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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 001. 1987-01-30. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/224.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-01-30). Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/224

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987 - File 001, 1987-01-30, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/249/show/224.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 327-B, January 30, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 30, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript I: [l]{i I I •I~.,,,~ ;\'iW:1 •1'1 ~ ;i. f'i I mwlfi1 ! lfj fllltt:.t:O:~ Pii• montrose VOICE Ga. Race Clash Part of Klan Strategy news analysis, inside HOUSTON WEATHER: Friday night: Partly cloudy and mild, low 48. Saturday: Partly cloudy and warm, high 75. Isn't it too early for spring? ~f,fj ~ ~ ~i ~:Ill --JA-NU-AR-Y3 -0,1 -987-IS-SU-E-327--8--1~;J~3 L__ ________ _ And They're Off! Runners will again compete Saturday in Montrose for the 2nd Annual Fine Arts 5K Run. (This photo is from last year.) Call 526-1710 for info. Stormy election puts new people in charge Your New Biz Guild Officers Sheri Cohen Darbonne, inside MORE NEWS ON THE HEALTH CRISIS o Group of TV Stations Accepts Condom Ads o Liberace Home from Hospital but Gravely Ill news, inside NOW IN THE MONTROSE VOICE: CAPTAIN VIDEO'S TV SCHEDULES 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 --=~ ....... 1- ---:::-- ~ <-,~· -:..-:: .- 1 I 1,I;.\ Spruce Up Your Home ,' If for the Holidays /11\ ~~ 1r ,, ~ HSK CONTRACTING I I 1'1\ A Full Service Contractor I 111/ ~, (11 • Roofing (All Types) • Tile/ Masonry if/ 1 I •• Remodeling • CarpeVFlooring II Sheetrock/ Painting • Cabinets /1\ \I • Plumbing/ Electrical • Decks/ Hot Tubs II \I I • Foundations Repaired • Room Additions II \\\ • Tree & Trash Removal • Concrete \\\ I\ I • Insulation • Chimney Sweeping & ,\ \,, • Water Proofing Repairs "\ 11/) 1 1 • Pest & Rodent Control • Fully Insured ( • Heating/AC • References Available ~ I s 1 ~ \,'' \\' No Job Too Big or Too Small 1 \ ,:\\\ 520-9064 ~I 'I II ,. OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 -VISA T I/\ //!.' l,1 I j JOE's OPEN HOUSE ~Pl~y ~safe! You've been curious. right? You've seen our ads But you just haven't had the nerve to apply for membership? Well. we're going to make it easy Come tour the facilities (but don't expect anything fancy) and see 1f a membership in the Society of Joe 1s nght for you and 1f you're rig ht for it THIS SUNDAY, 3-6PM 611 Pacific The "Cottage Playhouse" (Follow the path through the lot Look for the Play Safe flag.) Yes. everyone will stay attired. So don't worry 1f you see someone you know JOE 1s a pnvate organization which promotes healthy sexual fellowship among adult gay men. Membership requirements include (1. physical) not being unattractive and (2_ mental) having a strong pos1llv.e attitude about yourself and your gay sexuality_ An abundance of the No. 2 quahf1cattoA can help make up for a lack in the No. 1 qualification (none of us are perfect) Can't make 1t Sunday? Or can't wait? J.0 E.'s doors open (admissions allowed) .. TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 8-9PM FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS 11PM- 1:45AM SUNDAYS 6-9PM The management and staff of The 611 support the Omega House and appeal to you to do the same! 611 Hyde Park (713) 528-9079 One Group of TV Stations Accepts Condom Ads By Sybil McLain United Press International NASHVILLE, Tenn.-Knight-Ridder officials said the AIDS crisis overrides past taboos and prompted them to become the first major television group to accept ads for condoms. "We feel very strongly about this AIDS thing and the proportions that it's reached," said Art Elliot, president of WKRN in Nashville, one of eight Knight-Ridder stations. Although Knight-Ridder is the firot major television group to accept con­dom ads, stations KRON in San Fran­cisco, WRTV in Indianapalis and WXYZ in Detroit announced in recent weeks they would accpet condom ads because of the AIDS crisis. Medical officials say condom use is crucial to controlling AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. "We decidedatameetingin December that we would accept condom advertis­ing with certain caveats, based on the time of day and copy content," Elliot said Tuesday. "Everybody more clearly under-stands this (AIDS) is a problem. It's for that purpose solely that we've agreed to do this." NBC, CBS, and ABC said they will not broadcast condom ads. They would "be intrusive to the moral and religious beliefs of many of our viewers," said CBS spokesman George Schweitzer. JANUARY 30, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Police Seek Where Your Friends Live 3 pools, free cable, utilities paid and new exercise facilities Only 16 Units Left (713) 621-7880 Anocher Fine -flnger Properry Killer in Brutal Slaying The brutal mutilation murder of a 50- year-old openly gay man in far south­east Houston is being investigated as an isolated attack, police said Tuesday, Jan. 27. Homicide Detective Jerry Novak said he had discussed the case with other homieide detectives cur­rently working on unsolved murder cases involving gay victims, and was not alerted to any similarities to those cases. This victim, John Doyle, was found dead in his apartment in the 6900 block of Avenue U about5:45 a.m. Monday by co-workers. Doyle had been stabbed 10- 20 times "all over" and his body was mutilated. "The genitals were severed from the body and they were found at the scene," Novak said. Two knives, apparently used in the slaying, were found near the body, but a larger knife believed to have been used in the attack was missing, he said. Unlike other recent murder victims, Doyle probably had not been in the Montrose area prior to the attack, Novak said. Police believe Doyle, who had no transportation, to have been a loner who "freelanced" his sexual con­tacts in the southeast Houston area, the detective said. Although Doyle's wallet had been "gone through," police are not consider­ing robbery the actual motive of the attack. The other Knight-Ridder TV stations J~;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;.i are in Oklahoma City; Tucson; Mobile, "This looks more like a sexual assault or attack, from what we saw at the scene. It has all the classic signs of over­kill,'' Novak stated Ala.; Flint, Mich.; Providence, R.I.; Albany, N.Y.; and Norfolk, Va. Elliot said no condom ads will run before 10:30 p.m. and all will contain a line that explains condoms can be used as "a prevention of disease." "I would expect we'll get some com­plaints,'' Elliot said. "We'll get some heat. You always hear from the 'antis.' You never hear from the 'pros.'" montrose VOICE HOUSTON. TEXAS ISSUE 327-B FRIDAY, JANUARY 30. 1987 Published bi-weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) Community Publishinl( Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynght 1987 Office hours 8am-6pm Henry McClurg pu~sfl.,,ed•IQf Lmda Wyche mM1agmg NrtOf David Roumtort p10duc:l"1rl Elroy Forbes toeiel dlr«.rM Shen Cohen Darbonne MWs SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529·8490 Jerry Mulholland .ctv•'''''"ll' d•r«tor Ken Boge .ccoun1 H«t1f1ve POS1MAST£R Send •ddr•s conect• >ns to •oe Avon· dt•e Houston TX 7700&-3028 Suhsc,,plof)fl ,,,. *' US lbr Va.ce c•m•r or US /Wail) Sl25perwoektUPI021Huf'S) $65perye.r!!2w kt) or Sl2 50 por l•K mnrithl t26 weeks) N1,,•Dr1el .Overt111ng ••P'•Hnt•f1ve R1vt>ndell Market1 ig. 868 611•1 Avenue Nf'w YOik 10011 ,212") 2•2·6863 F/l'le/ adllert1s ng dNdl•llO All dl1;play ads 5pm 2 days pno.1opub+tu1io d•I• Al anl..O•ds2Pm daypn)r 10 p b 11ton :!ate e.:tu1e E ght A Save On Hair Care Services at Union Jack Union Jack Hair Salon-Save $5 on any haircut, color or perm Appointments not necessary, but recommended. Call 528-9600 for appointment U ni on Jack 1212 Westhe imer Houston 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 BEER BUST 25A DRAFT All DAY, All NIGHT 1tf,¢ ~· 7 Days a Week I-SATURDAY & SUNDAY LIQUOR BUST 15~ All the Well Liquor You Care to Drink 4pm-7pm 220 Avondale Wet Jockey Short Contest $200 Cash & Prizes Starring Maude Thursday Evenings 529-7525 JANUARY 30, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Georgia Race Clash Part of Larger Klan Strategy Signs of BALDING? News Analysis by Hylah Jacques Pacific Nru·s Serl'iC'e Special to the Montrose Voice PULASKI, TENN.-When Ku Klux Klan leader Tom Robb staged a rally on the courthouse steps here Jan. 17, he was greeted with jeers and protests from a racially mixed crowd of local resi dents. But on the same day 200 miles away in Forsyth County, Ga., the tables were turned. Taking advantage of deeply rooted racist feelings in the all white community, Klan leaders stirred up what civil rights activists later called "a 1000-strong lynch mob." Their target: a busload of demonstrators from Atlanta who had come to join some 30 white res:dents for a march in memory of Mar· tin Luther King, Jr. With local police unprepared for the escalating violence, the march was halted along its route. News of the confrontation quickly reached Klansmen in Pulaski as they prepared to celebrate the post-civil war rebirth of the Klan. Stanley McColl um, grand wizard of one of the two major national Kiana and the organizer of the Pulaski demonstrations, said that under the circumstances he wasn't dis­appointed that only 50 Klansmen showed up for his march: "A lot of the Georgia people stayed down there. I just heard there was a confrontation and arrests, but we did stop them from com­ing in (to Forsyth)." Indeed, Forsyth County has become an overnight rallying cry fora new kind of Klan which leaders call the "Fifth Era.'' In a telephone message for his follow· ers, Danny Carver, a Georgia great titan (cell leader) of the Invisible Empire of Ku Klux Klan and a Forsyth organizer, hailed the success of the counterdemonstration there. "I had a dream, and Saturday in Forsyth County my dream came true," hi!-i mes sage states. "Niggers were not run out by politics. Black animals will be kept out with rocks, bottles, fire, guns, and by the grare of God. The day of the rope will come and the names of al1 race traitors will he rem em be red ." But Forsyth County has also become a rallying point for civil rights activists. Hosea Wil1iams, an Atlanta city coun­cilman and former aide to the late Rev. King, was an early and key supporter of the Jan. 17 brotherhood march. Wil­liams and local resident Dean Carter, a white construction worker and karate devotee, were firmly committed to march again on Jan. 24. Mrs. Coretta Seotl King, president of the Marlin Luther King, Jr. Center, endorsed the march and attended. Organizers say they received calls from groups and individuals all over the country who wished to participate. "Brotherhood is not simply a catchword with which we recall the 1960s," says the Rev. C.P. Vivian, chairman of the board of the Center for Democratic Renewal, in explaining the marchers' motives. "Rather, 'brotherhood' is an as yet unachieved goal in many countiC'S around the nation such as Forsyth." What the demonstrators and leaden~ confronted was a Ku Klux Klan whose basic goals and programs remain the same, but those strategies have changed to meet the times. On the one hand, the Nazi tendcncit•s and paramilitary activities which began to emerge in the 1970s-during the Klan's "Fourth Era"-ha:;e now beeome the hallmark of its "Fifth Era." Armed auxiliaries, like the Order, as well as paramilitary training camps, like ex-White Patriot party leader Glenn Miller's in North Carolina, all suggest a gradual "nazification" of the Klan, a merging of groups sharing common goals, and a steady swing into terrorist extremism as a viable program for achieving those goals. On the other hand, Klan attempts in the 1970s to recruit from mainstream society have become more sophisticated in this decade. Klan extremists like Jesse Radford and Tom Metzger have donned three piece suits and entered electoral politics, with some success. Last November, Radford won 36 per­cent of the vote in a North Carolina state Aenatorial race against a Demo· crat who has been in office for 25 years. One of the biggest unifying factors has been the emerg•nce of Identity Christianity, a racist theology which appeals to a broad spectrum of the Far Right and provides a religious rationale for their activities. Klansmen demonstrating in Pulaski, though small in number, represented a composite sketch of the "Fifth Era" Klan. Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard McCollum explains: "The Fifth Era leadership is out in the open to take the heal, and the member­ship is out of sight," in secret cells called "slt•eper units." The Knights' chaplain, Tom Robb, is an Identity minister with dose ties to the Aryan Nation. The charismatic Identity leader and Klan veteran Robert· Miles led the cross burning ceremony which look place after the Pulaski rally on the farm of a 1ocal klansman. Miles is the prime mover of the white separatist movement within the Far Right which seeks to establish a "whites only" homeland in the north­west United States. Significantly, it is with the youth that the future of both the civil rights move­ment and the Far Right lies. Here in Pulat;ki, ~everal dozen teens. most of them black, 1<'<1 a high-spirited spon­tane<> uR protest against the Klan's pres ence. Onlookers applauded as one young black man al Robb's rally ". _ .Black animals will be kept out with rocks, bottles, fire, guns, and by the grace of God. The day of the rope will come and the names of all race traitors will be remembered." - Danny Carver, Forsyth County (GA.) Ku Klux Klansman shouted "America isn't white, America is black and white together," and embraced by a white friend. But the Klan, throwing off the tradi­tional robes in favor of stylish cammies, are also exploiting their appeal to youth. In the counterdemonstration in Forsyth, a majority of Klan sympathiz­ers were in their teens and 20s. Meanwhile, local Klan leaders in For­syth vowed that if the protesters returned there would be "a bloody mas­sacre." Not intimidated, veteran civil rights activists and their young suppor­ters were determined to demonstrate their right lo walk the streets of Forsyth County. "We've planted a seed here that will make people think," said local acti­vist Dean Carter. "And maybe some­thing will grow from it." PNS reporter Hylah Jacques. a freelance writer based in Seattle. regularly covers the Far Right The Proctor/MPH Clinic offers medical treatment of hair loss under physician supervision. We use Proxidil'" , a potent new prescription combination of a hair growth stimulator with a synergistic hormone­blocking agent. The growth stimulator makes your hair grow and become thicker, while the hormone-blocker helps to retard the balding process. Proxidil'" is the product of eighteen years of skin and aging research by a well­known dermatology researcher. For more information contact: ~ ProcmdMPB I~ Clinic Tu·eh·e Oaks Medic:tl lbwer 4126 Southwest Fre~":IY Suite 1616 Houston. Texas 77027 (713) 960-1616 Coffee Shop 1102 Westheimer - 522-3332 To Go Orders Always Welcome Break{ ast Specials $2.49-$2. 75 Lunch Specials $3.95 Dinner and Midnight Specials Serving Beer and Wine=----­Thanks for Your Continued Support of Aid for AIDS Meeting place of Wednesday morning Montrose Business Guild Breakfast Club-6:30am 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30. 1987 Do you know this 11Uln? Psychiatrist Says Movie Humiliated Her BOSTON (UPl)-A psychiatrist has told a U.S. District Court jury she felt "outrage and humiliation" when she discovered she was the model for a les· bian character in the movie version of Sylvia Plath's novel The Bell Jar. Jane V. Anderson, 55, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, said Monday she was defamed by her depiction as Plath's suicidal lesbian lover in the 1979 movie based on the largely autobiographical book. Under questioning by her lawyer, Anderson described the "very painful and upsetting feelings of outrage and humiliation" she felt whe she first viewed the film in a Boston theater Testifying in the third day of her $6 million federal court suit, Anderson said when she first read the book in 1971, she was shocked. She said it was obvious the Joan Gi1ling character in the book was based on her, even down to the physical description of her as "hor­sey." Anderson grew up in Wellesley with Plath, attended the same church and junior high school and was a year ahead of Plath at Smith College. Both were mental patients at the same time at McLean Hospital in Belmont. Among the 14 defendants named in the suit are Ted Hughes, the British poet laureate and Plath's widower, who sold the movie rights. Plath committed sui· cide in 1963, a month after The Bell Jar was published. Defense lawyers claim the movie and book depict fictional characters in fic­tional setting. .. :I 0 .0 • :-:· Prolessionol Theotre/615 TIXAS AVENUE -presents· "I tOVE 1llE ARDOR OF THIS f'IAY... ITSHOWIJHG, ITS l!RROtt, AHO ITSKIHDHESS.• .-..~._ ..._... . "lffA'lfll"TtEfll THIS IHVOtVEO -Ul'SlT-IH TOO DAMN tOllG KRAMER HOllORS US WITH THIS STORMY ART1CIJIA1t THEAl.lt.l.C.A.!. .W. ORK." JANUARY 30, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 Attorney General Halts Sell of 'Wonder Products' DALLAS (UP!)-The Texas attorney general's office· has won a temporary restraining order against a direct-sales firm accused of unlawfully marketing its products as a preventive or cure for health disorders ranging from AIDS to dandruff. State District Judge Harlan Martin Wednesday ordered the Carrollton­based United Sciences of America Inc. to discontinue the sale, marketing and distribution of medicines the company sold through an alleged illegal pyramid scheme. Stephen Gardner. af:lsistant attorney general, said that Attorney General Jim Mattox sued USA primarily for viola­tions of federal drug laws. The pyramid scheme is secondary to the suit, but served as "a dean-cut, fast way to shut them down." Gardner said. Telephones Wednesday at USA Inc. were answered by a recorder which told callers that per­sonnel were unavailable and assured them that "this is only a temporary situation.'' According to the lawsuit, USA Inc. has promoted it.." products for the cure, treatment and prevention "of a myriad of human diseases and conditions including AIDS. cancer. osteoporosis. heart disease. diabetes. arthritis. exces sive weight. cohti1o.;. diverticulosis, pre­menstrual syndrome. acne and dandruff . The lawtiuit also accused the com­pany of false advertising. The products were marketed by USA Inc. under the names of Master For­mula, Formula Plus, Fiber Energy Bar and Calorie Control Bar. Anderson also denied she ever "exchanged physical affections" with the author or any other woman, as the defense has alleged. She explained a Jan. 23, 19.50, entry in a diary she kept during her freshman year at Smith. Anderson wrote she and a female roommate were in "bed tog<>ther for the first time since we've been back." .,2-for-1•2-for-1•2-for-1•2-for·1•2·for·1•2-for-1•2-for-1•2-for-1•2-for-1 • 2-for-1 ' The court order bans USA from "sel­ling, delivering, offering for sale, hold­ing for sale or giving away" of the four ~ named products "or any other product." .. THIS coui:irNs:"i[~Eiv\~TUEED :~rW~e~i~~ :::~:ET~l OFFICE ! 2TICKETSFORTHfPRICEOf1FOfl n THl FOllOWl~G PERFOflMA~CES Of • TifE HOftMAL ltUltr ONLY USA Inc., a one-year-old company, last week filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Code i ~ ~ Q s~~~i·~~8:~~~E1.[~::~Yi~:1~~~1~1t~~~~::·:rE~~' i She said it was not a reference to a N ~ ~ LJ "THE NORMAL HEART" N homofi£>xual liaif:lon, but indicated they had gone to bed in separate beds at the same time. Anderson said she usually stayed up studying later than her room­mate and had to be careful not to disturb her when she went to bed ~ ~ ft 2-for-1 TICKET OFFER! It gained national attention in recent months bt>cau.se of endorst>ments it received from noted scientisL'\ and sports personaliti('!" Jn Mont-rose, Neady Eveiyone Reads the Voite •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKENDS United Sciences has more than 100,000 distributors throughout the country and has been promoted by sports stars including tennis champion Chris Evert-Lloyd, New York Mets catcher Gary Carter, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana and Dallas Cowboy Tony Dorsett. ne judge set a court hearing on the civil suit Feb. 6. Similar lawsuits were filed Wednesday against United Scien­ces Inc in New York and California . The Best Little Guest House in Town Reasonable Nightly & Weekly Rates Private Baths Free Parking For Reservations Call (504) 566-1177 l118 Ursulines, New Orleans, LA 70116 8 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 30, 1987 Haircuts, etc. by Mike Shampoo Cut & Blow Dry $14 by Mike Also Colors, Perms Frost, Eyebrows & Lashes by Don Complimentary Beer & Wine with Appointment Mon.-Fri. 9-6 Saturdays 9-3 522·3003 JANUARY 30, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 ·· ~'t>Nt'W CMfPTS ~'I> NEW m.\l:Pll:S ~~~ ~ NEW A<>MOO'S i\N'I>·· Statewide Rights Organization Idea Rejected at Conference By Sheri Cohen Darbonne MontroRl' Voic(• The idea of a statewide " umbrella" organization to coordinate gay rights agenda in Texas cities was soundly rejected at the Texas Lesbian / Gay Community Resource Conference, held Jan. 24-25 in Austin. "The general consensus, during that discussion, was that we don't need another one," said Bill Agosto, modera· tor of the Houston Gay/ Lesbian Forum, a local interaction group. Agosto explained that most confer­ence delegates felt statewide coordina· hon was already being accomplished through the efforts of Texas Gay I Les­bian Rights Lobby, Texas Human Rights Foundation, political organiza­tions in the cities and gatherings Jike the resource conference, a follow-up to the Texas Gay Leadership Conference held in Dallas in September. Annise Parker, president of Houston Gay Political Caucus, agreed on the rea­son the idea was defeated. "ft was felt another organization isn't needed at this time, that the agenda could be coordinated at the state confer­ences," Parker said. The state already has a forum of organizational representatives, coordi· nated by TLGRL, which meets on a reg. ular basis to exchange information, Parker said. Additionally, a system of periodic state conferences organized by local groups is emerging, Parker said. Another conference is scheduled for late this summer in Lubbock, with the host organization to set the agenda, she noted. The state organization was the only theoretical issue discussed during what turned out to be a "nuts and bolts" con ference, consisting mainly of a series of workshops on practical concerns of gay organizations, Parker reported. Work­shops on revitalizing organizations, fundraising techniques, networking with non-gay groups, and dealing with homophobia and media relations were included in the conference schedule. Agosto said he was impressed with the ''businesslike'' structure of this con· ference, compared with others ht> had attended. "It was probably one of the most pro· fessional formats I have ever seen in gay/ lesbian conferencing. The infor­mation was well·structured and very useful," he commented, citing a work· shop on organizational management, presented by Don Baker, as an example. "Baker outlined methods of develop­ing goals and motivating people, and set up a means of tracking performance. It was very much like a professional management course you'd expect to pay up to $1000 for," Agosto said. Lovell's workshop focused on finding common ground with organizations working on other causes, as well as working "related" issues into a common agenda. Mike Martin, an activist who became involved in politics in Fort Worth through joint efforts with local labor groups, spoke on getting involved through other issues. Joe Perez, president of Gay and Les­bian Hispanics Unidos, participated in a workshop on minority outreach within the gay community. During the workshop, members of minority organi­zations interacted with members of mainstream gay groups whose members are predominantly white males. "The most important development of the discussion was that (the main­stream gay leaders) agreed to look into existing minority organizations for gui· dance in minority outreach," Perez said He noted that predominantly white gay organizations have had difficulties approaching the issues as they relate to minorities, even in areas like AIDS edu· cation. "The workshop made a lot of gay white males realize there are some good reasons for low minority participation and turnout for events." Perez said. Minority group representatives attempted to show the organizational leaders how hard it is for minorities, inrluding women, to relate in the "GWM" world of gay community activi · ties, he ndded. Houston was mentioned as a poten· tial sit• for the International Gay/ Les­bian People of Color's bi-annual conference. Nominated by the IGLPC steering committee in November, Hous· ton was third choice for host city, follow· ing Toronto and London. Neither of the other two cities has submitted an appli· cation but GLHU may not be allowed to apply for Houston since regulations specify a 501·C3 non·profit organiza· tion, Perez noted. He said he would look into the possibility of applying in con­nection with another local organiza· ti on. Groups represented at the workshop, . besides GLHU, included Dallas Gay Black Caucus, the Austin Latino Les­bian and Gay Organization and an emerging black group headed by Mar­vin Prevost. Charlotte Taft spoke on women's issues. About 150 persons attended the week­end conference. Parker, Agosto, Lovell and Perez were among about 12 Hous­tonians who attended. U.S. Supreme Court Refuses LaRouche Case WASHINGTON (UPl}-The Supreme Court refused Tuesday to become involved in the tangled legal affairs of four groups associated with fringe poli­tician Lyndon LaRouche. The court refused to review a case brought by Caucus Distributors Inc. Campaigner Publications Inc. National Democratic Policy Commit· tee, and Fusion Energy Foundation seeking review of a ruling by the First U.S. District Court of Appeals. The groups were seeking to lift con­tempt rulings against them for refusing to cooperate with a federal grand jury in Boston and refusing to turn over docu· men ts La.Rouchc, 64, a four-time presiden­tial candidate who in 1984 collected 78,773 votes, less than 0.09 percent of the total , has been labeled at different times as "ultra.left" and "ultra-right." LaRouche has claimed that Britain's Queen Elizabeth is the "head of the drug lobby," and that the International Monetary Fund "is engaged in mass murder" by spreading the disease A IDS through economic policies. Liberace Home from Hospital but Gravely Ill PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (UPl)­Liberace lay gravely ill at his home Wednesday, two days after being released from a hospital where he was treated for anemia brought on by a bizarre diet of watermelon, aides claimed. A spokeswoman said Tuesday the namboyant pianist, whose trademark candelabra and outlandish wardrobe marked a spectacular career, was in grave condition with pernicious ane­mia, emphysema and heart disease Denise Collier, press agent for the 67- year-old entertainer, said he was at home receiving visits from close friends and relatives. "It is my great regret to inform you that Liberace is gravely ill with perni­cious anemia, complicated by advanced emphysema and heart disease," Collier said in a statement read from New York. "His physicians are vigorously treating him for this condition and are hopeful that he will respond to treatment." Born Walt.E>r Valentino Liberace in Milwaukee, Wis., on May 16, 1919, Libe­race was released from Eisenhower Medical Center in nearby Rancho Mir­age. Asked why Liberace had been released from the hospital when he was suffering from such serious illnes:;e:,, Colher replied: "Since I'm not a doctor I can't make that judgement. He's stable, but he's in grave condition." Associates of Liberace said he entered the hospital on Friday, On Sunday, the hospital confirmed he was there in a brief statement that said, "Mr. Liberace has been admitted , , . for evaluation of anemia. His condition is satisfactory_" Pernicious anemia results in a reduc· tion ofred blood cells and can be fatal if left untreated. Symptoms are paleness, generalized weakness and a lack of . vigor. Liberace's health had been in ques­tion for several days. The Las Vegas Sun reported Satur­day in a copyrighted front page story quoting "informed sources" that Libe­race was terminally ill with AIDS. Seymour Heller, Liberace's personal manager for 36 years. immediately denied the report, demanded a retrac­tion and threatened a libel suit. Sun publisher H.M. (Hank) Greens­pun said, "We stand by our story." A telegram to Greenspun from Libera· ce's Beverly Hills, Calif., attorney, Joel Strote, said in part: "Mr. Liberace does not have AIDS nor is he terminally ill." Heller on Saturday blamed Liberace's condition on a watermelon diet that he said the pianist followed to lose about 20 pounds. "He ate watermelon off and on for a couple of months," Heller said. "We got worried. Doctors told him watermelon did not have enough proteins required by the body and that he would have to stop, and doctors told him he had a slight csae of anemia." Heller on Saturday also said Liberace had postponed his show appearances for the next several months. At one time, Liberace was the highest paid performer in Las Vegas, earning $50,000 a week. He had his own televi­sion show for nearly a decade and is credited with discovering Barbra Strei· sand in the early 1960s. In the 1960s, Liberace won a $15 mil­lion libel suit against a London news· paper that claimed in a story that he as homosexual. In December 1986, Libe­race settled a palimony suit filed by his former live-in chauffer and travel secre­tary, Scott Thorson, for $95,000. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 Dissension May Strengthen Gay Rights Movement, Says Expert 13ETTER LAWilS & qARDEilS By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Mon/raise Voice Dissension among gay activists regard­ing political issues may actually have a healthy long-term impact on gay rights, according to a University of Houston­University Park sociologist. the heat of the moment, it is hard to see this," he said. Moreover, the argument of aggres­sive, confrontationist activism versus low-profile, "work within the system to effect change" diplomacy is far from new, Simon pointed out. As far back as the 1950s, early gay organizations like the Mattachine Society and Daughters of Bili tis struggled with the same type of conflict. "There are, for example, some seg· ments of the gay community who are embarrassed by certain contingents in the Gay Pride Parade. The goal of gay liberation is the right to be gay, in all of its forms, without apology,'' Simon said. Total lawn maintenance Commercial-Residential Dr. William Simon, a sociology pro· fessor whose field of expertise is gay rights. said what some may be viewing as a "split" in community leadership is in fact a reflection of the diversity of the culture, sending the important message to society that not all gay people are alike. Short-term problems and image con­flicts sometimes arise when internal disagreements in a social movement are made public, as happened recently when gay leaders' differing positions on involvement in the Democratic site selection process were noted in the local press, Simon said. Nevertheless, there is a "net gain" from a free exchange of ideas in a public forum. [n response to concerns that negative or controversial views fuel public homo­phobia, Simon noted that public views constantly change. Homophobes, who are usually set in their opinions, proba­bly aren't influenced either way by things they hear about gays, he said. "Robert Stoller, the psychiatrist, once said that the word 'homosexual' should always be used as an adjective. never as a noun." Simon observed. "Showing diversity help~ in our struggle, which is not only for the freedom to be gay, but to be individuals. Our goal is the right to he ourselves Sometimes, in politics, in "During the ',50s, one of the big argu­ments centered on how a gay man should dress." Simon said. "Going to a Mattachine meeting, one would think he was walking into a room full of FBI agents. People were told, 'don't dress gay. Don't be flamboyant,' until some finally said, 'why not?"' The two approaches have been rooted in gay political organizations "since the dawn of Stonewall" and will probably always be around, the professor stated. In practice, the separate drives appear to complement and assist each other, he suggested. Even the most radical represents· tions of activism contribute something to the gay rights movement, according to Simon. "Politics is sort of like a choice between syphilis and cancer ... this is bad, but this is worse. Radical gay lib reminds us of the costs of being taken for granted by the liberals who have won our support," Simon said. By cal­ling attention to themselves, militant activists give politicians the message that they will have to continue working for that support, he added. CRAB LICE STUDY "When Richard Wright first pre­sented Native Son for publication, there were protests from the black community that the main character's representa­tion would be damaging . . . yet if that book were not published, it would have been a great loss to black culture." In the gay community, the militancy of the noisemakers is balanced out by the diplomatic efforts of those who do work with the system. "The good thing is that we do have both," Simon said. The original goal of the gay rights movement is for homosexuality to be publicly perceived as simply another aspect of someone's life and personal­ity, Simon noted. Only by allowing the gay community to be represented as the diverse, wide-ranging social spectrum that it is can stereotypes, in all of their forms, be broken down, he said. Simon is a fu11 professor of sociology at the university. He is currently involved in a study of the sociological and psychological impact of AIDS in Houston's gay community. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose • Ldndscdpc • Trash Removal • Ch1mne4 Sweep • T rce Service • Slumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN AUTOMOTIVE Shocks & Front End Work Expert Brake Service 1411 T~fl (C,:·;:.j.j~ 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers may be male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 799-613 7. }> :ii () 0 z 0 =i 0z z Gl JANUARY 30, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Business Guild Holds Elections Amidst Dispute By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice Following an emotional debate over the former president's eligibility to run for the office again, members of the Greater Montrose Business Guild elected a new slate of officers and seven members to the board of trustees on Wednesday, Jan. 28. The guild's new president is Frank Turner of F.W. Turner and Associates Insurance. Other elected officers are Mike Reuter, vice president; Linda Rey· nolds, secretary; and Craig Litton, treasurer. Elected to serve two-year terms on the board of trustees were Joe Porro, Bill Yon, George Benedict, David King and Teri Shaw. Board members elected to one-year terms were Marjorie Kerr and Norman Guttman. Bob Bagot and Elroy Forbes, whose two-year terms have not expired, remain on the board. Phyllis Frye received four write-in votes for president, despite the fact she had been declared a non-member and thus ineligible to run earlier in the meet· ing. nicalities of parliamentary procedure. At one point, "Robert's Rules of Order," the most widely accepted parliamentar­ian reference, was ruled not to apply under the by-laws. Murphy was informed by the chair that the membership could not vote on stated flatly that he had neither received nor rejected such a letter. Frye, who has claimed repeatedly that she sent the letter to Bagot and personally delivered a copy to Yon, told the Montrose Voice Wednesday morn· ing that she had received the letter back. The slate recommended by the guild's nominating committee ran unopposed for the positions after the only other nominee, Tom Graham, declined to accept a board position. Graham said that although he could not serve on the board, he might be able to assist the guild as a legal advisor. Acting presi­dent Bill Yon, who chaired the meeting, said the offer could be discussed at a later general meeting. Newly elect£d Greater Montrose Business Guild officers are (I. to r.) Frank Turner, president; Linda Reynolds, secretary; Craig Litton, treasurer; and Mike Reuter, uice president A motion introduced by Jim Murphy, who said it was not clear whether or not Frye was still a member of the guild, to vote on her membership touched off a somewhat tense discussion centering on the organization's by-laws and tech-whether a member who resigned was still a member, but could vote on whether or not to accept the resignation. Murphy amended his motion, moving that the membership vote to refuse Frye's resignation. Lou Vanech asked board chairman Bob Bagot to respond to accusations by Frye that he rejected a certified letter mailed Jan. 20 wherein she rescinded her resignation from the guild. Bagot with a handwritten refusal on the enve­lope. Frye resigned as president and member of the guild Jan. 15, but claims she verbally rescinded on Jan. 16 in a telephone conversation with Yon. Yon acknowledged that he asked Frye to reconsider her resignation Jan. 16, but did not indicate that she rescinded. Bagot referred to the resignation and a series of letters sent by Frye to guild REMEMBER YOUR LOVED ONE ON THEIR SPECIAL DAY: •VALENTINE'S DAY FEB. 14 •ANNIVERSARY •BIRTHDAY •JUST TO SAY "I LOVE YOU" FOR BEAUTIFUL FRESH CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS, THE KROGER FLORAL SHOPPE'S BLOOMING WITH THE BEST OF EVERYTHING. WE'LL EVEN CUSTOM-DESIGN AN ARRANGE­MENT TO YOUR ORDER. members and the press as "a well­planned publicity stunt." The first vote on refusal of the resig­nation resulted in 13 votes to refuse and seven abstentions. A roll-call vote of all valid voting members was called, result· ing in 14 "yea" votes, with 11 members abstaining. Bagot reminded members that guild by-laws required a two-thirds majority vote to pass a motion. Brian Keever then pointed out that members who abstain are not considered to have voted under Robert's Rules Order. But Yon called for a reading of the section of the by-laws pertaining to the two-thirds majority. It was pointed out that the organizational by-laws speci­fied a majority "of members present" to pass the motion. making no provision to exclude those who abstain. Robert's was ruled not to prevail, and the motion was declared defeated. In spite of the resignation dispute, Frye, who did not attend the meeting, was presented a certificate of apprecia· tion honoring her for efforts and accomplishments during her terms as president. Frye's companion Trish, who accepted the award , called it "an insult" and "an attempt to coverup what has happened." The guild presently has about 120 member businesses and organizations. Its stated function is to promote the "Greater Montrose" area as a place to live, work and do business. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 Cough Up, Says God The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe The Reverend Oral Roberts. who was told by a 900-{oot·tall Jesus Christ to build a hospital, now says that God's ordered him to raise $4.5 million by March to keep it running. If he doesn't, Roberts said, God w1llkillhim. I stopped by God­for- Pre.ident head­quarter8 for a free cup of coffee and a chat with the cam­paign manager. the Reverend Roscoe Skamm. He said contributions were rolling in, thanks to an act of divine intervention, "You were visited by a 900·foot·tall Jesus Christ?" I asked. "No," he •aid. "but a 10-story·high giant taco did come to me one night:' "Hey," I said, "you must eat at Speedy Gonzalez's Whole Enchilada Parlor, too. And this taco gave you campaign advice?" "No, it told me to build our Secular Humanist Detection Center" said Skamm It was God, himself, who got in on the campaign planning. He said we ought to start producing 30-second spots to get his views over to the voters, and he gave me 60 days to raise $10 million for t.ee-vee time." "Or he said he'd kill you?" "No, he said he'd kill anyone who didn't cough up." I nodded. "That's certainly an effec­tive improvement on the fundraising technique he gave Oral Robers," I said. "Well, God's more emotionally involved in this one," said Skamm. " He's got his reputation on the line." "You think he's sorry he tossed his hat in the ring?" toOh, no. He said again just the other day that he was sick and tired of every preacher in the country claiming they had his ear and his endorsement for president. That's why he's running him· self. 'Cut out the middleman,' he says." "A good slogan, too," I said. "But do you think you'll make the deadline?' "Look at these mailers we're sending out," said Skamm, offering me a couple of samples. The first read: 04Dear Concerned Voter; I need your help. Do you want to Aie you among • the "womed well"? Have anxiety and depression become a dllllcult part of your lite? The Fabre amic otters free. contidenhal mechcal treatment for anyone in good health who quaillles Call us for free evaluation and appointment FABRE CLINIC 526-2320 put me back in the schools'! Or do you want the Commies, the militant homo­sexuals and the self-confessed secular humanists to take over our country? Do you want to send in $10, $25 or other (check one) today? Or do you want to fry in hell? (signed) God." "Fry in hell?" I asked. "No more Mr. Nice Guy," said Skamm. 11Here's the follow up." It simply said, "Vaya con Dws­Second Notice." Skamm rubbed his hands. "I figure I ought to havethat$10million bya week from Tuesday," he said. "You ought to be ashamed of your­self," I said firmly, "claiming that God would threaten to kill people in order to raise funds. Who do you think you are, Oral Roberts? I hope nobody gives you a mckel." Skamm gave me a look. "You should keep in mind the motto ofourlittle fund­raising project," he said. What's that?" I asked "Ask not what God can do for you," he said, "ask rather what God can do to you "On the other hand, here's a saw­buck," I said. "Can I have a receipt." C1987 (SF.) Chronicle Pubhsh-;g Co - Fortunes Gemini Feels Desired By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For fflday avenmg. Jan. 30. through Tuesday morning. Feb 3. 1987 ARIES~ Everyone should have some­one like you for a friend this weekend. You've got passion and compassion. You can light up the darkest places Spread the glowi Let 'em know what love is! TAURUS-You want what you want, and that's all there ts to 1t. With a little bit of 1mag1nation. you may get the material things. If you can control your need for control, you may have your emotional needs ftlled, too GEMINI -You'll feel needed. loved , cherished You"ll feel like number one, king of the mountain. top of the heap. This could lead to self-centeredness, couldn't 1t? Not if you return all those feelings to the right person CANCER -Work it out. You got over last week's hump, and now you're humpy and hungry again All that energy needs an outlet. Take a very special person to a very private place, and together, you can work 1t out. LEO-Somebody's got you by the tail Normally, you wouldn't mind that too much. but right now you have something important to prove. Show and tell what's in your mind and heart. VIRGO Last week's feelings of unreality and haunting dreams have sharpened into a keen sense of reality and how to make the dreams work. Con­fusion's out, clarity's in. A new version of your old self is making you happy and attractive. LIBRA -Blending the masculine and feminine, the aggresive and submissive is your talent this weekend. You'll find your­self at ease in the most uncomfortable situations. You could make a lot of money, or a tot of love. Either one makes sense. SCORPIO When an old love shows up out of nowhere, you'll know what to do and how to do 1t You're sure enough of yourself to know the decisions you make will be the right ones. SAGITTARIUS ·You're able to take some very original ideas and use them wisely Things that were hidden come to light. Old love and a new venture seem to go hand in hand this weekend. Pillow talk can be profitable. CAPRICORN -Have you seen your father, baby, standing in the shadows? Someone JUSt out of sight watching what you're up to? You can take this feeling as guilt. or as admiration for you as a special person How'm I doin', Pop? AQUARIUS S~m;one older.- who could have a very powerful influence in your life, attracts you There's a feeling of beginnings in the air New things are within reach; reach outi PISCES -What happens when you combine passion with sincerity? You'll find out soon enough, since you'll be giv­ing and taking plenty of each. It could turn out to be bigger than both of you •1U7 MONTROS[ VOICE ~Pl~y ~safe! Community News from Neigh borhood & Community Gro ups .. Counseling Center Director to Speak to Jolly Rogers The Jolly Rogers of Houston, a club for chubbies and chasers, announces that Biii Scott of the Montrose Counseling Center, will be a guest speaker at their next meeting Scott will speak on •·oattng in the 80s" at the meeting to be held at Backstreet Cafe. 1103 S Shepherd on Feb. 7 at 7 30 p m ttBering Begins AIDS/ARC Spiritual Support Group A spiritual support group for people with AIDS and ARC and their families. friends and care-givers has been formed at Bering Memonal Urnted Methodist Church The group meets each Wednesday at 6 45 p.m m the fellowship hall of the church. 1440 Harold Leaders include Dr L. Annette Jones, director of Bering's Counseling Center· Jay Nelson. organizer; Rev Ohver Vannorsdall. and Larry Luetwyler Each Wednesday session will begin with a covered dish dinner before breaking into small group sessions. Nelson said "To help people affected by AIDS and ARC. Bering's spiritual support group offers ways to reheve stress and enable them to process thoughts. fears. guilt and concerns. Nelson said Add1llonal information is ava1albte by calling thP church office at 526-1017 .. C.H.E. Elects New Officers Citizens for Human Equality held elections for its board of directors at its Jan. 13 meeting. Board officers elected were Jesus Aguayo, president Richard Brewer. treasurer; and Robert Park, secretary. Other members elected to the board are Steve Brown, Michael Lattimore and Paul Simmons Also serving on the board are Tom Hocker and Joe Porro Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Community Groups .. Mary's II Stays Atop in MSA Pool After last week's position round two of the top teams took a nosedive_ However, Marys It holds tight to first place while Bacchus I nses to second and Lipstick takes third Letters to the Voice From the readers of the Montrose Voice ~ New Alliance in Wichita Falls From Leslie Watson, president Wichita Falls (TX) Lesbian and Gay Alliance We. in Wichita Falls. wanted you to know our current community status I'm happy to say that the first alliance was formed in Oct. 1986. We are looking forward to strengthening our gay community and becoming more actively involved in improving the environment of all lesbians and gays through this organization Since Sept. we have raised $1801 to help fight Texas Statute 21.06. organized an alliance. and laid the groundwork for a Metropolltan Community Church I sincerely hope you will share with us your support and any information regarding happenings in your community. Our mailing address is P.O. Box 8063, Wichita Falls. TX 76307·8063. ~ Write the Voice Items in the ''Letters" column are opinions of readers and not necessarily those of the Voice. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to Houston. Please keep letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006 Tom's Pretty Fish 224 W stheimer (Only Six Blocks fro Main St.) 520-6443 We have a sale on gold fi h from very large {one foot) to Vert. mall, exotic black moors, red cap randas, small lion heads and beautiful big calico fan tail orandas. All regular large gold fish will double in price March 1. JANUARY 30, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Another DVitil SJ/gA Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & s1 Beer Friday & Saturday: NO COVER Country Express Band 8-12pm Friday-Jan. 30-10:30pm FANTASY IN MOTION NO COVER CHARGE 11830 AIRLINE - 445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine-Bender) 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 Voice Comics ' NORMN, OVER MERE! PEAS -rnE 517.E OF YOUR BRAIN! .. . NO EllAGGERATION!!!" BE FAMOUS. BE SEEN. ADVERTISE IN THE MONTROSE VOICE. JANUARY 30, 1967 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 G Direct Burial or Cremation CREffiATIOTI SERVICE ITITERTIATIOTIAL® Operated by James H Murphy Funeral Homes pnced $395 from ~ Happy Ours Can Beer $1 .25 Draft Beer 75¢ Well Drinks $1.75 Shots $1.25 363-9999 Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community .j :·i;;~i'. Bartenders Specials Every Weekend Nobody tempts you like 1022 Westheimer • 528-8851 Home of Eagle Leathers ~tt Bemoria:m MARK BOWLES Mark Bowles. 28. died peacefully Jan. 22. 1987, at 430 p.m. He had battled AIDS W•th humor and strength for 18 months A native of Syracuse. New York, Mark was a graduate of Georgetown Un1vers1ty He held a management position with Federal Express when he moved to Chicago one year ago. Mark had accomplished a lot for a man not yet 30. Funeral services were held in Syracuse He is survived by fnends from coast to coast. Bye Mark' Save a place on the other side' We'll all meet again! EUGENE(GENE)EARLE EWINS December 1, 1956-January 13. 1987 Do not stand by my grave and weep I am not there. I do not sleep I am a thousand winds that blow. I am the diamond glints on snow I am the sun on npened gram. I am the gentle autumn rain. When you awake in the morning's hush, I am the swttt uphftmg rush of Quiet birds 1n circled flight I am the stars that shine at night Do not stand by my grave and cry. I am not there. I did not die -Abdee Gene was well known in San Francisco for being one of the founders for the AIDS ARC Vigil, which 1s entering its second year at San Francisco's old Federal Building on United Nations Plaza A resident of Houston from 1975 to 1985. Gene was well known to his many friends as a lovmg. caring. and dependable friend Survivors include mother and father, Charlene and Earle Ewins of Houston; and sisters. Debbie Gordon of Houston, and Earlene Young of Washington. D.C Memorial services were scheduled for Jan. 29. at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church m Houston With eternal love, from his family and scores of fnends The family requests in lieu of flowers donations may be made m Gene·s name to the AIDS Foundation Houston, P 0 Box 66973. Suote 1155. Houston. TX 77006 OUAPOl. -y lNMontroMVace•PlonOndlO~tN .,....,. C..-,.....Mdll"ii9rdlCll"~olcu~.IG'lan ~F ...... orr...._9houk1Pf0ridea.•ltlinlar,,.,.. '"~ nott'l",....orv-the~ Tti.er.1tno~tor .. ...- 16 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 30, 1967 Working Together for a Better Montrose Around Town by Elroy Forbes Montrose Voiee Social Director Handsome Del McGee has successfully dealt with troubled economic times with innovative events. High1y visible this summer as chair of the AIDS Founda· tion fundraising committee, Del headed a large team of workers reaching far beyond their expected goals. The famous Happy Hour Daddy's Revue at The Galleon last September exceeded everyone's expectations. The society blast at The Tower fell short of goals but still managed to raise several thousands of dollars. Now, the Alley Theatre two-night benefit of The Nor· mal Heart is sold out. I think our com­munity should recognize McGee's work with some wonderful honor. What are your ideas? o Neartown News Ron Rodricks became president of Neartown Association when the Firehouse became the site of a festive Twelfth Night Plus this past Tuesday night. The annual Christmas party is used to install officers. Working with Formerly with Gump s, Lee Findley 1s w1th&n Rodricks this year will be Judy Butler, vice president Marty Bischoff, treas· urer: Frank Silver~ recording secretary, and Sharon Weintraub. corresponding secretary. Sharon has her community work cut out for her as she is also presi· dent of the Avondale Association. Con· gratulations to all and best wishes for 1987 o Out and About T.G.R.A. meets Sunday, 2:00 p.m. at The Barn on Pacific Street. Heard that T.G.R.A. officer Jerry stayed out past midnight one evening and his vehicle turned into a pumpkin. He's still out looking for his other shoe. Anybody ~een a glass cowbo boot in the vicinity of Cousins? . . The closing of Hot Rod left some contestants in the dark as to who the mystery Mr. Hot Rod winner is? We may never know .... Everyone is jumping at The Brazos River Bottom for the big star, Isaac Payton Sweat, the King of Cotton Eyed Joe. He performs four big shows, two each night, this Fri­day and Sunday, Feb. I. He will play the song and teach the new dance "The Joe Baily Roll." David Royalty is so excited he can hardly skip to the deejay booth. Alan Pierce is out looking for a Baily Roll suit to wear Popular artist Tom Liddell will open a show at Artist Touch on University Boulevard this weekend. The organization of J.O.E. is having an open house this Sunday, 3-6pm, at 611 Pacific (the Cottage Playhouse). This is for aJl us shy types 'cause every­one will stay attired and just socialize. Members can answer all those ques· tions you're embarassed to ask (like what is J.O.E . and what are the meet­ings like.) o Christmas in for the baby shower at Dirty Sally's. Good job both days, Gary. Popular gentlemen's gentleman Scotty Bright is still living the good life in Los Angeles. However, the good life may spread Scotty's recent investments into telemarketing. TLC, the annex, is Lee is now the darling of Zen, a floral design studio deep in the heart of The Remington. Presently he has been up to his noral tape for the latest Harold Farb wedding. Everybody who is any· body was there including Carolyn. I think Carolyn gave away the groom and a few household tips. But there was Montrose Guess which one is really having a baby? Monday night was the first organiza· tional meeting for Christmas in Mont­rose. A d.b.a was filed Tuesday to protect the name and group. A chair man will be elected at the next meeting. Those present included Bob Bagot, Adopt-A-Block; Rev. Gracie Lee & Lynn Herrick, A Place in the Sun; Kit van Cleat·e for lnnen1iew and the Guardian Angels; Gayle Ramsey, Near· town Bus.ine~s Alliance; Frank Turner for The Greater Montrose Business Guild; Brian Keever for GPC; Sirrom School of Belly Dancing; Ron Rodricks of Neartown Association; Kerr1 Et·an!> of Westheimer Colony Association; Bruce Herman of Inter­national Flag Co.; Jim Spence of lmmuno Therapy Clinic; Lyle Bar· rett of Montrose Art A1Jiance; Terry Hul{hs for Movemansters, and Barry Petree of Happy Hollydaze. Some IO other groups called in for representa tion, too. o Names in the News Gary Walter of The Roman was a busy soul this past weekend. First. on Satur· day, he took on the sheering of a life­time. The customer, although not qualifying for the tanning booth, loved the new do. Then on Sunday, he hostt>d what mu~t be a Montrose first. I hope Sherry remembt>rs to tell her baby that all her aunL-. and one uncle showed up really adding class. They have installed a grand piano in their complex along with the many Valentine treasures. Talent1·d Tom L1ddl'll l...ai:;t fall I wrote about handsome Lee Fmdlrr1 formerly with Gump'•· FYI, Lee, up to his chest in pansies and berdi­latrollopR making the world a more beautiful place to survive. Mike Cooil•y, recently involved in a gold mine operation , is planning to do several announrC'ments to avoid opera­tors without proper cred('ntiah;. Can you stand it'! !tfart1in Zindler is back on the air. But you could look at it this way. It is nice to know where he is and where you are planning not to be. I am surprisC'd by the number of pe<r pie unaware that there is still a KLEF radio station with classical music. KLEF has contacted many organiza· tions, including Chrifitma~ in Montrose, offering airtime for public service announcementR, calendar listings and support for next season. That wil1 be a big help. I don't know which celebrity is mak­mg more news these days, Shtrley McLa111e or Oral Roberts. CYB, if they worked together, Oral could have an out of bodv bank account. I aw.nrd the Movemasters Award to GNJrge Benedict who has moved home and •hop to l fiOl Welch at Common· wealth . GNirgt> will conduct a contf'st to nam(• th(• ,;hop. I (•nter "Moveahle Antiques." Until next wi-'ek, !-i(•e you Around Town JANUARY 30. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Everyone's Speaking, So Who's Listening? Ed itor ial by Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Once again gay residents of Houston, Texas, have been victimized by the results of action taken by self­proclaimed "leaders" and irresponsible media. Without dwelling on the painful details of the Committee for Democratic Awarenei:;s brouhaha, it would be wise for all citizens to take a broader view of the problems created when, especially in a liberation movement, a few individ· uals take advantage of media's hunger for more readers, viewers and listeners. The news media is a very competitive industry. Externally, there is a never­ending drive to increase circulation and ri~e in the ratings. Interna1ly, there are more and more people struggling to get and keep the fewer jobs available with today's automated newspapers and broadcast facilities. As a result of this competition, facts can be distorted and events taken totally out of proportion. This type of back-stabbing can work to the advantage of advocacy groups. But, intell igent media manipulation requires experience-experience obviously lacking among those placed in the so-called leadership Positions in the gay "community" of Houston . One possible reason that Houston gays cannot get more μositive results from the general μopulation media is lx>cau!-fe those called upon to speak really don't know those they cJaim to speak for. The organization most often caJJed uμon to voice gay views is the Gay Polit­ical Caucus. How can they purμort to be representative of an estimated 200,000- plus gays when the total votes cast in the final round of their recent presiden· tial election was 47? Also, it was nothing less than tragic when it was revealed only in later reports the Com­mittee for Democratic Awareness had fewer than 10 members and one of its chief organizers no longer resided in the state. This is not intended to be an attack on those who choose to work for the cause of gay liberation. However, it is intended to be a challenge to those plac­ing themselves in positions seen as representative. The challenge is to place honesty and truth above the desire for ego fulfillment Community leaders have a moral responsibility to attempt to educate the media as to the diversity of this com· munity. We are individuals, many with only one thing in common-sexual orientation. Although we share an inherent need for human rights and equality. we come from varied back· grounds resulting in different μolitical beliefs and ideologies. When the names we hear quoted all too many times begin to preface their statements with "I can only speak for myself. ... I can only tell you what ! know," will news reports on gay issues begin to be accurate and fair. Until that time, however, gayindivid· uals have a responsibility to hold our "leaders" accountable just as they attempt to hold other public figures, forcing existing coalitions to provide a fo rum for the needs of aH members of the community. Minorities must be wil­ling to speak out against the racism that exists right in our own backyard. The elderly must see that their needs are placed on the agenda when the needs of gays are addressed . And, who cannot admit that the sexism existing in our community, among both genders, is a Newest Surprise!! Wednesday Night Delight 2 5 t/J Well and Draft 75¢ Bottle Beer 8-lOpm ~-----------~ 10pm-2am 75¢ Bottle Beer $1.25 Well 25rt Draft We're Not Through Yeti p lus 10pm Nexus Naughties ------- The Only Place to be on Wednesdays "We are the Ultimate" Month of January Special No Cover disgrace. In the last two years gays in Texas, especially in Houston, have suffered painful political setbacks with the greatest loss being faith in ourselves. If we are to survive, itistimetoregain that faith. Some simple role reversing is in order. Thotie who have sat back silently should speak up. And, the speakers should take some time to listen. EASY COME-EASY GO! When going on vacation, alert your neighbors. Ask them to retrieve your newspapers and mail. Secure locks and windows. And leave a light on, inside and out. Don't give burglars an easy break. Six Years of Community Service Houston Chapter 523-8352 A non-profit volunteer organization Crystal's 911 W. Drew 522-7524 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 Alley Theatre Sets a Wonderful Trap with 'Glengarry Glen Ross' Review by Bill O'Rourke Montro•e \lolce Have you ever let a crazy person talk to you? I don't mean a mentally ill person. I mean the kind of person you meet at a bar in the afternoon, or a donut shop in the middle of the night. or, especially, sitting at the counter of a coffeeshop at lunch. If you've really bothered to try to listen to such a person, you know that there is a mesmerizing fascination in the way that they insist upon your ambled along compared with Shelly. Shelly's nickname is "Machine." Willy's play, Death of a Salesman, sails along deliberately, with a grand melancholy. This one jerks around, seemingly spasmodically, with engines racing all the time. There is never any doubt that these are petty little people. There is a lot of humor. You might leave feeling vaguely depresf!ed, just vaguely. I left with the jitters. as if I had just finished three cups of Turkish coffee. "Will you go to lunch!?" John William•on (Robert Graham, right) hustles George Aaronoe (Tom Klunis) out of the office as Richard Roma (James Harper, far left! tries to saue a real estate deal with James Lin.gk (Charles Sanders, Sitting) from falling apart in Alley Theatre's production of "Gkngarry Glen Ross." running through Feb. 22 attention while monopolizing the con­versation and generally ignoring any­thing you try to say-ignoring you completely if you try to change the sub· ject. It's like a mongoose, it must be, the way that steady stare of it~ eye spins a snake in place mid-air You couldn~t look away if you wanted to, and you do want to-very desper­ately at times. But ~ometimes they're ven·, very intere~ting. Then again, you sometimes get hooked into just appre­ciating the situation. You think. "This would be funny if only I could back away, and watch myself, or someone I don't have to feel embarrassed for, being trapped like this." I tis. But sometimes, unnervingly,you find that you're just as trapped as the poor schmuck who is the bull's eye of the target. I know because I've gotten to back up and watch it. You can, too.Just go down to the Alley and see Glengarry Glen Ross. The pit of vipers playwright David Mamet captures so unerringly is a group of real estate salesmen. Their voices bob and weave like prize­fighters. They lull you into a trusting sleepwalk. They puff up dreams like a brass band. They come in short staccato bursts, like machine gun fire, like a man vomiting forth his soul. Willy's play was seen from the per­spective of his home. You rarely saw him at work. Shelly's play all happens at work, or at coffee breaks down the street in a Chine8e restaurant. Shelly mentions his grown daughter several timel', but only in bragging how he put her through college. I don't think he ever mentions hb wife. This play is stuffed to the gills with undeleted expletives. The language, for aJJ its poetic variety, is very gritty. Coat irritants with excrescences and you get But all these birds of prey must beware of worms. They'IJ turn, given a chance. Robert Graham plays an office man· ager good at his job-being a hard nose. Tom Klun is' character is a yes man-or is he? Charles Sanders' character, the only buyer on view, can be easily dominated-but by whom, the salesmen or his wife? And Jim McQueen's cop doesn't take guff from anybody. Pat Brown, the Alley's artistic direc· tor. dire<-ted this one herself. The first act was written to be visuaJly static. But she got ~et dei-;igner Elva Stewart to give her plenty of mirrors. You can pick from thrtt views of anything. Then she got excellent performances from a lot of long tt>rm company members. So who cares if all they do is sit there? This short evening is so fascinating that it seems even shorter than it is. Yeah' o Notes Tonight and tomorrow night's previews of The Normal Heart (Alley) benefit the AIDS Foundation. As if you didn't know. Don't just assume that they're sold out. There's usuaJly room for at leafit two more. The Feb. I performance at the Comedy Workshop is the final for 8tage11' production of Sister Mary lgna· tius Explains It All for You. As Stages' artistic director Ted Swindley put it, "With well over a hundred per­formances, and an 11 ·month run in our third production of the script, we feel we can safely say this play has to be one of the all-time hits in the history of theater in Houston," The Museum of Fine Arts has acquired two new sculptures for the Cullen Garden: Ellsworth Kelly's "Houston Triptych" and Albert Giaco· metti's "Large Standing Woman !." H80 Composer in Residence TobiaR Picker hat:i founded the Houston Com­po" ers Alliance. So far. 20 locally·ba,ed compost>rs have joined, including such widt>ly·known ones as Carlisle f<loyd, Michael Horvit, Ellsworth Milburn, Paul English, Paul Cooper and George Gu rt. They're planning a Miller Theater The play is about all the men but, it becomes a tragedy for Shelly Levene (played by John Newton). He used to be the top gun, the sales leader. Although no longer number one, he has to keep going. If he's one of two losers in the sales competition, he will be fired. What can he do? Oc·er 2000 runners lined up for the first annual Fine Arts 5K Run in 1986. This year's race, sponsored by Abercrombie & Fitch and benefitting the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 31 It's interesting to compare him to Willy Lohman. Willy was in the same fix. But would he have ever lied to a cljent? Here everyone does. It's stand ard operating procedure. Willy sort of pearls. James Harper plays an oily shark. jerking his neck and slicking back hiA glossily pomaded hair. Michael M Ryan plays a human Venus Flytrap. Fall for his honey·coated tongue and he'll snap those steel jaws around you. concert in July. Any composers wishing to join should writt Picker at the sym· phony. Houston Ballet has an nouced their 87·88 season. They will be performing t>ach Rtand for two weekends. There will Live ht> the Houston premiere of a short ballet set to a commissioned score by Michael Kamen, who composed the score for the movie Brazil. And the world premiere of a full·length ballet based on The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Auditions: Houston Symphony Cho· rus: Feb. 3, one song, any style, sight· reading, ear·testing, by appointment only, Claudia Leis, 224·4240. o Celebrate! Feb. I !R93: West Orange, New Jersey· Thomas Alva Edison opened the world's first movie studio. Birthdays: 30-Tammy Grimes, Hal Prince. Vanessa Redgrave. 31- Tallulah flankhend. Carol Channing. Zam• Grey. I-Clark Gable. Langston Hugh('s, Garrett Morris. 2-Farah Faw· crtt, Robert Gluck, Elaine Stritch. "No matter what side of an argument you're on, you always find some people on your side that you wish were on the other side." -Jescha Heifetz (born Feb. 2) o Openings Cimarron Wind Quintet (Hemen, !)­ONO' Alberts and Nadolski (U. of H. Down· town, O'Knne GaHery, 2)-simplesculp­ture and meditative drawings Outlaw Talk.how (Blythe Spirits. 2)-hosted this we•k hy comedian Andy HuKgins flnlioz, flizt't, Ravel (Jones, 30) HSO. Second night Boito inst•ad of Ravel The Chieftnns (Rockerfeller's. 30)­with world champion step dancer Michael Flatley The Manipulated Environment (Houston Center for Photogrpahy, 30)­work by various artists who alter exist· ing objects or space soley for the photograph Abercrombine & Fitch Fine Arts 5K Run (ends at the MFA sculpture garden. :ll. 8:00 a m.) The Baron·~ Bil! Sneezl' (Company Onstng<', :11. 11 & 1:30) Caught in the Act, a new vaudevil· lean extravaganza (,Jewii:ih Community C't•ntrr. 31}-nE'w mime company with Linda Graham and Robert Leed• 16th Annual Art Show (Meredith Long Gallery) and Dinner Dance (River Oaks Country Club, 31)-"The Night of the Lotus!" benefits Multiple Sclerosis research. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi<e 1l A .'D 1420 Weslhe1moi Houston. Texas 77006 522-4485 WE DELIVER VIDEOS Head1 and Tai/1 Above the Reif - Lage Selection ot All ·Mole VHS Topes -Tues Thu!S ond Sun Rento ls $2 for Our Members -Now Open Sunday 2 to 8 OPEN 7 DAYS • Amex. V ISO . MC JANUARY 30, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Cd[jtllin Video! I FRIDAY January 30 I IJ llt m Ill Elil m ll1I KPRC KUHT KHOU KTRK KTXH KRIV KHTV A&E WTBS CNN DISN ESPN USA WGN SHOW HBO MAX TMC 5 ,._ FrlM~~ - - -""""' FIClaflll Oo!Stroll.e ~FM 1;·:::!m -w- """"-'"' '-- FICtafl.11 -'"- ... .... "' .. W~lllS :31 NBCNNS Wids.ide CBS- ABC- - '"'""' Tllll·. 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Nova News watch Factory 111Spoos Anmal Final Foor Mov.· LPGA Golf Cathenne Mazda the Great Classic: Seal Island FinalRoond D1sne)"s M!SLSoccer Best Wings at Mov: Dot and Steamers the Koala (L) (:15) DlV Rollermania Newsmaker Willows Newswatch DangerBay WoridCup Busl/less Animal Act' Sknng Sports Mov:Nancy SportsCente GoestoRio NHLHockey Plimenews (live) (45) DlV Week1n Mov.·Sooth Review Pacific Evenmg News SklWOfld Business Amenca's Sports (:JS) Five Cup NewsN1ght MileCr&ek Challenge Style Mov.· Xanadu Downunder (:10) Hlthwk (Lwe) Newsmaker Moneyweek (:10) DlV Sports Mov: South NewsN1ght PaC!lic Crosslire (:10) ShowB1 Big Story SportsRev1 SportsGante LPGA Golf Mazda Classic: final Round Business AerobtCS Daybreak Mickey GettmgFrt Business Mo Moosercise Nation's Bu © 1!Nl7 T~TVLis~ngGroup Inc A&E WTBS CNN DISN ESPN Daybreak USA WGN SHOW HBO Calliope Dr.Kennedy {:45)WhatN SUnday A. Schuller Valentine's Cartoon Hentage Mew: Fraogle Roe Express Shut Ins Teacller. Mov: Outol Mov: Killer Who Wouldn't '""''" HJtchcock Cheek It OU ""'"" Alrwoll Superman Teacher Africa C1sroKid Mov:Bestol LoneRanger Times Rawhide Wild, Wild Paper Mov: Purple West Chase:2ndYr Roseol Mov:Thank Mav: Kiss Gairo Yoo.Mr Me.Stupid LoserTake Moto Mov: Mov: Girl Vanishing MostUkety Wilderness Mov: J. Mov: Night Edga(Hoowr oftlle Mov: Comet Matilda Mov: FraQgle Roe Mommie (:15) Mov: F~ Dearest A Shining Virginian Season White Shadow Mov:Bestof Mov:Outot Wanted Love Boat Times .... Robert Klein Odd Couple CoverStory News Mov: Insider lterbalife Oarkside Mov: Make LOUGrilll (:45)Mov" Fortress Synchronal Stick Success Key Fame On location Cashflo """ ""~ (:45)Mov: Mrw:Flnal TBA J. Edgar Terror TBA AttheMovi Hoover Gash Flo INN News Mov:lustin Expo OddCouple (:55)Paper theDust '"".., Mov: Ox-Bow Chase: The Wrestling Incident SecondYear Mov:Wlndy That Girl Mov: City Room 222 Movietone Mommie Make Amel. Dream Dearest SuccesslCey Farth20 Fam.o!Str USA WGN SHOW HBO Cartoon Muppets February 1 I MAX TMC Mov:Hanky Mov:OUI of Panky Alrica Mov:Elvls: Mov: Real That's the Genius Way It ls Mov:Cotton Mav: Xanadu Club Albltmf!ash Mrw:She's Mov:Fo1t Working Her w., Through """' Mov: Crossover Ladyhlwke Dreams Mov:My Science Projeci Mov:Dutof Alric& Mov:Real Mov: Genius Company al Mov:Jagged Mov:Assault Edite on Precinct (:SO)Mov: Holcroft Covflnant (:45)Mov; °Co"nt'r'o l (:10)AlbiJm (:40)Mov; Ladyhawlle She's Working Her w., Through M,o. v.:C otton (:15)Mov.· EMs: Tllatsthe King David February 2 MAX TMC Mov:Pee Business Oa Good Mornin Pooh Corner Nation's E1tpress Mask Journey.Pt FraoileRoc Wee'sB1g Amstaoo (.05).re3flfll Athlete. The (35)8ew1tc Pursu1to (05)Earth Daywatch Hot Shoe {JS) Lucy Romanoc f05)Mov: Oaywatch Sp1nt WhereWe1e Triumph of You When Oaywa1ch West 11lel1ghts Mov little (05) Perry Take Two Pftncess Mason Anna of Frvt ""'" Great Detective Mov.· Btcky Sharp M Korda One by One Amandas R1s1ngDamp Mov Clouds OverELifope (05) Centennial. Part 6 Newsday (:05JTom lntemationa and Jerry I Hour (:05)S<:ooby Newsday (35)Fstone (:OS)G Isl Newswatch (:35) R Roa j:05)Beaver ('35) Earth ShowB1z (:05)Sanfor Moneyllne {'35) Hmoone C1ossf11e (:05) Mov PnmenlfWS AGatllenng of Eagles LarryKJng Ltve! Even1no (35) News Donald Duck """" You and Me Mov· Three Caballeros (45) DlV Ed1sonTwm '" Presents Owe Mov· Great Caruso """" pooh Corner M•ckey OonaJdOuck Ktdscene Kid scene Mov Srlent '"' (40)M Tht FllCka """" Mov. Beau Brummel A.Jr Power America Moneyllne Owe Air Power ( 35) Woman Sports Mov MovCJouds (05) NewSN'!Jht Llltlest OverEufOpe National Horse GeographlC Crosshre (15)0TV hplorer NewsN1ght Mov Greal Loveioy {05)Mov Update Caruso Dear Hearl Spofts Air PDWef News Air Power Overn1gh1 Mav Kids Sign Off L King Who Knew Get Smart Overrught TOOMk!Ch H•l!blllies Crosshre Dis A Gnttrth ShowB1z Presents CNN NlfWS Oaybreak M1tkey Tom and Je1 Business Mo Mousercise Busmess SportsGante "" Mov. Just Mov.· Roller Adventure theWayYou Boogie Mov·Where LPGA Goll Grt. Space Are OoWe Go Mazda Coaster HeathcliH from Here? ClaSSIC Gong Show FalCOflCrest Mov. AnQel Mov.· Better Mov: Th1rdRound 4Mooey WOfeAed Off Dead Summer of GoH Connet Chase Hillb11!1es Odd Coul)le '42 SportsLook Aerobics Mov· rm HoganHeroe Tw1JiteZon Golden Mov.- Casey's Mov.· D1arie Getting Fit Going to Be Honeymoon Shadow NHL Hockey Famous News M<N: Outof {Repeat) PfoSknng WldofSpor Ameoca's "'' Sports Loo« SportsGante 'B'"as"ke't ball Illinois at OhlOState "B'a"sk"et ball G80l'getown at St AmencasCu Sportscame One on One f1shm' Hole Wldo!Spor Sportslook SportsCente College Basketball llhnoisat Oh10S1ite JU11usBoro Aerobics Alnca Love Me Not D. Van Dyke Mov· Mov Liar's Club A. Gntl1th Momm1e Friendships, Joker'sWil Beaver Dearest Secfetsand Bullseye BugsBunny :45)Showti Lies JilCkPot Ghostbuster Journey, pt Mov.· Savage Reaction Smurfs Winkl8!& Blundttt"'s Harvest MakeaOeal G.l.Joe DanceParty Transformer Cartoon Factofld Express WKRP Alrwotl B Miller lheBard Fam.ol Mov: Man Strangers from Button Mov Willow Dreamchild RobmHood About Movie Mav·B1g Wednesday Jettersons FraggleRoc Riptide Hogan Heroe Mav· Out ol Mov.- Better Mov. College Africa Ott Dead Wildcats Pnme Time Basketball Wrestling Northern Alfred HJtChcoek Ofagnet Edge Night Search Tom SuccusKey Cash Flo "" TBA Wild Amef!can Wrestlmg Las10IW1! .R.o.m 222 SUccessKev .C..a.li.fo rnia Maonum. ..P,.l, . Suddenly Last Odd Couple USATon111ht Mov Blue Steel Odd Couple Movietone Fa1th20 Mov.· Mov·Creator Momm1e Mov Just Dearest !he Way You (SOJMov Are (15)Mov Personal ( 40) Mov A Nightmare Best Protocol on Elm (45)Mov. (55)Mov. (25)Mov· Ot!hvery Volunteers Th1efot Boys Hearts {20)Mav Killing (45/Mov- (.15)Golden Fields CocaCola Honeymoon KJd (.10)Mov (25)Mov Manl10m Wildcats Button Mov No Big voungK1ng Deal Badoeof Courage Mov·Fmever Young Mov· Gold ol Naples Mav.· Coca Mov: ICin Oavid Mov Altered States Mov.· forever ''""' Mov. Red Badge of Courage """" ColaKJd Mov· Altere<I States RedBid~of """" Mov EIV1s JANUARY 30, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 No Need to Wrestle with 'P.K. & the Kid' About half way through the show, he comes too clo8e to actually catching her. So the script, without explanation, sets him back on the trail about a half day's worth. He's tracked herto a small motel, but instead of camping in the parking lot he waits until the next morning and asks about her at the front desk. That's way out of character for this man. P.K. hitches a ride with the Kid (Paul LeMat). He's on his wayto"'fo thatarm wrestling tournament. Will he help her? Of course. Will she nearly make him miss the tournament? Of course. There are no real surprises in this show. The contest is mondo bizarro. First, we see interviews with theothercompet· itors. This doesn't advance the plot, but it does give director Lou Lombardo a chance to insert some footage of a man eating live grasshoppers. When we finally get to the big grudge match, the camera circles and feints trying to add some action to what is really not a sport for sober spectators. That doesn't work, either, but it does make the audience dizzy. John Desonti and Esther Rolle have good cameo bits. Esther is the earth mother we all wish we knew. There'sfar too little of her here, though. Molly Ringwald runs away from home in "P.K. and the Kid" I don't think this film will be in con­tention for a Golden Turkey award as one of the great laughably bad films of our time. But I could be wrong. This film will be much better late at night, after they add the commercials. Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voicf' Scott Cutsinger is in poor health. He has moved back to Houston from Holly­wood, but does not feel up to reviewing at the moment. Until such time as he can resume writing, I dedicate this column to him. Super Bowl weekend's new movie was P.K. and the Kid. It's about an oddly matched couple from Denver. The Bron­cos weren't the only team from the Mile High City that lost last weekend. The sports movie has come a Jong way recently. Starting back with Chariots of Fire, working up through all those "Rocky" films, past the twin glories of The Karate Kid, has it met its twilight with this movie about arm wrestling? All of the good, visually interesting sports seem to have been taken already (with the posRible exception of hang gliding). PerhapR the genre ought to be allowed a few years off before we find ourselves ending a film with a jacks tournament. True, a good writer might find a new twist on n previously used sport. But that would seem to be beyond the tal­ents of screenwriter Neal Barbera. PK. is a 15-year-old gir1. The Kid is a baby-faced middle-aged man. If that doesn't mnke you smile. you probably won't like much of the intentional humor in this movie. Molly Ringwald plays P.K. This movit• doe-s its bt•st to he a quiet, artsy film. Don't chew your popcorn too loudly or you'll miss parts of the dia loguE'. But Prf'tty in Pink or Sixteen C'and/t>s it's not! P.K.'s mother is growing oldt•r, start" ing to los<' hC>r looks. When she doe1" attract a live-in boyfriend, he puts th<' movC'8 on ht'rdaughter. Mama basically got'K along with it, for fear of losing th(' cr<•c•p. Thr less said about Mama the lwtter. Thankfully the film agrees with me on thnt one. Papa, howpver. it gives us in spades . Alex Ro<·c·o plays him with many a tm<•c•r and lN·r. If you like sitting on the front row, takc· along ~ome extra nap· kinK to get this man's drool off your lap. P.K. does the only intelligent thing short of homicide. She runs away. Her "father" follows her. Thanks to a few too many coincidences on Barbera's part (or perhaps he borrowed some kind of radar device from McGuyver), he keeps nearly catching her. His perfectly timed entrances reminded me of Jason or some other hack and slash "hero." They jarred strangely against the rest of this film. o Openings Alan Quartermain and the Last City of Gold Outrageous Fortune- Bette Midler and Shelly Long fighting over a man Black Widow Aliens (River Oaks, 30) La Donna Sc1mmia (MFA, 30)-part of a festival of Italian comedies. One Night Only At 2.1. Emilio Estevez became the youngest person to write direct and star in a major motion picture-"Wisdom" Rutger Hauer plays a bounty hunter, grandson to Steue McQueen 's old TV bounty hunter, in "Wanted: Dead or Alive." The Gold of Naples (MFA, 31). ONO' Latino (Rice Media Centerl--Houston premiere of Harold Wexler film about Nicaragua Giomi D'Amore <MFA, 1). ONO! Sherman's March (River Oaks, !)­more about the filmmaker's lack of social life than about history. Off-beat comedy Keep Your Present Job and Earn financial freedom in five months as a distributor for the hottest network marketing deal in Houston. I am a 32-year-old woman work­ing in the arts in Houston-and I'm not going hungry. Let me re­cruit and train you into a really in­credible financial opportunity You'll love using these products. So will your friends. Call me at 868-4608 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 30, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 11 hsted here rn the Voice where .1ter­a11y thousands turn each week - TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter promotion can help our business target your goals and reach your market Car 524~09 - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advert•5e your profess1ona1 service through a VoiceCla"1f1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge •I on your Amen­can Express Diner's Club. MasterCard Visa or Carte Blanche ANNOUNCEMENTS KELLY BRADLEY. M.8 .S .. R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1111dual fam11y and group practice l1m1ted to coping-stress role relat1on­sh1ps and sell-concept 1nterventron Ott1u 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Vow:e a general t:irculatron news­paper having pubhshed continuously for Oller '5 y ar qi 1!1ed I< accept 1ega1 notic ANSWERING SERVICES HARD TIMES MESSAGE CENTER. 933- 1945 SEE OUR DISPLAY A{J PAGE ME• COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 622-4240 SEEC.;..: 0 L.AYAC Page Me!'" Electronic Telephone Answering t,;omputenzed Al'ltwe tig Service Fot Your Personat and Home u.e • 24 Hour 7 Day Service • Your Mn.sages are Pnvate • No L 1ve C'perators N<l M•slakes ... ty $9 ~- rno)ntt"ily Ask About Free Tn•I Otter c 622-4240 "' ,. ' ANTIQUES YESTERDAY'S WORLD ANT10ues. 1715 W&st"91mer. 526-2646 SEE OUR D.ISPC.Al' AO Yesterday's World Antiques 1715 Westheimer 526-2646 Small'"hor; ~ "F' ATTORNEY PHYLLIS FAYE~ 723-8368 General prac­tice of taw LAINE SHAW. 222-7772. 645-3159 ~ AY AC ELAINE SHAW : g~:-r~el at La~ e P e F • Accdent 222-1n2 or 645-3159 Nof.-.tbWhEk' AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR. 2516 Genesee ( 101 Paci he) 526-3723 SE.EOUl'DlSPtAYAO SAL VIN AUTOMOT-IVE 524-8219 SIE O'-"'OiSPlA>"AD TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Tait 522-2f90 SEE ()t.JR01$/>tA1'Al) NEARTOWN l(ARZ 1901 Tait 524-8601 SEE()1lllD1'$P'lAYAO WEST GRAY AUTO 238 W Gray 528-2886 SlE RDS.Pt.AYAD WORRIED ABOUT YOUR CAR? To odvet' € o </Q 8A90 dl orq t < nt ht r Brake Special $59.95 per axle Tune-Up Special 4 cylinder $49.95 6 cylinder $59.95 e cylinder $69 95 West Gray Auto 238 W. Gray-528-2886 :=:. Wotk ~~a~ 1 •Mufflers •TW.S Car :~ = si-:1a11st I T ... os State lnSJ)Kflon Statk>n L - :n-.:...lOp.: ".: -: - J MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 CarburetOJ Sp .r1olist E1ectnca1 Repairs Al Brake Wcxk BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS 61no·s Barber Shop:302w 111h Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 for appointment Tommy·s Barber Shop. haircuts S 10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appo1n1ments 526- 8216 HAlAC-uTSBY MIKE. 522-3oo3 SlE OUR DIS.Pt.AV AO J6NBARTON -1515°"1 Dunlavy 522-7866 SEE OUR OIOPlAY AD -~ ~ SALON 151:51'> Dunlavy - 522-7866 BARS GAY BARS Listed here are only the gay bars which have placed a recent ad..,ertrsement 1n the Voice For 1nlormatt0n on these bars. please see thelf ads For information on other bars. cau the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 or see their ads in ott-ier publ1ca· 11 ms BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM. 2400 Bra­zos. 528-9192 >ff OUR DISPtAY AO CHARLIE"$ CLUB. 1100 Westhe1mer, 527-8619 SEE OUR OISPlAr AD CHUTES 1732 Westhe1mer. 523-2213 SEEOURDISPiAYAO CRYSTALS. OVERLOOKING MONTROSE. 91 t W Drew 522-7524 Slff RDtSl'IA>"AO D1RTY SALL y·s 220 Avondale 529- 7525 $Ef0UROiSPLA"AD Kss. 11630 A1rhne. 445-5849 SEf OUR DISPLAY AO MARY·S~ -1022 Westhe1mer. 526-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD M"iCHAELS. 428 Westhe•mer. 529-2506 SEE OUR DtSPLAY AO ROCK ·N--HoRSE. 5731 Kirby. 520-9910 SEE OUR DISPl.AY AD THE611.61i-HYde. 528-0079 SEE OUR DISPUIY AD VENTuAE-N. 2923 Main. 522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BONDSMAN --A-QUICK BAIL BONDS Fast. courteous. discreet. all type of bonds made Michael E Standag1 agent Mention the Voice tor $25 off a1· q11ahf1ed bonds 67&-4488. 621-8452 CARS AND BIKES 1972 Cad• lac. 4 door. run good led tires. $1500 firm 523-2213 - SELL YOUR CAR through a Montrose Voice c1ass.1hed ad Call 529-8490 CHURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH 614 E 19th. 880-3527, 351-4217 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CENTEAFORAPOSITIVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 SEE DUR DISPLAY AD Kin!i(dom Community Church ·Jom Our Family m 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays 11am 880-3527 or 351-4217 Center for a Positive Lifestyle meets Oown1own He.. day inn every Monday 8pm For more mlo. Dail 497-PRAY CLEANING SVCS SERVICE PLUS A auallty CIHnlng Sarvle• Rffldentlal •Commercial e BONDED e Jett Cunningham 522-3451 COFFEE COFFEE-& TEA WORLD. 9 19-R Montrose. 524-8536 Sff OUR 01'SPLA1' AO Coffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fine Teas Accessories 3939-R Montrose Blvd. 713-524-8536 CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING COUNSELING OR NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Welch. 527-8680 $EE ?uR OiSPlAY ACJ DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. 0 D.S 427 Westhermer. 524.0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RONALD A PETERS~ ODS 620 w Ala­bama 523-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Hnu~ton. TX 7006 M,ori,J.1y thru S.,11 Hour~ by APr'!" •nt!Tlf'nt (713) 524 0538 DWELLINGS. ROOMMATES. HDUSES/APTS. FDR SALE. RENT. LEASE Lovely large 0114! bedr()( ,.,,_ study 011 Newcastle, onem11etoG. •r1a. t1)Gre way New carpel. Italian Me. track light­ing Slable homeowner association 622-3231 $35.0('() ROOMMATE Needed to share large Oak Forest house with owner Wei! lurmshed and main- ~3,;,~ek~r~~~~~;~1i~~~~lu~8'.0~~1~:- Contact 956-0259 or 868-0916 evenings before 930 TOWNHOUSE/ MUSEUM AREA Two bedroom. 2' bath. large living and dining area Fully equipped kitchen. cen tral air! heat. lenced patio with pond and fountain. off-street parking $650 Derek 961-9000 day. 523-1203 evem~~s Share 2 bedroom. one bath apt in Mont· rose Call 527-9457 2 bedrooms. Hollywood balh. fully equipped kitchen with washer and dryer. hving room. d1mng room. greenhouse patio. CH1A. carpet. water paid 705 Pac1hc, $550 monuy. 523-2213 RIVER OAK$ TOWNHOME 2-1~. wid. covered parking 961-2732 after 7pm $575/mo plus electnc1ty Beaut•lul 2 bedioom duPiex. He1Qhts area 772·5497 H111crolv 1-59 GHM seeks roommate plus (fun) to share 2-2 condo {large master bedroom yours) $295/ mo All bills paid (Senous inqu1nes only) 772-4568 GHM looking lor responsible roommate 2-2 townhouse. SW Houston $177 50 plus bells Call Jerry at 661-3873 Room lor rent. pnvate home. Montrose 528-5454 Garage apt - w 'd. fenced yard. 699-9191 Leave message David Montrose Towrlhome. 2-1 , mirrored walls in d1mng room and master bed­rr >m. w d. quiet convenient 1ocat1-0n. unty $650mo. btlls paid 521·1335 A4 >mmate needed 10 share 3 br apt C se to UTMB in Galveston $150/mo pi half uhl11t1 No depo! 11 Cati L12 (409) 763-1407 VICTORIAN DUPLEX Montrose! midtown/ medical center. 1700 sq tt, ce1hng fans every room. 10· ceil­ings. 3 bedrooms. formal hving and dining room. carpeting and hardwood floors. 1' bath. laundry. oll street parking Can !.er\le as office and home. $4501 mo 52&- 8634. 654-7766 306 Stratford at Tait 1 bedroom. central ~~~·s.1 r~~~s l=~~~~e1t~~ll~a~~~C,~~ri pet OK $315 plus S150depos1t 523-6109 Professional execut1\le GWM seeks same 28- 38 yrs old lo share nice home Wes­the1mer Gessner area Must be sincerely interested in home shanng and discrete fnendsh1p This is a good opportunity lor a 2':f7et~':usi;~'mfsna• wnte POB . ANO t"fi VAS1 l AND HOLDINGS 10 THt 1M"-J OF 01\l<llALE, PRoVIDING IT WILL HEt-.~HORn\ BE KNOli.1\1 l\S "ViRKINVlllt." Heights 2-1 updated. ceniraiaTr. nice street. close in. $525 monthly. $250 dep­osit 392-5200 or 952-3202. Mr Green Montrose one bedroom apt 1n small quiet complex with pool. security gates laundry lactl1t1es. cable available Adults No pets $100 dep $265 plus electric. 713- 529-8178 MONTROSE Large 2-1 duplex. lots of windows and dosets Off street parking $45().lmo 861-3343 Must renl attractive older one bedroom garage apartment Hardwoods. applian­ces. air Needs minor work. but 11\lable Rent/ deposit negotiable. plus bills 523- 7646 Roommate wanted Montrose nice 2 bed­room house with pn..,ate palio. $2QO!mo bills paid 523-3814 1960-1-45 area GWM seeks roommate to share 2 bedroom. 2 bath apartment $250/mo. bills included. Must be employed and stable. 583-1739 TOWNE PLAZA APARTMENTS. 4655 Wiid Indigo. 621-7880 f QURDISflAYAC EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED PERFORMING ARTS Box office seeks Qua11f1nd perso mel. excellent verbal sktlls required After­noon. e..,ening or beth Call Mr Schwartz 526-5323 ATTENTION MONTROSE CABBIES Tired of missing personals. messages. ~~~?;:;nr~a~;d,tr•x1~~~~A~u~~B~~~1 Build your personal business with LIB­ERTY CAB CO Call W1nn1 522-2269 EXERCISE TAI CHI CH'UAN Gentle exercise promotes bOchly har­mony. peace of mind. increases energy alleviates elfects ol chronic ailments. February beginners classes Jack McGann 52~5204 or 531-9222 !MISC.I FDR SALE Sunmate. 8· tanmng lamp. excellent con­d1hon. cost $1200. make offer 14K gold plated mont blanc fountain pen & penc1: excellent cond1t1on. retail $495. make offer Contact Chns 999--6700 or 221 5135 FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch. 526-3651 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL, 3400 Montrose. 529-6666 '<FC OUR Dl'>PlAY AD FURNITURE REFINISHING urn ture re n s ng and re-upholstery • Ptck-up .-.d D•ll"•'Y • Cutlom DHigft FINtMI •Serving the G•y 445-4141 Communlt Since 1975 GIFTS CHRISTMAS CRITTERS. 1318 Nance Sff OUR DISPLAY AD • 9.99 "'"" 1& h111.1 ng.arld1.-11 l 1-C Pleose make theck or money order pdyable to HRISTMAS CRITTERS 1318 Nance Street Houston. Texas 77002 INVESTMENTS Investor wanted in 1nternallonal com­pany Small mvestment. big returns and tax shellers Call 528-7639 after 6. ask for Tom LAWN CARE BETIER LAWNS & GARDENS. 523-:: LAWN SEC OUR DISPLAY AO Sr1xx ANci-CHIPS-INC 665-6294. 332-4443 SH OUR DISPl..AY AO Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards, repair and build wood fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing, house cleaning, painting , gutters, small house repairs. Free Es ti mates LEATHER LEATHER BY BOOTS. 711 Fairview 526-2668 Sff OUR Dl'iPt.AY AD lfATHER BY BOOTS Custo~1~~Room l lec:~~~!~-f~R~ord I -Houston Texos­B's Leothef-Cho1n Dove - Austin Texas- MEDICAL CARE STEVE 0. MARTINEZ. M D . 12 08ks Tower, 4126 SW Fwy #1000. 621-7771 FABRE CLINIC, 5503 Crawford~ 526- 2320 SEE OUR OISPlAY AO MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David O ol Et (713) 52().8232 STOP getting rubbed the wrong way Call Carl 622-3942 Rubdown. y0Ur Place WM. s·1r~ shm. 40'1 Van. 531-9952 $1Slup Rx: RELAX! Massage by Biil 9'A~ke. MST 869-2298 S11mula1mg body rubs Out calls. 529· 3970 THE RELIEVER Intuitive body rub. secret Olis. 52&-371 1 Thom of Houston, 523--6577. Houslon. handsome. heallhy, honest and masculine_ (713) 968-0402 THOM OF HOUSTON 52W577 Begtn the new year wrth an exc11mg lun· hlled body rub Call Peter 464-8781 THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David D of Et (713) 520--8232 A 1oylul rub by a nice person Ben 270- 1828 Deep muscle. sensuous body rub. even­mgs and weekends leave message S1eve64~90 STOP geltmg rubbed ttie wrong way -Call Carl 6n-3942 Shmulalmg body rubs by handsome GWM 529·3970 leave message on recorder 1f no answer Sensuous massage m or out 5~3970 MOVERS Proleas1onal movers Flat rats 662-6674 5~9715 MOYEMASTERS Boxes. tooH Visa. MC. Amex welcome 1925 Weslhe1mer 630-6555 PERSONALS LEATHERMAN SEXLINK Gel oll with 1ooo·s ot lealhermen hke yout No phony actors Pnvate. conl1den· 11a1 No btll IO phone bu! lngldst One-on­one. man-to-man connections low-cost 24-hour S&M Hotline 415134&-8747 GwM couple. late 30-s. mterested m meetmg other couples lor bridge Hinter· esled. call 522-5902 LIVE ACTION NETWORK. 976-6500 ClASSIPHONE '6-44,'3 (place ads). 526-4669 (hear ad ) >FE OUR [)j 'lPUI r Al A TTRACTIYE GWM '10". 150 lbs. 32. en1oys a good t1mew1th omeone who cares lo..,es to cuddle and share tnl1mate moments together look mg for a prolessronal GWM 27-37. 140- 180 who en1oys the same Ad 327A c/o Voice Drug free urme samples 583-2710 Attractive European male, 5'9" 145, col lege student. dislike bars & drugs look· 1ng for monogamous relahonshtp Interests museums. mcw1es. music and traveling Reply blind Bo1t '32&-K clo Voice Hairy men/ hair fans adhst lnlopl)cpak. $3.oo- Hair. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 There are "Talkers" And there are "Doe<s." Talkers have beaultlul smiles and dial 976 numbers Doers ha..,e 29· waist or less and d111 529- l98' Bottoms only DON'T DO IT ALONE Join original 24-hour S•!Jt 11nk Un1nh1 b1ted. discrete No bill to phone e11cept long distance One-on-one. man-to-man. low-cost connections 1.oocrs of horny ~uys wa1lmg for calls (415) 34&-8747 PLAY ... safely at J OE. Meetmgs 5 nights a week And it's tun (See our other ads.) Michael lee Smgles. DOB 04-05-49. SSN 363-48-6268 I am aware of possible changes 1n your Ille. but lhat does not matter. Please contact Penny Jo (Sm- 211~~). ~~~~~~~I ~~~Ji J1.i2"s%ewood $500 REWARD For any mlormat1on which woutd help me contact "'RINNIE. .. male age 25. 5"5 ... long dark half. dark eyes Call (504) 586-9186 or wnte Tony or Coleman 521 Apt 204. SI Louis Street. New Orleans. LA 70130 GWM. 37, 5'10". 160, moustache. affec­tionate. cuddly. lookmg for similar man for safe se1t buddy. non-smoker please Describe yourself m reply to ad Reply Blmd Box 325-J Clo Voice All fetish uncensored adhstmgs B-. 4-s-lnl~~~ k ~;~er+A~~~~;rw:~~~t~·Ne~~ 10011 -ill Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places? Trp 1~ 0 Classi-!1' Phone Texas' Newest Way to Meet Others Hear Hot Uncensored Classified at 526- 4669 Leave Your Free Classified at 526- 4423 We assign your ad a personal ID code for complete discretion A DIVISION OF TECHNOLOGIC ENTERPRISES RULES FOR THE PERSONALS Person­als (and other advert1smg) should not describe or imply a description of sexual organs or acts No Personals should be ~irected to mtnoM Ad\'ert1s1ng must be pos1hve:· not •·negative·- {If you have certam preferences m other people. hst the qualilles you desire Please don't be nega11ve by hslmg, the kmds ol people or qualtt1es you don t desire) Thank you. and happy hunllng J.0.E.'S OPEN HOUSE Scared of the unknown? No need to be Come to JOE's open house this Sunday. 3-6pm No memberships needed. and everybody will stay reasonably attired Sllfl. though. there are some restnctions on who gets m See our large display ad elsewhere m this issue tor the physical and mental requirements lor 101n1ng JOE. JANUARY 30. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Keeping Up C Chronicl• F.aturH, 1987 If you have a baby, will you like it better than us? CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry's One-Hour Photo has moved tc.i 408 Avondale. tn the same budding as the Montr~ Voice Open Monday-Fnday ~m-6pm SAFE SEX? For your mental health. have sex For your physical health. make 1t safe se1t Safe sex is where there are no bodily fluids exchanged The virus which leads to an AIDS cond1t1on 1s beheved usually trans­mitted from one person to another from blood or semen Those who are ··recep­tive" are espec1ally at nsk Do condoms protect? They cartamly help But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant (the new prOduct lubrasept1c is especially recommended) Petroleum or vegetable-based lubncants will actually dissolve the condom and ellmmate the protection. Please "Play Sale ' PEST CONTROL RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL. 2513' Elmen. 524-9415. 223.4000 ')ff · 0 S:PtAr Al Results Pest Control 2513' Elmen 524-9415 Pest Control Supplies PETS ANGELS TO ZEBRAS Petworld 11725 Eastex Freeway at East Mt Houston 590--0471 foM·S-PRETTY FISH. 224 Westhe1mer. 520--6443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT All' Printing and developing enlargements_ 1umbo pnnts. him. Kodak ~aper 2615 Waugh Dr 520-1010 HENRY'S 1 HOUR PHOTO. 428' West· he1mer. 529--0869 SEE OUR OISPlAr AO PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING. 5400 Bellaire Blvd, 667-7417 ~E - R Dl'iPLAr Al PSYCHOLOGISTS DR NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Welch 527-8680 SffOURDISPl.AYAl REMODELING 26 years remodehng and repair expe­nence 772-5497 RESTAURANTS CHAPUL TEPEC. 813 Richmond. 52:?- 2365 SEE OUR -:USPIAr AO CHARLIE'S. 1102 Westhe1mer. 522-3332 SEE OUR DISPl.Ar AD NATRAJ INOIAN RE-STAURANT 2047 Marshall. 526-4113 SEE OUR OiSPtAY AD NICKY'S PLACE. 2109 Dunlavy 520-8039 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO PIZZA INN 3105£-shepherd. 522-5676 SFf Ot R or5'Pt.Ar AD Por PIE. 1525 WestN 1.,,er, 528-4350 5-- - ~ Of''"PLAY AD Pizza inn. , Delivery p; {Hotline) .i 522-5676 3105 s_ Shepht•rd SEWING SPECIAL LADY DESIGN Costumes and general sewing for ad1 Its Call Jan or Wanda 957-8102 STORES (MISC. ITEMS! THE EAGLE 1544 Westheimer 524 7383 SEC.., DI~ LAY AV SUPERMARKETS KROGER. J.300" Montrose TIRES •!• 529-1414 I THE 1U\ ( f'lACE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fa1rv1ew - •; blks West t:l M,.,ntr .. TRAVEL Professional e•ecut•ve -GWM. 3: years Old. wants s1m11ar to share vacat1 ,.. trav­els If you·re serious and want to en1oy a weekend or weetl, wnte PO Bo1t 772867 Houston 77215 San Francisco 1987 Bed-Breakfast Pn· vale Homes Comfort. Friendship Details. BayHosts. 1155 Bosworth 94131 415-337-9632 NEW ORLEANS-GUEST HOUSE, 1118 Ursulcnes. (504) 566-1177 Sff OUR DISPlAY AD FRANKLIN.GUEST House. 1620 ~::~~o£~..::"~DCo 1303> 331-9106 HAYING A YARD SALE? Announce 1t here then stand back lor the crowd Call 529-8490 orv1s1! the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard ule announcement FRANKLIN HQ!JSE DENVER .103 .'l31-9106 520-8108 in Houston for info A Guest House at 1620 Franklin Denver, CO 80218 Ralft: $1<4-$1/'CSmf;:"• "°" 11'1 s~ I Dnubl· TYPESETTING S°AME DAY TYPESETTERS. 408 Avondale. 529-08490 -E OUR OiSPlA) AO UPHOLSTERY. REFINISHING FURNITURE STRIPPING SHOP In the heart ol Montrose Rellmshmg. repairs. upholstery 529-7833 ALLEN-WADSWORTH co INC 9830- Sweetwater. 44!)-4141 SEE OUR DtSPLArAO VIDEO Loso VIDEO, 1424-C weSthelmer 522·5156 i>ff OUR Oi$PlAY AO WEDel1vER v1DEos_ 1420 westhe1mer. 522-4485 Sff - - PLAY AO YARD & GARAGE SALES Sunday only. al must go Assorted ttems and furniture. sofas. tables. beds chairs etc Al day corner of Ma.son and Strat· ford Yard Sale. Sat Jan. 31, 1420 W 15th StrMI at Durham 8am-t1 ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular class1f1ed rates of paying "'by the word.·· you can purchase space here "'by the mch ... Smee these are considered '"Display Ads." not ·c1ass1fled Ads," you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE , .. $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE , • $29 2· $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE , . $24 2" $34 3'' $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE 1" $19 2' $29 3' $39 Above rates apply to Weekend Ed1t1on Rates for Midweek Edition are 1/2 above rates 24 MON TROSE VOICE I JANU ARY 30, 1987
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