mailing, in strategy ses­sions at headquarters, went along to Ras· cals and Kindred Spirits on the candidates' bar tour, as weB as filming Election Central. "Gays are exerting considerable politi­cal influence," said Renshaw, and as Montrose Voice T he Ne~pa per o l Mo ntroH Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 .. ~::!:~lf~: :..ty A~:~~;E~J.i~7="r~~~ Contents copyright 1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm HenryMcClurg pub/11/1., ~~.~~ Jeff Br1y (JfiphtU Sonny 01vl1 •coount11"19 Robert Hyde m1n~ingeclltor H!!!:~:,ct Chuck Meredith 1POrt1«11tor Jon Cheetwood ent;::-m:.•::,.,. LytHama MJ.,.,,.,,"(Jdore<:tOf M;~~:° Jon Cheatwood clnsil1«/«lvert11mg ~°:,.~d~"!::.:;'~' Gr .. ler MontroM Bus•n ... Gulld. G•y :':C:-rvteff lntern1hon•JOayNewsAQMCY. PK.1hcNew1 ~~§;;~~~~~1f:Tf.:~;;:~~~E::~~;~ McNaught.JoeS•ker ~n~:!~!. ~~~, ... c04''9ci•on• to 3317 MontroM &.ib«flPl1011r•r•inUS1n,.11«11melope $49perye1r(52 IUUel). $29per1uc months(26iuv.).or$1 2Sperweelt(IM1 th1n261HuH)81Ck1SSUMS200•ch N•/lot1lll«hert.,1t1(1,.P1"9Hnt•lflfe Joe01S.blto.R1v.ndell M1Bet1ng. eee 6th A..-enue. N"' York 10011. {212) 242·6N3 Advwtia1ng~M•TUffd1y.530pm.IOfinuere!MledFrl· dayewnmg Not•ceto«IVMllH<I LOC1lld'lfe111aino r•I• acn.dl.MS111·A WNeffKti .... Julyl.1983 /teepon11bil1ty MontroeeYo1ce··doelnot1&1UtnerMPOf\&t"" pointed out in a Nov. 7 New York Times article. "They are unified, and they are good campaign workers." Although not politically active through­out the country, gays have great influence in cities such as Houston, New Orleans and San Francisco. The filming will illustrate Meyers story on Nightly News, but the representatives did not know when the story would air, nor how much Houston footage would be used. "Politicians are coming out of the closet. Others are actively seeking the gay endor­sement," said Renshaw. Because gays are becoming an increas­ingly vocal, aggressive and politically sophisticated minority as a group, they will be gaining even more attention in the months to come, he indicated. GPC president Larry Bagneris publicly complimented the crew Tuesday night for their "sensitivity and professionalism" in recording the events. Gays' Dress Influencing NongayMen International Gay New• Agency The gay movement "has had an extraordi­nary influence" on male fashion, accord­ing to designer Lee Wright, who recently agreed to do an exclusive collection of menswear for J.C. Penney. Wright says that there has been a grad­ual revolution in the way men dress them­selves. Traditionally men would shop for themselves after the entire family was out­fitted. Now, more and more males are thinking about their image and taking time to shop for themselves. Wright attributes this change to the gay movement. "It's a known fact that gay men have e more eethetic sensibility about them, and it carries over into the nongay community," Wright said. Wright is the third well-known designer to join the Penney team. Hals~n and Cathy Hardwick are already creating col­lections for the store that are geared toward the Middlt> America customer-in other words, the budget-conscious conau- =~c:o~:~!.rt":'thQuldalert ~-·•·-WU·~-- NOV 11, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Gay Mayor Wins Key West Election ~[. 2~i~~~:!~:eNi~ Scene Richard Heyman, 48, overcame "newco­mer" status to become Key West's new mayor. With a 436 vote margin, Heyman defeated Richard A. Kerr by a vote of3605 to 3169. Kerr's campaign stressed "morality" and the fact that he is a "conch"-the islanders' term for a long-time resident. His posters trumpeted, "Your vote will set the moral tone for our community." Heyman stressed tourism and preservation-one the main source of Key West's income, and the other the problem of inadequate utilities. Joe Balbontin, city commissioner and Kerr supporter, stated after Heyman's vic­tory that news of a gay mayor "would bring more of them (gays) down here." Heyman countered by saying that the island's problems have nothing to do with sexual preference. "We have to preserve the character and charm of Key West so it won't become another Miami Beach," he finished. Gay Membership Splits Council of Churches Orthodox churches will "reacress their situation " according to a spokesman, should the National Council of Churches lf~~~:iaieFe1:f:!~~p elio~b~:~o;:ii:: Community Churches, a 27,000 member denomination and haven for gay Chris­tians, reports the Religious News Service. New Texas Gay Newspaper Started First edition of "The Star" appears this weekend m Austin and San Antonio. Tiu Star, a new bi-weekly gay community newspaper, is releasing its first lBSl;le this weekend in Austin and San Antomo. The newspaper, a 16-page tabloid, is owned by the MontroHe Voice Publishing Company of Houston. which also pub­lishes the MONTROSE VOICE and Dallas GayNeu1s. ''Thia completes the 'Texas Triangle,'" said publisher Henry McClurg. "We're now serving Texas• three major popula­tion areas with three local, community­involved professional gay newspapers." Another bi-weekly gay newspaper pub­lished in San Antonio is the independent Cakndar. TM Star will be published on opposite week.a of The Cak ndar, givi!lg the area a new edition of a gaycommuruty newspaper each week. TM Star will feature local San Antonio and Auetin •toriee each iHue backed with national columns and features, including Brian McNaught; Peter Harrison; Roz .Ashley; Arthur Lazere; Sharon McDo­nald; health advisor Dr. Harvey Thomp­son; political activist, profesaor Dr. Dan Siminoski; Allen Young; and Jack Stur­dy's movie reviews. Ed Martinez is news editor of TM Star and Rico Young i1 advertising manager. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 11, 1983 GPC Not Totally Pleased; Many Not Pleased with GPC continued from page 1 tered Mary's with their bright red stickers urging voters to support the GPC bloc vote, a vote that clearly excluded Hall. Stickers were pasted to cars parked around the bar and on some of Mary's patrons. whether they wanted to wear them or not, reported one of the bar's man· agers. Upon entering the bar, Mary's surprised crowd greeted the mayor with shouts of "Keep Kathy"-the slogan painted on the front of the building-and the shouts of elation continued while the mayor walked through the bar, shaking hands and speaking with its patrons. At the rear of the bar, however, Mayor Whitmire'& progress was stopped by members of the GPC who joined together and refused to let the the mayor pass, said the bar manager, until other patrons of the bar forcefully broke the GPC blockade, an event which has received both confirm&· tion and denial from GPC affiliates, as weU as the owner and managers of Mary's. Rep. Dan burg, an avid supporter of the GPC. addres•ed the Friday night episode at Mary's: "A few GPC board members were up at the bar getting drinks. They didn't try to block the mayor. They were there to observe. There was no confront&· ti on and no argument." Another GPC member (who wishes to remain anonymous because of her public po!->ition~ aaid: '"There was no confront&· tion with the mayor. We have no problem "''th her. She walked in, saw our GPC bloc vote stickers, but I didn't confront her. I didn't even talk to her." However, another GPC member (Dan· burg' a affiliate) mentioned that the mayor offered her her hand and asked, "How are you, (name witheld)?" "I said not one word to her," the GPC member said. "I didn't respond, because I was genuinely hurt.' This GPC member further commented that she believed her organization felt abandonded by the mayor because of Mayor Whitmire's refusal to tour the bar with the GPC, rather than with candidate Hall. ''But we're not out here to sell candi­dates," the member added. "We're here to generate votes. But Anthony's her (Whit· mir~:•> man, and that's who she's push­ing It will be a matter of time before the incident at Mary's bar will be made clear to members of the community, an episode many members regard as an embarra88· ment to the gay community as a whole. Mary's owner, Jim Farmer, did contact the VOICE in an attempt to make public his feelings regarding last Friday's epi· oode: "Mary's would like to apologize to the mayor," he stated, "for the rudeness and actions of certain members of the GPC which occurred at my bar last Friday night." After leaving the bar in her silver Con· tinental limousine, Mayor Whitmire rode with Hall to Bacchus, a popular bar for gay women, where she met with enthusi· astic support, and then to The Copa, where she entered the packed disco to Donna Summer's "She Works Hard for the Money ... After touring The Copa, much as she had done at the previous bars by walk­ing through the crowd, shaking hands and &peaking with its patrons, a video of a male 1tripper was stopped for the mayor to take center 1tage. .. Remember me next Tuesday," she asked the crowd in a strained voice, brought on by a severe cold and laryngitis, and was applauded by a crowd shouting approval. Then she introduced candidate Hall, who told the crowd. "Let's don't turn the clock back four years," referencing accomplishments made by city council over that period. The following evening, the GPC con· ducted ita bar tour, sans Whitmire, and with what was reported as a considerable 1ucceas despit. an .'mpl-ant c.onf!Jrrta Whitmire on tour at Mary's Lounge Friday night-with no GPC umbrella These two people (Nikki Van Hightower and Anthony Hall), both conStdered friends of the gay community, were the front·runners and are now in a runoff for City Council Pos. 4. Whitmire supported Hall. GPC chose not only to endorse Van. Hightower, but to also "target" her race as a necessary win. This angered many in the gay community who felt that that energy should have gone into mare clear·cut races. tion with Councilman George Greanias, who, like Mayor Whitmire, supported Hall. GPC's tour consisted of Rep. Danburg and candidates Nikki Van Hightower and Anne Wheeler. Councilman Greanias had been invited by the GPC to go on the tour and had made arrangements to meet the tour at 11:30 Saturday evening at Rascal's, provided that candidate Hightower was not along. "Greanias had been aSBured by Bagne­ris that Hightower would not be on the tour," reported one GPC member who was at Rascal's at the time. "Then when he saw her get out of the limo, he went back inside and had a drink." Despite this brief episode which some members of the community see as yet another breach of community trust by the GPC, GPC president Bagneris said, "The tour worked like clockwork. We were sup­ported at every place." Rep. Danburg did not see the Greaniaa incident as being overly important. "He did not want to appear to be supporting Nikki Van Hightower," she said. "He felt by going on the tour with her that that would implicate hie endorsement (of Hall)." The divisions between the mayor, the gay community and the GPC came into sharper focus election night. While the GPC celebrated its victories at Ce11tral eOI )>era 2. 300 Wes· theimer, Mayor Whitmire's supporters gathered downtown al the Sheraton. After her victory speech where she 1aw her reelection as a referendum "to make this city the greatest city in the world," the mayor held a brief press conference, prior to which time she invited the VOICE for a private interview later in the evening. In her suite at the Sheraton, Mayor Whitmire was hesitant about addressing her relationship with the GPC and was adamant about the confrontation at Mary's which had disturbed many people in the community. "I don't know what you're talking about," she said of Mary's incident. "I rea1ly don't even want to talk about any such rumor mongering that you're getting into right now." Asked if she had felt abandoned by the GPC during this race, the mayor replied, "l certainly don't." But the mayor waa aware of the uncer· tainties and ofwhatsome deemed a lack of appropriate representation ~thin ~e community, but she sought to nee above it when addressing the VOICE. "I think in a citywide campaign you have to get votes from every part of the city, and the Montrose area has always been an important part of my consti· tuency," Mayor Whitmire said. "I live in Montrose, and in every election when I've run, I've alwaya gotten a strong vote from Montrose. · • • y ~~:i\ll~itll~f»:'!Ql'.~~~ "I think that the support that I have gotten from that area really transcends any kind of political factions within the area," she added, "and I'm glad about that. I certainly don't involve myself in the fights between the factions." Then Mayor Whitmire turned to the issue of gay rights and how she views her last two years in dealing with the issue. "I have always been a supporter of human rights," she said quietly. "And at times, certainly in my last campaign, that fact was used against me-the fact that I had support within the gay community was used against me-and I think at that time we saw that even though it was a very bitter part of our campaign, we were able to do enough work to overcome it. I think that some progress has been made at developing a larger base across the city of people who see the virtue of supporting basic human rights for all people." Meanwhile, across town at GPC's Elec· tion Central where patrons of Numbers, the politically minded in the community and GPC's members and advocates awe· ited the arrival of the mayor, GPC presi­dent Bagneris addressed the crowd in what will probably be his last large-scale address to the gay <'ommunity as presi­dent of the caucus, since officer elections for the organization are scheduled for the first of the year Bagneris, in a masterpiece of political rhetoric, expressed the disappointment he felt with Mayor Whitmire, and before the mayor arrived, he proposed vacating Numbers in an attempt to have the com· munity mirror his disapproval of her efforts with the gay community over the past t.wo years, despite GPC's endorse­ment which greatly influenced her reelec· ti on. "I just received a telephone call from a successful mayor of the City of Houston who just carried the Montrose precincts to the tune of 90 percent," he told the large gathering juitt before 1:00 a.m. '*And l had a few things I wanted to say to her. I wanted to say, first of all, that accounts· bility begins now-not tomorrow-but now. We will not tolerate retreat ofrespon· sibility to our constituency any longer by candidates who receive our support," he said, alluding to the possibility that she might not appear. "In all minority struggles, the task of obtaining basic h uman rights is diffilcult at best. Our message is clear," he shouted. "Your meSBage and the message to these people who sacrificed week end and week out for the Gay Political Caucus in this community-our message is clear! We're in this for the duration of this fight for equality, because none of ~s are free until all of us are free. We beheve, we really believe," he empha_sized, "that a great society is spawned m the sanctity of pri­vacy. That's are issue: the right to pri· vacy," he said to applause. "But alon_g with that comes the courage ~~~!:~~f~l~~~!~~;i:;~~~~~~~~~7~~: Thal'• the important line that lies with us," he said emphatically. "And I was going to tum to Kathy Whit· mire, and I was going to say that the days of Cinderella are over with. They are over," he shouted. "The clock has struck midnight and reality has become our fairy godmother." After being interrupted by more applause, Bagneris continued: "It should take no compromising to give people their basic human rights. That's what we're about. After working eight years in this organization, after working through Gay Pride Week, after working though an elec· tion just like the rest of these people up here," he said, referring to GPC's board,"! had the mayor of the City of Houston say to me, 'I'll come, but I understand that they're some TV cameras there.' I said, 'That'e correct.'" uwe're proud of the fact that CBS came to us and asked to film a documentary, but we told them to 'go get screwed' because they had done such a bad job with gay ,power And Gay Pride Week. Then NBC I ,, .1 I' came to us and we said we'd love to work with you, providing that we don't have to work with local TV cameras. You send us a crew from New York City, and we'Jl give you everything you asked for. And those three men have been absolute gentlemen. They have gone into gay bars, they have respected you because they realize that if they turn a camera on you that you can lose a job, whether it be $5000, $10,000 or $15,000 a year, it's still an income. "And I explained that to the mayor of the City of Houston and she said, 'Well, I'll be willing to come if there are no TV came-. ras.' "And I said to the mayor, the way I'm supposed to do as president of an organi­zation that delegates responsibility among the board members who represent every background, every group, everyone in this community, I said to her, 'I'll can you back in five minutes.'" After an other outburst of applause, Bag· neris continued: "Then I took my board outside, and I explained to my board the request of the mayor of the City of Hous­ton, and my board said to me if Kathy Whitmire, who makes $80,000 a year, can't face the NBC cameras the way we did after taking our votes, well, then, we're going to take it to you to let you decide what you want to do with that. "We've been tempted withe taste of free· dam!" Bagneris was interupted at this paints with shouts of 'recaB' from the crowd. "But let me guarantee you that it's an artificial taste of freedom, and now we want the real thing. We want the real thing," he shouted. "We want to have the same rights and privileges and protection under the law." Then quieter, he said, ult's simple. We want to keep our jobs, we want to choose the places we live in, we want to raise our kids if that's our blood. That's the bottom line. "But the reaJ bottom line is that we want for the people we've worked for, we've sweat for, we've suffered for to stand with us side by side until we've accomplished the goal of total freedom for every gay man, for every lesbian in the City of Hou&· ton," he said to thunderous applause. urve got four more months as president of this organization, and it would be easy for me to continue to play the facade, but I have had it up tohere,"heshoutedtomore applause. "I have no desire whatsoever to play anybody e1se's facade. If you can find the time to ride in a black day parade, an Irish day parade and a Mexican­American day parade, well damn it, you can find the time-when these people have suffered through an eJection-to come out and find the time to say thank you." After the crowd quietened, Bagneris pro­positioned them: "Now what we're going to do is Jet you decide if you're willing to continue-because we boast aJI over the country that . . . we have a pro-gay mayor-we are elected and dictated by you what you want us to do. Well tonight, we're not going to make the decision. You've done the work. You've stood up and lost your job, and you make the decision. We want to know," he shouted, "we want to see the show of hands of how many of you-now that the TV cameras are gone­would like to see the mayor of the City of Houston." The crowd voted overwhelmingly to see the mayor, and there were shouts of "We want her here!" Bagneris continued: "This is not a mob. We're going to control ourselves 1ike we always have, like ladies and gentlemen. Okay? And we're going to conduct our­selves as adults.'' Then Bagneris tried his final attempt at voicing his disapproval. "Now l want to know how many of you would like to just call it an evening and when they arrive decide that we've had enough partying and go home and let them come and visit anybody that they want to visit because we're not interested?" The crowd screamed, "No!" "The problem right now is I want you to realize that she's just been elected the mayor of the City of Houston. I w~nt you to promise me, should she come m that frontdoor-beca¥se I'm not lying to,YOU­I've never lied to you-I want you to prom· ise me that there'll be no hecklers from the crowd, rm shouting, and we'll stand here and listen to whatahehastosay, and we'll applaud her on the way out. And let me tell you why. Letmetellyouwhy,"heshouted. "And the first person that is rude with the mayor of the City of Houston will have to deal with me. Why? Because these members who stand with you tomorrow afternoon at 5:30 ... have a meeting with the mayor of the City of Houston. We have a meeting that's guaranteed.. Will you sup­port the Gay Political Caucus by acting like ladies and gentlemen? Will you sup­port us when we go in tomorrow and give her a list of the many things we want done in this city-this her second time around? Will you support us in what we want from the mayor of the City of Houston?" After the crowd promised to cooperate, Bagneris continued: "I have your word, and I've always trusted you." Bagneris then told the crowd to keep their clothes on and not embarrass Hous­ton's gay community the way so many had embarrassed theirs in San Francisco. "I beg you, do not embarass us.'' It was later reported to the VOICE that Mayor Whitmire listened to Bagnerie' speech to the crowd at Numbers via a walkie·talkie in her limousine. Mayor Whitrnire's only comment was reported to have been, "! just wish they wouldn't be taking this attitude." Minutes after Bagneris' spoke, the mayor walked onto Numbers' stage to resounding applause. "HeBo," she said in her strained voice. " It's great to see all of you." After more applause, she continued: "I just want to say that tonight we had a wonderful experience because they told us that we couldn't do it. They said it was a fluke last time. And I just want to congrat· ulate all the people that worked with us. It takes a lot of work, it takes a lot of dedica­tion. "We had strong opposition this time. We had opposition thatspenta million do]Jars against us. But because you did the work, because you worked. with us, we were able to win and were able to win big." Afte:r the applause died, aheaaid, "And I think this says a lot about this campaign and the people that worked in it." The mayor then excused herself due to her voice, and introduced George Grea­nias, 11a good friend of mine and a good friend of yours." Then Greanias made a statement that sat uncomfortably on the shoulders of many in the crowd. "These few people up here (the GPC board members) are per­haps the closest to you in terms of repres­enting the community. We don't forget it for a minute that we're in office. And don't let anybody let you think that we ever forget that we welcome, we acknowledge and we respect your support and we ask for it again, and again and again. We thank you. We both thank you. "You all have done wonderful things in the last four years," he continued, 'from '79 when the council changed. There is so much left to do. Don't lose sight of what the goal is. The goal is progress for this community, for this city. Stick with us. We're moving forward. We're gonna get at il You keep at it. You can't lose. And as long as we stick together, there's no goal we can't accomplish. We are united. We are one." Robots Replace Humans Will the age of robots usher in life after death? Neil Frude thinks so, says a recent issue of Omni. The Welsh psychologist says that after you're gone, your friends may be able to console themselves by having a cup of tea with your mechanical double at the wake. Frude &ayo robot technology will someday produce "look-alike vinyl shells" pro· gr8:-"1med to mimic speech, gesture& and attitudes. They may even beableto"phys· ically interract" with loved ones. Frude admit.a his notion is "profoundly disturbing," but he Bays "it's something akin to a bid for immortality~" •. Nov. 11, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 2327 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 ROCK on IN, ROLL on OVER & Watch Our Moves Happy Hour Daily 12pm-6pm Krazee Hour Nitely 9pm-10pm or 11 on ... Tuesday 75<t Well Drinks & Beer 9pm-2am Wednesday 2-for-1 Well Drinks 9pm-midnight 8 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 11, 1983 .-~~~~~~~~~-- Gays Busted for Wearing Police Uniforms on Halloween ~(. ~~iji~e0~~ce LOS ANGELES-Two men were arrested for impersonating a peace officer after leayjng Rafters bar in West Hollywood Halloween weekend, following a uniform theme Halloween party. Von Scruggs was dressed as a Califor· nia Highway Patrolman, and his friend William Markley wao in a Los Angele• Police Department Uniform. Neither of them wore authentic badges, utility belts, holstered weapons, handcuffs or batons. Scruggs said they were both members of a uniform club. After rounding the comer from the bar, Scruggo and Markley were surrounded by SlX CHP patrol cars, arrested and taken to the West Hollywood Sheriffs Station where they spent the night. Their cos· tumee were confiscated, and they were charged with the misdemeanor which car­ries a maximum penalty of up to six­month 's imprisonment or a fine of $500 or both Scruggs said some of the officer• tried to provoke them with name calling and harasoment, but they refu&«I to respond to it. He said that the clothing had been pur· chased from a uniform store that services CHP and LAPD officers, and explained how they told the oales clerk they were not aworn officers when buying the patches. The store swore they did not sell the uni­form• without the purchaoer ohowing the proper ID. An entirely different picture was painted by Sgt. Norris Soloman of the LAPD who coordinates relations with the city'• numerous private patrols. Sgt. Solo· man said that he is unaware of any law prohibiting the oale of the uniform• to civ· ilians, and he knowo that all the uniform sales companies do it. He said his office asks private guards to mix-match the pie­ces 80 they aren't confused with a sworn officer's. Nevertheless, an individual nightclub guard may try to dre88 identical to the LAPD uniform, and when he io <lis­covered, they will tell him to change it. "Wearing of a police officer's uniform may or may not be legal," said Soloman. "It depends on whether or not there was intent to deceive the public." He cited the movie industry as the nota· hie exception. Next we checked with Western Costume, the film industry's largest supplier, and got two conflicting responses. One of the higher-upo in the men'• rental department said they 14most emphatically do not rent police uniforms to the public." He said they get lots of requests for cops, Nazis, nuno and priests, which they will only oupply for bonafied theatrical use. Another employee said that'• not true. "They're just concerned about making costumes that might be considered in bad taste. As for uniforms, there's ways to get around it. We'll change some little detail, like the width of the pant striping or a olightly different badge, and let them go out." As for priests, Western Costume made up an absolutely exquisite Pope for one Halloween celebrant who apparently wao not arrested for impersonating the Pon· tiff Neither were any of the costumed copo at the Uniform Sabeth party held at Duane'1, another gay bar, the night fol­lowing Scrugg1 and Markley's arrests YEAR ROUND GROUNDS MAINTAJNANCE INSECT CONTROL FERTILIZING W~r LANDSCAPING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE CALL DAVID WORTHY (713) 529-0027 Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN 0 Regular Subscription $30 D Trial Subscription $15 3212 Smith. Suite 102 526-7911 Tommy's Barber Shop 2154 Portsmouth (Greenbriar Shopping Center) 528-8216 D Send me more information, please. Name _________________ _ Add re~----------------- Cft}' ________ State __ ltp ____ _ Type of Computer. _______________ _ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Boy Scout Fights to Get Back Old Troop ~f. ~~'lnw~.:e ~~~:;s BERKELEY, Calif.-Attomeys for the Boy Scouts of America said in October that they will appeal a court decision ordering an openly gay Eagle Scout to be reinstated as an adult scout leader. The California State Court of Appeals in Los Angeles upheld on Oct. 6 a lower court ruling that the BSA's 1981 ouster of Timothy Curran, 21, whose homosexual­ity was revealed in a newspaper article that year, was "arbritrary and capri· cious." BSA attorney Malcom Wheeler said from Los Angeles that the BSA maintains a policy of not permitting "girls, gays and th&godless." Wheeler said that "one of the ideas of Scouting is to get kids out in the woods­removed from everyday problems, one of those problems being sexual relations." Curran disputed the assertion, saying that he found it "highly offensive. They obviously think that because I'm gay, I'm going to molest kids, and that's a garbage stereotype of gays in general and a per­sonal insult to me." Curran went on to assert the fact that most cases of child molestation involved girls being molested by heterosexual men. Dayjd Park, BSA national director,oaid previous attempts "by several boys who refuse to acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being, as well as several females," were unsuccessful. In fact, one of the ten "Laws of Scout­ing" states that 0 a Scout is reverent .. toward God." A spokesman for the American Ciyjl Liberties Union said, however, that that particular policy i• un<'On•titutional, on the grounds that it yjolates an atheistic Scout'e First Amendment rights. "The First Amendment, while it gives us the right to worship as we please, also gives people the right not to worship at all, if they so choose," the spokeeman said. California Superior Court Judge Robert Weil ruled last July that the BSA must prove "a rational connection between You·rs Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Major Gay Community Newspapers homosexual conduct and any significant danger of harm to the aBSociation" before the BSA can expel anyone who is gay. Curran asserted that "it will be difficult for the Scout.II to prove I'm immoral. They made me an Eagle Scout; they gave me the Order of the Arrow (one of Scouting'e higheot awardo). They've gone to great lengths to prove how moral I am," Curran continued, "and now, they're trying to kick me out simply because I'm gay. There's no way I'll let them do that to me without a fight." Park responded, "We just don't think parents want homosexuals in the (Scout) troops." While national BSA leaders are opposed to Curran's reinstatement, local officials have openly welcomed Curran back Da.;d Potter, ocoutmaster of Troop 37 in Berkeley, oaid that "If you wanted to select a person who has been the ideal Scout, that person would be Tim Curran." In an editorial, the Oakland Tribune, the newspaper that made public Curran's gayneu in 1981, said that when queeti­oned about Curran being gay, nearly all of the membero of Troop 37 said, "So what? We don't care." The editorial continued, "And why 1hould anybody care?" The editorial concluded that the true measure of a Scout's worthiness ie what he does in hie capacity aa a Scout, not what he does in his private life. Gay Porn Star Killed Falcon Studios model "Dick Fisk," 28, was killed Oct. 31 with his lover and the driver of another vehicle in an early morning auto accident in an Atlanta, Ga., suburb, Marietta. Fisk, whose real name was Frank Ricky Fitts, and his lover Billy Joe Howard, 22, were enroute home. As reported by Atlanta's Cruise News, police said Howard was driving when his Dick Fisk in Falcon photo car crossed the center lane and struck a pickup truck driven by Stewart Rhette Wallace, 31, of West Marietta. Fisk had recently appeared in the Man­date and Torso. His major film endeavor was Falcon's The Other Side of Aspen. He had recently been employed at Atlanta gay clubs. Moscone, Milk Assassinations Still Heated Issue ~f. g~<;.nw~;e ~~~~::s SAN FRANC ISCO-With the fifth anni­versary of the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and openly gay city Supervisor Harvey Milk approaching, the Justice Department in late October refused to either confirm or deny a local TV news report that Attorney General Wil­liam French Smith had been urged not to prosecute their convicted killer. KGO-TV reported that Smith received a recommendation from the department's criminal division that former Supervisor Dan White, who shot Moscone and Milk to death at point-blank range in their City Hall offices on Nov. Tl, 1978, not be prose­cuted on charges that he violated their civil rights. John Rueeell, a Justice Departmentspo· kesman, told The Sentinel, a local gay newspaper, that the White case "is still being examined by the criminal division, and no new decision has been made." Ru88ell added that although he does expect a decision to be reached soon, "I can't tell you just what soon is." A spokesman for U.S. Attorney Joseph Rueoniello expressed total surprise by the KGO-TV report. "Not only have we not heard about this so--caJled recommends· tion, but if it had been given, we would have been informed." Rueoniello himself was quoted by the San Francisco Chronicl.e u saying that "I would expect to be the first to know (if a decision had been made). We have no information about any decision that has been made." The report was attacked by the longtime lover of Milk as "totally off·base." C. Scott Smith, the sole heir to the Milk estate, claimed that contrary to KGO-TV, "other news sources said a recommendation had not been made yet." Moreover, Scott Smith said, the report was broadcast on a Monday when the Jue· tice Department received new information on the case 11only that weekend." John Wahl, the attorney representing the Milk estate, was quoted by the Chroni· rte as saying that the KGO-TV_ report was "a trial balloon b)' t~ Justice Depa,rt­ment." DWI CRIMINAL D EFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAM ILY LAW Nov. 11, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 e AIR CONOITIONING e ELECTRONIC TUNE·UP e AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION e AIR O ~ ~ ~ g ~ ~ z w Q ~ . ~ m • m ~ ~ ~ ~ FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ~ n ~ * Winterize Cooling s24ss ~ ~ * Oil Change and Luve '1995 ~ ATTORNEY AT LAW 3 3 17 MONTROSE, SUITE 3 18 (7 13 ) 523-5006 ~ *Front Disc Brake Service s59ss • ~ * Tune-Up Special (most US cars) $3995 ~ . ~ 1V~3N39 e 9NINOl.llONO:J ~IV e ~1Vd3~ 1V~3N39 e NOISSl~SNV~J. OIJ.V~OJ.nV e n Inventory Sale 20°/o to 50°/o Off on Slacks Sport Coats Sport Shirts Dress Shirts Jackets Sweaters Active Wear Ties Now Open Sundays Hours Tuesday-Friday 10 to 6 Saturday 10 to 5:30 Sunday 12 to 6 Located at Fountainview and Westheimer 5 blocks West of the Galleria 10 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 11, 1983 AIDS Funding in Britain Not Major Issue By Lindsay Taylor International Gay New• Agency LONDON-The death of a hemophiliac in Bristol from AIDS has led to further calls for the British government to allocate more money to fight the disease. Another hemophiliac in Cardiff is among the 20 confirmed cases of AIDS in Britian. Both men are believed to have contracted the disease from contaminated supplies of clotting agent Factor VIII imported from the United States. The U.S. currently Aupplies more than half of Bri· tian's Factor VIII, and the government cutbacks in funding mean that the United Kingdom will not be self-sufficient in blood products, at least until 1985. Although the British Hemophilia Society (BHS) has contributed around 25,000 pounds (about $37,000) toward research to find a way of insuring that supplies of Factor VIII are free of AIDS, Social Services Secretary Norman Fowler has refused to increase governmental funding of the project. At a meeting in late September, junior Health Minister Lord Glenarthur told the hemophiliac organization that the government was unwilling to expand its AIDS research because this would mean that other medical research projects would have to be cut r.rhe hemophiHac group now plans to join with gay groups, organizations con· cemed with intravenous drug users and health service trade unions to form an AIDS Action Committee. This Action Committee aims to put pres· sure on the Department of Health and Social Security to treat the AIDS problem with more urgency and to counter inaccu· rate reporting about AIDS in the media. Julian Meldrum, secretary of the gay Hall-Carpenter Archives, has al ready made a detailed complaint to the Press Council on newspaper coverage of the dis· ease. The committee intends to issue a reg· ular newsletter to organizations representing all groups that are particu­larly at risk from the disease. Letters 'Thanks for Reviving the Spirit' From Larry Bagneris Congratulations on a job well done to the hosts of both the Gray Party, held at Numbers Di•cotheSundayofthe Westhei­mer Art Festival, and also the party for us small people (under 5'7") held at Baja's. For a moment, I thought I was in the Houston of three years ago when T -dances and parties were the themes of Houston weekends, as we celebrated the joy of knowing and accepting that we are gay. Thank you for putting the spirit of par· tying back into our community. Rascal's Efforts Applauded From Larry Bagneris A big thank you to the management and staff of Rascal's for the evening of October 24 The $600 raised and donated to the Gay Political Caucus to help defray the cost of thie municipal election was greatly needed and appreciated We could see from the production that it wu a labor of love. On behalf of the Board of Directors and the members of GPC, we thank the entire ataff of Raacal's for their contributions and eontinuing support. '~~ ~"J) eans 'n ,,tuff ' ' I ;New & ~seh­~ orn & ~orn! ©:lotqing I We buy used jeans. I Call 'Wild Bill" or "Sonny" ~?c~;;.2s~~v!1;~~~~~nfl~~~ l':.!) 880-8821 & 880-8844 402 Lovett 527-9866 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS li'l~i\~€~. ~OO~t ;;:.,~·,.rs, 'TI'~&~lb cc~?~Jr~~~ ~ m&~lb «'CcJ,t-·$'Y I'.IT'.G.t"'~ 'iJ'~&~[L ~OO~~'iJ'&~~ A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 Free Dinner Dravving Monday thru Thursday during Happy Hour Dynasty on Wednesday Nights Nightly Buffet $6.95 Sunday thru Thursday in addition to our regular menu NOV. 11, 1983/MONTAOSEVOlCE 11 Sweat Socks: One Woman's Story Commentary By Sharon McDonald When it comes to sports, I have always been cordial but distant. As a child, the fulJ extent of my athletic repetoire was the repeated climbing of a single tree in which I would sit for hours daydreaming of an even less active childhood. I thought that once I grew up, I would be free of the daily pressures to run, jump, sHde, hit and catch. Call me naive, but I looked forward to my adult years as a fruitful time for affairs of the intellect. Back then, women were allowed, no encouraged, to let their muscles atrophy in peace. But right around the time I would have begun living out my happy destiny as a sedentary grown·up, I fell in with an energetic group of women who called themselves by a strange new name: femi­nists. At first I thought their philosophy meant more choices for everybody: I could be either a chemist or a karate champion. What I didn 't know was that the karate You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Ma/or Gay Community Newspapers champion didn't have to study chemistry, but the chemist would have to take up some arduous sport to stay in the feminist ballgame. Only the language had changed since childhood. Yesterday's "Get your nose out of that book," has become today's "Get in touch with your body." This is a paradox of modern feminism that I find difficult to understand: nobody tells Rosie Casals to write a book, why do they tell me to play tennis? It'• important at this point to explain that I don't dislike sports just because I'm no good at them, although that certainly helps. But simple ineptitude is a mere embarraeement that's easily forgotten. What's not easily forgotten is a lifetime of sprains, strains, cuts, scrapes, bruises, lac­erations, concussions and temporary embarrassments. I dislike sports because I hurt myself doing them, sometimes quite badly. I can fall and chip a bone on any type of surface you've got, from grass to concrete. The only time I can catch a ball that's hurtling straight at my unique and fragile face is when it knocks my last two fingers backwards three inches farther than they were ever meant to go. I think it's about time for feminists to face the fact that some women were just not meant to totter four inches off the ground on blades, wheels, a foor·long slab of wood or any­thing else. Women whom I would otherwise con­sider caring friends have tried to get me out there into the danger zone. "Look at you! You call yourself a dyke? Look at that arm. Where's the muscle?" "It's in my fingers. I type 90 words a . .. " "You've got to start thinlting about your health!" "I run. I'm staying inside where it's safe." "You don't know what you're missing." "Yes I do. Pain." It doesn't help that Louise is on the side of the athletes in this. One balmy evening when she and I were in the first glow of new found love, she chanced to ask what sports I enjoyed. When I aaid none, that lovely period of idealized romance passed forever into history. Some people are so judgmental. Louise's childhoood had been a whirl­wind journey from championship this to championship that. From a modest begin­ning at prizewinning marbles, she went on to conquer her neighborhood at base­ball, ping pong, basketball, skating and so on. She once remarked. to me what an easy transition it had been to go from GAA (Girl's Athletic Association) to GAA (Gay Activists Alliance) without even changing T-shirts. AB if our relationship wasn't tenuous enough, Louise decided that we needed to jog together every night. I reminded. her that I considered achieving normal pos­ture an athletic event. She could not be moved. I said I'd think about it. True to my nature, I approached this subject first from an academic angle. I read all the books about jogging, and it was there that I learned about cramps, strains, faintness of breath and "overdo­ing it." I stopped reading. Next, I went shopping. After pricing jogging shoes, I came home with the aforementioned. faint­ness of breath. This was soon followed. by faintness of heart. The more I though about it, the stupider it seemed. Being an urban dweller, certain physical pursuits like karate or running do make sense to me. But jogging has no euch intrinsic, pragmatic value. Whateelf­repecting mugger responds to, "Back off, buddy, I'm a jogger"? Not does jogging provide you with an escape maneuver; it just doesn't work to jog away from an attacker. This is in sharp contrast to the more versatile sport of running, which can be utilized either to run from an attacker or to run to attack someone. Jogging, on the other hand, produces only two concrete results: stronger calf muscles and better wind, both of which are good for only one thing-more jogging. I presented my findings to Louise, but you can't tell her anything. So, with our frail relationship hanging in the balance, I purchased the proper shoes, baggy shorts and sweat socks and revised my will. I was ready. Louise glanced up from the television, lit another cigarette and said, "Not tonight, hon, let's start tomor­row." The next night she was meeting a friend for dinner and suggested we wait one more day. The following day she came home from work exhausted. "How about tomorrow night, sweetie?" she groaned. By now, all I can say is it's a wonder I've retained my sweet disposition and toler­ant, loving, giving, accepting attitude through all this. If in the name of femi­nism or health or God knows what else my lover and friends advocate chasing a ball around, or want to browbeat others into doing the same, I'd be the last one to say it's not an excellent use of time. I mean, if they want to move their con· versation to the level of debating the absorption capacities of different brands of sweat socks, I'd never suggest it was a step down. Some people might say these women have become sweaty, ill-clad, pant­ing bores, but not me. Goodness, if I let a little thing like watching my friends beome competitive over-achievers turn me into an unsupportive name-caller, well, what would that say about friendship? AB for Louise and I, we have made a peace of sorts by discovering a physical activity we can do together. Although it is more private than a jog around the local park, I will say that it has satisfied both our wants by providing exercise, sweat and exhaustion without requiring a trip to the emergency room. Until something bet­ter comes along, this will do just fine. McDonald, who lives in Los Angeles, is co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. Prourlly Presentmg Our Newest Musical Comedy ~-.v:~ .. of the , ilver ere en Cabaret/ Theatre SHOWTIMES Thursday-8:30pm Friday-8:30 & 11pm Saturday-8:30 & 11pm Sunday-8:30pm Doors Open 7pm Happy Hour till 8:30pm 2700 ALBANY-Open 7pm-2am-528-3611 (ad1acent tD Olhcer"s Club) 12 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 11, 1983 Pop Culture and Gay Rights Gay Community By Dan Siminooki For a Jong time, I have believed that the expreSBion of views on "public" issues in media like film and music offers a special way for political activists to build support for their causes. If "culture" can be cailed "political," it is moat powerfuJly so in three senses. First, it can bring attention to existing problems in a way usually ignored in mainstream political discource, and thus involve us emotionally in the search for solutions. Second, because of the artist's freedom of expression, he or she is not limited to the practical political agenda, solutions or views of the future. An artist define& problems more freely and has greater latitude to define alternate poli­cies, institutions, lifestyles and moral codes. Last, and most urgent, the artistic address to an audience is more direct than a political one, it aims to the heart and emotions, rather than the head and rea· son. The result is that though the politician may be more "conect" in analysis, the artist strikes a deeper cord, creating pain or fear or self-identification, urging us not only to see the problem, but to live it for awhile. Hopefully, this submersion into the realm of the artist allows us to emerge more sensitive to the problem, more open to its discussion, and more likely to partici­pate in its solution. Were Karl Marx to comment, he would surely agree that "con­sciousneBB raising" is a necessary part of any revolutionary program. I contend that it plays an important role in gay rights at the moment. If we agree for a moment that culture can speak politically, and its expression can be used to promote a political move­ment, we are still left with a towering ques­tion. What is "gay culture?" The answer seems to elude all of us. Whether or not there is a unique gay aesthetic, the crea· tion of a truly unique people or whether it is only the product of a ghetto-ized sub­community, are issues too large to tackle in this column. Happily, though, another standard offers itself for this discussion, one not based on who the artist is, but bow effec­tively that person portrays gay life. This You·re Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of Amer1ca·s Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers standard is the language adopted by the Alliance for Gay Artists in the Entertain· ment Industry, which recently presented its third annual media awards. They are given to actors, writers and production staffs in film, TV and theatre for "the realistic portrayal of gay and les· bian characters and issues in the enter­tainment media," AB did the earliest Oscars and Tonya, these awards cele­brated. honesty and accomplishment with­out nervous nominees or declarations of best anythings. Instead, they celebrated the works that allowed audiences to expe­rience three-dimensional gay and lesbian people, that invited non-gays to expe­rience our richness and difficulties and that gave us the chance to see ourselves onstage as we are in our private lives. Among the most emotionally received theatrical tributes were the late Jane Chamber's play, Last Year at Bl!M!fi•h Cove, and the ensemble of actresses who played it, Pat Carroll's solo performance in Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Ger­trude Stein, Vincent Price's powerful ver­sion of Oscar Wilde in the one-man Dwersions and Delights, and Caryl Chur· chill's Cloud Nine, all productions of the Los Angeles Theatre. For what I consider the best film yet made about the pains and rewards of com· ing out, John Sayles' Liana won, and received special recognition for, the perfor­mances of Linda Griffiths and Jane Har· aren. In television, award went to [)ynaaty for the honest and routine way in which the gay character Steven Carring-ton was portrayed, and to PBS for its pro· duction of The Fi~h of July, with Richard Thomas and Jeff Daniels as the stable gay couple-and probably the most "normal" people in the play. The awards evening was produced, writ­ten and directed by members of the Alliance and was easily more entertaining and crisply presented than the more famil­iar awards shows. I felt proud to be part of the family. The Alliance numbers about 250 members, its main percentage made up of gay professionals. In addition to the awards, year-round activities include monitoring productions that focus on R-ay life and working to eliminate stereotypes. There are risks to open members of the Alliance, as chairperson Chris Uszler reminded the audience. the same risks faced by every person who chooses to reject the closet Speaking for himself and the Alliance, Uszler affirmed that he would not be intimidated: "I am not discouraged ... no, far from it, for I see a new generation of gays and lesbians emerging in our his­tory .... People who are willing to take risks, refusing to pay the emotional price of the closet, individuals who say 'I can be myself, openly and freely, and I will work in this town again!" Whatever their background, sentiment or sexuality, most artists speak to their audience in metaphors rather than politi­cal tracts. If they are forced to create ste­reotyped charaters, most audiences will believe them and extend them to the real world. How short a time it is since any gay character found in the media was ridicu-lous and disturbed! But if gay characters were once one-dimensional and false, that is less true each year. The characters honored by the AGA were complex, honest and wholly within their dramatic context. Some were extraordinary gay icons, like Stein and Wilde, but most were ordinary people, like you and me. Their sexuality was merely an aspect of their makeup, not a constant source of struggle and conflict. When Americans can begin to see us in the media in all our richness and variety, we begin to close in on our political goals. Dr. Siminoski is a political scientist and has been active in the gay rights move­ment for about a decade. He may be writ­ten at 1221 Redondo Blud., Los Angeles, CA 90019. 1983 Stonewall Features Syn­dicate. • San Francisco only $329 Round Trip •San Dieao only $270 RouncTTrip • Miami & Ft. Lauderdale Gateways to Key West . as little as $229 Round Tnp (daily non-stops to Ft. Lauderdale eff. Nov. 1) Certain travel restrictions may apply. Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at 738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTERN America's favorite way to fly.. . 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The Ca~ Crusher Corp. also offers a full­serv1ce pickup recycling program for bars restaurants & industry Call 864-2223 for details Spring ~shmgton 2011 Silver St. Nov. 11, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 We feature ... • All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka, 1.75 liter, $7.69 Jamie '08 Scotch, 1.75 liter, $11.79 McCormick Blended American Whiskey, 1.75 liter, $9.89 Rene Junot red or White French Wine, 750ML, $1.79 MASTER cARo 1402 Welch at AMER1cX~x•R•ss Waugh Drive 529-9964 :· FOR ALL YOUR REPAIR NEEDS Foreign and Domestic • Guaranteed Mechamcal Work • Total Transmission Service • Air Conditioning Specials-Free Check • Body Work & Paint Shop • Free Cust_omer Tow Service • Fleet Prices on all Service SPORTS CAR SPECIALTIES ENGLISH AUTO REPAIR (FULL SERVICE) WITH RAY DORSEY 200 PIERCE (713) 650-0591 Owners Tony Pegg, Lance Harrington, David Disher THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS BRAKES-COMPLETE Front-$49.95 Rear-$59.95 Incl. parts & labor Free Brake Inspection & Adjustment SHOCKS Installed-Labor Only $12.95 OIL & LUBE $18.95 Includes Labor, Oil, Filter & Lubricant TUNE-UPS $39.95 Includes Labor, Plugs, Air Filter, Gas Filter, Clean & Adjust Carb., Set Timing, Inspect Distributor Wires & Rotor FREE CAR WASH with Brake Work or Tune-Up :·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·:· 14 MONTROSE VOICE/ Nov. 11, 1983 Good Taste, and Why Not? By Allen Young "Good taste" is supposedly a matter of spe­cial concern to gay men. When a gay man lacks good taste, whether in his clothes, his home decor, his conversation or his behavior, he is said to be " tasteless," a word that in today's gay banter has become a campy exclamation. (For some reason, all of this seems less relevant to gay women, which is why I refer any to gay men here.) A friend of mine who writes for Fag Rag, one tasteless enough to burn a Bible at a Gay Pride rally, has on several occasions expressed his mockery and disdain for this gay male preoccupation. He see it, I believe, as a kind of faggot snootiness, an attempt by gay men to use esthetic values to find respectability in upper-middle­cla88 heterosexual society. My friend's Bible-burning must be forgiven if only becauHe it spurred much interesting dis­cussion about religion's role in gay oppres­sion. As for his condemnation of faggot You're Reading tho MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Major Gay Commumty __ _ __!:!...ewspap~rs preoccupation with taste, I have been until recently quite sympathetic with his point of view. I am beginning to distinguish , howe\oer, between good taste that is simply an honest appreciation of beauty, and a fashion-oriented concept of taste sometimes known as "piss-elegance." Piss-elegance is something I find irk­some. The Queen's Vernacular (now pub­lished by Paragon Books as Gay Talk) defines a piss-elegant queen as "one equat­ing wealth and style with real achieve­ment; one who lives in sham elegance." (A second definition of the term says it is a "jealous reference to a rich homosexual.") Since coming out into the gay world, I have met a few gay men who could be described as " piss-elegant," and a few oth­ers who manifest a self-conscious preoccu­pation with taste. based on airs, manners and fashion.Such men are not likely to become my close friends. But I have also met some fine artists­men (and women. too) with a well­developed esthetic sense and a commitment to creativity. The gay friends and acquaintances have meant a Jot to me. They have opened doors for me to realms previously unknown, and they have taught me something about good taste. I use that term in the most positive way. Twelve years ago, my main idea of something attractive to put up on a wall was a brightly colored Cuban poster show­ing fists and guns. supposedly to express solidarity with the people of a beleaguered Third World nation. In general, the idea of having attractive surroundings was then of little concern to me. That was before I was part of the gay community. Ifl were to list the things I have learned from my involvement in gay life, I would have to place at the top this newfound concern for beauty in my immediate surroundings. And why not? Our lives are enriched by beautiful things, both manmade and natu­ral. This is one of my disagreements with the radical left, which focuses so much on negativity. There is often no room for beauty in their world; they see most art as "politicaHy incorrect," for according to them, we must always be aware of suffer­ing and injustice. Frankly, I don't want to look at fists and guns anymore, neither in real life nor in posters on my wall. I feel sorry for the oppressed artists who are vic­timized by political commissars, whether they are movement ideologues or Commu­nist party bureaucrats. For such commis­sars, art is "bourgeois" unle88 it "serves the interest of the working class,•• wha­tever that is. Some might claim that it is middle-class privilege that allows me this concern for beauty. But poverty and squalor are not synonymous. When I lived among the Zinacanteco Indians in south.em Mexico, they manifested a strong desire for beauty and excellence in their colorful clothing. The Indian man I lived with, who was weaving a new staw hat for an upcoming festival , made it quite clear to me that he had "good taste" and also that he felt a certain disdain for men in the village who did not take the time and effort to make their hata beautiful. All of this is really by way of introduc- ITALIAN BEEF HOUSE-CHICAGO STYLE SANDWICHES * ITAL/AN BEEF * ITAL/AN MEATBALL * ITAL/AN SA USAGE *POLISH SAUSAGE *VIEN/YA HOTDoqs , . . • .• • NE .R CORN~!3. M ON]'~-~-~e.~~~~T-fi~JM,EA, tion, as I want to share with readers of this column my appreciation for the work and friendship of an artist I know, Gerard Brender a Brandis, whose wood engrav­ings are among the decorative items in my home. Ger, a Canadian who lives and works in Ontario, is one of several artists I have met in the gay community. I was introduced to his work through RFD, the country gay journal, which published some of his engravings of rural architec­ture and plants. Shortly after, a feature article on him in Body Politic made me aware that his temperament and lifestyle were much similar to mine. Eventually we met, and we now have become friends. We are now collaboreating on two books, one on Cape Cod, another a collection of quota· lions, both to be published through Brand· stead Press. Brandstead Press is Ger's own creation and was established 11 years ago to pro­duce limited editions of wood engravings and linocuts. It now has facilities to per· form every stage of production of hand· made books, from papermaking to binding, Ger's primary work has been botanical illustrations, but in recent years, he has sought to bring his gayness to his work, and the result has been two volumes of illustrated gay poetry. But, as Ger wrote me in a letter I excerpted for publication in Lavender Culture, overt gayness in art is not essential: "What ie more important is to realize that the pres­ence in my life of interpersonal realtion· ships nourish my entire being and spill over into my creative processes, just as my creative vitality makes me more capable of contributing to another man's life." Ger's work has won him significant recognition; it is included in may public Commentary galleries and university and library collec­tions, as well as in numerous private col­lections. His dedication to his craft is inspiring: imagine working a book from start to finish, including weaving the cloth for the cover, ma king the paper, engraving the illustrations, handsetting type a nd operating the printing pre88! Yet, for all his success, Ger does all he can to keep from being "sucked in to the subur­ban, commercialized and consumerized­too much a part of the trendy gay scene, too much a businessman." He writes, "My life and lifestyle a ppear too often relevant, a nd yet there is no real a lternative on this planet." These are my feelings, for when I leave the typewriter today, I will go into the garden to plant carrots and eggplant, spend some time in puttering around the house to make it more pleasing to me, and a little later, go to the bus station to pick up an old friend whom I haven't seen in years. Theee pleasures-the manmade beauty in my home, the natural beauty of the plants in the garden, both the functional beauty of vegetables and the "pure" beauty of flowers, and the love of friends in the gay community whom I have come to cherish so much-help make life rich and worthwhile. I refuse to rob myself of these pleasures just because I know that there is pain and suffering elsewhere in the world . My appreciation for beauty does not under­mine a desire and hope for a better world; in fact, the two are inextricable. Cl 1983 by Allen Young, author of seueral books, including "Gays Under the Cuban Revolution" and "Lavender Culture." Dis­tributed by Stonewall Features Syndicate. ~--------------------------~ One Moua ''/// 1111TlD11/D G_" Cll•"""' • THE MOST Ill DRY CLEANING To serve you better, we've extended our hours Monday- Thursday 7am-11pm Friday & Saturday lam-midnigth Sunday Supper ti/ 10pm 808 LOVETT ---..... ..._ __ SOerpveinng W Bereeakeknfadsst,, OLurdnecrhs, tDoi nGnoe r ___. .. 521-1015 ... -----• open 7am-10pm Nov. 11 , 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 16 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 11, 1983 Lesbos' Sappho Remains History's Romantic Enigma By Patrick Franklin Plato reg&l'ded her so highly that he called her "the tenth muse," a name that bes­towed the status of a demi-goddess on her. Catullus quoted her poetry in bis own. The ancients Clll'efully kept copies of her nine books of poems. But who was Sappho? The life of the woman whose very name is used as identi­fication for the love between women and whoee birth on the island ofLesbos gi~es a !lame to the women who practice that love, ta now lost. But "lost" is too kind a word. The memory of Sappho brings with it a legacy of talent and geniu1 that was too start.ling a burden to be borne by genera-tions of men for whom the love of woman for woman was vile, and who demanded that the place of women must be subser­vient. But she lived. More important, she wrote, and in such a way that the minds of ~:r:~~:;'~8:;e:.;~:g.s~:i~~r!~J~ men could burn her books and try to erase her memory, but not completely. To do so would have required that they censor or destroy .many of the works of the great male thinkers who admired and quoted her. She was born in the late 7th century B.C. When. exactly. is lost in time along with the date of her death. We know the name of her father, Scamandronymus, who died when ahe wa1 only aix, and we know that he must have been a relatively wealthy man becauae of the position in society that ~i:'o~'fro:j:J:'eedp.!~ t:':t =..=s~~~=t have been spendthrifts. Very little else of unquestioned truth remains from independent sources. What few hints can be aasumed come from the interior evidence of her poetry. She wa1 a friendly correspondent with the poet Alcaeue, and the two of them were conai· dered leaders of the Aeolian school of poe­try More important by today's standards is that she applll'ently presided over a femi­nine literary aet at Mitylene, writing short poems to the ch&l'ma of some of thoee women. It is on the basis of those small fragments that her highly regarded repu­tation rest.a. They ahow an unqueationed ~r=:~dt:ling expressed in perfect, It was this, her ability to combine emo­tional depth with classical purity, that made her not only the greatest woman poet of Greece, but one ofthegreatpoetsof all time. Solon, hearing one of her veraes recited, declared thathecouldnotdieuntil he had learned it. Passing references indicate that she was married and bad borne a son. Still, those references never show the depth of feeling, the sincerity and the grace with which she described her feelings for her women friend1. That bothered even the ancients, and they believed a legend that Sappho had thrown herself from the Leuc­adian R<>clt in fnurtration at having failed in love with a young man, Phaoan. Though the story was disproved by Roman times, it was continued by later writers who could not understand a woman who was complete without male companionship. She, in tum, frustrated other writers by refu1ing to con1ider the passing ace.ne. She ignored the eternal strife and struggle of the Greeks and their interminable civil wars. Her poetry concerned eternal values, those of love and the relationship of common people with the infinite. Per­haps the only complete poem that survives is a hymn to Aphrodite, the goddess of love. Her entire output of nine books of poetry was small. even for those times. In her own words, they were "roses, but roses all ." There were no thorns or faded blos­soms in those books. and they survived at The fathers of the church had little use for her poetry, and all copies of Sappho's verse were summarily burned when disco­vered. They offered no support to the views of those men, unlike the writing of other "pagans," and posed a real threat to the idea of male supremacy that the early church was so devoted to. Sappho seemed to be a dead iasue. Even today, when we are left with only tantalizing fragments of what must have been an exciting body of work, the old prej- 1-t until the destruction of the Library in ~dnA,eompletedby~Alllbo.iD~ !.Yr:'/.:TJ.r;CJ.a.-:o•t:vL'I'N.!M udices appear. Robert Graves, writingthe The White Goddess, a volume extolling the role of women in poetry and art, tells of his discussion with a professor about the poe­try of Sappho. "Tell me, sir," he asked, "do you think Sappho was a great poet?" The Oxford don looked up and down the street to see if anyone was listening. "Yee, Graves,'' he whispered, "that's the trou­ble. She was very, uery good." Humanity can be proud that one woman in it.a early history stands as a monument Feature to the ability of all who face prejudice. At the same time, we must mourn for the vicious destruction of her art. Willa Cather said it best. "If of all the lost riches we could have one master res­tored to us, one of all the philosophers and poets, the choice of the world would be for the lost nine books of Sappho." Franklin, of Carmel, Calif., is the direct-Or of Stonewall Features. 1983 Swnewall Features Syndicate. Texas Renegades Presenting Adragna's Carnal Fantasies By Billie Duncan Competent artists depict things, good artist depict thoughts, and great artists depict passion. Perhaps Rober t J. Adragna is not a great artist, but his work evokes a sense of, well, lust from the viewer. Cowboys, horses, guns, leather, outerspare-these all are elements in the works that are now on display at Texas Renegades, 1318 Westheimer. But the overpowering element in Adragna's meticulously crafted paintings is his own awarmess of the attraction of the sensual male animal. "I'm fascinated by the way a person wears a pair of pants or a belt," said Adragna. "the way something is shaped ~o t~em that best displays their personal- 1ty. Lest someone should get the wrong impression, a word of clarification: these paintings are not pornographic. they are merely carnal. Adragna's style is a form of theatrical super-realism. His paintings were created, for the most part, as iHustratins for books. It seems that a lot of the books took place in the Old West-an area for which Adragna (a native New Yorker) has a great fondness. "One thing I was disappointed in when I came to Houston was that hardly anyone was wearing cowboy hats." Adragna is very attactive to costuming, and, though he uses real people as models, he clothes them in his mind the way he would like to see them. "You know what's the fun thing about painting-people like this, you get to dress people up in your fantasies . And, in a way, they don't know it." He confessed that he has been known to drees for bro, himself. "I have an absolute fettish for blue jeans," he said with a slow smile, and admitted that he thinks jeans have a place in lovemaking "if they're a turn-on for the other person." He paused for a moment, his brown eye searching for the right thought. "The trou· hie with porno films 1s that they get undressed too fast." If he were to direct a porno film, he said thathewouldhave"all the different types. The Village People were perfect for me. But they didn't carry it far enough." As far as plot was concerned, he said, "I would like it if you didn'tget to the orgasm until you had explored all the other possi· bilities. The orgasm would come at the very end of the movie." But his favorite films are western and science fiction, and he said that his art is very influenced by the films he sees. He is pleased with how well his film sense has worked in with his illustrating jobs, bu the feels that he would Jike to have more free­dom of expression in his painting than he is allowed working as an illustrator. "I would like to go bolder into the fantasy." Eighteen of the 22 pictures in his Hous· ton show were originally done as illustra· tions. Of the other four, two are of Adragna's lover of five years, David. One of them is titled "Number Ten" and is on the list of paintings in the number 10 spot. Adragna explained that he had had no title for the painting, but when he was making out the list, it fell to the number 10 spot. "I thought, 'How appropriate!"' The only painting that does not have et least one male figure in it is called "Ameri­can Dream" and is an acrylic of the grill of a vintage Cadillac. "A Mercedes Benz is not as sexy as an old Cadillac." There are no paintings of women in the show. He thought of one that he decided OPENING SOON ... Nov. 11, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Artist Robert Adragna not to bring. "I didn't bring the painting because it's (the show) in a gay bar. And she's dressed in leather, of all things!"· He said he would like to try his hand at painting fantasy images of women, ~ut "most publishers are too conservative, unless it's Playboy or something like that." Adragna's illustrations are generally commissioned by such people as ~ce Books, Dell Publishing. Jove Publica­tions, Berkeley Publishing and the Ameri­can Post Card Company (for whom he has done two cowboys). everal of his pictures recPntly Montrose Art appeared in The Advocate, which is where Creative Source, 702 Avondale, and Gor­dana Kristofic of Texas Renegades noticed him. Gordana decided she wanted to bring him to Houston. "I wanted to show how someone from New York saw cowboys," she said. Robert J. Adragna 's cowboys (and other men) will be on display at Renegades through Sunday. and the charming artist will be on hand tonight, tomorrow and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. to di~us_s his work and. hopefully. sell some pam_tJngs. It would be nice to keep some ofh1s fan· tasy cowboys in Texas where they belonR"~ Winter's the Time of Discontent Feeling down? Gaining weight? Sleeping more lately? You're not crazy, you're hib· ernating, reports Omni. Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health have discovered that some of us get bummed out as the days start shortening and don't come out of our blue funks until springtime. "I should have been a bear," complains one sufferer. "Bears are allowed to hiber­nate; humans aren't." The researchers say they've obtained successful results simply by plunking their patients down under lamps to pro­long daylight artificially. For a longer­term cure, they suggest imitating the birds by flying south for the winter. But don'tgo too far south. Down under, they get depressed, too, from June to November. HOUSTON 611 HYDE PARK 18 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 11, 1983 Night Music's Waltzing Fairytale for Adults Montrose Live By Joe L. Watts Theatre Under the Stars has opened its '83-84 season at the Music Hall with a 10th anniversary production of A Littk Night Music, and has brought in Juliet Prowse, Larry Kert and Hermione Gingold to head the cast of this Stephen Sondheim musical billed as a waltzing fairytale for adults. Winner of six 1973 Tony Awards, Night Music is a musical adaptation of Ingmar Bergman's Swedish film classic, Smiles of a Summer Night. The story is elegantly set in Sweden at the tum of the century when Madame Armfeldt (Gingold) brings together for a midsummer weekend in the country a handful of discontented lovers­her daughter, actress Desiree Armfeldt (Prowse); Desiree's former lover, lawyer Fredrik Egerman (Kert); Fredrik's young wife Anne, still virginal after 11 months of mariage; Fredrik's son Henrik, a divinity student in love with Anne; Desiree's cur­rent lover, Court Carl·Magnus; and his unhappy wife, the Countess Charlotte­plus assorted servants and other guests. Amid silver birches and with the "smiles of a summer night," the lovers juggle their ill-matched relationships until finally they fall into proper order. Night Music is a very stylized, innova­tive musical, and Sondheim's lyrics and music are quite sophisticated. A mood­setting vocal quintet perform before and during many scenes, helping to explain and develop the storyline along with the actors. Night Music's style is considered light operatic, rather than traditional Broadway musical. The quintet, in this production, all seemed to have well-trained lovely voices, but were too hard to understand at times Hermione Gingold (an international treasure of the English speaking theatre) seemed a bit low key in her performance as Madame Armfeldt, but then she is required to perform the entire production from a wheel chair. However, reported to be an amazing 85 years young, she still had a twinkle in her eyes and oCf'med a crowd-pleaser. Larry Kert (the original Tony in West Side Story) was secure and fine in his per­formance as Desiree's former lover-he and Juliet had• some nice moments of inner play. Juliet Prowse (poHesaing a pair o~ '{Or· geous legs) was very capable as Desll~. and her rendition of Sondheim's classic "Send in the Clowns" had the right emo­tion, if not the right voice. Early in the play, Madame Armfeldt tells her granddaughter Fredrika "that the night smiles three times." TUTS is for­tunate in this production to present three wonderful surprise "smiles." A bright and professional smile comes from Henrik (Stephen Lehew) who laments that all of his advances to his wife are turned away with "Later, Henrik." Lehew deserves respect for his technically fine performance and brings laughter with his character's romantic frustration. The second smile is a wry grin for Coun· tess Charlotte (Barbar Lang) whose nar­cissistic, philandering husband has driven her to resent men, sex and anyone who is happy. Lang sings beautifully of her woe. in the touching "Every Day a Little Death" and is the best actress in the casl Later in Act II comes the "musically best" smile from Petra (Laurie Daniels) the maid who has dreams of grandeur but a grasp of reality that she blends power­fully in the "The Miller's Son." A Little Night Music will play through November 13. o Stages' 'Getting Out' a Powerhouse By Joe L. Watts >.. it'• second offering in the Women's Playwright Series honoring the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Stages is present- ~t..t o"":~e*;a~~I- ~~ production of a young woman's release Juliet Prowse from prison and her struggle to cope with "the outside" hits a very powerful cord and is a totally accomplished display of strong, tight direction and honorable first class acting-theatre at its finest! Stages had the honor of Norman's pres­ence at their opening night performance. Norman is the winner of the 1982 Black· bum Prize and the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for her current Broadway success, night, Mother. Surely she must have been moved and proud to have seen her extremely well­written Getting Out given this almost flawless rendering by Stages. At the opening of the play, Arlene (in her late 20&) has just been released from pri­son after serving an eight-year term for murdering a taxi driver, along with a few incidentals such as robbery and prootitu· tion. She went in a hellion and came out a meek mouse afraid of her own shadow. And in this case, that shadow is her former self (pre-prison) played by a younger actress. Scenes from her past when she was a wild animal ready to tear the world apart occur intermittently along with the present happenings of her life (a clever and quite theatrical device uoed by playwright Norman). Enter a bag full of selfish members from her past who are not ready or capable of giving her the support she needs to deal with her new freedom: the prison guard, who has retired and has driven her to Ken­tucky hoping to gain sexual favors; her former pimp/boyfriend who wants to "set her up for business again;" and her mother, a hard and bitter woman who offers nothing but negative talk of how difficult her life is going to be, finding a job, making any good new friends, etc. Then along comes Ruby, Arlene's upstairs neighbor in the run-down build­ing she has just moved into. Ruby (an ex­con, herself') is a cook at a hash house, or as she calls herself, "the queen of greaoe." She offers Arlene the simple honest truth: you won't make as much cooking and cleaning as you will on your back, but whatever you make, you get to keep all of it. Arlene isn't sure she can accept this phi­losophy and is completely destitute, con· sidering the options with which she is faced. Dare she hope that her life could someday be a good one? Norman's text is taut and tough, but contain• touches of humor in looking at life in the raw. Her delineation of the char· acters is excellent. Director Ted Swindley deserves much praise for a sharp, compelling production and for bringing together an impeccable ensemble of actors. And Stages' caat is an electric power plant. The energy, intensity and electricity was wonderful to watch Robin Bradley as Arlene underplays her role with an inner beauty that is very ~Ci a:/ns ~~«;eb~ounger Arlene) generates an explosive perfor· mance that is often hypnotic-a young actress sure to make a name for herself. Charlie Trotter is right on the mark as Bennie the retired prison guard t1mitten with Arlene. Jean Proctor presents a well-crafted characterization as Arlene's bitter and callous mother. Dorothy Edwards as Ruby (Arlene's ray of sunshine) is wonderfully warm with good comic timing and delivery. Daniel J. Christiaensas Carl the pimp is the perfect slimy snake, trying to lead Arlene back into a life of crime. Like the values in Norman's drama, the message here is simple and true: you should get out and see Getting Out; it will be time well served. Stages' production will run through Nov. 19. o Women's Chorus Slated for Houston from the solo works in the first half of the program, he will sing Rejoice in the Lamb. Although Rejoice was not originally writ­ten for treble chorus, this transcription was authorized by Britten This concert, then, will focus on 20th century composers, though not on 20th century music, as most people thinkofit­ruthless cacaphony. Lovers of vocal music will not want to mies what promises to be an exciting and enthralling concert. The concert will be presented at the John Wesley United Methodist Church on Nov. 19 at 8 p.m. For ticket information and directions, call Clara Lewis at 444- 3545. o Houston Symphony's Valley of Dry Bones NeYille Marriner. conductor; Robert Tear, tenor November 5th Program Mozart, Symphony No 35 Britten. Serenade for Tenor. Horn and Strings. Wet>­ern. Im Sommerw1nd: A Strauss. Suite from Der Rosenkaval1er ~~~~=k 6':~~l.i~:~!=-S:~~~~~i!~;.~;~~~ By Peter Derksen gram: Pur~I. "We Sing to Him," '"Evening Hymn;' Four vividly emotional works performed Barber, ''Melodies Passageres;" Theodore Chandler with scarcely a trace of feeling t1hould Ginutera. "Cinco Canzo1nes Populares~'" Britten, 0'A have been slightly surprising even to long- Ceremony of C.rols." •·Reto1ce in the Lamb time Marriner fans. He is on the way to By Peter Derksen becoming (in reputation) the Toscanini of Habituh of symphony and opera often his generation, flooding the market with look down upon "amateur" musical superb-sounding precision recordings of groups, judging that they could not possi· the classics. In particular, he has brought bly be as good as their professional coun- many fine 18th-century works back into terparts. The fact is that not all highly the active repertoire. talentedandtrainedmusiciansareableor Mr. Marriner, making his Houston willing to lead the concert life, with its debut, opened the concert with one of hie extreme demands of time and energy. stock items: Mozart's Haffner Symphony. Groups which perform music for the sheer The orchestra was immense by this con­love of it offer a quality of inspiration ductor's standards: 12-10-8-6-4 strings (he sometimes absent among the mercenar· hasbeenknowntouse6-6-4-4-2). With min ies, and also have the freedom to explore ute differences, the symphony sounded lesser-known works by the great compos· exactly like it did when he conducted it in ere, ae in thia program Boston five years ago, and as he recorded The Cecilian Singers are a group of 25 it on Philips about 10 years ago. (which is women united by their love of serious a tribute to the Houston Symphony music and commitment to make it more Orchestra's level of playing technique.) available to their community. Founded in Marriner's Mozart is crisp, exact and 1977 by Clara Lewis and Joanne Cox, rather predictable. their purpoee is to present choral literature Robert Tear, one of the world's leading of the highest artistic quality, either pre- operatic tenors, also made his first Hous· viously written or commissioned for them. ton appearance Saturday night in Ben­They are one of the only treble choruses jamin Britten's Serenade. He sang very active in this country. well, with almost perfect diction, audible Until the last century, it was relatively even over full orchestra. Thomas Beacon uncommon for women to perform music in was a model accompanist and soloist on public, particularly in church, so most horn, and contributed most of the vitality choral music was intended to be sung by of the performance. He played the modal men and/or boys. Some composers, such Prologue and Epilogue on natural (valve­as Nicolai Porpora and Michael Haydn less) horn, the pure sound of which, com­( younger brother of Joseph Haydn), bined with strings, was paradise. Mr. bucked the trend and wrote extensively for Marriner led the ensemble through the ser­treble voice. The Cecilian Singers have, as ies of songs in a generally restrained and far as they have been able to determine, direct manner, letting some Mahlerian offered the U.S. premieres of three of intensity loose in the Elegy, set to a poem Michael Haydn's four major works for tre- by Blake. hie chorus and orchestra, and they are Anton Webern's Im Sommerwind ("In planning to perform the remaining one the Summer Wind") is a youthful work next year. with slight premonitions of his later obses· lngeneral,though,fewcomposerswrote sion with concise atonality. As a late much for treble chorus or understood the romantic symphonic poem, it is oversha· musical qualities of the treble voice. Two dowed by contemporary works by Richard more recent prominent exceptions are Strauss, Sibelius and Schoenberg, among Brahms and Benjamin Britten. Later this others. Nonetheless, it was a pleasure to season, the Singers will perform Britten's listen to, evoking images of the high Alps Miasa Brevis in a concert with the West· in high summer. Marriner's conduction minster Choir and the Forth Worth was,asmightbeexpected,preciseandres­Chamber Orchestra. trained, allowing the music to stand on its Guest artists are an integral partofCec- own, unembellished. ilian concerts, not only to round out pro· Richard Strauss, ever alert to the com­gra. ms, but also to give the singers the mercial potential of his music, extracted opportunity to work with different special- an orchestral suite from hie popular opera ista and better their craft. Past guests Der Rosenkaualier. The suite has become have included the Southwest String a popularconcertstsple, appealing both to Quartet (Houston Symphony Orchestra opera lovers who seldom get to hear the principals), the Fort Worth Chamber original, and to Strauss lovers who detest Orchestra, the Texaa Little Symphony, opera. The music captures the brilliant Charles Nelson (an operatic baSBO from gaiety of the opera, with its lover's Dallas), and such varied accompaniments intrigues, comic episodes and elegant as a harp ensemble, brass quintet and balls. Though technically excellent, the mime troupe. peformance was too cold and detached for The coming concert features lyric bari- my taste. (This would have pleased toneJackColdiron,headofvocalmusicat Strauss, an unemotional man whose fri Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary gidity on the podium was legendary.} . in Fort Worth. He is eepecially noted for Cons1denng music as havmg four basic his perfonnanc!es'of the·Fa..n; Requiem «• ty~ pf quahti.e1;.J>h~sioal, il)IA>lll'<)tu.il, under the direction of Robert Shaw Aside emotional and spmtual, 1t is apparent that Neville Marriner, as a conductor, ia master of the first two. approache11 the third with the greatest reluctance and the fourth by unconscious accident. By mod­em standards of musical composition and performance, thi1 sort of thing ia quite acceptable. • Admittedly, a concert with virtually all the notes played correctly ia a rare thing. But is it music? Can these bones live? Starting Next Week in the Voice FREE PERSONALS (up to 15 words) See form page 23 Houston's New Gay Theater with an Male 'Private Lives' By Robert Hyde Is Houston's gay community ready for a munity whose most recent performance theatrical repertory company that does was in Boys in the Band, which may be nothing but gay plays? revived by Pace at the Tower. Hopefully so, according to two men in Watt.a made reference to Montrose the community who are launching their Activity Theater's production of Women first production next week with an all- Behind Bars, made popular by drag queen male version of Noel Coward's Private Divine, that brought Houston's gay Lives, that sophisticated comedy that reu- audiences to the theater, but he feels that nited Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Bur- plays should not have to be sensational to ton on Broadway earlier this year. attract the attention of the community And if this play is successful (and open- Even t~e popular Bent, Watts said, had its ing night is already promised to be stand- sensational element with its nude scenes ing room only), the community will be and its on-stage climax between two men. reacquainted with other favorites, such as "But !t's time now to do new, positive P.S., You 're Cat Is Dead, and Gertrude gay scripts," Watts said. "We shouldn't · Stein, Gertrude Stein, as well as intro- have to do something sensational or out-duced to lesser-known but new positive rageous to get people into the theater." works by American gay playwrights. Etheredge goes on to point out that this "I have a hugh social consciousness new repertory company will invite many about .gays," said John David Etheredge, gay actors to perform, an opportunity that the director of Private Lives and co- haeeludt>d themsimplybecausetheyhave founder of the newly incorporated Diver- been gay or effeminate. sity Theater, the non·profit theatrical "And somedirectorshavehadtobypa88 group which will bring the plays to Hou•· them bec8;U&e of this," Etheredge said ton. "Some people go into politics or "lt'e a reahty. It'• not totally pleasant. I'm become very active in other areas of the sure.it's happened to me. And there are so community, and this is my way of doing many talented gay actors." somethina for us." If Private Lives is a success, then, Ethe- Etheredge hao been involved in theater redge's goals will come closer to reality in for most of his life. After graduating from providing this opportunity to local gay Northwestern University in Natchi- thespians. tochee, he studied as an apprentice at the But why Private Lives, rather than Alley Theater, supervised a local repertory some more recognized gay play? company in New Orleans for over two "I thought of going with something less years, and has directed over 40 plays in his established," Etheredge said, "but I didn't life, including the recent Skirmishes at know if anyone would have heard of it. Stages. R..ally, this play is just an easy first step The idea of forming a local gay reper- for us." tory company occured to Etheredge when Watts agreed with Etheredge and feels he aaw the community reaction to last that by making this an all male produc-year's production at Stages of Bent when lion , a lot of people will come to the play several performances had to be added due juat to see if it will work. to sold-out performances. He was moved "I think it's innovative to approach a when he saw an individual in tears during classic that's been revived on Broadway," the play which analyzes the love between Watts said. "We've cha nged some of the gays in a Nazi concentration camp. pronouns," he added, regarding the all "I then realized that most members of male cast, "but so far,onlyourdragqueen the community had never seen plays (who's playing one of the roles and uses about themselves," Etheredge said. camp constantly off stage) is confused by "Gay people spend most of their lives all this." without role models. Most of their first 18 The play's comedy revolves around two years are invalid," he said. 0 Maybe some- married couples (in this case, gay) honey­day a psychiatrist will come along and tell mooning on the French Riviera when two a aix·year-old kid that it's all right to be members of the newlywed& who were once gay, but that's a long way off." lovers spy each other from adjoining bal- And it's with this spirit of forming a conies and realize that they are still in comfortable identity that the new gay Jove. They slip away to a private residence theater group ia being launched. Ethe- wheretherenewmatesdescendonthemin redge feels deeply about his conscious- an emotional and hilarious tug of war. raising effort for the community and One of Houston's oldest gay bare, the believe• that gay people need to see 'plays Pink Elephant at 1218 Leeland, is dona!· about them1elve1. And to date, that iden-• ing its new stage area, The Other Side, to tity has been stereotyped, for the most this new theater company for its inaugu­part, by motion pictures and television. ral performances which will be held on only this year ~ave two major gay play~ Tuesday evenings, beginning November (Torch Song Triology, La Cage aux Foiles) 22, at 8 p.m. Tickets will be $3 to make the made inroads on Broadway and been evening more accessible to the commun- ~~~!y :::r~h~~~h~Yb~o~gaS:y a~dii:c:~ it~;A lot of people in the community don't depressing; Boys in the Band, too negs- support things as much as they should," live.) Watts said, hoping that this will be the "There'• got to be an audience in Hous. exception. ton for very positive, sensitive gay plays," ''And this is something we both want," aaya co-founder Joe Watts, a long·time act. Etheredge added. "Hopefully all of ua can ing member of Hou1ton'• lheatnc.J com· , wprlf 1<>Rethe~ to estabjislpt.", ui ~ '" •."I ~t ,,_. •' ~ •1v1 1 ,,1, oh '.>r!J \ : ... 1 .1 Nov. 11, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 Ch'l.ij.tmaj. ca'l.dj., w'l.ap, 9L{h, 'Jj. and j.WE.at j.hi'l.tj., mo'l.E. c'l.itfru and fnau than wn!! 6stt Jlawth..Jtn£-._.J./'-'u.s.ton 'Juul 7'/000-529-S299 [I/Un aJlo..Jay tl:tu claiuula~ l!am·'/pm. .!..'Jun tilf 9f>m on df,~..Jo.y b '7f'.u1.da~ THE ALTERNATIVE We have a better way. A better way of pu lling you in touch with the people that you want to meet. People whose interests are compatible with rours, sensitive people. Attractive people. Peo­ple who may be mterested in lasting relationships. Peo~le who u?derstand that you can't depend on the bars to provide you with quality companionship. We h~ve a better way-and we'd like to show it to you. Private selection offers a umque app~oach to video dating, combining state.of th~ art technology with the dynamics of interpersonal relat1onsh1ps. Call today for your free consultation. 9 PRIVATE~ es. SELECTION 4200 Westheimer-Suite 250 (713) 961-9876 20 MONTROSE VOICE/ Nov 11. 1983 Sports Tennis Club Elects Officers o Montrose Tennis Club Elects '84 Officers By Rich Corder The Montrose Tennis Club looks to be in good hands for the coming year after Tues­day night's election of its '84 officers. Yours truly was elected to a third term as president. new member Christi Callie became MTC'e first woman officer as vice • president, Rich Ryan was reelected secre­tary, and newcomer Mark Dingman was elected treasurer. Richard Pregeant will assume duties of Challenge Ladder director. Randell Dick­erson will focus on new member activities, and Mario Durham will make himself available to assLSt Mark with the money. Congratulations to these officers and committee chairpersons! Arriaga and No. 3 seed Mark Dingman have something to say about that. Nine other Houston players complete the class. Open Doubles will feature myself and John Ryan seeded No. 1 over pros Tim Calhoun and Jan Mauldin. The No. 3 seeded team is Jim Kitch and Jon Colbert (the No. I team in the MTC). There are 11 other teams, making this the most inter· eating doubles competition we've seen here in Houston With MTC's plans to host a national doubles tournament in the spring of 1984, this is a good sign. • There is no admission for spectators. Play begins Saturday at 9 a.m., and semis and finals begin Sunday at 10:30. Come watch the fun! o Tennis Championship Younger People Begins Sunday Suffer More ~~~~::,~~i~~n~ft), i:J,~h~0~~w!fn-r;:;.!~ Mental Problems mg!'. Class A Singles' defending champion Tony Cibrian of Corpus Christi (recent Clas• A champ at Dallas Oak Lawn's Texas-OU Classic) is seeded No. 1. The No. 2 seed is Houston's No. 1 player Rich Ryan, hoping to avenge last year's cham· pionship match. Five other Houston p)ay· era will figure into the results. Class B Singles will feature No. I seed John Teamer (of San Francisco) favored to meet No. 2 seed David Davenport (also of San Francisco). Six Houstonians, one player from Corpus Christi and one from Kalamazoo, Michigan, round out Claas B. Cla88 C has a dozen entranta, with myself as No. I seed hoping to defend my 1982 championship, but No. 2 seed Robert Researchers are scratching their heads over a major new study that indicates peo­ple between ages 25-45 suffer from many more mental problems that older folks, reports the New York Times. Experts at the National Institute of Mental Health say the reason may be that older people have a hard time remembef· ing psychological traumas from their eariler yeara. The three-year study of 11,000 people contained another surprise. Doct.ors had thought depression waa our number one problem. It turns out alcohol abuse is tops, followed by drug dependence. THANKS, HOUSTON! r--·~ .___:AMERICAN MAKE READY·--~ ~ American Make Ready would like to announce the opening of our new office now serving ... SAN FRANCISCO P.O. Box 15068 #342 Phone (415) 861-7640 HOUSTON/GALVESTON Phone (713) 529-9985 DALLAS/FT. WORTH Phone (214) 828-3012 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Applications now being accepted four our Houston location. 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NOV. 13 14 15 16 17 For add1honal 1n!Ofmal1on or phone numbers tor &Yenls hsled below look for ltMI S?Qflsonng organlzallonunder ·orgamzahon1 .. 1ntheMontroseClau1!1ed Selected Events through 7 Days •FRIDAY: Veterans Day, Nov.11 •FRIDAY: Committee for Public Health Awareness's "Sharing Group for the Worried Well," 7-8pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett II.SA TURDA Y-SUNDA Y: 3rd annaul HouTex Tennis Tourney, MacGregor Park llMONDA Y: AIDS victim support group meets 6:30pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 llMONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain •TUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPIT Radio, FM-90 •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Dec. 6 •IN 8 WEEKS: Houston Data Professionals meet 7:30pm Dec. 6, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main •IN 8 WEEKS: Greater Montrose Business Guild meets 7:30pm Dec. 6. Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westheimer •IN IS WEEKS: Winter begins at 4:3lam, Dec. 22 •IN 6 WEEKS: Christmas, Dec. 25 UN 11 WEEKS: Gay Pre88 Association Southern Regional Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston UN 25 WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventione, May5 ANNOUNCEMENTS •BUSINESS-OWNERS We hst tree uch wee« 1n thlS drrectory MontrOH commumty or~anaa- ~~ts~~rstt!:1~~0~Erv~d'i~: d•s1nbutl0n ilnctk:lt" ih11 li.tk19i1 a MONTROSE VOICE dhlrlbuUonpoint GIGANTIC GARAGE SALE Benefitting Gay Switchboard. Dona­tions needed for Nov. 12, 13. Held at Alabama at Roseland. Call Switch­Selected Events board 529-3211 in Future Weeks DWELLINGS & ~~i!nw~~~:r~hG~~:~ meets ROOMMATES 6:30pm Nov. 19, 210 Fairview, •pl 1 •IN 1 WEEK: Full moon, 6:30am, Nov. 20 U N 1 WEEK: Choices meets l 2:30pm Nov. 20 •IN 1 WEEK: Unitarian/ Univerea1iet Gay Caucus meets Nov. 20, let Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •IN 1 WEEK: Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm Nov. 20, Presbyterian Center behind !st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main UN 1 WEEK: Lutherans Concerned meets Nov. 22, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •IN 1 WEEK: Houston ruea Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet ?pm, Nov. 22 •IN 1 WEEK: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets ?pm, Nov. 22, Bering Church, 1440 Harold •IN 1 WEEK: Interact meeting, Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm, Nov. 23 UN 1 WEEK: Thanksgiving, Nov.24 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference, "The Challenge of 1984: Together We Can Make a Difference," San Diego, Nov. 25-27 •IN 2 WEEKS: 5th Memorial Harvey Milk/ George Moscone March, San Francisco, Nov. 27 •IN 2 WEEKS: First day of Hanukah, Dec. 1 •IN 8 WEEKS: Lesbians & GWM 33 NONSMOKER (with cat) seeks employed responsi­ble roommate, 2-1-1h townhouse, fully furnished, near Hillcroft & 59 Bus line, security, quiet complex $200, deposit $187.50, Y.i utilities (References verified) 664-7296 (keep trying) QUAINT MONTROSE One bedroom m charming, well­kept four-plex. Nov. rent free. 522- 2204 THIRD ROOMMATE WANTED Nice old house. $250. References, deposit. John. 521-3300 RESPONSIBLE G/W/M WANTED To share 2 bedroom/1 bath. Mont­rose/ Richmond apt. available. Dec 1. $250 all bills paid. Contact Brian Forgey, 524-6900 (home). 522-7130 (work) GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE (A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year 523-3223 MONTROSE ROOMMATE WANTED G/W/M to share 2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment with same. $260+ '~ utili­ties 529-0018. IH 1 pm SPACIOUS HEIGHTS HOME 2 bedroom, den, dining, living, kit­chen. Yard, upkeep furnished. $500 + split third of ullht1es with frugal duplex mates No pets $450 deposit (negotiable for right perso~(s), ldeal for roommates.) House built m 1909, stately Heights mansion type m quiet neighborhood, lower floor only of three story for rent. Call 869- 4025 or 529-8490, Hollis GAV BARS Gay People in Medicine meet "f!oUSioN • &iar P•tch 229'4 W HOk:omo.-MS-9171 :~~1-..96SM•r1inlulherK1ng-M1-2521 • Chieken Coop-535 W•the<mer ~2240 ~· 2531 Richmond-528-2259 d11co • Dirty s.11y·s-220Avonda..::529=752S­~ 5731Klfb'Y=521-i«.4- e E1.r1-1213-R;ct;iOOnd""-527~71 - ~t011e9tt-659-0453- - • Galleon__:-2300R1ch.TIOOei=S22-ie_1_6 ~i09-TUlm-=---s2M12e - - - • JR·s-aoe-PIC111c-s21"=2sl9 ~~1e~~~~n&Lynn·a::e,7- Fa1~1ew-s28- ~9::' .!~11~~·- -5245 BulleiO ·sP'eectway­itlllv J..:::312 Tuam__:-52&:9343- - • Lo-.a:s oe~::-_2321c;~;,;,-s2~2 eMarys-1022 Westh••mer--Si.88S1 ~moi.1a1-Park MOtetBer- -SOwauQh"Dr--861 :~n~~~~~un - -!>34 We1the1mer -526-7519 =~ry-Ch.ltiotte's-·911 W Orew--52~ ~OM M•n.n1.1·co~e-Pac11ie-52<i7'88 • Night L119--1l22 WH!he1mer-S2aqj51 :.~mbers 2-300 W911he1ma';'"""..:s-2e~6551 ioffice(1C1u-~-oo;..·1t>11;y-:_52~ -­~ 101eWGfiV--525-is03 - :e=ouua w1---,:tti R.ch~-528-8903- - el8Phant-·1:i1e LHianci-6s&:oo.o e Ranch_:-&62o-;Ai M;,-;;-528-8730 - ~i02- t<l7by~...:6272d-;-ning.li.,. • Rlch"s-2401 San Jacmto-650=07&.f e Ripcord715Fa1rvoew-s21=2192- ~i00A1b;ny..:..5~11 e 6t1-611 HydtiPark *~~~-=~-~~:rWnlh••"*--521: :::ns-535 -WMth81m«-5i0-02"•·• ·1e1b1an e ventur•N.....:.292JMa~iUiixil-- - !_W_9!~_P.!.aJl~.~-=-~~-m~~ ALEXANiiR1A=- --· Nov 11. 1983 I MONTROSE Vorce 21 Montrose Classified eTrarnmpe-C7 W•nnt9-763-1247 eFantasyl-...OSMaurice(WtnOwoodShopp;rlg Ctrl-232-0336.disco LAKE CHARLES-e? aragon-1501 Br09d~9389 d1sco ORGANIZATIONS A Plac.1r1 the Sun-c/o Gracllynn Books, 704 Fa1rv1ew-522·7695: subgroup ol l!H Inc concerts7pmTu.s ACLU-1236 W Gray-524-5925 AIDS Hotli~o Gay Switchbolird-529-3211 Ameriean Gay Athelsta-'57-«ll!O A1tro Rainbow Altiance-520-IM51 [Y01ce). S2<>-0552(TTY) ~rft:'orJl~~obert'-'oon, dir.209 =~.=~~~o;~ed.!.9:~-~~~- ~!!:i~~-·:::Jfr"*(BWMT}-<:IOGay Choices lesbian social group::...c/O Gay ~:,1:.~:t,.~.:~~':"'* 12 30pm 3td Sun Chnst••ri ct.uren-ot tM Gooc1-s~...;en,....::1-;o:; Com"littM for Public t-t.fth Awweneu-POB 3045~.522-5084-S/\anng Group for the Worntld Wd" mMt Fr~ 7-!pm MontroseCounHlmgc.nter ~~ GosP9f Cent&f 1700 Montrow­Co~ Aytz Chay1m meets at CCF. 217 :~'}~-ea&-e997 Mf"VtC9 & soc1al 8pm 2nd & Cr•111Hot1•n&-228-1505 ~;:!,~ay·A~ A-mer---;a-nGay ~ndatJon2700Mason524-5791- ~Q;:_~~~~- ~~d7~ ;,~•& ~o.~ 730pmSat Fam.1,.;&F;-~-~ tnfft 2Pm3rdSuriatPreabytenanCenter•tOakda+e bet"undFirstPl'esbytenanChurch.5300Ma•n ~1~f~~~h~~S210 Far101n-526-~1 F7"~ru,,~-=--s~12a1- ~1:,,:".>:.-.--;..,.0:.:.1, .=- =--.= ... .,..~...,.= iGA5ei= ~y&L•boariAfch1 ..... olTexasatt•hataolllH QiY ANri Qub-2615 W-.Jgto 1124 77008 ~8?'~'?'~ i.a-..ci{!ni 2722 Newmari 112 Gay llaliM Group-~9844 f!:¥.~E,~ca=·~~lrn ~;; 7~ =r~o;~=i~~r.i:::.~ GaySwrtchboard POB382•_n2S3 ~3211 :;::.r;:to0n.counMltng.reterrals.TTY, AIDS G,...t., Moritrote 8us1n.s Guild--<orrtact through Montrote \'0tee meeta 730pm. 111 ~:Stti..C:;riu"'tyrOCln'\L•benySarik.1001 ~='i"t.FM1960 Ar .. Far·Away Fnends =lelt1terl&1thAff• ~~=-~;_~ ~-;~ .~~=- & • HoustonCrtyHal-901 &.gby -- •SfllySal.!!:!_:-~4-~kson-~~ BEMii.iDNr=- - - • Copa-304-&i;;ns-:-e32-42Cie:dosco . su;;d0.,..,.. .. :: .• 91-crockeo=-833-3989- _ ~~roM.MrV•ces1pmSuri.B•blestudy730pm HoustonCom~1tyClowns~14 Hou11oriO.t11~ol ~·riEut Roon\. Hohday '""Central_ 4640 S Maui­S23- fl822-mM1730pm2ndTue1 HOuStor;-MOiorcyc1e Clu~ GALvESTON M8"("S.1022Westheimer-52&-8851 • FiY-21010· .. -·763-9842 •Mary 11:..:250f~76J..Qr.435 • Robert"tLal+na- 213Kempner- 7~6996 'Montrose Live' each Friday in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment Wf-s'=9-=~s:~ -11oouon1mM-Church ot Chnstian Fatth-217 Fa1tv1ew- 529-B005 MMCel1045amSun&7.15pmWed ==.~~:_~~'" Tu.9 & S•m; cl\olr prachoe ~t.i"Un,fY-1217RJChm~ ~72&e.S20-5fi99Serw>ee1730pmFri.11am Citlzen1 lot Human Equality (CHE)-&Olil Fann1ri 11301-236-8686 boan:lmeet2ndTues Ho~tOn Nor1h Prolessoona11 POB 3840 ~~~~c77~B~l.::;f~4.::;~c.;1·~~~~;;,.,2>~-e=0<~-1=73~2· ~~~;!i ·~~:.·::;: fro~:!.•:: :~eg~~ ~1oni':!:n t1~~a~W~:h:o~~b1~:~~~":: Symphonic Band. Montrose C~. board mMt 730pm 1st Thuni (Yaned 1oca11ons1 educat•ona1torum730pm3tdThurs ;!°;7.r~K~: Citizens for :;:c~~s1·2~~Z::1~~~~~ ~- ' H~man Equ-~Hty (CHE)=~--.;~~!:' :2~= :~~ ----·~- j 22 " look out, .everyone! ... We're being attacked by a giant sq ... Well, na ... I'd say medium squid!" The Far Side by Gary Larson " C'mon, c'mon, buddy! The heart! Hand over the heart! . . . And you with the brains! . . . Let's have 'em!" ~'m~.,.· BurMU P0B 391. Bellatre ~~t;is~~ ~':°r~~ 2~T:'°:i ~7io':UM- 6265 M••n. & 4th Tues •• Y•ned 1ri1er.ct-POB~-1ii:W~nm-sn-1014 mMt 4th Wed_ BenngChurch.1440Harold. 730pm eKPFT-R8ci;Q. -FM-~9 LM11BT;d-:.. 526-4000 -W•lde'nSte•n'·;ayrad1oshowThurs 7:~QOOpm KS/AloSFOu~8110n.:.100, WMi"he1mer 41113- 524-AIDS "ZapClapRevueTwo.Too''benel111n November. NumMrs. 300 Westhe1mer r;:~f5 BiCycie ·ciUt;-Ol"~--682:cM56~.rOt ~~~~~SJ~~~ Alc0holic1 & Aianon-1214 ~~b~~G·~"f.r;~~~~-~"·;;~ c .. ti;;ns & Gay P9op1e m Med•cme--aaa=--9488 mMI 730pm t1!Sal Li9b;in -Mott\ers .Ubgroup ol Cho1ces. meets llland3tdSat.830pm.210Fa1rview.ap11 LUine-;-1n1-CoO-cerMd-=me.1,--9,· GraC-. Lutheran Church. 2515 Waugh-521-0863 •S3-114J·meet2nd&4thTueaeven1ng1 e Me1rOl)Ol;tan -CominUn~tiCh-UrCh of lhe Resurrection 1MCCRJ-1919 Oec•tur·- 881-9149- pot-luck dinner 730pm 111 S.1 mootrily, .. ,.,,e91 10451im & 71Spm Sun & 7 1 Spm Wed. memberah1p mqu1rers Cl•U ~Tue1.educet1onc1eaanTues&Wed ~~= 2~ :~:ce--521-2461 •lhi1ete l1H ~t1:~IOQ~9n"' ~~~,~~1~ i~:"~ Mulbeny Mon1roHCiv1C CiUb ... NeertownAuoc111o0n e MOflt;(,H Climc:.1(M w•iheorMr~52&-55J1 open weekn1ghl1 6-10pm; women·• emphU•I ~':!~~1~n1 ;!fv':!b:r.·~~~~~.R300~!;,~·.~,:~ Monl/O.e COuna..-;ng ·c;;:;w~-:900 Lovett #203-529--0037 AIDS v1ct1m support group mee118JOpmMon ~z:i'~~~::::::.1e~~=.1:r~ng1l~-~~~~ MOfl-troHT9fW'•t c1Vb·· -Roch at 524-2-151 pl•y Sun, 10 30am-1.30pm, M•cGl'egor Park =~r~.~~ ~~~;~·~:=m eOw1 ~:i$1~~m~~':1 1~eci;,r:~~~_e~~1~~23 i.tSAtor .. ier HoustOn -(M9n·a--J 50ttt>ert- 5~8902dey. 523-0413ev• MSA1Wo.n:9n·a $0ttt>e1ITeague=12&:"s31I MsA,1vOri~-8io-2930Q8mei730P'm Tuw.Gregory-UncOlnachoct.1101Tett ~=~~!fi~~~~~~~n:-:.:,' 7e;~ MofitrOH Wiien iUt;g;OuPNNrtow.i' ~ Mulll~S 1eoe;;t-etUb1=meetlltlnee .. n -710 P.e•l•c-&28-IM27 club night Thurs ~11100 (MontrO"ieCiviC'CiubJ= meeta 11 Bering Church. 1.uo Harold- 522·_!_~--~!!_t~~.~ ~9! New FreedOm Chnt11an ChUrch-912 W '111h- 591·1342HrY1ce110.m Sun. 730pm Wed ~:ot:7f ;:I~ Nffr!Own- COmmun"rtY ~;_·1 L1btr•c10.;po-& 60ii063:"" 7726Q:. RecrHiiOnai Land Fund CommmM-· Mu111ng Clubproteet :;;~~:·v Gay1Lnb1an suPPort Group ~"!.~Bar A1M G•r•·~332-:J737 meet Thurs Tex•BeyAr•GayV°'"'itl..:.332..:1131 mMt b+-wMldy ~"!:n=~~5~~~~4FoUndluon--1915 f;~10er1----<:10 MafY'•. 1022 wl.theimer-ff~~= UC=:i.~f;:~·r?n~~7~t 52&-5842 meet3rdSunaltemoons W9.JaY•n Fellowltt;p:-:&64=8899- ~=:~=~f:}C)ny ArtS-ASIOC.a11on· ·1001 w_om.n·1 Lobb_y~A1l1.li~Cheilea--:_52_1~~ foNR0i- Con~ Area Lambda Socl8ty·-Jan at (409) 756-03S4orR•yal(409) 75&-4097 co;;-re,;ArN.l .b ••r ;:.K1thYa11•os)756-90e9 m9!!8pm2~1~lhf1'1 .AKEC'HARLES-- )lgl'llty-·Rtt. Box216C.Longv1Ue.LA706~ PERSONALS PERMANENT RELATIONSHIP WANTED GWM. 30. 5·9·· 145. brown hair/eyes, seeks someone for lifetime relation­ship_ EnJOY concert-going. quiet evenings at home. bicycling, com­panionship. Call and leave message if not at home. as I'm in and out quite a bit Kenneth 680-8286 CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more. 500 members nationwide. lnfopixpak $3. NYWC. 59 W 10th. New York, NY 10011 HAPPINESS IS .. . a handsome. healthy, humorous. happy hunk as your escort or model from .. TexEscort_ 524-9511 Major credit cards honored Security and discretion assured BODY MASSAGE In or out. Bruce. 521-2009 The 'Voice' is Hou~ connection to Gay America- every Friday PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e Club HOu11on Balh1- -2205 F.nn1n~5!H998 ::;~~~~ Quarter Theater-3201 lou1s1Ma • M•dlowne sp...:3100 F8nn1n-522-2379 e 2306Ciub- :-2JOtfoeneu.ee- :s2i-fl2is- RESTAURANTS e eaJl:s--402LOv8tt--521-9&66 • BoulevardCale-aoeloven • Chapultapec-813 Richmond-522-2365 e CU1iured-Cow-2366R•~e - ~:;:nk1e·1- Monlroae at W9sthe•mer-s29~ i Man G1rner eeCf-138 WGray ::r~~~~-'s~I~~ndw1Ch ShoP-153fi 9Greekls1anc1-3o2Tuam--s22-1o.ao ==lt~~=--;~1!-~;:t~:f3_8_!! - e s·en-1303 w .. n..,mer-52&-8823 • One's; Mffl---201_9 W~ril1=--sfa-~~ • Perky·1--R1chmonda1K1rby-524-0075 • Rasca1s-2702K•rbv-52,_:e212 • SeoondVerH-3619WHh•ngton • SpamahFIO""er--3921 Main e Spud-U-Llke-416 Westheimer--5~ • Star PizH-2111 Norlolk-523-0800=- __ • Steak·n'Egg-4231 Montrose-528-8135 ~19m·1 Collee -shop=1s2s-W8sthe1mer-529- SERVICES, ETC. BUSINESS CARDS $13.101 Discount printing CPC. Why pay more? (713)667-3600/664-9465 Now hiring AGGRESSIVE SALESPERSON Young company needs person to promote new environmental con­cept to bars and clubs_ Simple oper­ation with superior standards. Hours 9 to 5:30. Call 864-2223 BE GOOD to yourself today_ Licensed massage therapist on duty l Oam to 10 pm, 7 days a week. By appointment. 528- 3147 Randolph Alan READY FOR CHRISTMAS? Available now. Exquisite jeweled, sequined and pearl-trimmed velvet tree ornaments. Also orders being taken for hand-st itched holiday notions For m
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