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Houston Voice, No. 1207, December 12, 2003
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Houston Voice, No. 1207, December 12, 2003 - File 001. 2003-12-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2489/show/2460.

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(2003-12-12). Houston Voice, No. 1207, December 12, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2489/show/2460

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1207, December 12, 2003 - File 001, 2003-12-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2489/show/2460.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1207, December 12, 2003
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date December 12, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript I 'Silver Bells' 01ce -- • • ti • I Gay Men's Chorus of Houston celebrates silver anniversary of making music together. Page 15 ISSUE 1207 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 12, 2003 Parl<er makes history again First gay council rep wins city controller race By BINNIE n SHER A few days after voters in Houston overwhelmingly handed the job of city controller to Annise Parker, the first Jes· bian to be elected to the position. she said her 62-percent majority over opponent Bruce Tatro says more than meets the eye. For starters, it says that she pulled votes from both Democrats and Republicans in a city that is home to for· mer Republican President George Bush. "I drew votes from all segments of the city," Parker said. ·~t least a third of con· servatives (who voted) voted for me." The Houston runoff election on Dec. 6 also handed a landslide victory to busi· nessman Bill White, who served as deputy secretary of energy in the Clinton administration. and who ran for mayor against Republican Orlando Sanchez. White garnered 63 percent of the vote to Sanchez's 37 percent. In another key race, voters delivered a narrow victory to civil rights attorney Ron Green, who faced District G City In other races of interest to gay men and lesbians . Houston Gay and Lesbian Politicai Caucus (PAC)-endorsed Adrian Garcia defeated Diana Davila Martinez for the District H seat on the council v.ith 52 percent of the vote. and caucus-endorsed candidate Peter Brown lost the At-large, Position 3 seat on the council to Shelley Sekula-Gibbs, who received 52 percent of the vote. Houston is a city that has three times elected Annise Parker to the City Council. Her stunning . runoff victory serves as a message to her that Houston expects her to be herself. "I intend to be visible and outspoken on our (lesbian and gay) issues." she said. Since the runoff. Parker's photo has appeared in newspapers nationwide, and her victory has been lauded by gays and lesbians throughout the countrr Houston City Councilwoman Amise Parker, left, celebrates her election to the position of city controller with (from left) daughters Daniela and Marquitta Paricer and her partner, Kathy Hubbard "This is a big v.in for the GLBT com· munity," said Chuck Wolfe, executive director of the Victory Fund. ·~ise has won a key race in an important region. The fact that she won because of her work on the city council on behalf of all Houston citizens is significant to the future of all GLBT candidates." Councilman Bert Keller in the race for At· large, Position 4 on the council. Green received 53 percent of the vote to Keller's 47 percent. Green's win was considered crucial to gay men and lesbians. even though Keller had voted favorably on gay issues in the past. It insured that politicai mix on the city council remained at eight progres· sives to seven conservatives. Please see B..ECTION on Page 8 Marriage or bust? Advocates say civil unions 'separate and unequal' By LOU CHIBBARO JR. With Americans engaged in an unprecedented dialogue on the issue of gay marriage, the nation's gay civil rights groups are being asked whether they consider Vermont-style civil unions as an acceptable alterna· tive to civil marriage rights for same­sex couples. While praising Vermont for adopting its civil unions lav.: leaders of virtually all of the national gay civil rights groups have come down solidly behind demanding full civil marriage for gays. saying civil unions fail to provide the full legal rights and benefits of marriage. "In our countn; we have just one, single legal protection for families. and it's called marriage," said Evan Wolfson. executive director of Freedom to Marl); a national group helping coordinate lobbying efforts for same-sex marriage. Representatives from a number of gay civil rights groups said that bene- Please see MARRIAGE on Page 9 POLICE MUM: Despite pressure, police have nothing to report on the Allyn murder. Page 7 I PIPE A TT ACK: Police haven't determined if beating of dancer a hate crime. Page 3 2 DECEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE ''I wish there was a new med.'' ''I wish there was a new med.'' ''I wish there was a new med.'' ''I wish there was a new med.'' ''I wish there was a new med.'' REfATAZ™ (atazanavir sulfate) Ask your doctor if REYATAZ is right for you. www.REYATAZ.com 1-800-426-7644 REY,t,TAZ ts• trademork ol ll<istoH.4yers Squibb Company C2003 Bristof..M~rs Squibb Company, Princeton. NJ 085'43 ff you would ~ke more 1nfor1Ntion, talk to your doctor or c•ll 1 ·800-426-7644 OctobH 2003 F Hi0004 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I local news NV dancer attacked in Montrose Police not yet classifying attack a hate crime By JOSEF MOLNAR Allan Koren Tibbetts saw an opportu· nlty to offer a helping hand when a young man got out of his car near the corner of Avondale and Whitney In Montrose. looked quizzically at street signs, then asked for directions. Tibbetts was visiting Houston from New York OVl'r the Thank;;giving weekend to per­form at a DiverseWorks World AIDS Day event the following week. and he knew what It was like to be unfamiliar with the area. He pointed the way to the street the man asked about before turning and walking away. What happened next. Tibbetts said, he will never forget. Thirty seconds later, the first blow from a pipe split the skin along the right side of his head. "I had absolutely no idea what it was," Tibbetts said. "I wasn't expecting to be attacked by someone I had just had a pleas· ant conversation with." He called for help and tried to run, but the man kept hitting him before wrestling him to the ground between two cars. The assailant continued to beat Tibbetts before demanding his money. In all, Tibbetts sustained at least seven blows to his head and back. With the money in hand, the man jumped into the passenger seat of the car and it sped away. At the hospital, Tibbetts received 37 stitches on his head, and it was there that he said a technician told him his was the sixth assault the hospital had seen that weekend. Silvia Treviiio, a public information offi· cer with the Houston Police Department, said HPD has only received an assault report from Tibbetts and is waiting to finish its investigation before determining whether Tibbetts was the victim of a hate crime. "They're definitely going to look into whether it's a hate crime or not," she said, "but at this time there is no reason to label it as a hate crime. We don't want to start second-guessing this situation." Trevinio said the pattern of the attack will help determine how it will be labeled. Tibbetts has said his attacker did not use homophobic remarks at any time during or after the attack, meaning HPD will likt'­ly classify it as an assault and robbery. Tibbetts, for one isn't convinced that his attack is simply a case of robbery and assault. He points out that the attacker concealed his weapon. Also Tibbetts was \I.earing a baseball with a Human Rights Campaign logo. ''If you want to mug someone, you do 1t with your \11eapon shown, and maybe you hit them once to show vou mean business," Tibbetts said. "It really felt like the mugging was an afu•rthought. If you want to take somlL one's mone); you don't keep hitting them." If PD follows the lead of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. which broadly defines a hate crbne as "a criminal offense committed against a person, property, or society which is moti· vated. in whole or in part, by the offender's bias against an individual's or a group's race, religion, ethnic/ national origin." The assault on Tibbetts is the only case reported to police thus far, but reports drifting through the Montrose community speak of several attacks. The reports have prompted the Q Patrol, an organization that relies on volunteers to patrol the Montrose area, to add reinforcements. "We want to get the awareness up to pre­vent !X-'OPle from being attacked, help them when they're being attacked, and raLc;e aware­ness about repotting to let other know so hopefully there's not going to be another per son," said Chris Arasin. Q Patrol chainnan. Ray Hill, a gay activist, said the dispar­ity between the number of people now claiming they've been assaulted and only one report is disturbing. He said hospital assault cases are investigated immediately by a poltce officer, even if the victim does· n't file an official report. "The hospital and police reports can't verify that many people in the community who have been attacked," Hill said. "If these people nre assaulted and didn't get medic.'ll aid, what's that about?" District D City Councilwoman Ada EdY.~mls has ei.;pres.<;ed concern about the assault reports, as has newly elected At ·large, Po.sltion 4 City Councilman Ron Green. Street lights are few on the streets of Montrose where assaults on gay men have been reported. Thirty seven stitches were required to close wounds Allan Tibbetts sustained when he was assaulted with a metal pipe on a darkened Montrose street over the Th.1nksgiving weekend. (Montrose photo by Dalton Dehart) Because many gay men are not open about their sexual orientation, they may be unwilling to report being a victim of a hate crime. For that reason, Councilwoman Edwards has said her office will receive reports from anyone reluctant to file an offi· cial police complaint. While Tibbetts was willing to file a police report and speak with the media, he acknowledges that many victims would prefer to avoid the publicil): Trevino agreed. and said that unlike sexual assault files, which are largely con· fidential, the law requires files associated with these kinds of crimes to be classified as public information. "Complainant information is public information," she said. "Maybe that's why they don't report crimes like this." Trevino encouraged anyone who has noticed anything or who may have been a victim of a similar crime in the to call HPD. She added that associates can also report the crime; but not knowing the first-hand details keeps the department from do mg little more for that victim than filing a report. Still, she said an incom· plete report ts better than no report ft MOREINFO Houston Police Department 713-222 3131 HPD Online General Safety Presentation www.ci.houstontx.us/deparfme/police/ cp 5/sldOOl htm City Councilwoman Ada Edwards 7J..3.247·1247 DECEMBER 12. 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1207 LOCAL NEWS 3 NATIONAL NEWS 4 FORUM 10 OUT ON THE BAYOU 15 COMMUNITY CALENDAR 20 APPOINTMENTS 21 CLASSIFIEDS 22 HOROSCOPES 25 NO REGRETS: Officials at a loUJsiana school that disciplined a 7-year-old student for saying that his mom is a lesbian claim the boy is owed no apology. Page 5 HOUDAY STYLE: Photos chrorncle a week's worth ,,f holiday events in Houston. Page 7 CONJOINED WITH ASHCROFT: What would Cher do to U.S. Attorney General John Ashaoft if she were hlS con101ned twin? Page 18 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Houston Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200. Houston. TX 77006. Houston Voice is published weekly on Fnday by Window Media LLC. Subscriptions are $92Jyear for 52 JSSUes (only $1 n per JSSUe) 4 DECEMBER 12. 2003 f4 Boogie! A New Year's Eve Gala Gaslno • Dancing • cabaret Lounge • Oiscoooted Rooms • Dance Music of Al Kinds presented by The Chamber the greater houston glbt chamber of commerce at the Warwick Hotel December 31st, 2003, 7pm-2am Attire: Black Tie, Cocktail or Texas Chic Tickets: $69+ Hurry! Every year sells out! :>ackagos start a· .,, up to $169 00 per person, packages can 1nccuae opbOnS such fu I VIP d1nnor cOCKta1ls d nner bu et and broaKfast after midnight See web site tor deta s and to pay before tickets sol out For tickets: www.GHGLCC.org or call 713-523-7576 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE nation I news Three top-ranking former military leaders come out as gay WASHINGTON - Three high-ranking retired military officers who criticized the U.S. military's ban on gays serving openly announced this week they are gay, according to a Three former high-ranking military leaders said President Bush and the Department of Defense are doing little to stop gay harassment The three told the New York Times this week that they are gay and had to live a closeted life to serve their country. report in the New York Times. The three, Brig. Gen. Keith H. Kerr and Brig. Gen. Virgil A. Richard. both of the Arm;: and Rear Adm. Alan M. Steinman of the Coast Guard, said they were forced to lie to their fam· ily, friends and colleagues so that they could serve their country. They said the 1993 "Don't Ask. Don't Telr policy is ineffective and undermines the nuli­tary" s core value.s: truth. honor, dignit): respect and integrity, according to the Times. "I was denied the opportunity to share my life with a loved one, to have a famil): to do all the things that heterosexu­al Americans take for granted," Admiral Steinman said. "That's the sacrifice I made to serve my country." The officers said that the Defense Department and White House had not adequately addressed the problem of harassment. "The president seems reluctant to emphasize the anti-harassment part of the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' polic;:" General Kerr said in an interview from his home in Santa Rosa. Calif "He just doesn't feel this is a serious issue." S.F. voters defeat Green candidate who left Dems over gay marriage SAN FRANCISCO In the end to a clos<'iy v.atched race, Democrat Gavin Newsom defeated the Green Party's Matt Gon1.alez Tuesday in the bid to become San Francisco's 42nd mayor. The race garnered international media attention to see how voters would respond to the differences between the cm tr1St Newsom and the liberal Gonzalez. While only 3 perct'nt of the city's population are registered Greens, polls before the elections showed the candidates virtually deadlocked. Gonzalez left the Democratic Party tn ~ because he thm1ght the party was moving away from ib progres.~ive past, including its overall opposition to gay marriage "I decid­ed I run not going to vote for candidates who support the death penalty or oppose gay mar­nage," Gonzalez wrote at the time. Newsom said durmg the campaign that he supports gay marriage. Ultimate!): Newsom captured 52.6 percent of the vote to Gonzalez's 47.4 per· cent. with about 11,lXXl votes S(>parating the two candidates. Kan. judge questions harsher punishment in gay sodomy case TOPEKA, Kan. (AP)- Calling some of the state's justifications "utterly ridiculous," an appellate judge has questioned whether the state can punish illegal sex more harshly when it involves homosexual acts. Kansas Court of Appeals Judge G. Joseph Pierron presided last week over a three­judge appeals panel as it heard arguments in the case of Matthew R. Limon, whose conviction stems from sex acts in 2000 with a 14-year-old male. Limon was 18 at the time. Convicted of criminal sodomy, Limon was sentenced to 17 years and two months in prison. Had Limon engaged in sex with an underage female, he could have been sentenced to one year and three months in prison. "I'm just trying to come up with a reason, other than you don't like homosexuals," Pierron told Deputy Attorney General Jared :\taag, who was representing the state. N.J. domestic partner bill could become law in 2004 TRENTON. N.J. (AP) A Democrat-spon· sored bill that would allow samc-se.x couples to form domestic partnerships and thereby gain some of the tax and insurance benefits enjoyed by married couple:. could become law by early next year. according to a spokP.Sper son for Go\: James E. McGreevey (D). Tim measure introduced by Senate Co-PresidPnt Richard Codey (D-Kssex County). would limit domestic partnerships to heterosexual con· pies 63 and older who couldjeopanlize pension benefits by remarrying. and to adult same-sex couples. An earlier measure in the Assembly would have enabled any two urunarried adults living together to gain the benefits of domestic partnerships. The Assembly version drew criticism from McGreevey as too brood and expensive Advocates for gay rights embraced the prospects of the legislation but vowed to continue court fight-; to form same­sex marriage.s. Calif., Neb. lesbian couples fight for parental rights, custody SAN FRANCISCO Two women. formerly a couple, are battling over custody of 7-year-old fraternal twins, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. At the same time, an estranged !es· bian couple in Nebraska awaits a judge's deci· sion on custody of their adoptive son. the Associated Press reported. In San Francisco, one of the women provided the eggs for con· ception of the children, and the other carried thP girls to term. the newspaper reported. The pair raised the twins together until they broke up nearly two years ago, and court.s so far have awarded the birth mother sole parental rights and custody. In January, the California Court of Appeals will hear the case, the Chronicle reported. In Omaha, Neb., a two-clay trial to determine whether Serenna Russell or Joan Bridgens would have custody of their 7-vear-old son took place last month. Bridgens ~dopted the baby in 1996 while in a relationship with Russell From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com DECEMBER 12. 2003 5 I n tional news La. school punishes boy for saying 'gay' ACLU vows lawsuit if demands aren't met 'to correct harm' By CHRISTOPHER SEELY LAFAYETTE, La. - A 7·year·old boy arrived home from school last month with a disciplmary note because he told anoth· er student that his mom is gay while wait· ing in line for recess. "I sed bad wurds," wrote Marcus McLaurin, a second·grader at Ernest Gallet Elementary School in the Lafayette Parish School District in Louisiana, on a "Student Behavior Contract" dated Nov. 11 McLaurin wrote on the contract that he should have "kept his mouf shut.• McLaurin's teacher clarified the "bad word" in her writings on the contract, which was obtained by Southern Voice "He explained to another child that you are gay and what being gay means," said the teacher. The day of the incident. McLaurin's mother received a phone call from the school's assistant principal warning her that her son said something inappropriate, said Sharon Huff, McLaurin's mother. "That [phone call] was nothing com· pared to the shock I felt when my little boy came home and told me that his teacher had told him his family is a dirty word," Huff said. Two days after the note and phone call. McLaurin was forced to attend a school behavioral clinic and restricted from explaining his gay family to other stu· dents. according to the American Civil Liberties Union, which is representing McLaurin's family and sent a letter Dec. 1 to Ernest Gallet Elementary School. At press deadline, the Lafayette Parish School Board was scheduled to meet Dec. 11 to hear the results of an investigation being led by Lafayette Superintendent James Easton into the ACLU's allegations. said Justine W Sutley, public relations director for the Lafayette school system. Easton has said that McLaurin did not receive punishment because he said the word "gay" but because the boy disrupted the class. "The superintendent has said the disci· pline has been for talking in or disrupting class, Sutley said. ''He has also said that other documents exist that we are not privy to. But in addition to the note Huff's son brought home on the day of the incident, a separate behavior report from McLaurin's teacher also criticized him for explaining what being gay meant. "Marcus decided to explain to another child in his group that his mom is gay," the When Marcus Mclaurin. 7. returned home from school last month with a disciplinary note, mother Sharon Huff (left) and her partner, Heather Manley were shocked to find out he was punished for saying ·gay: (Photo by Chris Hampton) teacher wrote. "He told the other child that gay is when a girl likes a girl. This kind of dis· cussion is not acceptable in my room. I feel that parents should e:qilain things of this nature to their children m their mm wa):" The school board will likely determine whether to meet demands made by the ACLU on behalf of the boy and his mother, Sutley said. If litigation is to be avoided, the school board must make a "satisfactory response" in its l)(>c. 11 meeting. said Ken Choe, an attorney with the ACLU Lesbian & Gay Rights ProJect who is handling the case. ·we are looking for the school to ensure that Marcus can speak about his family. Just like any other student can speak about his or her families." Choe said. The elementary school also must expunge McLaurin's disciplinary records and apologize to McLaurin and his mother. Choe said. "What Marcus and his family are asking for is minimal.· he said. "They did not want us to file a lawsuit off the bat for money or disciplinary action against school employ­ees. We've only asked that the school acknowledge that there was an error in judgment that had serious con~equences." If the ACLU decides to file litigation, it would do so by claiming that the school violated constitutional rights to free expression and equal treatment, attorneys said. ·rn this case. the discrimination is clear. There is discrimination between hetero· sexual parents and gay parents," Choe said. HIV increases among gay, bisexual men New diagnoses up 17 percent over four-year period, CDC says By RYAN LEE Using the most comprehensive data to date, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention recently announced HIV diag. noses rose by 5.1 percent between 1999 ancl 2002. includmg a 17 percent increase among gay and bisexual men. Some AIDS educators fear the increase among men who have sex with men may be the result of a cultural shift, with younger people being less afraid of the disease. "Unfortunately. the data is not surpriS· ing at all, as we continue to see an increase in the number of men who report homo· sexual activity as a mode a transmission," said Kim Anderson. executive director of AID Atlanta, a non profit service provider. "We're faced with a generation of young people who did not see the walking dead." The data - published in the Nov. 28 issue of the CDC's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report - showed 102,590 people in 29 states were diagnosed with llIV between 1999 and 2002. Men represented 70.5 per· cent of new cases m the four year period. with gay and bisexual activity represent mg nearly 60 percent of those transmls· sions, according to the CDC. In 1999, 9,988 new HIV diagnoses were among gay and bisexual men, compared to 11,686 in 2002. "People are a lot less anxious about HIV than they used to be," said Philippe Chiliade, medical director for the Whitman.Walker Clinic, an HIV organiza· tion in Washington D.C. "I think some of it may be the result of peer pressure, in that if you see other gay men around you tak· ing risks sexuall}: it's easier to copy the behavior of those around you." Younger men may not fully compre· hend the magnitude of HIV. but Chiliade has seen an equal amount of nsky sexual behavior reported by older. educated and wealthy men, he said. "I think what we are seeing now really tells us we need to do something more than just making people aware of how STDs are transmitted." he said. Starting in 1994. the CDC used 25 states all of which required confidential reporting of persons with HIV - to track the progression of the disease throughout the country. In 1999. four more states met the confidential reporting requirements, and they are included in the newly released data, according to Carly Stanton, a enc spokesperson But not included m the 29-state survc!l lance are several states wtth large gay pop­ulations, including California, New York, Texas and Georgia. Those states' confiden· Exposure category for new HIV infections in 29 states, 1999-2002 1.8% Other Total new infections: 102,590 tial reporting systems have not been in place long enough to produce accurate numbers, Stanton said. Georgia the last state to adopt an HIV reporting system begins collecting HIV diagnosis data at the begmmng of 2004. Health advocates are eager to see the complete data, even if it reveals an even higher increase in HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men. "If we start seeing (remaining states] in CDC data. I'm pretty sure we're going to ~cc tho c numbers rise," Chiliade said. "I think from a public health standpoint it's important for the CDC to be aware of who's getting infected because at least that v.ill help us target our prevention messages." Despite the 17 percent increase, Anderson and Chiliade said decades of HIV prevention efforts are having a posi tive impact "If we had not been doing what we've been doing, 1t would have been worse, Anderson said. "I think it's a call for us to be even more Involved. and at different levels .. Junior high school and high school stu dents should be targeted by HIV preven· tlon messages. including cutting-edge ways to get their attention, Anderson said. "We need to get access to greater dollars so we can market to younger people effec· tivel};" she said. "Just like the GAP mar­keb. we need to market prevention educa· lion on the same le\•e!. "The best thing we can do right now is do advertisements on a bus shelter or on a postcard, ' she ~aid. Chiliade agreed that safer sex messages should be delivered to school-aged children. "Teaching abstinence ..,, a great tool, but for tho e \\ho v.ill be 'ell."Uall~ act1\e, \\e need to prepare them as well," he said. 6 DECEMBER 12. 2003 THE ORIGINAL SUV 2004 Discovery S MSRP $34,995 SALE PRICE $30,995 7019 Old Katy Rood • 713· 293-6100 www.loridro'<erhouslon.com ~ -Fr 9am-7pm • Sat 9om-6pm ~DVANTAGE AUTOMOTIVE GROUP The So uthwe1t'1 Lar9e1t Land Rover Centre Great Car Insurance! 713.661. 7700 For Auto, lfamr, Rmtns l/fr, l/ml1/1, B11slnru lmuranu and m11c11 morr. 631511. l.oop ~out/1 \/<.185 &llairP, n: 77401 ll'lt'U~hmPrlt-r.1s:r11r) com wwwhoustonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I international ne 5 Brazilian mayor indicted after banning gays from town SAO PAULO. Brazil (AP) A mayor in southern Brazil who signed a decree banning gays from entering his town has been indicted under anti-discrimination laws, the state prosecutor handling the case said last week. "Mayor Elcio Berti step!>('d beyond any reasonable limit," said prosecu­tor Agenor Salgado. "If convicted, he could face two to four years in prison aside from losing his office." Berti, mayor of the town of Bocaiuva do Sul (population 10,000), 250 miles south of Sao Paulo, signed a decree Dec. I Hprohibit· ing the presence m this jurisdiction of members of the class known as homosexuals, who can bring no benefits whatsoever to thf' town." A gay rights group called Dignity announced that It would mount protests outside the Bocamva do Sul city hall late last week Berti was unavail· able for comment. "The mayor has shut down city hall and disappeared," said Bocaluva do Sul police officer Waldemar ~lateus. "Even we don't know where he 1s." Elcio Berti. nayor of Boca1uva do Suf. Brazil has been indicted by state prosecutors under dllti-dis· cnmination laws after he siqned a decree banning gays from the city. Jamaican reggae star accused of inciting gay bashing in England LONDON' Complamts that a Jamaican reggae star mcited violence against gays during visits to London are under investi· gation by local police, Reuters reported. Bounty Killer, born Rodney Basil Price, 1s a dancehall reggae artist who gained fame in 1996 with the album, "My Xperience," according to the news agency. He also has gained popularity in the United States, col· laboratlng with Janet Jackson and some of the nation's top rap artists. But a number of complaints have been lodged against the star, alleging that he has incited homo· phobic violence and murder, London police told Reuters. "In a democratic soci· ety !>('Opie have a right to criticize homo· sexuality, but they do not have a right to encourage queer-bashing," gay rights group OutRnge! told Reuters. Clive Driscoll, detective chief inspector of Scotland Yard's Racial & Violent Crime Task Force, said police are delving Into lyrics from several of the singer's tunes. OutRage'. officials said they are concerned by lyrics such as those in ghetto slang from "Another Level." which states: "Bun a fire pon a poop and Mister Faggoty ... Poop man fi drown and dat a yawd man ph1losoph}:" Reuters reported. Uzbek leader's declaration of amnesty may help jailed gay journalist TASHKENT, Uzbekistan (APJ Uzbek President Islam Karimov issued amnesty that would apply to some prisoners convict· ed of Involvement in extremist groups, according to a government statement. Its phrasing makes 1t likely that 1t could be applied to jalled journalist Ruslan Sharipov, who is servmg a four-year term for having homosexual sex, which is illegal In Uzbekistan. His pardon was sought by U.S. officials and international rights groups. Karimov's decree, timed to the 11th anniversary of Uzbekistan's post-Soviet constitution, would grant amnesty to those in such groups who "have firmly set on the path of correction," said the statement, which was published in official newspa­pers. It didn't name extremist groups or say how many convicts would benefit from the amnest}: The amnesty would be applicable only to those extremists whose prison terms do not exceed IO years. Australian man sues McDonald's over alleged anti-gay remarks ARDEER, Australia A man who alleged that a McDonald's employee made anti-gay comments about him and a friend is suing the fast food chain, the Herald Sun of Melbourne Australia, reported. Paul Corda of Werribee alleged that he and a friend were called "poofters 'and "faggots" by an employee of .McDonald's at Western Ring Road in Ardeer He said he later was oflered an apology by the restaurant man· ager and a meal voucher, the Herald Sun reported. Corda alleges that he ordered and paid for his food in the drive through and heard a staff member make comments into her headpiece, the newspaper report· ed. He now is suing McDonald's in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribune, alleging that the company dis­criminated against him on the basis of his sexual orientation, the Herald Sun report­ed. John Whitehouse, McDonald's employ­ee relations manager, said in a letter the worker admitted to making an inappropri ate comment to a colleague, according to the newspaper: But \\'hltehouse said the corporation should not be held responsible for the comments of one employee. Solomon Islands officials arrest woman for being a lesbian HONIARA, Solomon Islands The United Nations Commissioner for Human Rights is monitoring the arrest of a woman who is charged with being a le.~bian, according to a report in the Herald Sun newspaper: Homosexuality is illegal in the Solomon Islands. The woman, who was not named, 15 charged with one count of committing an mdecent practice, having sex with a person of the same gender. The Herald Sun report· ed the woman was refused bail after appear­ing In court on Monday. Magistrate JE'fferson Leua said the offense was a seri. ous one and that the middle-aged, divorced mother would be remanded in custody to ensure there was no interference with wit nesses. Ashley Wickham, the head of the UNHCR's Honiara oflice, said the case would be followed closely. "We should be try ing to comply with international standards, and clearly some things have been happen­ing here that clo not," Wickhan1 said. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com DECEMBER 12. 2003 7 I ocal news Police mum on Ross Allyn murder investigation Police are saying little as they investigate leads in lobbyist's homicide By BINNIE FISHER Three weeks after gay Houston lobbyist Ross Allyn was found dead of a gunshot wound inside his burning home, police have zipped their lips about the case. Media inquiries are being forwarded to the office of John Cannon, Houston Police public information officer. He says homi· cide investigators have given him nothing to report. Allyn was found shot to death early on Nov. 20 inside his burning home at 919 Worthshire. He had been shot in the back of the neck and was found near the front door, as though he had tried to escape his assailant. Police have appealed to gays and Jes· bians to come forward with any informa· tion that may help them find Allyn's killer. Allyn, who in 1997 was caught up in an FBI bribery sting that sent City Councilman Ben Reyes and Houston Port Commissioner Betti Maldonado to prison, never got over the feeling he was being watched. Although a judge dropped the case against him, he remarked often to friends that he felt he was still under scrutin): Police spokesman Cannon said this isn't the first time investigators have been hesi· tant to talk about an ongoing investigation. "I know they are working on a number of leads," Cannon said. "There are a lot of players involved." There were many players because there were many facets to Allyn's life, providing numerous avenues for investigation. Friends have suggested that his life as a lobbyist could have turned up enemies. There are those who have wondered whether he took the wrong person home on the evening before his murder. His abuse of cocaine was well known, and some have speculated that could have brought about his untimely end. Police are under intense pressure from the City Council to solve the case. Allyn counted several council members among his friends. The evening before his death, he attended a fundraiser for Annise Parker, who was elected city controller in the Dec. 6 runoff. Cannon said when homicide investiga· tors have tied up the loose ends, they will release information to the public, perhaps even the name of a suspect. "When they are ready to discuss it in the media, they'll talk." Cannon said. ft MORE INFO Houston Police Homicide Division 713·308·3600 Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee talks with fellow award winners (from left) Sheila Scott Award Winner John Coulter, HATCH youth Brian, Student of the Year Mohammed and Lori Hildalgo, the center's employee of the year. The Rev. Carol Mobley, assistant pastor at Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church and her partner, Adrian Bowie. enjoy the Sisters holiday party. Bowie is president of Sisters. The Black r ie, Inc. recently presented $46,000 to six agen· c1es. including Benng Omega Cornmuruty Services, An Uncommon Legacy. Ass1stHers, People with AIDS COJlilion, the Montrose Counseling Center and PFLAG/HATCH Holidays in Houston (All photos by Dalton DeHart) U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee gets a hug from Montrose Counseling Center Executive Director Am Robison after Lee was presented the center's Ed Eaton Award for Public Service to the GLBT and HIV Community. In tum, Lee pre­sented the center with a check for $100.000 in federal funds. The Houston Pride Band recently proVtded seasonal music dunng the annual hofiday party thl'llWll by the Houston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce at the Kilworth Manor 8 DECEMBER 12. 2003 I 10 al news Houston civil rights attorney and newly elected At-large. Position 4 City Coonalman Ron r.t'eefl is all smiles as his savors his election night victory with U.S Rep. Cllis Bel ( 0-Tex.) at the George R. Brown Convention Center. ' L rban Leather Hedefines Strle" II ou t n Dl ~1g11 R urce; \la~uzmc ILEATHER z < CD a: :::> wwwhoustonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Gay candidates no longer a 'shock to political system' illCTION. continued from Page 1 Parker concurs. "I don't know what it says about the gay community," she said. "Two years ago we were defeated on domestic partner benefits (for city of Houston employees). But in terms of our own individual efforts. I think we can thrive." Voters from all walks of life have become accustomed to gay and lesbian Any Style Any Leather S RICE AVE. WESTPARK 713 432 7632 HOUSTON TEXAS 77081 candidates, she said. "Every election cycle (in Houston) we're beginning to have gay candidates in the pipeline." she said. "I don't think it's a shock to the political system anymore." Wolfe said that as Controller, Parker will represent 2 million constituents · the sec· ond largest number of constituents repre­sented by an openly gay or lesbian public official in the country. The public official with the most constituents is Carole Migden. who represents 21 counties as a member of the California State Board of Equalization. Parker realizes that many of those who voted for her don't know what the city con· troller does. "Controller is in many ways an obscure position," Parker said. "As controller, you don't have a vote and you don't have a role in public policy." She said she has a definite goal in mind as she enters office. "I did not run to reform the controller's office." she said. "More 1mportantly. I intend to reform the relationship between the controller and the (city) administration." As the runoff drew near, Parker said she was gratified that her opponent's negative ads did not mention her sexual orientation. "You can't play that card anymore," she said. "He just characterized me as a tax and spend liberal." Term limits in Houston prevent city office holders from running for more than three two-year terms. There are those in Houston who are already specu· lating about what Parker will do six years from now. "I certainly don't intend to end my career in public service as controller for the City of Houston," she said. Houston City Councilwoman Annise Pari<er 1s thronged by supporters at the Home Plate Bar and Gnll as she celebrates her election to the position of city controller. (Photos by Dalton OeHart) HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com DECEMBER 12, 2003 9 Ina ona news Gays in Congress deal with marriage backlash MARRIAGE, continued from Page 1 fits provided through Vermont's civil unions law, or about to be enacted through California's super domestic partners law, are nice stepping stones that help some gay cou­ples now. But, the ultimate goal is for same­sex couples to be able to get married in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Wolfson, a gay rights attorney, said he's concerned that incorrect information sur­facing in the news media is misleading rank and file gays and their straight sup­porters into thinking a civil union is equal to civil marriage in all respects except its name. Confusion over the difference between civil marriage and civil unions, Wolfson said, could hurt efforts to achieve full marriage rights. "Gay people should not enter into a dis­cussion of bargaining against ourselves," he said. A newly formed coalition of African American gays raised the issue of civil unions versus marriage rights this week in announcing plans to launch a $100,000 media campaign promoting same-sex mar­riage in the black community: "Civil unions is separate and unequal," said Keith Boykin, co-founder of the National Black Justice Coalition. Boykin, a White House special assistant in the Clinton administration, compared civil unions to the past U.S. policies of racial segregation, which labeled mandatory all-black school districts as "separate but equal." "Our whole notion is you don't go half a loaf for civil rights," said Mandy Carter, one of the African-American gay civil rights leaders who joined Boykin in form­ing the black coalition. "We don't want to settle for domestic partnership or civil unions, not that they're not important," Carter said. "But if we're going to go out and advocate, what we want is full marriage equality:" Unions don't offer full rights The concept of civil unions first sur­faced in Vermont in 1999, when the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that the state's marriage law excluding marriage rights and benefits for same-sex couples Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) said she applauds gays striving for full marriage rights. (Photo by Michael Wise) violated the Vermont Constitution. The court ruling gave the legislature the option of changing the law to allow same-sex mar­riages or legal "unions" that offered the same rights or benefits provided by the state for heterosexual married couples. The state legislature, faced with a highly contro­versial issue, chose the civil unions option, backed by the state's governor at the time, Howard Dean, now the frontrunner for the Democratic presidential nomination. The same-sex marriage versus civil unions issue surfaced once again this year when the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court issued a ruling nearly identical to Vermont's high court. However, some legal experts have said that the Massachusetts ruling requires the legislature to open up the state's marriage law to full, same-sex marriage, with no legal wiggle room to form civil unions. Others have disagreed. If the legislature fails to act by a court­imposed deadline of May 15, 2004, a number of legal analysts, including gay rights attor­neys, say the court itself may declare same­sex marriage to be legal in Massachusetts and order the state to provide marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Before the Massachusetts ruling, civil unions became a hot topic in the Democratic presidential election campaign, as six of the nine Democrats running for president said they support civil unions over gay marriage. Three candidates lag­ging in the polls - former Senator Carol Moseley Braun of lliinois, Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, and the Rev. Al Sharpton of New York - have declared their support for same-sex marriage. The six leading candidates, including Dean, have argued that civil unions provide all the legal benefits conferred by marriage. Dean, who signed Vermont's civil union law as governor, has said he also favors a feder­al law providing federal marital benefits and rights to those joined in civil unions. Gay rights attorneys concede that legal­izing same-sex marriage in any state, including Massachusetts, would not pro­vide with the many rights and benefits asso­ciated with marriage to gay couples that come from the federal government, includ­ing tax deductions, immigration rights and Social Security survivor benefits. The federal Defense of Marriage Act, which Congress passed and President Clinton signed in 1996, bars same-sex cou­ples from receiving any federal marital ben­efits, though activists have questioned the statute's constitutionality: Mamage can lead to DOMA challenge Why, then, do most of the nation's gay rights groups claim same-sex marriage is preferable to civil unions? Wolfson and attorneys with Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, a gay liti­gation group, .say legalizing gay marriage in Massachusetts and other states will open the way for legal challenges to the Defense of Marriage Act, known as DOMA. Experts in constitutional law have said it remains unclear whether a section of the U.S. Constitution known as the full faith and credit clause requires states to legally honor marriages issued in other states. Most legal observers say the question will be tested in the courts, with the U.S. Supreme Court making the final decision. But without legalizing same-sex mar­riage in one or more states, this issue could never be tested and the possibility of obtaining full federal marriage benefits and rights for gay couples could never be achieved without passage of legislation, activists argue. Extra-legal benefits? David Buckel, an attorney with Lambda Legal, said legalizing same-sex marriage in states would have benefits that go beyond just the legal issues. "The key issue is gay people, not the gov­ernment, should make the choice between civil unions or marriage," Buckel said. ''As long as the government takes the choice away from gay people, we are second-class citizens. The official message from our rulers is that we are unworthy." Added Buckel, "Our position is that any choice available to a different-sex couple should be available to a same-sex couple. We would be making a terrible mistake to allow the government to take marriage off that list of choices." Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), the first open lesbian to serve in Congress, called 2003 "a tremendous year in the debate and discussion on civil marriage for gays." Baldwin said she agrees with gay rights leaders that marriage is far preferable to civil unions for gay men and lesbians, and she supports efforts by gays in Massachusetts and other states to secure marriage equality in the courts. But she said she and other gay rights advocates in Congress must now face a backlash against same-sex marriage and gay civil rights in general orchestrated by anti-gay groups. "I think the struggle for full civil mar­riage rights is a very important one," Baldwin said. "That having been said, I in no way discourage efforts to protect our fami­lies in the meantime" through civil unions or domestic partner laws, Baldwin said. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), another openly gay member of Congress, said he also supports legalization of same-sex mar­riage and predicts the Massachusetts high court will decree legalized same-sex mar­riage next May. Like other observers, Frank said he believes the Massachusetts legisla­ture will choose not to act, with conserva­tive lawmakers working instead for a voter referendum to amend the state Constitution to ban same-sex marriage. Frank said that by 2006, voters will view the issue as non-threatening and most like­ly will vote against a referendum to repeal marriage rights for gays. Rep. Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz.), the third open­ly gay member of Congress, has no official position on same-sex marriage or civil unions, according to his press secretary, - David Buckel, a gay rights attorney for Lambda Legal Defense, said gay activists need to keep demanding that the government treats all of its citizens equally. (Photo courtesy of Lambda Legal) Neena Moorjani. Moorjani said Kolbe opposes a constitutional amendment ban­ning same-sex marriage and joined Frank and Baldwin in issuing a joint letter to all House members urging opposition to such an amendment. Kolbe did, however, vote for DOMA, angering a number of activists and leading the Arizona Republican to come out in anticipation that activists would identify him in retaliation. Gay groups unified in support of marriage rights While sometimes disagreeing over strategies and issues, all of the major national gay civil rights groups are unified in their support for legalizing same-sex marriage, according to Wolfson, who said he confers with the groups frequently. Among them are the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay political group; the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force; the National Latina/o Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Organization; Lambda Legal; the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation; Parents & Friends of Lesbians & Gays; Log Cabin Republicans; and the National Stonewall Democrats. Log Cabin Republicans spokesperson Mark Mead and National Stonewall Democrats Executive Director Dave Noble said same-sex marriage enjoys widespread support from their member groups. Martin Ornelas-Quintero, executive director of LLEGO, said his group's diverse membership appears solidly behind the con­cept of same-sex marriage, lining up behind LLEGO's efforts to lobby mainline Hispanic groups in support of equal marriage rights for gays. Ornelas-Quintero said the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, a coalition of 33 Hispanic advocacy groups in the United States, came out against a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage follow­ing a LLEGO lobbying campaign. Craig Howell, member and former presi­dent of the D.C. Gay & Lesbian Activists Alliance, said GLAA also supports same­sex marriage. Howell said GLAA is pleased that the national groups view marriage as far preferable to civil unions or domestic partnership laws. l1fdit>4td 1i voice EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION ExlcutNe EdW CHRIS CRAIN EdW BINNIE FISHER bf!Sher'.cthoustOllvoice.com PndlC!ion KIKI CARR Conespcxdeuts: LOU CHIBBARQ JR JOE CREA. LAURA OOIJGlAS.BRlM'N LAUREL FAUST, MIKE FLEMING. MATTHEW HENNIE. RYAN LEE. BRIAN MOYlAN KEVIN NAFF. KEN SAIN CHRISTOPHER smv STEVE WEINSTEIN CoolrhJtors JOHNNY HOOKS. JOSEF MOLNAR. JASON VICTOR SERINUS ANO MUBARAK DAHIR PhotDIJ'aphers DALTON DEHART KIMBERLY THOMPSON Webrmst2r ARAM VAJ'Tl ~'I SALES & ADMINISTRATION fieneral Manager OANll E'~' · demerich;.il.houstorMJiruom Accllunt ExecutM!s BRf!T CUUUM - bcullurmihMtOllVOICe com SCOTT RYAN sryar(IL~tllllVOICe.com JE'lNIFER HOUANO rhollandaJhoustonvoire.com Aimristrative ~ .KJHNNY HOOKS jhooks.'..i.houst011V01Ce.rom National AdvertisiniJ Repr!sentative Ri'lendell Media· 212-242~ Nllisher- WINDOW MEDIA UC President- WIWAM WAYBOURN ElitDnal Dtechw- CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controller- BARNETIE HOLSTON Art Dtechw- R06 BOEGER Operations Manager- MICHAEL KITCHENS Mrietilg Manager- DAN GARRIOTT rn ........ ~=f1Jll MEMBER tt.da1Eer .. _ lilid;;&;Ol- CHARTIR MEMBER Established 1974 as the M.introse SfJr 500 Lovett Blvd.. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 wwwhoustonvoice.com Contents copynght 2003 Office hours: 9 am. to 5:30 p.m weekdays To dmil i letter ..ethn lln*l be !ewe' !Im 400 ~We resent the "'111 to edit for cmtent arid lefr,j!h ~ ri Wltfl. hold n.wes ~ re!Jiest. but )llU nJJSt n:Ule yar n.we arid~ imter fa' micatm Please send mail to HCXlston \Ila. 500 ~ BllU. Suite 200. lblstcn. Texas ~ fax f7l3J 529-9531 or e-mail to edtiri hoostoovcice.am Opirioos exjl'l!SSed ttmil do !Ill refk>ct those d the JbJstoo VDr.'e Issue 1207 r ditorial Bathhouse Betty might be right Bette Midler shocked her gay fans when she asked whether marriage was a good idea for same-sex couples, but are the gay guys you know ready to tie the knot? By CHRIS CRAIN HE GOT HER START AS Bathhouse Betty, back in the days when gay men treated "the tubs" as all·around social clubs, and not just as places to - you know - become better acquainted. So it came as an unpleasant shock to many in her legions of gay fans when Bette Midler, asked by Larry King this week her views on gay marriage, didn't offer up a pohtically correct answer about equal rights long overdue. Instead, Bathhouse Betty thought about the flesh·and·blood gay guys she knows and loves. and questioned whether marriage was such a good idea . "Many of the homosexual men that I know - you know, they like to move around," said ~ficller. "They like to have - you know, they're - that's part of it That's part of the fun of being a gay man. I'm really wondering how what that commitment is going to be about. Does that mean they're not going to cheat, they're only going to be with one?" Many of us, like Bette, know one or two homosexual men who you know hke to "move around." In fact, we knov; a v. hole slew of gay men for ''horn "monng around" is you know part of it, part of the fun of being gay. Of course, let the record reflect that the same could be said of many heterosexual men and plenty of married ex presidents but her point is still one worth considering. Some of the attacks on "gay marrtage • ha•e been over thl' top alarmist like suggesting it could lead to thr rnd of civilization. Others have been heterosexist. as if there v.ere something innately superior about the "complementarity" of heterosexual love betwern people of opposite genders. Superior? No. But differl'nt? Maybe. WE SOMETIMES FORGET THAT THIS "experiment" of same-sex coupling is still a relatively new one. It is only in the most recent generation that large numbers of gay men and lesbians felt frt!e enough to find a partner and build a life together. For many gay couples. especially the men. long.term relationships aren't necessarily exclusive sexually. In fact, as Bette put it so you know eloquently, many of us have found that's part of the fun of being gay. We write our own rules. Of course there are plenty of same-sex couples. especially on the lesbian side, for whom sexual monogamy is every bit as important as it is to George W and Laura. And thert! are even some heterosexual couples toda}; especially under 30, who tie the knot and then make unco1wentional decisions about what that commitment means to them sexually. But the gay rights movement hasn't always been exclusively about accessing traditional institutions like marriage and the military, For a long time, it was much more revolutionary, focused on rewriting traditional institutions to reflect a more progressive and less rigid vie\\ of life In the case of marriage the ll'gal rules can be pretty darn rigid depending upon the state. They certainly all asplre toward sexual exclusivity, and sex outside of marriage can be grounds for dtvorce or, ln states with "no hull" divorce, at least an argument for a more favorable divi­sion of propcrtv. In some states, adultery remains a crime, though tt's unclear \\hethcr those laws v. ill survive the Supreme Court's nil mg this sumirrr striking down sodomy lav.s that criminalize private consensual sex between adults. Certainly the major religious faiths that have recognized gay marriage in one form or another expect the couple to remain faithful sexuall}: HOUSTON VOICE DECEMBER 12. 2003 PAGE 10 BUT THOSE OF US WHO HAVE BEEN in long-term same-sex relationships, and those who professionally counsel us, often find that it is more important to communicate honestly about what sort of ground rules each partner wants and coming to agreement and living faithful· ly to those terms. For some of us, that means monogam): but not for many of us. The ground rules themselves, whether complete monogamy or some you know - moving around, are less the point. Do same-sex couples who choose something less than total sexual cxclu siv1ty still deserve full access to mar­riage rights and responsibilities? Ar!' they less entitled than straight couples who publicly aspire toward monogamy but then look the other war at S!'xual infidelity (those ex·presidents come to mind again). Is it any of the government's business what private arrangements couples might make on something so private as sexual monogamy? Does it become the govern­ment's business when the couple signs up for legal and financial benefits? And what about unmarried couples, gay and straight? An entire framework of public and private benefits have been established for unmarried "domestic partners." Most of these benefits were enacted because gay couples couldn't access all the public and private benefits of civil marriage, although the benefit rules are typically written in gender· neutral terms and more straight couples avail them· selves of them than do gays.· If gay couples can get married, should domestic partnership benefits be jettisoned? Or ought we as a society have one level of benefits for "live·in" couples and another, more involved and broader set of benefits for couples that legally Ile the knot? Or are we moving toward a three­tiered system, with gay "civil unions" in the purgatory somewhere in between those domestically partnered and those heterosexual couples who, in the words of the Supreme Court, enjoy the "sacred precincts of the marltal bedroom." Bathhouse Betty may not have intend­ed to open such a can of worms whrn she offered her two cents on gay marriage, and Larry "Softball" King certainly didn't mean to trip her up by asking the ques· lion. But maybe we ought to take a stab at thmkmg about these issues before we petition our government to rewrite a ccn· 1urics-0ld tradition. 1 1/h Chris Crain rs ~ executive editor of Houston Vorce and can be reached at ccrain(aiwashblade.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com ADA EDWARDS Attacks in the Montrose community illustrate that hate is a very present danger for gays, but victims' silence will only make the problem worse. Community must report attacks F1RST, I DEPLORE THE RECENT ATTACKS THAT HAVE taken place in the Montrose area. It continues to be a sad and horrible fact, that despite how far we have come as a city, there is still the ever.present reality of violence against people who are perceived as different. In the days following the Thanksgiving Day weekend, our office began to receive reports by e-mail and phone informing us that there had been a rash of violent attacks against the Lesbian and Gay community in the Montrose area. Our office immediately contacted the Houston Police Department and they confirmed that one attack was report· ed over the Thanksgiving weekend in :\1ontrose in which the victim was beaten with a metal pipe. At that time. the Police did not have on record other reports of assaults or beatings in the area. In contrast, several Montrose community leaders have reported to me, other incidents where individuals were assaulted during the same time period. Many of the victims stated that their assailants allegedly traveled in a white pick-up truck. But sadly, in almost all of these other cases, the victims have chosen not to file a formal report with the Police Department. Our office will continue to work with neighborhood bar owners, community activists, civic clubs and the police to coordinate efforts to strengthen security and safety for Montrose residents and visitors. As one of the elected City ETHAN ENCORE Council representatives for the Montrose area, I take these attacks and the city's response to them and the community, very seriously FINAILY; IT IS CRUCIAILY IMPORTANT THAT everyone report every incident of verbal or physical abuse to the police no matter how seemingly minor. I understand that for some, there is still fear about con­tacting the police, particularly for those who may not be open regarding their status at work or to their families. I have worked with many community activists, as well as with HPD, to institute cultural diversity and sensitivity training programs within the Houston Police Department. For this reason. I will make our office available as a conduit for those who may be reluctant to report these crimes directly to the police. Hopefull}: this will ensure that vital evidence can be collected while still respecting individual choices and decisions around priva11: \\1thout individuals who are willing to come forward and report incidents, the Police Department cannot establish a discernible pat· tern of assaults in the Montrose area. Unfortunate!): the world is still not free of hate; however, we cannot sit idly by and tolerate or ignore it. If you have been the victim of an attack or witnessed an incident, please step forward and speak out. With concrete information. we will be able to thoroughly investigate and seek justice in these cases. Only by speaking out can we begin to make our communities safe from those who threaten violence simply on the basis of hate. 'm Ada Edwards holds the District D seat on the Houston \Yi' City Council. She can be reached at 713-247·1247 Reinstate-"---........ 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Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6108 • loz1etti11n.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I action! ale 'Queer Eye' for mainstream ads Kressley lands spokesperson job with Marshall Field's By RYAN LEE THE •QUEER EYE" EMPIRE CONTIN ues to expand. as personalities from the hit makeover show sign endorsement deals with high-profile retailers. Fashion guru Carson Kressley - one-fifth of the "Fab Five· from Bravo's "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" - takes his quick and catty tongue to Chicago, starring in Marshall Field's commercials touting the department store's niche "13-hour" sales. ·we were interested in Carson because we love his fashion style and know-how. and we thought he would be a great fit for our brand." said Heidi Weaver, senior manager of public rela· tions at Marshall Field's. "We pride our· selves on being very cutting edge." In the commercial, Kressley prances through the company's hallmark store, located in downtown Chicago, dispens­ing fashion advice to shoppers, accord· ing to Weaver. "The spots are very lighthearted," she said. "We've gotten a ton of responses from our guests, and people are responding to the upbeat nature and the witty tongue he brings." Marhall Field's- through its parent com pan}: the Target Corporation - has a non-discrimination policy that includes sexual orientation, offers domestic part· ner benefits to same-sex couples and has a gay employee group. Weaver said. ANOTHER MEMBER OF THE FAB Five, interior design expert Thom Filicia, may have penned a deal to replace actress and comedian Kirstie Alley as advertising spokesperson for retailer Pier 1 Import<;, according to a report in Advertising Age, an ad industry magazine. But officials at Pier 1 declined to confirm whether Filicla is the new pub· lie face for the compan~: "The article announcing we had changed spokespeople was actually incomplete and speculative." said Mary Ann Roth, a Pier 1 spokesperson. "Kirstie Alley is our spokesperson through the end of the year. However. we will have an announcement coming out about our 2004 marketing plan very soon." USING OPENLY GAY CELEBRITIES to hawk mainstream products is not unprecedented. But the recent partnering of gay celebr ities and highly recognizable companies is encouraging, said Mike Wilke, executive director of Commercial Closet. a gay advertising watchdog. Fashion guru Cd'soo Kressle'J from Bravo's 'Queer Eye for the Slrai!jrt Qr{ can now be seen on television hawking sales at department store Mcmhall Fiekl's. (Photo courtesy Bravo) "They're definitely going for a main· stream audience with these ads,· Wilke said. "It's really a perfect fit for them to be pitching home furnishing and fashion." Some pundits predict an anti-gay backlash following recent positive cover· age of gays in the media, but Wilke says gays in entertainment may be immune. "Some people are marveling in the amount of attention ('Queer Eye'] has got· ten in the entertainment media," Wilke said. "But r think it will go completely unnoticed because it is a perfectly natural place for them to appear as endorsers." In September. the conservative Montana Family Coalition announced it would introduce a media campaign against ''Queer Eye," calling the program "outrageous• and a "joke," according to the Independent Record, in Helena, Mont. "To me, that's not a reality show about gay people." Executive Director Julie Millam told the paper. "A really good reality show for gay people would be five gay men dying of AIDS." Contacted this week, Millam said she was unaware of Kressley and Filicia's new spokesperson gigs. but she let out a hearty laugh when she heard the news. After learning she was talking with a gay newspaper, Millam ended the interview without providing comment. 0 ACTION! INFO Marshall Fiekfs 700 On The Mall Minneapolis. Minn. 55402 612-375-2200 www.marshallfields.com Pier 1 Imports 301 Commerce St. Suite 600 Fort Worth, Texas. 76102 Bl7-87B·8000 wwwp1erl.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I on he recor "No, not at all. It was part of the video we were acting, there was no lesbian vibe going on." Pop star Britney Spears, responding to a questi.on about "lesbian t.ensi.on" between her and Madonna while on a press tour in South Korea (Associated Press, Dec. 8) "Our written Scriptures have limita­tions. They cannot be equivalent to the incarnate word of God in Jesus. They con­vey God's word in a particular cultural and historical context. And these Scriptures are the word of God in the words of human beings." Los Angeles Episcopal Bishop J. Jon Bruno explaining Scriptural passages against homosexuality in an address to the 108th annual convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 7) "The court decision was undeniably bold; but it was also firmly based in conserva­tive thought. Which makes the radical right's hysteric opposition to the ruling mistak· en and inconsistent." Patrick Guerriero, executive director of the Log Cabin Republicans, praising the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruling that denying gays marriage rights is unconstituti.onal, in a Wall Street Journal column (Dec. 4) "We are not from another country, we're not from another planet, we are your fami· lies, your brothers, your sisters, your aunts and uncles. If we can get our families to understand that what we're talking about here Is equal rights, then we've won. That Is the conversation that needs to be had." "Hairspray" star Harvey Fterstetn, in an interview following his stint portraying Mrs. Claus during the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade (Associated Press, Dec. 4) "Anyone with two brain cells to rub together can tell that homosexual activity is perverted." Ben Biddulph, a member of the Trowbridge 1bwn (})uncil in England, in a letter w the editor of the Wiltshire Times newspaper. in which he complained about the "politically correct" nature of the council wward gay rtghls issues (Gay.com UK. Dec. 9) "AIDS Is the wrath of God, a punishment on homosexuals .... God felt it's time to mete out punishment, or there would not be any difference between men and animals." Taiwan Vice President Annette Lu in a speech promoting safe sex (365Gay.com, Dec. 8) "I may well officiate at a same-sex marriage next year, after the [state] legislature has a chance to pass an enabling statute." Former Massachusetts Gou. William Weld in an interview following the state court ruling on gay marriage (Boston Globe, Nov. 26) "There are a lot of questions - cou­ples are asking about blood tests, application forms. As a community, we haven't had to pursue something like this before; it's incredibly exciting." QJrri Planck of the Family Pride Cooliti.on, an advocacy group for gay families, when asked about the prospect of gays getting married in Massachusetts and returning to their home states (Associated Press, Nou. 29) "Most Americans don't pay attention to this issue until it's thrust upon them. Now you're going to see millions of them raising their voices .... They don't believe gays and lesbians have the right to define marriage for everyone else." Matt Daniels, whose Alliance for Marriage has promoted a constituti.on· al amendment banning gay marriage (Associated Press. Nou. 29) DECEMBER 12, 2003 13 14 DECEMBER 12. 2003 I Support our community. Holiday gift shopping at: Houston 713-595-9952 817-289-1234 214-379-7979 210-933-1234 512-735-5002 Call Toll FREE 1-888-399-MALE www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE AID FOR AIDS www.aidforaicis org All JH AIDS IUU 1111$M llY lldidlU tf all lypn 11 u .. 11 IJY..,.sllil't ''"" II Liiie AH'1'l. 1•1 hrt•Maa 11• Africa. If JH0ft 1witdlt4 llltta,lu tf stoctJile4 11eds, JH cu me llftl b 4mllgg 1~111 •Hicalim 11 AID JOI AIDS uw! Open Wide: Pretend you're a trained seal and catch a flying shrimp at Royal Japan Steakhouse. Page 17 I Trouble at the Pole: As it turns out, Santa, Mrs Claus and the eight tiny reindeer make for a fairly dysfunctional family. Page 16 Out on th u HOUSTON VOICE DECEMBER 12, 2003 PAGE 15 Gay Men's Chorus of Houston celebrates 25 years of music with 'Silver Bells' and a new CD By JOHNNY HOOKS HERE IS NO QUESTION that 25 years signifies a mile­stone in any life situation. A couple celebrates their silver anniversary together at 25 years. A monarch's silver jubilee comes after a quarter century on the throne. The Gay Men's Chorus of Houston celebrates its 25th anniversary this holiday season with produc­tions in Houston and Galveston appropriately titled, "Silver Bells: Holidays in the Ci~" The word play is intentional. All of the concerts in the 2000-2004 sea­son are "silver," said Artistic Director James Knapp. Founded in 1979 as the Montrose Singers Inc., the chorus has from the very beginning been known as the most visible face of diversity in the city Knapp said that is a tradition on which the group has expanded. "Diversity means all people," he said. "The face of our chorus is one of the most beautiful mosaics of diversity in our community We have 12 countries represented in our organization." From a first season that began with 10 singers, the Chorus has grown to include about 150 voices. The support staff for the chorus is made up of more than 40 volunteers. It takes that mai;y hands to produce the group's concerts. KNAPP JOINED THE CHORUS AS ITS ARTISTIC director three seasons ago, when only 30 voices were heard. He crune with a background that included directing choral groups at the college and university level and also as music director for Sugar Land United Methodist Church. He had left making music to become an artis­tic consulant for a group called Intropa that manages international artistic tours for perform-ing artists. When he learned that the chorus was looking for a director, he threw his hat in the ring. He isn't shy about saying. "They made a really good choice." His three-year record would back up that statement. In three years, the chorus has not only Please see SILVER BELLS on Page 19 16 DECEMBER U, 2003 what i. fd 1 i:•n .J" I PLACE vouR CLASSIFIED AD NOW' CALL an 863 iaas VOICe. OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE eate J.B. BLACK Santa's herd of eight tiny reindeer is a twisted and dysfunctional lot in Theatre New West's holiday offering 'Reindeer' adds just enough spice IT SEEMS WE ONLY THOUGHT we knew Dasher. Dancer, Prancer and Vbcen. Things at the North Pole are a bit more twisted than anyone ever sus­pected. Santa has a criminal fond· ness for harnessed reindeer in spiked leather. Mrs. Claus is a drunken elf abuser. And apparently no one's quite sure it was that left Rudolph a catatonic mess. They're all part of the highly dys­functional family that makes up 'The Eight Reindeer Monologues," a spicy new comedy gliding in for a holiday landing at Theatre New West Who knew that Santa leads around a dysfunctional herd of reindeer. Could Santa and Mrs. Claus be to blame for the rein· deer neuroses? It wouldn't be the holidays without a bit of dysfunction, and "The Eight" piles it on in huge. sumptuous heaps. Consider Hollywood (a.k.a., Prancer, played by Tom Kirk), who resents the fact that his career has been eclipsed by Rudolph. Hollywood is bitter that his 1989 self-titled holiday movie is overlooked at Christmas in favor of the stop-motion tale of Rudolph and his shiny red nose. He's also angry at the movie industry's apathy toward his peers. "No deer has ever been nominated for an Academy Award," Hollywood says. "You can't tell me Bambi didn't deserve an Oscai:" FEMINIST REINDEER BUTZEN (LlSA Marie Daugherty) has other issues, mainly with "the jolly fat pervert. .. After all, she points out, isn't it a little creepy that Santa knows when you're sleeping, knows when you're awake and knows the perfect way to sneak into your house at night? Dasher (Steve Bullitt) only wants to bring a little order and dignity to the team As the group's captain, he's always been "number one since day one" and doesn't want gossip and allegations to stand in the way of his elite crew. Cupid (Jeff Bingham) hints that he's not the only gay reindeer on Santa's team, just the only one who·s open about it. He has his own sordid tales to share about the .. holly jolly walking talking sex crime." When it comes to pulling the sleigh, Cupid moans, .. Santa loves that whip and, to tell the truth, so do I." A melancholy Donner (Joe Watts) pro­vides a sharp perspective on Santa's top­flight team. "The British have the queen, Americans have the Beatles and reindeer have the Eight," he explains. Donner is racked with overwhelming guilt for hand· ing son, Rudolph, over to Santa. Comet (Glen Fillmore), however. sings Santa's praises. A young buck from the v.TOng side of the Pole. Comet now preach· es the saving graces of the ''Gospel of St. Nicholas." It was Santa who rescued him from a life of late-night misdemeanors that included knocking over igloos. Dancer (Katie Hughes) recounts how she was first offered a job on Santa's team. Still, she doesn't understand why she has to work on the holiday She originally wanted to pur­sue a life in the ballet, but found reindeer ostracized for wearing tights and tutus. FINALLY. VIXEN (BIANCA TOSCNO) IS the "world's most famous victim," leading the scandalous crusade against Santa. Her allegations of North Pole impropriety are met with scorn. ·~ I telling the truth or am I a lying Vixen?" she asks. Working from Jeff Goode's biting script, Watts and co-director Tye Blue have assem­bled an incredibly talented, attractive cast that scores with each set piece. There's not a single misstep or wasted comic opportunicy Two performances in particular stand out. The statuesque Kirk delivers a blister­ingly funny turn as Hollywood/Prancer. One of the highlights of Kirk's monologue is his uproarious reenactment of a scene from "Prancer" in which co-star Sam Elliot stalks the reindeer with a shotgun. As Dancer, the energetic Hughes bub­bles and sparkles throughout her entire set. Her voice carries a wonderful Midler· like tone, a comic vibrancy waiting to spring out at just the right brassy moments . .. The Eight: Reindeer Monologues" is perfect for those who like their holidays served with a lot more spice than sugar. () MOREINFO The fight Reindeer Monologues Theatre New West 1415 California St 8 p.m Thursda¥· Saturday 4 p.m. Sunday through Dec. 21 Tickets: $15 713-522·2204 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com di J.A. CHAPMAN Utensils clanging and shrimp flying through the air equals dinner with a hibachi chef Royal Japan Steak House sizzles . I.IKE A TRAINED SEAL AT MEALTIME. I dutifully sat with my mouth agape wait· ing to catch uhrimp tossed by our hibachi chef. Just like everyone else. I missed. We were sitting around a granite hibachi table at Royal Japan Steak House and Sushi Bar watching our hibachi chef cook and entertain us at the same time. Our skillful and wisecracking chef had arrived with a clang of utensils. He'd tos.<;ed an egg for the fried rice back and forth. claiming it was a "Japanese ping pong". He'd barbecued shrimp over an onion ring "volcano." He'd somersaulted bowls of rice and caught them behind his back. And now he was doing the shrimp toss. At his urging, we'd backed our chairs all the way to the wall and gamely tried to catch the shrimp. After two rounds, signs of our failure lay about us on shirts. chins, chain; and carpet. We'd never make it as seals. THE ROYAL JAPAN STEAK HOUSE AND Sushi Bar gives a good first impression. A long granite sushi bar snakes down the front dining room and bar area. Intimately lit booths line the bamboo shaded windows. It strikes a nice balance between casual and classy. Unlike the sleek front dining rooms, the hibachi rooms are well lit, with unadorned neutral walls. The ambiance is much like a bland hotel conference room. Despite the unexciting decor, we opted to try the hibachi experience. Our group of four was seated at a table for seven. with the warning that if another party arrived with· m ten minutes. they'd be seated with us. Our helpful waiter did his best to answer questions about the menu. but we struggled to hear each other across the hibachi table, as the room seems to have an acoustics problem. TWO OF US OPTED FOR THE STEAK and shrimp hibachi dinner ($19.95). The waiter and chef asked how we wanted our steaks prepared, but it made little dif· ference as they were both served medium. Even so, the steak was tender and juicy. The shrimp was perfectly cooked and full of flavor. making the hibachi shrimp dinner ($16.95) an especially good deal. Two dipping sauces accompanied the hibachi dinners and sauteed vegetables rounded out the meal. The sashimi platter ($13.95) wowed us with its presentation. Nine pieces of sashimi - three salmon. three tuna and three red snapper - were artfully arranged next to a mound of grated daikon radish adorned with three skew· ers. Unfortunately the sashimi did not live up to appearances. A hibachi chef entertains diners with a fire show. The salmon and snapper were pass· ably fresh. but the tuna was a gray and flabby disappointment. If the. e three low-end selections are the only options on the sashimi platter. then they should be the freshest of fresh. Royal Japan offers an eclectic selection of desserts. Cheesecake from the Cheesecake Factory sits aside sherbet, ice cream and ice cream trume~ or pie. We sampled the ice cream Mississippi mud pie ($4.95), which was little more than average mocha ice cream in pie form. Service glitches were a problem. Water glasses were never refilled. A bowl was not provided for the sashimi's soy sauce and wasabi. And the waiter knew little about the desserts, even mistakenly telling us several weren't available. While each complaint was minor. together they left a poor impres.~ion. Royal Japan shines at the entertaining hibachi tables and a reasonably priced lunch menu makes the hibachi experience more affordable. However, the quality and fresh· ness of the sushi and sashimi is questionable at best and the service is needs work Still, it's not every day that you get to catch your dinner in mid air. For that alone. Royal Japan Steak House and Sushi Bar is worth a try. Roy.ii • Steak House & Susli Ba' 2946 S. Shepherd Houston. TX 7709B 713-526-6888 wwwroyaljapan.com Food: re!leltei Service:••• Vaine:••• Scene: !elre!!91 "=St ay home and eat cereal ••=Well, if you really must le! le! le!= Fine for all but the finnicky rel• le!• =Worth more than a 20-minute dnve lei le! le! le! le! =As good as you'll find in this city BEST NEW MUSICAL 2002 TONY AWARD" NEW YORK. THE ROARING '20s. A SMALL TOWN GIRL IS ABOUT TO TURN THIS BIG-TIME TOWN UPSIDE DOWN! -WINNER! DECEMBER 12. 2003 17 18 DECEMBER 12. 2003 what are you waiting for? it's free! I.I I t\f.f ,j I PLACE YOUR FREE AD NOW! CALL 877 863 1885 voice OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE di Sh There's a Fine Line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash Gays waste a trip to Baltimore's Grand Central, sexy AM catalogue is spiked and Cher hates the GOP. Leaving the Station THERE WERE PLENTY OF PISSED OFF D.C. queens in Baltimore last Saturday night - the night that the Grand Central nightclub was scheduled to hold a JANET JACKSON vs. MADONNA dance party. The Blade wrote about the unique event back in October and confirmed that the party was still scheduled on Tuesday, Dec. 2. Even the doorman taking the cover charge said that the Janet! Madonna party was happening. However, lo and behold, there wasn't a Janet or Madonna song to be heard inside the club. Nor was there a crowd. but that's another story. Dish has it on good authority that plenty of D.C.'s gay boys were excited about the event and some even booked hotel rooms to spend the night in Baltimore after shaking their groove things at the club. Apparently. employees at the newly renovated $1.4 million venue decided at the last minute not to hold the event. "I don't know what happened," said Grand Central OY.11er Don Davis. "There was a serious communication problem going on. and I was really embarrassed by it. It doesn't make us look good for a mishap like this to happen. It's not professional. " Davis apologized profusely to anyone who came for the special event. He said that a rescheduled date is in the works and that new procedures have been put in place so that a communication breakdown doesn't happen again. Final quarter THERE ARE GOING TO BE A LOT OF empty gay coffee tables this holiday sr>.ason. It was announced last week on CBS's 60 ~tinutes that retailer ABERCROMBIE & FITCH had pulled its latest edition of A&F Quarter!}; the store's catalogue/soft core porn magazine, from shelves amid protests that the magazine was too erotic for the young market the company courts. On the "60 Minutes" episode, a news anchor said the A&F Quarterly apparent· ly offended social conservatives, who com plamed about the risque photos. But the segment primarily was about a lawsuit former A&F employees of col'2r have filed. alleging that they were fired because of racial discrimination tied to the comp,1ny's efforts to portray a certain image That, of course, Is why gay men loved it. Often featuring photos from gay pho­tographer BRUCE WEBER, A&F always delivered plenty of pictures of hot, young, Bruce Weber scantily clad men. often in homoerotic positions. Now it seems the magazine may be done for good. An unattributed quote on the gos­sip Web site Gawkercom says the retailer is ceasing publication of the magazine entirely. "I work on the A&F Quarterly and as of yesterday [Dec. 8] it was announced to us that it will no longer be continued," the source said. "Several employees here in New York were fired by A&F because they will no longer be needed." A flack from A&F didn't return calls by Dish's deadline. Looks like the boys will have to go back to HONCHO. Bless her heart DISH IS STILL GETTING OVER THE SHOCK that CHER listens to C·Span. as she told you a few weeks back. However, if the grand diva. who staged the world's longest goodbye tour. is going to be politi· cal. at least she stands on the right. err left, side of the political spectrum. The New York Daily News reports that in an interview in the upcoming issue of Us Weekly conducted by "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy" fashionista CARSON KRESSLY, the star says that she would love to be a conjoined twin with U.S. Attorney General JOHN ASHCROFT. "So 1 could influence him a bit or beat the shit out of him," Cher says. Kressley asks her if she would ever he a Republican. "Are you kidding me" I'd rather stick nPedles m my eyes," she replies. r( @ Send comments, suggestions to_ __ ~ Disl(_(l)S()VO COlll HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com DECEMBER 12. 2003 19 I out on the bayou 'Silver Bells' marks 25 years of music for Gay Men's Chorus SILVER BELLS, continued from Page 15 added 120 members, but it has drastically increased its audience. "Our audience has gone from about 300 per concert cycle to about 1,800." he said. "We've gone from wonderful, smaller venues to making a real commitment to recognized and valid concert venues." This season. he said. most concerts will be pre­sented either at the Wortham CentE'r or at the Hobby Center for the Perform mg Arts. The last 25 years have seen Houston's gay community devastated by AIDS and harassed by discrimination and prejudice. Through it all. the voices of the Gay Men's Chorus of Houston have risen above the strife to heal. uplift, move and delight all those within hearing range. To anyone who balks at the idea of purchasing a ticket to a concert by a group of predominately gay men, the GMCH beckons. "We are your sons and daughters. your coworkers and your friends. Our songs are from the heart and we present you one voice." KNAPP SAID THE MISSION OF THE Chorus is to achieve excellence m choral music, to provide a nurturing environment for members and offer a source of pride, unity and support to the diverse comm uni· ties that are Houston. He is confident that the mission is being accomplished. A member of the Gay and Lesbian Association of Choruses (GALA) with over 10,000 members worldwide, the Chorus is one of the oldest in the country and among the largest. Knapp has brought an unmistakable international pedigree to the GMCH. whose performances shine with lively fan· favored traditions that feature a wide range of musical treasures. Principal accompanist Beth McConnell provides another bit of musical diversity from having performed throughout the United States. McConnell has served as the accompanist for the Houston Symphony Chorus, choral ensi>mbles at University of Houston. as well as local churches and theaters. If all that wasn't enough cause for celebration. the chcr rus releac;ed its first CD in years, a h9liday offering enti­tled "Gratitude." In the CD's liner notes. Knapp says. "Gratitude is the heartbeat of the chorus. We are grateful each and every time we are together. grateful when we have the privilege of singing for an audience and deeply grateful for the magic that has changed the lives of so many through the transforming power of music." A drunken Mrs. Claus. played by Kitty Kam gets a ride home from designated driving members of the chorus dunng the group·s holiday production (All photos by Dalton Dehart) THE CD FEATURES MORE than an hour of music from diverse holiday traditions, that were recorded during the past year at the Stude Concert Hall in the Shepherd School of Music on the Rice University campus. at the Bering Memorial United Methodist Church and the Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church. "This is so exciting." Knapp said. "We printed 1,000 copies and sold 1.200. We've ordered a second printing." The 15 tracks feature a wide range of Holiday themed songs, beginning with a rousing "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" and followed by "Carol of the Bells." Other tracks include "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year," "Over the Skies of Yisrael," "Music of Hanukah," a gorgeous rendition of the classic "Home," and fin-ishes with a 13-minute version of "Christmas Flourish." The most unusual performance on the CD is "The Twelve Days After Christmas." With lyrics that include. "The first day after Christmas my true Jove and I had a fight. And so I chopped down the pear tree and burned it just for spite." This year's holiday concert features the debut of the side-splitting "Forgotten Carols of Other Lands,'' the gospel soul of "Behold That Star'" and the rollicking new favorite. ''.All I Want for Christmas is You." The concert treats audiences to a visit to Santa's workshop - as only GMCH can present it. with a special musical appear· ance by Mrs. Claus. who has dipped a little too deeply into the eggnog bowl. Knapp said the 2003-2004 season has proven that as the audience grows in size, it also grows in a diversity of its own. "From that diversity, we are really trymg to build those bridges to the greater communit)~" he said. "We want to break those labels of just being a cho· rus of gay men." @MORE INFO 'Silver Bells: Holidays in the City' 8 p.m Dec.12 3 p.m Dec.14 Wortham Center 500 Texas Ave. 713-521-7464 www.gmch.org 'Gratitude' www.gmch.org Decked out m tuxedos and evening attire. the chorus follows the lead of art1st1c director James Knapp as chorus 'girls' take 1t away. Artistic director James Knapp and principal accompanist Beth McConnell bask m audience applause along with members of the Gay Men's Chorus of Houston 20 DECEMBER 12, 2003 Authentic ... Te\\' York Pizza Pizza - Pq"' u/'q He deliver & more than pizza! Q/qt'/i dl\.'icJieS :r Satt Midtoll'n I (713) 533-1140 106 GRAY AT B.4GBY Galleria Area (832) 251-0220 NEWYORK PIZZERIA "ww.nypizzeria.com GAY FRIENDLY celebrate in style HWFFL presents 'il • ii • new year's eve • stardust .. .. '* !Mumber 3 ht 2003 Rennaissance Hotel 6 G~ P1w W. 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Satlltday Night Lm. 9:'!0 p.nt Willing Ones Group, 1201 W Clay 713-521-1243 or 713-528-9m. wwwJambdahouston.o Montrose Soccer Club. 10 am practice. Woodrow Wilson School FalfVleW and Yupon. New players welcome. but begon­nm not cumntJy being adrnitte<1713-862-949l http://geoc~ !Jes.COl11/molltrose E-mail: montrosesoccer a yahoo.cont Q-Patrol Volurlttm wa;< the streets to help prevent hate cnrnes. 9:30 p.m. Convene at commooity center 713-528· SAFE. E--mait qpatrol~'l'aol.com Sl Stephen's Episcopal Clutlt Rosary 8 am 1805 W Alabama 713-528-6665. Houston GLBT Cormuiity Center. Orop-m, noon-5 p.m. • CATS (Community Awareness for T ransgender Support) boatrl meet· ong. 2 p.m. 3400 Montrose. Suite 207 713-524·381a www.hollstonglbtcenter.org. SUNDAY DEC.14 Front~ Houston. ~meet at Memorial Pat1< at 8 ant fer a three-mile run. lrttp://home.swbeltnel larathon/houfr.htnt E-mail ~swbetl -.et 713-522-0899 Bemg MemoNI lM1lted Methodist Cluth. Semces at S-.30 & 10:50 am Sunday school 9:45 am 713-521>-1017 CenUr fer Spi1tual Uvtng. Strvlces at ll a.m.. for children at 10-.50 a.m. 6bl0 Harwin. 713-339· 1808. The center also has commitment cerenonies. ~ bookstore and classes. Commullity Gospel. Service at 11 am & 7 p.nt Sunday School for c!vldren 10 am 713-880-9235 or wwwcommunoty· gospelorg. Commullity of Kindred Spirits in 8eaumonl Worslup at 6 p nt 1575 Spind1etop Ave. Beaumont Texas. 409-813-2055. E-mail: cksrtv3(runetzero.net Covenant Cluth. Ea.menical, Liberal Baptist. Service 9:30 ant & educatiOn hour 11 am 713-668·8830. Emenon lk1itarian Cluth. Adult educatoon. 10 am Service. 11 a.m. Lurch at noon. www emer50nhou.org f'orst Ccngrevational Clarch (Memorial). Service at 10 a.m Chnstian Emlcatoon. 1130 a.m.. 713-468-9543 or fcc·hcus· ton.org. Fist lWbrian l.Wwrsalst Cluth. Services at 9-30 & U.30 a.m. Brunch at 10-.30 a.m. 713-521>-5200 church@;firstuu.org. Free HIV Testilg. Montrost etnc. 9 p.nt-midnight at Club Inerw 713-830-3000. Gay Bo'41Q ~ 7 p.nt Palace Lanes. 4191 Bellaire BM. 713-801·1187 Gay c.tholcs at Sl Ame's-&uston. 5 pnt wor1/lip service Dmner and social ~wt.net. 713-623-0930. ~ AsMri*t Clarch Gaylgay-affimung congregation. 11 am service 567 Cedar Grove. Livingston. Texas. n35l 93t>- 64b-nl4. E-mait leol <Lt4Sttex.nel ~ Lulhlnln Clutlt Sunday school for all ages 9 ant Service 10-.30 am 713-528-3269. HA T.c.H. Houston Area Teen Coalrtoon of Homosexuals metts b-9 p.m. For metling 111formatoon. call 713-529·3590. wwwha~ Hcuston Ten. CUl. 9 am-noon MemoN1 Parle at the Terns Ctn!Rr~com Llmbdl c..tw. Alcoholics Anonymous. 9-.30 a.m Came to Bdifve Group 1201 w Cl.Tf. 713-521-1243 or 713-528-9m WWW larnbdahouston.org_ ~ Ftlowship MetrapoiUrl Cluth. 10 ant servoce. 3333 Fannin, Sllte 106 713-528-6756. Mortl!woods ~ ~ Cluth. Semces at 9-45 & 11:15 am Sunday school 9:45 am 281·298-2780 ReswTectlon MCC. Services. 9 and 11 am Cholclren and Youth Sunday Scllool. 10 a.m. Cllildrtn's servoce.11 am 713-861· 9149 Sl Pitnck's Reformed Catholc Mission Sunday M.lss at noon Holy Ul1IOns avallable. Group meets at the Hair Express, 3310 Dtlawart. Btaumont. Texas mo1 409·781-8152 E·mait bwatsonl~RR.com. Sl Stephen's~ Clutlt Holy Eucharist Rite I. 745 am. Holy Euchanst. Rite n. 855 a.rn; Educotoon hour. 10 a.m; Choral Eucharist. 11 a.m. 713-528-6605 Sunday Bnrdl. For HIV-posjtive men ll am R1va's, lll7 MJSSOOri SL Paul, 7J3.880-0690 ~mail: PoznBuffOaol.com. The Women's Group. Meeting and discusSIOn. 10:45 a.nt ID· 529-8571 Tixnau U!!itarian Universalist Congrtgation. Adult d1scussio<i. 9 ant Service. lll5 am. 281-2n.8882. WWW luUC.011J Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston Coooty. 502 Church Sl Servoce.11 a.nt 713-686-5876 Houston GLBT Comroonity Center. Drop-ii\ 2-6 p.nt • New Covenant Christian Church, 10 am -noon • Lesbians Over Age Fifty (U)AF) 2-3 p.nt • SISTERS. 3:30-6:30 p.nt • GLOB­AL meebng. 6 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 ID-524-3818. www.hollstonglbtcenter.org. MONDAY DEC.15 Free HN Testing. Monlrost Clirncc J.7 p.m at the clinic, 215 Westhcimer and 33U Richmond. Suite 100; 4-8 p.nt at Bricl<s. 617 FaiJ'Yiew. and 9 p.m. - l am at 0, 710 Pacific. 7J3.830. 3070 Free HN Testing. 4--8 p.m. at AU Star Nl!WS. 3415 Katy Frttw.iy Health clinic with free testing for HIV and syphilis. 713-869-7878. Gay Bowf'ong Ltagues. Wornerfs league. 6:45 p.m Dynamic Lanes, 6121 Tanef Drtve. 713-861-1187 • Gay Fathen/Fathers f'orst. Support grOllp. 8-9:30 p nt Bering Memorial United Methodost COOrtlt TOil\ 713-n6-8736 www.geoct~ton/ ~ Assembly ChoJrch Gay/gay-affirming congrt1)iltoon. 7 p.m. aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston. Texas. n35L 936·64b-nl4 E-ma1t leol a.t4Sttex.net. Grief & Di'iorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713-521>-1017. ext 208. Kolbe Proj@ct. Eucharist 7:30 p.m ID-861-1800 l.anM! Cerrter. Alcoholics Anonymous. 8 p.m. Beginners' Group. 1201 W Clay 713-521·1243 or 713-528--9772. wwwJambdahoustonor Montrose Clinic Offers weelcly peer support groups for gay and bisexual men with HIV Spanish SiJWjng group meets, 6.'!0 p.m 215 Westheimer 713-830-3050. Grupo de Apoyo para ...atlno5 gay y bisexuales VIH positives. Lunes 6:30. Para mas informaaon lama al 713-830-3025. ~Voices Rldio Show. 8-10 p.m KPfT 90.l Houston GlBT Comnu1ity Center. Drop-in 2-9 p.m. . 3400 Montrose. Suite 207 713-524-3818 • HRC PAC. 7-9 p.m. www . · ; ot1 · .. r.org TUESDAY DEC. 16 Benng Support Networic. Lunch Bunch Gang. 11 a.m. 713-521>- 1017 Free HIV Testing. Montrose Chnoc.1-7 p.m. at the clinic, 215 Weslheuner and 3311 Richmond. Suite 100; 4-8 p.nt at The 611 611 Hyde Parle and 8 p.m. - modnoght at Club Houston. 2205 Fanrin ID-830-3070. GlBT Ptntecostals. Sollie study. prayer. 7 p.m. in the Heights. For info: 936-931-3761; e-mait wwwWgbl947,g;cs.eont Houston Rougirleck Rugby. Practice from 6.30 • 8 30 p.m. For mott Information, log on to wwwroughneclcsrugby.org. Hcuston Worrrtrfs Rugby Tum No expenenu necessary. Practice. 6'.30--8:30 Westland YMCA Kay 713-208-1529 lntnocllction to Budchsm. All welcomo at 634 W Temple in the Heights. 1 p.nt canton. 713-862-8129. Rainbow RMigiers. fffe C&W dance lessons. Brazos Rover 8ottont No partner needed. Btgmner 2 Step. Waltz. Shuffle & Swmg 8.30 p.m. 713-528-9192. Hcuston Gl8T Commullity Center. Drop-on 2-9 p.m • Lesbian Comi"9 Out Group, 7 p.nt. 3400 Montrose. Suite 207 713- 524-3818 www.N>ustonglbtcenterorg WEDNESDAY DEC.17 Center for Spirftual lMng. Meditation (drop-01).11:30 am-I p.rn; SOM Do..:1MI0'1 & ExploratiOn. 7 p.nt 6bl0 Harwin. ID· 339-1808 OutSbtt. This roller Ruik skat. ckib hosts Gay Slcat. N'ght at Zenrth Reller Rll1k, 8075 Cook Road ~ery Wednesday from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. $5 entry plus sl<ate rent.IL 281-933-5818. Dobie367@aoi.am CrysUI Meth Al'll1r'f'l'W$ (CMA). 815 p.nt meeting Montrose ~Center. 701 Rodvnond Ave. Room 15 Bftlg MlrnoNi United Methocist CludL Scpport Net-.wrlc Pot Luck lllnnfr, 6:30 p.nt Vanous Sllppot'! groups, 7 p.m. 713- 526·1017 Btie Study. Noon & 6:30 p.nt Sl Stepheds Episccpal. 713- 526-6605 . Free HIV Testing. Mcntrose Clinoc. 4-8 p nt at M.vy's, 1100 Westherner; 9 p.nt·midnioht at Ropcord. 715 FilJl'VlfW. 10 p.nt· l a.m. II EJs. 2517 Ralph. 10 p.nt ·I ant at Modtowne Spa, 3100 Fannin. 713-830-3000 Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clime. 9 a.m.·I pm 2015 Thomas Sl OraSurt method Call fer appomtment Sharon. 713-873-415l Gay Bo'41Q leagues. 6:30 p.nt Palace Lanes. 4191 Sellaott Blvd. 713-861-1187 ~ AsMri*t Clarch Gay/gay-aff1111111VJ congrtgatlon. 7 p.nt aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove. Livingston. Texas. 7735l 936-046-nl4 E-mail leol illeasttexnel www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE Houston Pnde Band. Open rehearsal. 7:30-CfJO pm. 1307 Yale 713-802-1488 . Houston Tennis Club. 7-9 p.m Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center. houstootenmsclb@aol.com Spuilual Uplift service. 7 p.m Resurrectioo MCC. 713-861 · 9149 Houston GLBT Commonity Center. Drop-on, 2-9 p.m. • Free HIV testing. counseling. 7-9 p.m • Hooston Pride Sdnd rthe.mal. 7:30 p.nt • 3400 Mcntrose, Suite 207 ID-524-3818. wwwJ .t >t1 1ter. rg THURSDAY DEC.18 ~oty Gospe4 "' 7.30 p.m. ID-880-9235. WV. . f90Spelorg. Free HIV Testing. Houston Area ConmJnity Sffloces.10 a.m.· 2 p.m at Joseph-Hones Clinic.1710 West 25th Sl Also 11 am· 3:30 p.m at Gallery Medical Clinic. 5900 North Freeway, and Club Toyz from 9 p '11.·mtdnight 713-526-0555. ext. 23L 227 or 226. Free HN Testing. Montrose Clime 8 p.nt· midnight at Brazos River Bottom (BRB), 2400 Brazos, aid at Cousins, 817 Faomew. and 4 -8 p.m. at All-Star News, 3415 Katy Freeway 713-830-3000 Free HIV Testing 4-8 p.m. at All Star Nows. 3415 Katy Freeway Health clinic with free testing for HIV and syphili~ 713-869-7878 FrontRunners Houston Runners meet at Memonal Parle .1t 6:30 p mfor a three-mole run http-/ /home.swbell.neVlarathon/houfr.htm or e-mail Jarathoo(n~bellnet ID-522-0899. Gay Bowling Leagues. Luci Duos. 9 p.nt Dynamic Lanes, 612I Tame! Drive. 713-861-1187 GLOBAL Gay.lesbian or Bisexual Amance al the UnNersity of Houston-Central Campus. Weekly meeting. 6 p nt e-mail: nguyenOO~ hotmailcom. Hep c Recovety Support group. 6:30 p.m. Senng. 713-521>- 1017. Exl 21l Houston Rougirleck Rugby. Practiee from 6:30 • 8:30 p.nt For more information. loo on to www.roug!mecksru¢y org. Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experienu necessa.y Prattice, 630-830 Westland YMCA. Kay: ID-208-1529. Lakt Uvlngston Gl8T Support Group 7 p.m dinner and dis­cussfoo. Groce Assembly Chun:!\ 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston. Texas. n35l 936-646-nl4. E-mail' leo!'a-easttex nel Lambda SlcaU1g Club. 8 p.m Tradewmds Skating Rmk. wwwneoso~com/-lrsc. ID-523-9620 Montrose Clinic. Offers weekly peer support groups for gay and bisexual men with HIV English speaking groop meets. 6:30 p.nt 215 Westheuner ID-830-3050. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. No partner required. Bruos R"er 8ott0nt 8:30 p.m 713-528-9192 Recovety From Food Addiction (RFA). Meeting for 12..,.tep prooram open to aU. Noon-I p.m Sl Stephen's Eptse0pal Church, 1805 W Alabama Sl RFA: 713·673-2848 www.geocl­toes. com/rfa772.35/. E·mail: rfaworldservice@aol.com. Spinis/l Cliario Conwrsation Group. Cal~ Agora. 7 p.m. E-mail charlahcuston@msn.eont 713-411>-no1 Women's Clinic. Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Houston Gl8T Commullity Cerrter. Drop "' 2·9 p.m • "M•rnling and Shtdiing. • 2 p.m • Montrose Wnt~ Protect 7-9 pm • PFlAG Houston Boanl Meeting 7-9 p.nt • 3400 Montro>., Suite 207 ID-524-3818. www.hoostonglbtcenter.org FRIDAY DEC.19 Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clime. 9 am-1 p nt 2015 Thomas Sl OraSurt method Call for appointmenl Sharon. ID-873-4157 Free HIV Testilg. Montrose Chnoc.1-5 p.m at the clinic, 215 Westheimer and 3311 Richmond, Suite 100; 10 p.m to I ant at Roch's. 2401 San Jacinto; 10 p.nt - 2 am. at The Meatrack. 2915 San Jacinto; 10 p.nt - I ant at Modtowne Spa. 3100 Famin; 10 a.m - I am at EJ\ 2517 Ralph. ID-830-3070. ~ AsMni*f Clarch G.iy/gay-affirm1ng congr<gatoon. 7 p nt aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove. Living,ton. Texas. n35l 936-646-nl4 E·malt leo!'a-easttex.net. HA T.c.H. Houston Atta Teen Coalition of Homosexuals meets 7-ID p.m. For meet1119 lllformabon. can 713-529·3590 WWW hatcllyouth.org. Hcuston Tennis a.ii. 7-9 p.m. Memorial Parle at the Tennis CtntRr Houstontennisckiborg Kolle Proj@ct. Morning prayer, 10 ant 713-861-1800 ~ Volunteers wall< the streets to help prevent hate cnmes. Cf.30 p nt Convene at commo111ty center 713-528· SAFE. E-mail: qpatrolmcta,;iol.com Houston GLBT Conmlllity eenur. Drop-on 2-9 p.nt • Women's Game Nl(Jht 7:30-930 p.nt • In Our Own Wrote (Poetry Niqhtl 8· 10 p.m., 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 713-524· 3818. www houstonglbtcenterorg. ~ To list an event. c.ill 713-529-8490. fax al ~ 713-52'19531. or e-mail ecfrtor@ hoilstonYoice.c Oe.ldfine is Monday at 5 p m. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I appts. FRIDAY, DEC. 12 Poissant O'Neal Gallery, 5102 Center St., will host an opening reception for works by Dan Havel and Seth Mittag from 6-8 p.m. 713-868-9337 SATURDAY, DEC. 13 House construction. ginger bread-style, will be the project of the day when Houston Gay & Lesbian Parents meets from 2-5 pm. at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. 1805 W. Alabama at Woodhead. Families are asked to bring graham crackers, at least two bags of candy such as gum drops, Life Savers. Tootsie Rolls. etc .. to be used in decorating houses. Members of the group and anyone interested in becoming a parent are invit· ed to participate. MONDAY, DEC. 15 The cast of the Alley Theatre's production of 'A Christmas Carol' has organized a bowling tour­nament called The Ebenezer Scrooge Holiday Bowl for Hunger at 4 p.m. at Dynamic Lanes. 6121 Tarneff St. Proceeds will benefit Target Hunger. 713-226-4954 WEDNESDAY, DEC. 17 Bnng a new. unwrapped toy to the River Oaks Theater. 2009 West Gray, at 7:30 p.m .. and get in free to a benefit screening of· An Affair to Remember". Better bring a handful of tissue as well. since this classic starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr doesn't leave many dry eyes in the theater. The toys will be donated to the U.S. Manne Corps Toys for Tots program. 713-524·2175 Open Mic at Chances. THURSDAY, DEC. 18 Open Mic Niqht has proved so successful at Chances. 1100 Westheirner that the club plans to make it d regular Thursday night event. Anyone who with rhythm 1s invited to JOin fluff the kat on stage Bnng, a guitar, drum. set of spoons. what ever from 9p.m·l a.m. wwwfluffthekalcom DECEMBER 12. 2003 21 !appreciate being a part of this community! I want to see Fitness Exchange as more than a health club. It is a community center! So I use the Houston Voice to show my appreciation, and as my invitation to its readers. -Mary Ann McBee Fitness Exchange 22 DECEMBER 12. 2003 CLASSIFIEDS SALE I HOUSTON RENT I HOUSTON EASTWOOD tdillon located off 45 South. Sholl commute to l/cfl! or Med Centet I.lg 2 BR, 1 BA. den & formal DR. hdwd ftr, b t·tn bookshel'les. Bottom SIOI)' of 'enoY '>cine S6SO/mo. (713) 923-2621 EASTWOOD large 3 BR, 18A bungalow. 'idwd fir\ reN k~ & new bath. reN applianC!s Uld WO, CAC. quiet street across lr:im c!UJrdl. S • 000/mo. (713) 89S-• 409 MONTROSE Sl (713 41C-7215 305 A'IQlldale, 2 BR, 2 S BA. 1 ~ very CU1e. great locaticn, W/O 2 part 'ars. central Ac, cwtjard, pallO. SPRING BRANCH I BR. 1 S BA. LR. k:t, fam rn. hdwd flrs, clout:: garage fenced yard. AC/heat, rJW, StlM! S950/mo. 1'3 682 9634 SHARE I HOUSTON HEIGHTS Roomate W<lnted. FurrWied private room. Move in '/04 S4SO/mo Uld utils. Street or dnveway prkg. H: (713) 862· 13Cii. C: (713) 299 9' 48. NEAR 610 I NORTH Seeking GlBT indMdual to shr 2 BR, 2 BA home In quiet neigl'.bodlood S4SO/mo + 112 utils. WO 111- duded. No peu. Oep & refs 'l!Q'd. (7 '3) 302·3649 SAVE SSS Montrose area GM to share tum 2 BR apt S2751mo. (713) 521 1112, leaoie msg SAVE SSS NW HOUSTON Share house wt GWF I/I Nonhwtsl Houston. PriYale BR & BA No smol:mg or drugs. S400/mo + 1/ 2 utils. (28') 97(). 7912 COMMITMENT CEREMONIES ANNOUNCE YOUR UNION The Houston vooce IS proud to announce the ildditJOn of a ·comrruunen1 Ceremonies· cate­gory IO our Classified listings. When making arrangements for yo;;l Union don't forget IO include L'>e most '11portanl aspecl cl all announc:ng the date P\Jblish1119 yoor W1100 os easy & Simple. ca (87n 86J 1885 "" m to !lilt the fi, hing toucll­es on yoll1 cmmony ANNOUNCEMENTS EMERGENCY AIDS liw;mg Coa non HoustOn CflSJS need tax deduct be donatlO:'.S. SOl(cJl non-profit (713) 864·1795 htt;i:web wt.net/ahch www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Visit houstonvoice.com to place your ad. Up to 25 words only $12.50 per week. 504 each additional word. Fax toll-free 1.888.409.6768, or call toll-free 1.877 .863.1885 VOLUNTEER GROUP NEEDED 8·10 seJf:I people w/trailer 01 truck to move 400lb spa. Benefit AIDS shelter fOI Xmas. (713) 864· 1795 or ahchCwt.net • EMPLOYMENT FT- / PT OUTREACH WORKER -NEEDED -M~ be able to wort nights. Wdl be recrunmg participants IOI an H1V study on the streets of Montrose. (713) 520-8928 TRAVEL I INTERNATIONAL GAYRIBBEAN CRUISES 15 SAILING FROM GAl,V[SlON IN 2004 olSpnng F ·.,; ~ _..._AJ.nl 2~May 2 ol:irand Princess Cruise December 04· I I Ca 01 go on-~ne for rates & Info (888) 813-994 7 www.Gayribb&3f"lrntKO( N'll'T\. TRAVEL I U.S.A. DC GuestHouse Elegant Victorian mansion built in 1167. Logan/Convention Center location. Ilks away from world dass dining I diverse enter· tainment. Gay owned a. operated. (202) 332·2502 www.d<guesthouse.<om. HAWAII - DIVERS WANTED 10U1 lambda Divtrs, a GlBT dive cllb, for a he aboard tnp on the Kooa AggresSOI .Llnuaiy 14 JI Vi5it ..ambda Diver's website f0t mfoonatJon. WWW uapp.org/lambdatfivers HILTON HEAD. SC Planning IO •etocatel Need a vacauon1 t,!Jke 'Pl' plans OON to come to beautiful beaches of Hilton liead, Sooth Carolina long term rentals or limited short term 'ffitafs. See SOltle of our propel!y istJngS at http lOlllelistmgs.tnpod CJJm/ Feel free to send onqwnes IO ~e~oselong1erm0aol com. LOST RIVER. WEST VIRGINIA The Guest House at Lost Riv et 2 his Beltway. Prenuum accommodatlOllS n a cozy countiy style B&8 se1tlng Quietly secluded, pnvat• & bordenng the rrul· lion-acre George Washington National FOlest, this mm1·resort offers a contmuous atmosphere of tranquility & absolute pea<e while In a lw:urroos serung. Our main lodge, wr over 4,000 sq ft of common area, IS constructed of log & cedar wl an enOI· !1lOUS 19foot tall stooe fueplace. Guest will alwa)'\ find a nool: or crantT'f to efljOy a cozy place to cuddle, relax & enJOY the space IO yourself. Amenities ind .. heated pool; 01Jtdoor JaCUZ21, indoor subterranean stone & tile grotto wl 10 perSOll spa & 8· person steam room, new fitness cent~ ACE·CertJfied Personal Tramer by appl mas~ therapy room, licerosed therapost on staft facials & taMlng. Dinner Saturdays. (304) 897 5707. E mail: guesthseChardynetcom Web page· www guesthouseatlostriver.corn MOOSE MEADOW LODGE Vermont log home, Waterbury. Gay-owned, l•xunous Adirondack-sty!<> 8&8 on 86 acres. Pre­mtet site for civil uruons & romantic getaways. (801) 244 S378. www 'OOOSerneadowlodge.corn NEARBY GETAWAYS GALVESTON ISLAND GETWAY Fabulous selection of beachflonl beachslde. & bayfront homes. Weekly & wee!oend rentals. Sand N' Sea Pirates Beach. Call (800) 880-2554 for a free brochure 0t VIS!\ www.sandnsea 'Dm fol photos, mfo & weel<tnd 'IJO(lals. SOUTH BEACH, FL SL.AND HO\,SE Be m the rrnddk of the sexiest stnp at SoBe s l.;:gest gay guesthouse Rooms/studios. Complunentaiy b:tJHast & weekend happy 'lour' Walk to gay beat'I, hot rughd le. the f~t shopping & dining 1428 Colijns Ave (BOV) 382 2422 www ~ ndhousesOIJlhbeach com • com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I CLASSIFIEDS VEHICLES 1967 CADILLAC DeVILLE Runs & des a ~eh; queen New nor & roof Red, 2 door S5.000 00 Call (711) ' fi7 3 7 595 •k '"'~'~'lo.-~=~ RUN IT 'Till YOU SELL IT. Take advantage of our new "Run it 'till you sell it" promotional. Place a n ad to sell your car and email a photo of the car and run the ad until it sells. It's only 539.99. Call our friendly otaff toll free today! (877) 863-188S. FINANCIAL SERVICES LEADING FINANCIAL INSTITUTION apprOVlng 1maH buSI n~~ 'llOlt~ & veh\de n~ lmmed >te respc-ie <irve us a ca af(866) 21~ 7661 INSURANCE GRAPHIC ARTS DESIGN VIVAGRAND GRAPHICS XPRESS v nlied postcard design v 3te or Band logo desi;;' v • ~1 card dcsign ..... /el v' 1yac n You have to be seen to be heardl www.vivagrand.com I (917) 304-4S56. HOME IMPROVEMENT YOU BUILD HOMES ... I Bl llO ADS FOR Y YolJf Home mp!M He;; on ' 877) 863 1885 ext 247 or rwoodland@wa CLEANING SERVICES MOVING FRENCH'S MOVING SERVICE local I State Wide. www.ahoustonmover.com. (713) 861 -1212. PHOTOGRAPHY I VIDEO DAVID LEWIS IMAGES Events. headshots, portra~ New stdio (713, .140-S503 or wwwda't IA. rom. MASSAGE DECEMBER 12. 2003 23 BODY STRESS RELIEF Mont"lSe l'<JV dis a • Dan (71l) 5 9-8787 7 I 857 1009 THERAPEUTIC SWEDISH sports, ~ nssue, myothefapy laxa •he-apy a'. " ~ g Men10< Park ~ Mon-u Sl\Jdoos. (713 ~14 S400 www 19m.mage.:om SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK Relaxation, Myo· therapy. deep tissue. 56011 .Shrs; SSO/hr. (RMT 1024S89) (713) 739·0087. (713) SC1 -98S2. deeptissueman20 aol.com. MASSAGE BY Bill All IJlC <lays/wlr. Ex BODYWORKS BY LOU RMT s & :>eep 288) COUNSELING I SUPPORT BODY I SOUL MANSCAPING Wax;~ & clipping Dale Priv Moo uose ea (7' ll 529-5952 .>r appt ADULTS ONLY YOUR ONLINE TOYSTORE Save money viSlt our site & see WWW :sd scount~ "'JeOl1 com. (9S4 565-KINK (5465) r--------------------------------------------------------------, ~I i I' 1 ! f..'. 1 f 11 11 Classified Order Form • www.houstonvoice.com • Phone 877 .863.1885 I OUR RATES HAVE CHANGED VO ice IN PERSON: B~ng COIT'fleted form w th P-'I .• t .e Ho 1mn Voice off.ces (M.> 9am-Spm) 500 Love:t Flvll. Sul~ 200 IV MAIL: Ma co~eted f(\rm wf1I! payrrent 1D Hous1Dn Ve :e Cl~fleds, 500 Lovett Blvd, Sult~ 200, Ho~ton. TX. 71006 BY PHONE: Ca I n with co~ieted form to 877 e6318S5 IY FAX: fiL't twp eted fcrma:id aed .card lnfo'Jllallcn 114-Tllt CIAS­~ IF EOS 888 409 616a BY EMAIL: Vl~t houstonvolal com top xe yc~r erdcr onl ne AD POLICY; T'ie Hous10r. Voice rtserws the rlg~t t> ed ~ rec.asslfy or r<ject ads not ~~~g HilUSt:n TO PLACE AN AD: Voke $Llndards. No refunds IOI eartv cancellobOn. Mlspr nts The Hoaston Voice Is not responslble tor mlsprlnlS appearng after !he first weiok. C~ec<ads promp!I)' DEADLINE FOR AD SUBMISSION • MONDAY AT 5:30PM FOR FRIDAY'S PUBLICATION PICK YOUR CATEGORY RATE S12.50 egai Notices Announcemenl:I _mM•moilarn Lost/Foufl<l ~1116 [f!lrlc)".1""1t - Domestic Help tare~ P~~lons W'lt.tid Voluntff" Gflll4JI -~ormingA"t; SpJ!tl nstrualorl Local Accomod<f !OM ·~Pl lntem.11.,nal •rave) USA - Neaiby G~aways •ravclTdot> •rdV•I Com1>Jruons _Bu)IS<!H Art~Antlques VehldllS ~ales Pets Pltihcatlon:> MallOr:!e< Phone SilvlcE$ ()ppor'Uflllies ~.,dal Legal Stivl(e:i Computer GraphlC Des~Jn Genaral Sorvocos FllM!al limoo<lfl(o/llr!VU1 Cat.iring Atchn..aura 5eMus _ Heme lmprov~n1 Pa t1ng~\a'lpapel ng Floonng £1tctrleal Ur::kcaplng _Clear.~ Hao '9'fltmOYa M<:N1t19 PhoC:igraphy M.issa;ie HIP"= Dating Counseln~ _Body&Soul Coach og Roal f<l.te Servi <-< Open HOU!+ ~ale (R I fstate) WJntid lu Buy Rem.ii Str11<e1 To Rent R<-a E tJte) Ylantad Iv Rtr.t Rootnmirte 'i<l'llces To Share (Roal 8.tiM Par\:!w;J WRITE YOUR AD PLEASE PRINT a.EARLY TEXT: TOTAL YOUR COST AD RATES Upt)25 womsfar S12 50Ptr ~ue. 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S60 00 20', DISCOUNT ON FIRST TIME VISIT 713-527-0400 or 832-524-7700 MASSAGE Full Body Relaxation l'"'anl!'assage.ret 713.942.2399 • Montrose locat on • 7days ev s • vsa Mast r d • Outcalls welcome Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon 7777 SoulhWr.st frcr.way, Suilr. 820 ('l8il) oif~IO '}· ~1'10 http: n11.houslonladalpla5licsurgen.com Ci 11 tl'if • 11JJ MASSAGE MIND • BODY • SOUL •Swedish • Deep Tissue ·Relaxation • Montrose Location , nREWARD YOURSELF A NICE TOUCH/RELAXATION OF BODY AND MIND BY LEE 832 978-7017 CENTRAcl Y LOCATED 1 ::>AVS/EVENING'l OUTCALLS WEL(;OME Get results! Call now at 713.529.8490 to place your ad in the directory! HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JILL DEARMAN Mars could bring out the artist in you, so do what comes naturally and be creative with a Capricorn. Practice creativity, Sagitarius! (\() Aries (March 21 to April 20): Y Mercury and Venus in your career sector are brinl!ling you luck at work. But you have to work hard to make that luck work even harder for you. Attitude is everything -on the job and in brd with a Libra. \../' Taurus (April 21 to May 20): U This is the best time of year for \OU to plan a trip, sweetie. While everyone Is gearing up for family gatherings, per haps you should throw on your scuba gear and escape all obligations. A Virgo wants to go deep-sea diving with you. The water b more than fine II Gemini (:V.Cay 21 to June 21): Do all your own accounting while Saturn is retrograde in your money house. You need to take money matters serious!}'. Do the boring receipt-tabulating work you've been avoiding. A Taurus will play with you while you play with your calculator. ~ Cancer (June 22 to July 22): ._;y There's no need to panic over a work related mishap. Everyone is on your s ide. You arc allowed to make mistakes. In fact, 1t makes you seem more human. A Pisces wants to help you move up to the next level. 1) Leo (July 23 to August 22): The U l Sun meets Pluto in your house of love affairs, so don't be surprised if all sorts of troublesome and complex charac­ters want to get with you this week. A Scorpio can't leave well enough alone. Can you? Yl'n Virgo (August 23 to September 11.f 22): Uranus in your health sector has your body shaken up but good. Don't worry though, a more peaceful time is ahead. Your love life is related to your good health, so make love, not war, you whore. A Sagittarius wants to make it with you. .0.. Libra (September 23 to October 22): Turn off all that reality TV and get in touch with your sense of romantic reality, dear: That means if you ·want true love, you have to work to get it and keep it. If you give up a tired old illusion. you will get a fresh and fierce Aquarius in the bargain. m Scorpio (October 23 to 11 L. l'iovember 21):If you are starting to wax sentimental about a love gone wrong, stop. cease, and desist now' You can have something so much better, informed by the "real" you. not by an old illusion you had of yourself. A Capricorn gets you on a multitude of levels. )(' Sagittarius (November 22 to December 21): Mars in your ere· ativity sector could bring out the artist in you. Paint. pla}; or do whatever comes naturally. Then do it again. and again. Creativity is a practice. Amazing sex with a Capricorn requires the same mix of dis· c1pline and abandon. Y\_ Capricorn (December 22 to ·p January 19) Venus finishes up a stint in your sign on Dec. 20, so make this a week of Jove You deserve it. Don't wait for a Sagittarius to come on to you. Make your move while you are looking so hot! You need to tap into your earthy side. """""' Aquarius (January 20 to """""' February 18): Mars in your com· municat1on sector makes you quite the spokesperson, sweetie. Stand up for the cause you believe in most, and a Scorpio will stand right beside you. Don't be afraid to put your beliefs on the line. Jt Pisces (February 19 to March 20): Magic needs to be mLxed with good humor, darling. You will experience a dream come true with a Libra, but you may have to deal with a strange booby prize, too. Laugh about the little things, and grab for the big things with great gusto. l;f. Jill Deannan is the author of the best· ~ selling 'Queer Astrology for Men' and 'Queer Astrology for Women' (both from St. Martin's Griffin). For information on charts and consultations, call 212-841· 0177 or e-llktil QScopes@aol.com ' "'We're not kida1ng. Regular price is $29.95. Get 'em while they last! Be one of the first 100 and recieve a free gift with purchase/ Must present this coupon. 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