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Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003
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Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 001. 2003-06-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2408.

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(2003-06-20). Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2408

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 001, 2003-06-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2408.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date June 20, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Path to Pride Houston's gay rights movement - and Pride - would not be where they are today without pioneers like Ray Hill. Page 15 ISSUE 1182 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JUNE 20, 2003 l~SIDE W<aySc MONTROSE ~Rold 1 Rlclwnand- ......................... .. II Montrose is known as the heart of gay Houston, but the neighborhood began as the heart of the entire Bayou City as well. - Page 3 Pride Week 2003 begins By PENNY WEAVER Gay Houstonians are full of Pride this month, and even more so as Pride Week 2003 begins in earnest this weekend. This year's events mark 25 years of Pride in the Bayou City for gay; lesbian. bisexual and transgender Houstonians. Officials with the Pride Committee of Houston (PCOH) plan a busy Pride Week. Major events Pride Day at Astroworld on Saturday, June 21; Pride Cabaret on Friday, June 27; the annual Nighttime Pride Parade on Saturday, June 28; and parade Trophy Awards on Sunday; June 29. This week's activities include the following. Saturday, June 21 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Pride Day at Six Flags Astroworld Cost: $35 in advance, $39.95 at the door; includes all-you-can-eat catered lunch and concerts. Six Flags Astroworld, 610 South Loop, between Kirby and Fannin Patrol benefit from this event. Latin Divas recording artists Miss Lupita and Adassa are featured performers, with a special appearance by Thea Austin, who will debut her new remix of her No. 1 pop hit "Rythym is a Dancer 2003." For more infor­mation, call 713-521-0107. Walk Cost: $20 Sam Houston Parle Pnde Week 2003 culminates next Saturday, June 28 wrth the ' annual Houston Pride Parade. a mghtttme fest that drew an esti­mated 130 000 people last year. This 3.1-mile race begins at Sam Houston Park, with an out-and back course along Allen Parkway. The event benefits AssistHers and is sponsored by the @J@fi I e I Th• .,,.;., Comnri"" of "'"'"" ond Q ~J-0 ... s;,lli '"""" ""'"'" "'"' 5k "" '"" & Pr!de Monthreachesitspeak Canada s PM endorses Please see PRIDE on Page 5 this weekend and next. Check out a summary of upcoming events in the Houston Voice's Pridefile. Page 15 German Shepherds Blanca and Ranger complete the home of one gay Houston couple. Page 18 • gay marriage Government won't interfere with provincial court ruling By KMN SPENCE NEW YORK - Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien announced Tuesday that he would draft a law allow­ing gays to marry. A week earlier, two Toronto men became the first same-sex couple to be wed in Ontario after a provincial appeals court overturned Canada's ban on gay marriages as unconstitutional. To circumvent any constitutional challenges by conservative provincial governments, Canada's Supreme Court will review Chretien's proposed bill, according to the New York Times. Then, the bill goes to Parliament, where there appears to be a simple majority in favor of repealing the ban on gay marriage. Aside from Chretien's Liberal Party, Bloc Quebecois and Ne\\ Democratic Party leaders have told media sources that they intend to sup­port such a proposal. The decision by the Ontario court gives same-sex couples who live there the same status that they currently enjoy only in Belgium and the Netherlands. In the United States, only Vermont grants civil unions. But Ontario goes even further than the two Please see MARRIAGE on Page 7 Canad"ian Prime Minister .lea! ctretien's government announced Tuesday that it would not appeal court nil­llXJS allowirJ,J same-sex marriages. Instead they will urtnxix:e legislation this fall rnakirJ,J gay marriages legal fur the entire country. (Photo by Tom Hansorv'AP) 2 ~JNE 20 2003 DUMP YOUR DSL, DROP YOUR DIAL-UP. You can't beat our business telecom service for quality, reliability and value. Call 1.866.THE.DARE and let us prove it. It's a fad - we are the better choice. www houston VOite.com HOUSTON VOICE f' NOW & SAVE $700. Total Communications Options~ is big business tools at small business prices. Our premium fiber-optic network delivers reliable local, long distance and Internet service through one cost~ saving, Tl-grade connection - including "always on" Internet access with speeds of up to 1 Mbps. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I local n ws All of Houston began with Montrose The city's history traces back to the neighborhood traditionally known as the heart of gay life f:<iitor's note: In horwr of Pride Week and 25 years of pride and gay history ln Houston, this story is the first in a three-part series taking a look at the changes m the .\fontrose neighborhood, traditionally known as the heart of gay Houston. By JOHNNY HOOKS The Castro district in San Francisco is per­haps the best known gay neighborhood in the United States. New York City has Chel<;E>.a, San Diego's gay-bol'hood is known as Hillcrest. many &>attle queers call Capitol Hill home and Provincetown ha'>. well. Provincetown. And the Houston neighborhood. which has that certain savior.faire? Montrose, of course! It's been compared to a drive-through Greenwich Village, a low-rent Hollywood Boulevard (OUCH!) and Sodom and Gomorrah (naturally!). but I wondered. What is Montrose - better yet WHO is Montrose. how can you tell if you really live within its bounds, and has it always been the gay haven it is now? I decided to find out the answers for myself and for the sake of the newest members of the Montrose GLBT community. I knew current Montrose residents wrre in good company with Clark Gable, O'Henr;; Howard Hughes and Lyndon Johnson all having called our 'hood home at one time or another; but WHERE is this Montrose? The boundaries, which have always been and remain controversial. according to the Hentage Society News, are: West Gray on the north extf'nding east to Louisiana Street. which curves along Main Street to Richmond Avenue. Richmond down to South Shepard, thPn closmg the loop again at West Gray. I harl always heard that Montrose was so named because there used to be a Mount Street that ran through the area. The street was said to be covered in ro e gardens, hence the name Mount-rose e\entually became Montro c. Wrong. The discovery that this is a myth sparked my curiosity even more. It was then I knew that to really understand the birth of Montrose, I would need to go back to the birth of the city of Houston. Hrre is what a little hlstor1c research and reading via the Hen tag Society News and other sources uncowred. In the 1830s, two enterprising young brothC'rs from New York John Kirby and Augustus Allen were lured to the Hepublic of Texas by the attraction of cheap land. How cheap? The brothers purchased about 6,642 acres at an average cost of $1.42 per acre. The land sat at tho Juncture of Buffalo and White Oak bayous, a navigable waterway being a requirement at that time for a city to survive and flourish. In the two years from U1c 1111 WGraySt MONTROSE Westhermer Road Richmond Ave ....... 11111111111111111• Montrose, long known as the heart of gay life m Houston. is a neighborhood bordered on the north by West Gray Street. on the east by Louisiana Street. on the south by Richmond Avenue. and on the west by Shepherd Dnve. (Graphic by Bonnie Naugle) time of its founding in 1836, Houston (named for Battle of San Jacinto hero. and soon to be named president of the republic of Texa~. Sam Houston) was filled with shops and hotels and a population of 2.073. In 1837, Mrs. Obedience Fort Smith acquired 3,3i0 acres of land stretching from downtown to present day Rice Umversil): Mrs. Smith was a true pioneer, having moved to Texas from MLc;sissippi after rais· ing 10 children and being widowed. The land owned by Obedience remained undeveloped, even after her death in 1847, and was used primarily as cow pasture and eventually a dairy until the beginning of the 1900s. Just try to 1magme a herd of da!I'Y cat­tle grazing at the corner of Montrose and Lovett today! In 1910, John Wiley Link, a successful !um· berrnan from Orange, formed the Houston Land Corporation with some a'>-sodates after acquiring 250 acres. much of it from the estate of Obedience Fort Smith. In 1911, Link undertook the most ambitious development m Houston to date. He named hts addition Montrose Place (take that, Aaron Spelling!) after a histonc tov.11 in Scotland immortal· ized in the \\Tiiings of Sir Walter Scott. Montrose Place was the first subdivision in Hou ton, and possibly the state of Texas, developers provided future residents with the most modern and luxurious advan tages. The entire city of Houston had only 26 miles of paved road in thr early 1900s, nnd Montrose claimed 11 mile~ of those. It could al~o boast 22 tlllll's of paved side\\alk withm its four tree-llned boulPvards: ~lontro c, Lovett, Yoakum and Audubon. In addit1on, miles of samtary sewers, water and gas mains were laid to "give the people invited to build their homes there an opportunity to enjoy the ." fl·uits of their labor Landscaper Edward Teas Sr., who later developed Teas Nursery, planted evergreen and camphor trees, 4,000 shade trees and seven railcar loads of palms. The four main boulevards \\ere paved with shell and topped with a granite top. which made for a dust-less drive and were consid­ered the finest "driveways" in Texas. The finishing touch was a streetcar line, the Montrose line, which served the entire area. A 50- by 100-foot lot did not exceed Sl.700. about 34 cents per square foot, with homes ranging from $3.000 - $8.000 per home. In 1912, Link built his own home at the corner of Alabama and Montrose Boulnard for an unheard of SG0,000. which included such extravagant amenities as stained glass. steam heat, cut glass doorknobs and a vacu­um system. At the time it was built. the third floor was a lavL~h ballroom, and the home served as the only refuge for flood· soaked residents o( the neighborhood more than once over the years. Today, Link's former home is the administration building for St Thomas Uni'Yerslly; along with the hotel La Colombe D'o1~ they are the only original structures along Montrose Boulevard to remind us of the area's first glory days. Th" years 1913 through 1922 saw Houston grow by almost 10 miles square, almo t exclusi\ely in the Montrose Addition. The 1930s saw Montrose Boulevard, and there­fore the entire district, as the most promi nent address v.ithin Houston city limits. easily besting the former title-holder Main Boulevard, or Main Street. Unfortunately, like many re 1denual areas that were close to a dO\mtown district, Montrose went through a period of general and sometimes e\·en SC'Vere decline begm­nmg in the 1940s !:'hortl} after World War 2. The popularity of migrating to the emergtng "suburbs" of River Oaks and .Memorial soon turned mto an exodus, leaving behmd ncar­empty p:ilatial homes, and settlng the <tag(' for desperate landlords to seek out ne\\ ten­ants for the aging mansions of Montrose. /\'rxt rreek: The '50s and '60s see enor­mous changrs in Montrose. JUNE 20 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1182 LOCAL NEWS-.. --·-----·----... 3 NATIONAL NEWS·-·-----·--··-···8 FORUM .............. , _____ ........... - ................. 10 OUT ON THE BAYOU.----.... ·-·--.. ··--15 COMMUNITY CALENDAL .. . ___ .19 APPOINTMENTS ... ________ 19 CLASSIFIEDS. .. -------···--· .. --20 Q PUZZL£... ----·-·a MY STARS 26 DECISION Justice Pamela Minzner powered a recent New Mexico Supreme Court ruling that some S4'J may allow gay couples to sue for loss of companionship if a partner is mJllred. Page 8 NO BONO Accused serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph, whose alleged targets ncluded a les­bian 01ghtclub. waived h s nght to bond thlS week Page9. VIEWPOINT As a male-to-femaie transsexual cofurmist Gwen Smlth refuses to be p geon­holed Page 11. POSTh4ASTER: Send address changes to Houstor V0tce 500 Lovett B!v!I.. Suite 200 Houston. TX 77006 Houston Voice rs pub! shed weekly on Fnday by Wmdow Media llC. Subscnptzons are $92/year for 52 ISSlles (only SI n per !SSUe) 4 JUNE 20. 2003 CALIFORNIA CLOSETS~ "'"he rome .., increasingly the focus of self exp·ess1on and 1rid1vidual coMfon From the too', and essentials of everyday .fe to the possessions and treasures that you cherish, you deserve something extraordinary when it colT'es to organiz·ng your horne Call today for a complimentary in-home design consultation. 713.785.0111 · calclosets.com V1s1t our showroom. 4003 Waldo Street, Houston www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE "60 ON A JOURNEY FOR LIFE" *PURCHASE** ANY NEW VOLVO VIA THE VOLVO OVERSEAS DELIVERY PROGRAM AND YOU WILL RECEIVE TWO COMPLIMENTARY ROUND TRIP AIR FARES TO EUROPE AND ONE NIGHT HOTEL IN GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN. Generous savings on the U.S. MSRP and even more generous travel offer. For more information contact: Tina Harris at 713.868.6844. VOLVO for life mmm wmm \4oM> en Nnenr;t. LC ~ b • • N511• *9d ~ 'ttlho. Nwett rerneMblf to...., JOll ~ &J ""Wth pun:tme" 8f'Y ,.._ 2003 \t6l on r. ~ 0......,"'-(X:'i05CJRlndV'IC1Rnot"""'9d). Tina Harris • 713.868.6844 thams@starmotorcars.com www.volvocars.us/overseas • When Your Trick is Good Enough to Serve Great Coffee To In The Morning ... Make Sure You Have Some!" Imagine never running out of coffee again! I created a service for coffee drinkers that delivers award-winning coffee direct to your home on your personal schedule. A FREE information pack and coffee sample is ava. ':iblo by calling my free, recorded message (24 hours) at 1·877·523·7257, Option 7. Some Answers You can find the Q Puzzle each week in the Classifieds sections HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JUNE 20. 2003 5 I local news Twenty-fifth year of Pride wraps up June 29 PRIDE. continued from Page 1 Houston Montrose Athletic Association. Registration after June 13 is $20. Trophies will be awarded to the first overall male and female winners, the first masters male and female winners, and the first wheelchair winner. The top five males and females in age groups 30- 34, 35-39, and 40-44 will receive awards. The top three males and females in all other age groups will receive awards. The race will conclude with a party and presentation of awards and door prizes in Sam Houston Park. All participants will receive a T-shirt. For more information, go to www.geoci­ties. com/ houstonpride5k/ index.html, or call 713-661-8919. Sunday, June 22 1-4 p.m. Family and Youth Day Cost. Free Memorial Parle JPMorgan Chase hosts this family event, which will include a moonwalk, DJ, face painting, popcorn and cotton candy. 7-930 p.m. XALT: Xtreme Adoration of the Lord Together (Praise Day) Cost Free Community Gospel Church, 4305 Lillian Organizers plan an interactive night of praise and worship to God and Jesus featuring local talents in song, sign and poem. A dessert reception and fellowship follows. 7 p.m. Interfaith Gay Pride Service Cost. Free Bering Memorial Umted Methodist Church, 1440 Harold This celebration marks the pre-release of an Interfaith Affirmation of Inclusiveness signed by many of Houston's pastors, priests and rabbis in support of the GLBT community, according to the Rev Troy Plummer of Bering. Rabbi Todd Thalblum of Temple Sinai will be present, plus guest soloist and the choirs of Bering and Resurrection. Tuesday, June 24 6-8 p.m. ·outbreak A Community Forum on Gay Men·s Sexual Health" 1415 Bar & Grille.1415 California Montrose Clinic will host this commu­nity forum to educate and/or create aware­ness for the need for gay men to be tested for sexually transmitted diseases. 630-9 p.m. Milam House -10 Years, One House, One Purpose Cost: Free; donations accepted on behalf of Milam House Milam House. 4100 Milam St. The public is invited to tour Milam House, which provides temporary housing to men living with drug or alcohol add ic· tlon and HIV I AIDS. While th"Y recElive treatment for their addiction Milam House residents attend school, hold Job or attend job-training programs. This is an eight-bed facility with a maximum stay of six months. Refreshments will be provided by PWA Coalition - Houston. For more informa­tion, contact Milam House at 713-520-9248, e-mail bjones'a'pwach.org, or go to www.pwach.org. Wednesday, June 25 8:30-10 a.m. Explaining HIV Drug Resistance; A Patient-friendly Approach Cost: Free, but RSVP required The Center for AIDS, 1407 Hawthorne This meeting will be led by Andrew Zolopa, M.D., clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. For more information, call the center at 713-527-8219. Thursday, June 26 7:30 p.m. 'Hope Along the Wind: The Life of Harry Hay" Cost: Free Theatre New West 1415 California This documentary screening is part of the Texas Triangle's Profiles in Pride Series. 7:30 p.m. (lobby opens); 8:30 p.m. (play begins) ·could Angels Be Blessed" Cost: $10, with proceeds benefitirtQ GCAM Theatre Suburbia. 1410 West 43rcr This performance is a look at love, life and expectations. Light refreshments will be served at 7:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Gulf Coast Archive & Museum of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender History. Friday, June 27 11 a.m.·5 pm. National HIV Testing Day Cost Free Montrose Clime, 215 Westheimer The free rapid HIV antibody test pro­vides results in less than 30 minutes. 11 a.m.-430 p.m. National HIV Testing Day Cost: Free Other sites for testing are: • Donald R. Watkins Prevention Center, 8449 Bellfort St. Suite 140 • WAM. 1240 1/2 Post Oak Road. Suite 121 • Kashmere Annex. 3815 Cavalcade • Progressive Amateur Boxing Association (PABA). 3212 Dowling For more information, contact the Houston Department of Health & Human Services HIV1STD infoline at 713-794-9020. Other agencies sponsoring the testing are Bread of Life. Families Under Urban & Social Attack (FUSSA), NAACP, Thomas Street Clinic and St Hope Foundation. 8 pm. Pride Cabaret: Before the Parade Passes By .. Aga1111 Cost $50 Alley Theatre, 615 Texas Ave A VIP Reception will follow the night' !l<'lformanre by som of th most popular local talents. This two-act review incorpo­rates Broadway show tunes, popular stan­dards, and comical skits, all within a Pride theme, according to the PCOH Web site. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Baile 2003 Cost· $30 in advance. $35 at the door Radisson Astrodome. Sam Houston Ballroom. 8686 Kirby Drive This Pride Week celebration is a black­tie event and Hispanic celebration. includ­ing dance with musica latina. The fund­raiser benefits gay organizations and includes a silent auction from 9 p.m. to midnight, and reception hors d"oeuvres at 9:30 p.m. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Steel Pride Cost: Donations accepted at the door Meteor. 2306 Genesee Grey Party Inc. presents a mght of pride, music and entertainment to announce Steel Weekend, the group's new October GLBT fund-raiser. 9.30 p.m.-12:30 am Out of the Bars and into the Streets with Q Patrol Cost. Free Meet at the Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose. Suite 207 Houstonians are welcome to join Q Patrol on a special patrol through Montrose. For information, call 713-528-SAFE. 9 p.m.·3 a.m. Official Pre-Parade Party Rich's. 2401 San Jacinto "Silver" is the theme for this event, with special guest performer "Lady Bunny." The show begins at 12:30 and 1:30 a.m. on the main stage. Saturday, June 28 3 pm. Houston Comets Pnde Oay Cost: $8 and up The Houston Comets plan a first-ever Pride Day at the Comets game versus the San Antonio Silver Stars. The event includes Autograph Day, so the first 1.000 fans to enter the arena receive a voucher for the post-game autograph session. For more information, call Ericka Bowman at 713-963-7334, or fax orders to 713-513-8345. 6-815 p.m. Pre-Parade Concert featuring Amber Cost Free Budwtiser Stage at Westheimer and Yo.1kum Headlining will be Amber, singing her top dance hits, including "Sexual (Li Da Di)", ·~bove the Louds", "Yes". and "Need to be Naked." Joining Amber on stage will be popular local talent including the Gay Men's Chorus, Nancy Ford and Kofi , among many others, according to the Pride Committee. 845 p.m. America's Original Nighttime Pride Parade Cost: Free Parade runs on lower Westheimer from Woodhead to Whitney The 25th anniversary parade will include a synchronized light show and pyrotechnics display at the i;randstand. located at Yoakum Street aero s from Mary's ... Naturally. Bleacher seating with a prime view is available for a $25 donation to the Pride Committee. The Silver Celebration Pride Parade will include appearances by "Queer As Folk" cast member Robert Gant. the popu­lar Dallas drag drill team "The Strangerettes:· and a section of a special 25th anniversary rainbow flag created by Gilbert Baker. the rainbow flag's "Betsy Ross," according to PCOH. Emcees Maria Todd 11.Ild Ernie Manouse will provide commentary on parade entries. 9 p.m.-3 am. Official Post-Parade Pride Party Rich's. 2401 San Jacinto "25" is the theme for the mght, with recording artist Amber. Showtime is 1 a.m. on the main stage. 9:30 p.m-12:30 am. Out of the Bars and into the Streets with Q Patrol Cost" Free Meet at the Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 Sunday, June 29 3:30-9 am. SterlingPRIDE03 Cost: $20 The Gatsby, 2540 University Blvd. Spoiled Boyz presents SterlingPRIDE03, the official Houston Pride Afterhours Party, featuring DJ Dawna Monte!. 4 p.m Pride Parade Awards Ceremony 0 Houston. 710 Pacific 'new location' Parade emcee Erme Manouse and "Queer As Folk" cast member Robert Gant will help present tr0phies honoring the best of the best of Houston s Pride Parade entries. 6'10 p.m. 'All the World's a Stage" By invitation Only Ovations, 2536 Suite B. Time Blvd. At Kirby This evening of gay theater and song benefits Unhinged Productions. For more information, call 713-547-0440. ·Queer As Folk": The Babylon Tour South Beach, 810 Pacific The Babylon Tour, which tours the country in May, June and Jul)~ recreates the vibrant nightclub featured in the television s1•ries. The tour stops in Houston at South Beach. \\i th music pro­vided b>· DJ Tracy Young and a special appearance by "Queer As Folk" cast member Robert Gant. ft MOREINFO Pride Committee of Houston PO. Box 66071 Houston. TX n266-6071 Phore 713-529-6979 Fax 113-529-6929 WWW pndehouston.org e-ma nfo 'I pr dehouston.org 6 JUNE 20. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE saturday, j ne 28, 10pm/9c ut!b e 11 0 AOL I( 4 HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JUNE 20. 2003 7 I national ews Gay marriage in U.S. still an uncertainty MARRIAGE. continued from Page I European countries, "'hir.h have a resi dency requirement beforP gay couples can be wed Ontario has no such restriction. Gay marriage activists on both shies of the border are celebrating the court's decision . .Many American advo­cates of marriage equality are hopeful that the Canadian prime minister's publlc avowal of their cause may mean a sea change in attitudes m the United States. "What this presents for American couples is an opportunity to easily enter into a legal marriage and come back to the United States with a power­ful tool to break down the remaining discrimination here." Lavi Soloway. founder of the New York-based Lesbian & Gay Immigration Rights Task Force, told the Times. Advocates like Soloway also hope that couples returning from Canada will challenge states' refusal to recognize the legality of their relationships. U.S. couples face uncertainties Already, there appears to be a smat· tering of U.S. gay couples going to Toronto, Windsor. Ottawa, Stratford and other Ontario cities to marry. The number may be higher after provincial officials process the qualify­ing documents from interested couples, but "currently there are 10 same-sex marriage registrants," said Gerald Crowell, a spokesperson with the :\<finistry of Consumer & Business Services in Ontario. American couples wedded in Ontario may still face "uncertainties and dis· crimination," upon their return to the United States, according to a joint advi· sory issued by New York-based Freedom to Marry and other pro-gay marriage organizations. "People in Seattle cannot go to Vancouver," said Evan Wolfson, execu· live director of Freedom to Marry. "As of today, only in Ontario may they marry." A spokesperson at the Office of the Registrar General for the province of Ontario said a few couples registered to get married on the day of the decision. "It's tapered off a little since then." Registering is a two-step process, Crowell said. First, applicants must go to city hall to fill out a series of forms. Those papers are then filed with the provincial government at the Registrar General. Crowell speculates that there may be 20 or more couples who have already registered in Toronto. Crowell was unsure of the percentage of American applicants. "We don't capture that residency data," he said. The majority of gay marriages in Ontario are taking place in Toronto and Ottawa, the Canadian capital, he added. Michael l..esMer {left) and Michael Star1< celebrated their marriage with a bottle of champagne. They were the first gay couple legally married in Canada. (Photo by Michael Stupyark/Toronto Star) Toronto City Counselor Kyle Rae said four American couples have wed there so far. "We have people from Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Florida and Washing­ton," said Rae, a gay member of the City Council. "Since June 10, there have been a total of 131 same-sex marriages" in the province. Rae himself plans to join their ranks June 20 by marrying his partner of nine years, Mark Reid, at a ceremony in an art gallery within the downtown ward that Rae represents. Religious allowances In a bow to organized religion, Chretien announced that his proposed bill would allow religious institutions to refuse to marry gay couples. But in Canada as elsewhere, couples can be wed in civil ceremonies as well as religious ceremonies where a member of the cler­gy is licensed by the government to per­form marriage ceremonies. In most towns throughout Ontario, a marriage license can be obtained from the clerk at the Marriage License Issuers, the Canadian equiva· lent of a marriage bureau. The license is valid anywhere in Ontario for three months. To obtain a license, only one of the parties must be physically present. Necessary documents are identification, such as a birth certificate, current pass· port and photo identification for both individuals. The fee varies slightly from city to city. Mass. case pending In the United States, the issue of gay marriage is about to become more heated. At present, Massachusetts presents the most likely prospect for approxi· mating Ontario's decision and even moving beyond neighboring Vermont's civil unions, according to Mary Bonauto, an attorney at Boston-based Gay & Lesbian Advocates and Defenders. Bonauto argued a case in front of the Massachusetts State Supreme Judicial Court on March 4, in which she repre­sented seven same-sex couples seeking the right to marry under the state ConstituUon. By la\\; a decision must be made 130 days after the argument, ~o Bonauto expects a ruling soon "We could win it, or also lose it, or end up in a Vermont-type decision in which the court says you're entitled to the protections of marriage," she said "Our case argues that [current interpre­tation of the law] is excluding same-sex couples from what is already m the Constitution," she said. If the court agrees v;ith her plamtiffs, then the state legislature doesn't have to take up any amendment to current la\\, Bonauto said The premise of the right for gay cou­ples to marry is based on "equality, lib­erty and privac~;" she said. Many states have pac;sed so-called "defense of marriage acts," which limit marriage to a man and a woman. In 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the nation· al Defense of Marriage Act into law. N.J. case heads to court New Jersey is providing another Judi­cial battleground for the fight to marry. The State Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments in the case of seven same-sex couples. "Canada this v.eek has -hown us what's possible in New Jerse~:" said David Buckel, an attorney at Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, which is arguing the case. The state's attorney general tried to quash the suit by arguing that gav peo· pie can indeed marry - just not each other. Lambda Legal successfully fend· ed off that challenge. GO\'. Jim McGreevey said he cannot comment on court cases. but shortly after the case was filed, the Democrat said he objects to any effort by a court to re\'erse state law as it applies to marriage. But a multi-pronged approach will impel legislation and public sentiment to include gay couples, Bonauto said. If the Massachusetts decision is favorable to gays. it will be a national boon for gay marriage, she said. "We all know gay families Jive in every county," she said. "The families are there as a part of the community. They need the same protection afforded to other families. We're in a ciYil rights movement here.'' @MOREINFO ~gowmnent www.cbs.gov.on.ca Freecbntn~ www.freedomtomarry.com Ldda Legal Defense & Elb:atioo Finl wwwlambdalegal.org Gay & LestUI Advocates nl Defenders www.glad.org 8 JUNE 20. 2003 Go Straight to the Gay Market Presents E1111111r 2003 Community Expo and Consumer Market " September 20 & 21, 2003 George R. Brown Convention Center Pi] ~~·~ f.j JPMorgan IGAY & LESBIA YELLOW PAGES® Join our sponsors and returning vendors 1n courting the growing GLBT fT'arket. Why2 Because there are over 1 2 million gay adults in the U S. with over $452 billion to spend annually. Call 713-523-7576 or visit www.ghglcc.org. www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I national n ws N.M. ruling may allow gays to sue for loss of COJ.l!Panionship ALBUQUERQUE, N.M (AP) - In a dedsion that may pave the way for ' ame-sex partner claims, the New Mrxlco Supreme Court ruled that people in long­term relationships married or not can sue over loss of companionship when the loved one is inJure<l. Lawyers say the gender-neutral ruling handed down in Santa Fe this spring left open the question of whether same-sex couples would have the same rights as other unmarried couples in such "consor­tium" cases. "We hold as a matter of first impression under New Mexico law that a claim for loss of con­sortium is not limited to married partners," Justice Pamela Mtnzner \\Tote tn the April 25 decision. There was no dissent. The ruling, which imposed no preconceptions about gender on future cases, said only that the relationship must be "commltte<l and exclusive," with no other intimate or spouse clouding the case. "I think this decision certainly sets the groundwork for same-sex couples to file claims for consortium," said Nicole Schamban, president of the Justice Pamela Minzner authored a recent New Mexico Supreme Court ruling that attorneys say may allow gay couples to sue for loss of com­panionship 1f a partner 1s injured. (Photo courtesy of the Supreme New Mexico Defense Lav.-yers Association. Court of New Mexico) Calif. lesbian seeks alimony in 'divorce' LONG BEACH, Calif: Michelle Platt's lawsuit against her former partner of eight years, gay rivil rights activist Marsha Nalfy, seeks ongoing monetary support similar to alimony and could be preredent setting, according to Platt's attorney, Jeffrey Erdman. Platt wants between $10.000 and $20,000 per month, reported Frontiers, a gay newsmagazine. "We are confident that :Marsha will prevail in every respect," Naify's attorney said in a \\TittP.n statement Platt argues in court documrnts that she des<rves the ongoing payments because she gave "more time and energy to the business/ investment interests and affairs of Naify, at Nalfy's msistence and request, and [she] eventually discontinued working independently of her work on behalf of Ms. Naify" Tht' lawsuit IS pend­ing before the Los Angeles County Superior Court in Long Beach. New Mass. judicial rules ban anti-gay bias BOSTON (AP> - Massachusetts' highest court updated its ethical code of conduct foriudges for the first time in 30 years. The Supreme Judicial Court released the new 52-page co<le of ethics on June 13, and the new version, which takes effect Oct. 1. It includes new rules and accompanying commentary to help judges interpret the rules. The code's language was al<;0 updat­ed to remove male-only references to judges and add domestic partners to lan­guage referring to a judge's spouse. For the first time, the SJC also banned judges from joining groups that practice "invidious discrimination" on the basis of sexual ori­entation or ethnicity, other than churches, the military, and any "intimate, purely pri­vate organization." The earlier rules had only specified non-discrimination based on race, sex, religion, or national origin. La_ Senate bans pOOlic sex, keeps sodol1ly law BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - The Louisiana Senate went on record June 16 against sex in public, following the lead of the state House. which passed the bill a month ago. An explicit video­tape shot during the French Quarter's Southern Decadence festival, an annual gay celebration, inspired the legislation. The video has been much circulated by a New Orleans mini~tcr who wants his city to clamp down on the festival. Public sex is already illegal, but the new blll outlaws sex tor the "purpose of drawing a crowd" and includes harsher penalties than those in the existing law, of up to a year in jail and a fine of $1,000. The unanimous decision came less than a week after the state Senate defeated an rffort to repeal Louisiana's 197-year-old anti-sodomy law by a 23-10 vote. Kraft settles suit over same-sex harassment BIRMINGHAM. Ala. (AP) 'I'he federal government and the parent company of Nabisco Inc. settled a lawsuit that claimed a male supervisor at a Nabisco distribu­tion center sexually harassed male employees. U.S. District Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn was asked last week to approve the agreement between the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Kraft Foods Inc., which owns Nabisco. The EEOC filed suit in October contending route drivers and warehouse workers at the Nabisco facility were retaliated against when they com­plained about a gay supervL<;0r. Charles E. Guerrier, a lawyer for the EEOC, said the agreement resulted from private settle­ments of "substantial amounts." Kraft spokesperson Lynne Galia said the allega­tions occurred before Kraft bought Nabisco. In a separate case, RSG Forest Products settled a same-sex harassment lawsuit by the EEOC late last month, according to a consent decree filed in U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore. RSG agreed to pay $20,000 in compensatory and punitive damages to the man who initial­ly complained and $45,000 to each of four other male workers. The company admit· ted no wrongdoing. r .... staff Mii wire re,orts www.houston voice.com J police beat Accused serfal bomber drops effort seeking bond Birmingham, Ala. - Accused serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph waived his right to a sched· uled bond hearing Monday when it became clear he would not be granted bail, his lawyers told the Atlanta ,Journal-Constitution. Rudolph pleaded innocent June 6 to ~era! charges m the 1998 bombing of a Birmingham abortion clinic and stands accused in a string of Atlanta bombings, including the Ji'ebruary 1997 bombing of gay bar the Otherside Lowige that mjured five people. Through notes left near the bombing site·, investigators believe Rudolph was moti· vatP.d by ant1-gay and anti-abortion views. He was arrested May 31 in Murphy, N.C., after five years on the Lim. Prosecutors later extradited Rudolph tu Birmingham, rather than Atlanta. because they felt the evidence including wit­nesses who identified Rudolph was strongest against him in that incident, though Rudolph Accused bomber Eric Robert Rudolph waived hJS nght to a bad hearing June 17 as he awaits trial on federal charges that he bombed a Birmingham abortion. which killed one Rudolph is also suspected m three bombings in Atlanta. including on~ at may later face trial in Atlanta. a lesbiJn nightclub. (Photo by AP) ----------- Fla. woman gets 25 years for shooting ex, bystander PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) - A 62-year-old lesbian received two prison sentences of 25 years and one of 20 years for shooting her estranged partner and a bystander out - side a chw·ch. Andrea Cobb \a.:as sentenct.'<i June 1 I for attempted first· and second· degree mtmler and aggravated battery for the April 2002 shootings. The pw1ishment amounL~ to a life sentence given her age, but it is the minimum set by state 1'\w. Assistant Public Defender Michael Van Cavage argued for a lesser sentence on grounds Cobb has no prior criminal record and was overmedicated on pre­scription drugs when she shot her ex-lover, Joyce Anderson. in the hand and Nancy Browning, a church member who tried to stop the attack. A bullet lodged in Browing's spine permanently disabled her. Neither victim attended the sentencing. Pa. prison to pay for trans inmate's honnone treatments PI'ITSBURGH - As part of an out-of· court settlement, the state of Pennsylvania agreed June 13 to pay the hormone therapy costs of a transgen­dered prisoner incarcerated in the 1995 rape of an 8-year-old girl, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune. The Pennsylvania Department of Corrections is paying for hormones for Jessica Elaine Wolfe, born James Elliot Wolfe, 39. Prison spokesper­son Susan McNaughton said the inmate is taking an estrogen replacement drug that costs about $240 a year. Wolfe told the paper that she is also receiving shots that help decrease testosterone levels and can cost as much as $7,000 a year. "It's basi· cally humanitarian medical considera­tions," said Shannon Minter, legal direc­tor for the National Center for Lesbian Rights. ''They should be punished. and the punishment is incarceration, but the punishment is not withholding medically necessary treatment." Wolfe was t.'\king female hormones to prepare for sex· change surgery when she was arrested. Prison officials stopped the treatment, causing withdrawal symptoms, accord· ing to a lawsuit filed by Wolfe. Murder case against N.C. novelist readies for start DURHAM, N.C. - Jury selection in the murder trial of war novelist Michael Peterson, 59, is expected to be completed next week, paving the way for opening arguments on June 23, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Peterson stands accused of the December 2001 killing of his wife, Nortel executive Kathleen Peterson, in a case swirling with themes of mone~: status, politics and bisexuality. After the death, Peterson's private life underwent public scrutiny, which heightened after investi· gators found gay pornography on his home computer and men who say they had sex with him. Questions asked of potential jurors indicated that prosecu­tors will introduce that evidence at trial. To add to the intrigue, the body of a Peterson friend - and mother to his two adopted children - was exhumed this spring after prosecutors learned she died in a 1985 stairway fall similar to the way Peterson says his wife accidentally died. The case's twists make it a public fascination, including plans for live Court TV coverage and a French docu· mentary. "It doesn't get a lot more com­pelling than this," Peterson's lawyer, David Rudolph, told the newspaper. Iowa man feared reporting assault outside gay bar DES MOINES, Iowa A man waited until June 11 to report a J\.fay 25 a~sault outside a gay bar because he feared retaliation from his attacker. the Des Moines Register reported. Michael Moon. 32. said the man broke his leg after forcing him to say that he would leave tovm and seek God's for· giveness for being ga)-: "I was afraid he was going to track me down, track do\\n my family if I reported it," Moon said. "He said, 'Faggots need to get out of town."' Moon told City Council member Christine Hensley about the incident during Gay Pride festivities on June 8 and she con· vinced him to go to police. An arrest war· rant is imminent, police said. From staff and wire reports Ray JUNE 20. 2003 9 Right now we have a great selection of Land Rover Service Loaners very attractively pnc.ed. All vehicles have never been titled are low mileage, and have the remaining balance of a 4 year150,000 mile factory warranty. Great Car Insurance! 713.661. 7700 For A.UlD, I Jomt', Rmtt'rs Ufe, Hf'olth. Businl!'Sl Jnsurantt arul much more. 65151\:LoopSourh. te.185 Bellair?. T.X ;';401 u'U'U·.'ichmnierAgmcy.coni STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive ElflDr CHRIS CRAIN ELflDr PENNY WEAVER editor houstonvoice.co Pnxb:tion BO'INIE NAUGLf. JOEY CAROUNO Conespo11de11ts: LOU CHIBBARO JR. JOE CREA. l..Al.IRA DOUGLAS-BROWN, MIKE FLEMING MATTHEW HENNIE. BRIAN MOYlAN. KEVIN NAff JE11NIFER SMITH. RHONDA SMITll, STEVE WEINSTEIN CalbtxJtm JA CHAFMAN. JOhNNY HOOKS. TINA KING PhotDpJhers DALTON DEHART KIMBERLY THOM?SO.'I Welmaster ARAM VARTIAN SALES & ADMINISTRATION General~ DAN!a EMERICH demertch(fi:houstonvoice.rom Accomt Exeaitiws BRETi' CUllliM - bculh.rn:O houstorMMce.com BRIAN MARTIN - ~houstonvoiceJ:o AdmiistntNe Asslslarlt USAGAl.l..ARDO- lgallardc(~ National AdYertisilg ~ Riwridell Marketllg ~. 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OpirJcn; eiqressed themn do not reflect trose d the Houstm Vote Issue 1182 guest editorial First they came for the Muslims Why should gays fret over the fate of pious Muslims who overstayed their visas and are about as likely as Jerry Falwell to embrace our cause? We could be the next scapegoats. By ADELE M. STAN OR ATI'OR."<'EY GENERAL John Ashcroft, it's been a busy couple of weeks. First, there was the matter of defendmg hh Department of Justice after his own inspector general released a report taking the agency to task for its roundup and long detention of Muslim Immigrants, charged with no crmies,'in the wake of 9/11. Then there was his impassioned plea before the House Judiciary Committee on June 5 for expa.ns1on of the USA Patriot Act, the legISlation hurriedly passed into law during the panic that followed the attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center. Finall}': there wa<; the mess \\1th DOJ Pride, a gay employee group, in which Ashcroft presided over the department's apparent refusal to allow the Justice Department's gay employee organil.at10n to hold its annual pride event at DOJ headquarters. That initial decision was followed by a partial reversal of that stance but a continued refusal to sponsor and underwrite the securi· ty costs of holding the event at the headquar· ters. DOJ Pride organizers ultimately decided to move the program to Capitol Hill, where NJ. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (DJ invited them as guests of the Senate. While the last of these controversies has, understandabl}': garnered the most attention Within the queer communit): the DOJ Pride flap is a mere indicator of why we need to turn our collective gaz.e to the first two. Correction In the June 13 issue of the Voice, a news story on the Canadian marriage ruling ("Ontario court OKs gay mar­riage"), a direct quotation is attributed to activist Evan Wolf-;on on the issue of "comity," or thfl acceptance of Canadian marriages in the US. In fact. that lan­guage paraphrased Wolf<;on's actual state­ment on the topic. In addition. the article failed to identify Rex Wockner as the free. lance journalist who obtained that inter­vie\ 14 The Voice regrets the errors. IN THE DAYS TIIAT FOU..OWED THE Sept. 11 attacks, more than 750 Muslim immi­grants were rmmded up - many on pure hearsay -and held in a federal detention cen­ter without being charged, their families lied to about their whereabouts, and their access to lawyers denied or obstructed. A number of the detamees. according to the inspector general, were subjected to ver­bal and physical abuse, including the use such of torture techniques as keeping them shackled in solitary confinement under bright lights some 23 hours a day. Wh}; you may ask. should queer people fret over the fate of pious Muslims who overstayed their visas? After all, you might reason, they're about as likely as Jerry Falwell to embrace our cause True enough, perhaps. Nonethele", what's right is right, and these people were done wrong. More than that, the United States Constitution was done wrong, tram· pied on with Impunity by the FBI. And that bodes not well, my friends, for both the nation as a whole and for us as a community. History has shown. time and time again, that when the powers-that-be go looking for scapegoats. we usually make it onto the short list Even when the initial targets are ethnic, religious or ideological groups, the sights ultimately fmd us in range, as "ell. During his recent visit to Capitol Hill. Ashcroft was hanlly contrite about the inspector general's findings. "We make no apologies," he said, for holding prisoners until it was determined that they had no connection to terrorism. In other words, guilty until proven innocent. In the 2001 Patriot Act, Ashcroft won the right to amass. through secret warrants. information on the library habits of U.S. cit· lzens and residents, their retail purchases. credit records, general health and mental health charts, student records and the like. Likewise, the government's wiretapping powers were expanded, with e-mail and Internet traffic designated fair game for secret government survei.llance. The defmitlon of terrorism was broad· ened in such a way that domestic political HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 20. 2003 PAGE 10 advocacy groups that engage in civil disobe­dience could be monitored and infiltrated by law enforcement authorities with little judi­cial oversight. Had this bill been law during the 1980s and ·sos. Queer Nation would have been a prime target for the terrorist label (especial· ly after that Communion stunt at New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral). Most frighteningly, the Patriot Act allows the FBI to "investigate American citizens for criminal matters without probable cause of a crime," according to the American Civil Liberties Union. so long as the agents claim the investigation is •·for intelligence purpos­es." If you missed your chance to kiss the Fourth Amendment (protection against unreasonable searches and seizures) good· bye while she was being rushed out the door, you may wish to send her a note. IF YOU THOUGHT ASHRCROIT'S BLOOD Just would have been satisfied with the red meat of one hunk of the Bill of Rights, think agam. He's back, and he's asking for more. Imagine the consequences for political activists and just regular queer folk if Justice's proposed Domestic Security Enhancement Act passed into law in the form it took when some saint at the depart· ment leaked it, earlier this year, to the Center for Public Integrity As reported by ABC News, the draft calls for granting the Justice Department the power "to wiretap a person for 15 days with· out a warrant, [and would permit] federal agents to secretly arrest people and provide no information to their family, the media or their attorney until charges are brought, no matter how long that took." But the bill's coup de grace is its provi· ion alloY.ing "the government to strip Amertcans of their citizenship for even unknowingly helping a group that is con­nected to an organization deemed to be ter· rorist." Note the phrase "deemed to be ter­rorist." You may want to think twice before joining the gay contingent at the next anti· globalization march. And remember those Muslim detainees. and how we didn't feel that outraged about what happened to them, since they weren't U.S. citizens? According to this draft of what has come to be known as •·Patriot II," the government could deem you and me non-cit· izens for an act of civil disobedience. One of Ashcroft's first acts upon assuming office was to drape the classical nude sculp­tures that grace the headquarters' lobby in sheets, so as to cover their privates An act of civil disobedience I'd love to see: Let's have a party in the lobby and yank those sheets. We can use, as the new fig leaves, copies of the Bill of Rights, a docu­ment soon to be rendered unenforceable. ... Adele M. Stan IS ~ a Washington writer and can be reached through this publication. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com GWEN SMITH I'm not a 'homosexual man' because I'm not a man and am primarily interested in women. I refuse to be reduced to a sexual fetish. Not a man, not a queen ASSUME FOR A MINUTE THAT YOU have read yet another example of some straight guy telling the world exactly what you are. Imagine if his research into you and others like you is flawed, and really doesn't reflect what it means to be you. These depictions of you are so flawed that they reduce who you are to a sexual fetish, and erase important parts of your self-identity. Now you know how I feel about the recently-published book "The Man Who Would Be Queen" by J. Michael Bailey. Bailey - "a single, heterosexual man" according to his text - seems to believe there are two types of male-to­female transsexuals in this world: the ones he classifies as homosexual men and those he classifies as autogy­nephilic men. The distinction between them seems to lie mainly in which ones turn him on and which ones don't. "Autogynephilia" is, for those who may not be familiar with the word, a person with a sexual fetish around body feminization, particularly in regard to having a vagina. It was coined by a doc­tor in Canada who has a bit of history in junk science and bizarre research. Bailey's subjects are largely from the club scene, and many do not fit the more-<>r-less accepted standards of transsexuality. At least one of his text subjects has come forth and claimed she was misrepresented in his text. MY VERY EXISTENCE INVALIDATES Bailey's rigid pigeonholes. I can't fit his "homosexual man" category, because I am bisexual, and.primarily interested in other women. I don't fit his "autogynephilic man" category because I have never been one to "fetishize" about having a female body. Never mind that I also don't fit the label "man" in most meanings of the 1 l1cl1l llll II ETUll llEEI term. lIRSTI SAY ''I DO-A', 11-EN BOB SAYS ''I DO-A" A~ WE'RE MAARIED! He doesn't talk about female-to-male trans people in this book. Sad!); I have learned that Bailey is researching the topic, though he frames FI'M individu· als as "tomboys" in his call for partici· pants. Bailey also has some views on homo­sexuals as well, which consist of stereo­types that I thought most people got over in 1972. Homophobic stereotypes of limp-wristed sissies are still the stan­dard by which homosexuality exists in Bailey's word. Bailey himself has started to tour some college campuses, with a presenta­tion that comes off like a second-rate Jerry Springer show. What bothers me most about Bailey's book iS that it was published on a national academic press and stands JUNE 20. 2003 11 poised to make its way into curricula around the countr): TRA.~S PEOPLE HAVE HAD TO WEA­ther similar situations before, most notably with the 1979 release of Janice Raymond's "The Transsexual Empire," the final nail in the cotrm of 1970S~ra transgender activism. and it took a decade before activists gained enough fortitude to respond. Raymond's text is still used today to attack transgendered people. Bailey's book could do more damage to transsexuals, and homosexuals, than a dozen Janice Raymonds. and I certalnly II!\ @info Gwen Snith is a San Francisco­~ based transgender activist and can be reached at~ 12 MAY 20. 2003 tiuustun A..-ea tilV ~ervices !:?Yan White Vlannina Cuuncil Invites You to Meet Houston Public Leaders and Add Your Input to Title I Allocations Also ... Trends & Needs Influencing HIV/AIDS Services in the Houston Area • .This televised P.ublic Hearing Will Be Held At Houston City Hall Annex Council Chamber 900 Bagby Street, Public Level. Downtown Houston 7:00pm, Monday, June 30, 2003 Fo,. lnfO,.miJtfon P:;ckets, Free Chtfcfcq,.e & Free Ttanspol'tiJfion Ple;;se CiJ// in .Jdvance: Phone: 713-57.2-3724 Fax. 713-571.-3740 TTY: 713-572...,2813 Houston Area HIV Service! Ryan White Planning Council Office Of Support www.rwpc.org 99 DOLIAR.S A :'\IGHf* • YE.AR~ 01 D Within walking distance to Gree11W1ch Village, SOHO and Chelsea Step mto our lobby and step mto the past where litamc survivors, Edith Wharton and Buddy Holly ~ave slept Book now before we are sold out Use promo code 1647. Wolcott Hotel 4 West 31st Street NYC 10001 lbetw!en Aw & 8roadw3y 212-268·2900 • www.wolcon com • sales@wolcott.com •ftatas may be htghet on some calendar d.a:n A FACE ONLY YOU •coULD LOVE! Tell them you saw their ad in the PETS section of the HOUSTON VOICE Classifieds l1t.Jltir.m voce PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AO NOW! CAll 877 863 1885 OR PLACE YOUR AO ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I on the record "In effect, we'll have a taxpayer.funded authority figure on school grounds during school hours telling school children that homosexual behavior is OK .... Unless this bill is defeated, we have sacrificed our children's innocence on the altar of political correctness." !V. Y. Assemblyman Dan Hooker (R·Sharon Springs). on a proposal to target bullying and harassment based on sexual orientation. among other categories: the bill passed 136 to 8 (Daily Freeman, June 16) "You keep your homophobia out of this cham· ber, and you keep it out of this building, and you keep it out of the government. We are here. We are your brothers and sisters. We deserve respect, and we demand respect, and we're going to get it." N. Y. Assemblyman Daniel O'Donnell([)· Manhattan), Rosie's brother. on the floor of the NY. state legL~lature, responding to Hooker's opposition to the anti-bullying bill (New York Post, .lune 1 I) "I ha\'e a record as attorney general that is separate from my personal beliefs." Willillm Pryor; Alabama's attorney general, testifying before the Senate Judicillry Committee on l11s nomination by President flush to be a federal appeals court judge,' Pryor hlJs acknou:ledged canceling a family trip to Disneyworlli thnt coincided with the annual Gay Days, and he wrote in a brief supporting the Texas sodomy law that striking dou•n the lau! wou/li be akin to approving of "prostitution, adultery, necrophilia, bestialit>: pos· session of child pornography and even incest and [Jfdophilia. "(l\'ew York Times. June 12) "[Mark Foley] is simply a vain, calculating, sollpsistic politician who stands for nothing but his own resume. He has betrayed the GLBT community, deceived the right wing and offered nothing substantive or enduring to public service. Florida and America deserve more than having Congressman Closet become Senator Secret" Wayne Besen, a former spokesman/or the Humnn Rights Campail[n who is now a morn­ing DJ at Sirius satellite radio's Out Q channel. on the announcement by Rep. Mark Fbley (R· Fla.) that he would not d1SCuss reports that he is gay during his ongoing run for the US. Senate (May 30) "I have personal principles, but the law is another matter. The mayor of a city has specific obhgations that he or she might not personally agree with. Declaring Gay Pride Week is one of those obligations that the mayor of Edmonton is legally bound to do." Edmonton. Canada's mayor Bill Smith, explaining tef'S4'ly at a press conference why he decided to sign a Gay Pride declaration after refusing for seven years to do so; his prior refusals led to a complaint filed against him by gay activists under the city's human rights ordinance (Edmonton Journal, June 12) "Get over it, get on with it. They just are. Admit it. It's not an issue of sexual orientation; it's an issue of civil rights." Ron Cante/on, mayor of Nanaimo. a small town in the Canadian provmce of British Columbill, offering advice to Smith. the Edmonton mayor (l•:dmonton Journal, June 12) "People are still unsettled bv the possibility that Rudy might not have been entirely heterosexual. Ambiguity makes people uncom· fortable." Author J<:mily I.eider. on her new book, "Dark I.over The Life & Death of Rudolph Valentino," which speculates the famous actor was unsettled by his own sexual orientation and probably hnd at least one affair with a rnan (San Franc'isco Chronic/R, Jurre 15) HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com BUILD LEAN MUSCLE MASS REDUCES BODY FAT REDUCES STRESS LEVELS NCREASE STRENGTH ENHANCES IMMUNE SYSTEM + ENHANCES SEX DRIVE + IMPROVES MOOD + REDUCES FATIGUE + IMPROVES SLEEP + LOWERS BLOOD PRESSURE + INCREASES ENDURANCE + LOWERS CHOLESTEROL + INCREASES CARDIAC OUTPUT E REPLACEMENT SPECIAll T HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE /TESTOSTERONE THERAPY 1.888.663.1777 II www.moderntherapy.com Proud llM!mber of th• American Academy ol Antl·A9in9 Med1cone. THE Health Club for montrose 4040 mllam St. Houston Between Richmond 6 Alabama In montrose www.fltne fxchonge.cc 713.524.9932 S2000FF Annual Membership I Health & Recreation fair Heettfl kremln11. Dtmonltritlofts, Glue· ftWtVt, 1 DIV 0n11 mtntbmhlp 1pec1111 lld 111«11 Sit. June 7111, 11 :JI Rm • 3:11 Pm Optft To Tbt Publkl JUNE 20, 2003 13 The New Lakes of Jersey Village (281 ) 469-1661 (713) 542-5324 New Sales Team! • New Prices! • New Floor Plans' 100°/o Financing Available Location! Location!! Location!!! Off of Northwe't Freeway at Jone' Road Red tile roof~, Stucco front elevation~, Spnnklcr sy,tems, Energy Star package lake, and muc.h more' Peter Estevez D • R •Horton Homes 20 Cherry Hills Jersey Village, TX 77065 Affordable Luxury Living Just a Step Away! 14 JUNE 20. 2003 • For Adam and Steve For Anna and Eve Because in the begi,nning, they only had one choice. 11-IE GALAxIE JEWELERS we Create the Unusual 2511 Sunset Blvd. (near Kirby) 713.521.2511 2001 MCAF Diamond Star Award Sudden Impact wishes you a Wonderful 25th Gay Pride J!!WEUllS OP ANOJCA Call us at 713.520.9696 or visit us at 106 W. Gray in Houston www.suddenimpactcollision.net www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE "Dot by dot building up the image ... " Marion E. Coleman Your Community Image Inker! Hous of Col m n Fine Printing & Graphics 901 WEST ALABAMA HOUSTON, TX 77006 4693 713 523 7521 FAX 113 524 2643 WWW HOUSEOFCOLEMAN COM Board Certified Psychiatrist Jon-Paul Hamilton, M.D. DINING: Midtown pizza place serves up delicious Italian dishes. Page 17. I PETS: Gay Houston couple's four-legged "children" are two German Shepherds. Page 18. on e OU HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 20. 2003 PAGE 15 The world according to Ray Hill Arguably the father of the Houston gay rights movement, Hill presses on in his own unique style ByTINA KING AV HHL WAS A GAY ACTIVIST IN R Houston at a time before "gay activist .. could have been a term said out loud. He remembers the day when a gay man got assaulted and a sheet was spread out on a pool table In a bar so that those present could treat the vie· tim themselves. They had to, Hill relates, because to call in emergency medical techni· clans would mean that the victim would have to tell where. how and wby he was beaten up. If he did that. the best case scenario would be that he would lose his job for being gay. Hill has dipped his hands into the blood of a gay-bashing victim in the days when HIV I AIDS was new and fear of the disease was overwhelming_ He has been a high school quarterback, an evangelist, served time in prison and conquered alcoholism. Those who first meet this fascinating man receive a warm greeting from a tall. person· able gentleman with an outstretched hand. He Is articulate he uses words like "machina· hons" and "esoteric." Names of the mothers and fathers of the GLBT movement, court cases and dates, names of reporters, police officers, city offictals and authors stream from his tongue as if he were the fountainhead. As Houstonians celebrate Pride Wll. Hill reflects on his own path ci pride - a path that has run parallel vi.1th Houston's gay rights movement Coming out It was 1958, Eisenhower was president. Hill went to Galena Park High School and a man could be thrown in jail just for being gay, bee.a use it was a cnme in the United States. Hill had a\wdys !0101m that he was gay am was so ov.'af'e cl his ~ 11ess that he decidOO to bcmme an CWil!,'elist. Having been raised in a fundamental· 1st Baptist church by his atheist mother; Hill became a 13-}-ror<>ld evangelist bcrause he believOO that one day God \WUld "cure" him ci his hornooexuality Ry the time he was 16 years old, he'd was a successful minister and had acquired a drinking problem. His homosexual deslres were still present; he became sick of the hypocrisy and retired from the evangelist's circuit. '11uoogh all ct these ymn;. knowing th.1t he was ~Hill was lllWI' mmro ct wmn he \Ill<;, so at 17 he rame out to his mothes; he rroills. lk resjXXJSC? "Oh, :,oo're g;l)I Thafs SlX:h a reliE! Raymni (Ray's father) am I haw been nOOcll1g that :,oo've ~ <Ires.sing up (coots am~) Il'IOCe than the <Xhet" txiys in the neighlxltlood am we thought that~ vi.ere tl)'ing to appoor wealthier than we are. "We were afraid that yoo might grow up to~ a Republican am embarra&5 the~ .. she told him. Road to activism In his early years, Hill formed the "Promethean Society" with Rita Wanstraum, Ray and Davie Patterson and John Hilliard. The society was named after the mythological god of fire and light. The group found it an apropclb name, as they would be the fire and light for a society that had little light when it came to the issue of homosexualit); Hill explains. Hill and Wanstraum had different views on the way those in the movement should conduct themselves In order to best promote the cause, Hill recalls According to Hill, Wanstraum said outsiders would judge the entire movement by the actions of the few. Therefore, she was in favor of projecting all that was respectable and "normal" to the watching world and felt that GLBT people should watch their behavior. Hill, on the other hand. believed that the actions of one do not reflect all. because peo­ple are individuals and should be viewed accordingly. He was more in your face: "We're here, we're queer, so get used to It." Togethe~ the pair were early co-grand marshals of the Pride parade when it was in Its infancy. Hill believes In openness when it comes to his own imperfections as well. He openly volun· teers that in the 1970s he was sentenced to the Texas penitentiary for commercial burglaries. This was the way he financed his social activist endeavors stealing. lie was released from prison In March 1975 after serving four years, four months and 17 da_vs. Hill soon mnde this expertence applicable In a positive way by starting his 0\\11 radio show In April 1975. "The Ptison Show" on KPFT 90. l FM has become widely reno\\11ed, even globallJ On the front lines Think 1991, the Paul Broussard case and the "Woodland 10." Hill was personally lnvol\'ed in reacting to that infamous Houston gay beating. In the early morning hmm; of July 4, 1991, Hill received a phone call that a yowig gay man, Broussard. had been the Victim of a gay baslung, was lying in a parlting lot and the emergency team refu.o;ed to pick him up_ Hill got on the phone and demanded that Broussard be picked up_ When Hill arrived. Broussard's blood was still wet on the ground and many in the GBLT community just stood around in stunned silence, Hill recalls. Knowing that the stigma and mystery Sur· rounding HIV and AIDS made even gays fright· ened of their own spilled blood, Hill walked up, put both of his hands m Broussard's blood. wiped them on his shirt, and then proceeded to talk to those on the scene, he relates. Hill spearheadt'll an eft'ort to find the a.;s.ilbnts. Thi!. ultimately resulted in the wiearthing of 10 young men from the Woodlands who aJlegt!dly com­mitted this aime. Because ci Hill's e!Ions. seven In all eventually received jail ~tena!s, and now because <I Hill's efforts. at least one has been paroled, and Hill is seeking to help the others. Hill explains that he began corresponding with and visiting with the young men in prison. Hill believed that the fastest way to further alienate them from and harden them against the gay community would be a prlson system that often is brutal on gays. "It's like sending in mad dogs and getting out rattlesnakes," Hill says As he has come to know the young men and their stories, he believes the most benefi· cial thing for the gay commw1ity, the dty and the perpetrators themselves is for them to be paroled. Hlll sees no dichotomy In both having helped to have them incarcerated and tn now coming to their aid to have them freed. Seasoned activist Hill's activism as a gay man extends through­out his life. His }'Ounger sISter died In a car aCCJ· dent In 1917 and left two }'Oung boys. Hill adopted and raised the children as his 0\\11, and It was their choice that he do so. He over·prepared them for the reaction their peers might have to them being raised by a gay parent. he says There weren't any negative reactions to speak oC. Havmg studied the art and science of bringing about social change, he says the oft· quoted phrase in the civil rights movement IS "Quote ~lartin Luther King, but read t.talcolm X." He remembers the day Anita Bryant came to Houston and gays ceased to be scared, frightened individuals fending for themselves and they solidified into a unified comm unit}; realizing that they were not alone. He still says that gays are individuals and need to be seen in all their messy, multi-faceted diverseness. Hill's desire is that those who have had such a pivotal impact in the GLBT movement, though perhaps having untidy lives like his own. not be written out of GLBT histo­ry He doesn't always go with the flow. He doesn't fear struggling upstream to bring about change. He wants to make people think, and he certainly succeeds. Th s weeks activities as Pride Mont c de Pride Committee of Houston www.pridehouston.o 9 p.m 5 am Offiaal After Astrowortd Party "Rollercoaster" Rich's, 2401 San Jacmto Slnlay, Jooe 22 1-4 pm. Family and Youth Day Cost Free Memorial Par1c 7-9-.3-0 p.m XALT: Xtreme Adoration of the Lord Together (Praise Day) Cost Free ComnlJl1ity Gospel Church 4305l.Jlhan Tuesday, .lllle 24 •new date* 6--8 pm "Outbreak A Conmmity Forum on Gay Mens Sexual Health 1415 Bar & Grille 1415 Ca iforma Wednesday, Jooe 25 8 30 10 am Explam ng HIV Drug Resistance: A Patient Approach Cost: Free but RSVP required The Cen r for AIDS 1407 Hawthorne Tlusday, Jooe 26 7:30 p.m. "Hope Along the Wind The Life of Harry Hay" Cost" Free Theatre New West 1415 California 8:30 pm. "Could Angels Be Blessed" Cost: $10. with proceeds benefiting GCAM Theatre Subtl'bia.1410 West 43rd 16 JUNE 20 2003 Tuesday June 24, 2003 6 pm - 8 pm @ 1415 Bar & Grille (1415 California, formerly Sonoma) 1HECLl~ 110115TO Guest Speakers www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE A Community Forum on Gay Men's Sexual Health • Frank Strona - Gay Men's Sexual Health Specialist, San Francisco • Michael Venator, RN - STD Nurse, Montrose Clinic Cash Bar & Free Buffet For More Information - Call 713.830.3006 or www.montroseclinic.org ~--Lambda Legal c_::_ seeks Legal Director lambda legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc., a notional non-profit lGBT and HIV/AIDS civil rights organization, seeks a legal Director to be based in its New York Gty Headquarters. The Legal Director is a member of the senior management team and will provide leadership and coordination in the planning and vision for the department and organization. Responsibilities include supervising senior attorneys, coordinating joint program planning and work with the Education and Public Affairs Department, budgeting, and working with other legal lGBT organizations. The ideal candidate will have a minimum of 7-10 years civil rights litigation experience and excellent monagement and organizational skills. (See "Jobs" at www.lambdalegal.org for details). Salary: DOE, plus excellent benefits package. Cover letter and resume by July 11, 2003 to Mr. Kevin Cathcart, Executive Director, lambda Legal, 120 Wall St., Suite 1500, NY, NY 10005. Fax: 212/809-0055 KINDA Lrlf<£ A DAflNG 6£RVIC£ ... l..OVEVOODOO www.lovevoodoo.com ... ON 6f£ROID£6! ! ! HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com dining J.A. CHAPMAN Delicious pizza, subs and more served up to delight patrons at this family eatery Ponzo's a Midtown gem TUCKED AWAY IN A 1\-UDTOWN STRIP center is an unexpected slice of pizza heaven. Ponzo's is a small, family-owned place. serving up pizza, subs and a few more Italian standards. Don't let the unassuming exterior fool you: Ponzo's is a true neighborhood joint with some of the best pizza around. I took along a friend who considers himself something of a New York style pizza expert. Being the purist, he insisted we start with a slice of plain cheese piw1 ($1.50) to properly assess the quality of the crust, sauce and cheese. A perfectly crispy crust provided the base for the zesty sauce, rich with tomato and oregano. Just the right amount of cheese topped it off and, as my friend noted, they'd browned it for a moment to add a hint of crispiness -a nice touch. He gave the pizza high marks, and had to admit it rivaled his favorite pizza in Houston. We also ordered a slice of Ponzo's deluxe ($.1) to provide a comparison. The same excellent crust, sauce and cheese provided the base, and it came loaded with topping.~. High quality meats, including sliced - not crumbloo Italian sausage, were a treat, and the one slice was almost a meal in it.'*'lf. The pizza is great, but it's not the only thing on the menu. The huge calzone ($7.50) arrived on a pizza platter, pre-cut for easy access. It easily servL'<I two people. While the crust was excellent, overall the calzone was a bit bland. The homemade marinara served on the side had good flavor, but was disappaintingly watery and didn't add a lot. A better choice was the cheese ravioli ($7.25). While the ravioli them.~lves were somewhat thin and wirema.rkable, U1e tradi· tlonal meat sauce more than made up for it. A richly layered blend of tomato. oregano, garlic and fennel, it made the dish. We found ourselves breaking off pieces of the excel· lent calzone crust and dipping them in the sauce, for our own Italian creation. Being primarily a takeout joint, Ponzo's doesn't have a liquor license, but they'll set you up with chilled glasses if you bring your own. Spec's is convenient­ly located across the street, or you can go next door to the Dog House Tavern and grab a beverage of your choice. PONZO'S AUlO SERVES HOT AND COLD ubs. The .Moutl1watering Meatball sub ($6 for a mne inch> was a hearty interpreta· tlon of an old classic The large, spicy meatballs were a treat and clearly home­made. ServHd in an outstanding cnisty sub roll, top1wd with more of that delicJous meat sauce and a bit of romano chet!se, this sandwich was a real meal. As good as the meatball sub was, even better was the Ponzo's Original Sub ($6 for a nine-inch). A toasted sub roll is loaded with hard salami, cotto salami, mortadella. pro­volone cheese. lettuce, tomato. and diced pepperoncini, and topped with Ponzo's orig-inal vinaigrette. With high quality meats and cheeses, sweet and spicy pepperoncini making it zing and the vinaigrette melding the flavors, this sub is the real deal. Owing the hot summer months, a cool sub like Po!ll.o's Original really satisfies. Ponzo's is something of a family tradi· tion. The original Ponzo's \11as in California, and run by the grandparents of the owners here. There are photos of the old place and of the movie stars who ate there hanging on the wall here. Copies of the grandparents' Ellis Island entrance certificates add to the homey feel. Our waitress tried to talk us into try. ing a cannoli for dessert, but when we saw them lined up the cooler, covered with col· ored sprinkles, drizzled with chocolate sauce and topped with maraschino cher­ries, we just couldn't do it. A great cannoli doesn't need to be tarted up. We opted for the cheesecake ($2.50) instead. I wondered if a pizza joint could make a good cheesecake, but I shouldn't have worried. It was so light and creamy it had to be made with mascarpone, not the cream cheese that typifies most American cheesecakes. Even the graham cracker crust was still crunchy. It was an ideal end to a very satisfying meal. As we sat outside at one of the three checkered cloth-covered tables, sipping ow· wine and enjoying the breeze through the old live oaks, Ponzo's seemed like the per· feet neighborhood spat. Locals from the sur­rounding Midtown apartments and town· homes kept stopping by to pick up a pi.Z7.a or dine in. The aroma of garlic and toma­toes wafted through the arr. It's just what you imagine your neighborhood pizzeria · should be. Midtown is lucky to have it. Ponzo's 2515 Bagby Houston, TX 77006 713-526 2426 www ponzos.com Food: !91!91191191 Service: !el•• i. Value· 19! 191 fel i. Scene••• "=St ay home and eat cereal • !el= Well, 1f you really must •!el,..= Fine for all but the finmcky !el !el !el !el :Worth more tlm a 20initrte 00\ie ••••n•:As gocx! as youll fmd 111 this city JUNE 20. 2003 17 "If you have to as!<:, you stiouldn't come" Mature Audiences - Strong Language - Nudit) Written by Robert Chesley Directed by Joe Watts Starring Brett Cullum & Glen Fillmore Through JULY 12th •Fridays and Saturdays Curtain: SPM •Tickets: $20 •Reservations 713-522-2204 mJ ... 1,,1 1415 California St. Houston, Texas 77006 • Lunch Buffet l lam - 2p1'11 • Dinner 5pm - l Opm • Sunday Special: Bottomless Mimosas and Belinis All Day! MEXICAN RESTAURANT BEST TAMALES• QUESADILLAS MENUDO • FAJITAS • CALDOS AWARD WINNING MARGARITAS • 1.99 FROZEN MARGARITAS •1.99 HUEVOS RANCHEROS TREAT YOUR SELF TO OUR ORIGINAL MEXICAN FOOD ALWAYS FRESH, AT AFFORABLE PRICES TO GO ORDERS WELCOME 713-522-2365 CHAPULTEPEC · WHERE EVERYONE IS BEAUTIFUL 18 JUNE 20. 2003 ISl'T IT TIME? GET TESTED FREE ANONYMOUS HIV/STD TESTING Houston Area Community Services 3730 Kirby Dr. Suite 1165 •Houston, TX 77098 713-526-0555 ext. 226 Oflering Peace & Reconciliatio11 co the Alienatl'd 10::1<) Height~ Bhd Houston, 1X 77008 ph. il3.861.18CX> uw.11Jdl!.'fmjerl.org ~· ..... 20 Momltlg Prayer 10om ~·J~2a Euchoriat 7~ Celebrating 26 Years in the Community Saturdays at 7 :30pm i307-H Yale • 713-880-2872 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE TINA KING Gay Houston couple share all parts of their home with pair of affectionate dogs German Shepherds a delight JUST OUTSIDE THE BELTWAY 8 SOUTH· west of Montrose, dogs bark in the barkyard of a beautiful white Spanish stucco house with a red tile roof and lush greenery. One of the home's human residents, Robert Harwood, introduces his two "kids": German Shepherds Blanca and Ranger. Blanca. 2, is snow· white, while Ranger, almost 4, is black and tan. Both are friendly and affectionate, but do not jump on and knock down visitors in their enthusiasm, as is the case with many large dogs. Originally from Minneapolis, Harwood has known that he was gay from the time he took his first tap, jazz and ballet classes at age 5. His mother said he was always dancing around the house as a young boy and she approached him about the dance lessons. It was also his mother who first came to him and asked him if he was gay and Harwood knew there was no other answer but to tell hei; "Yes." Though his devoutly religious Catholic par­ents had some problems at first in accepting their son's sexual orientation, both are now accepting of him and his partner, Richard, and his three sisters have always been "cool" with it. Harwood relates. All his siblings are mar­ried and still live in Minnesota, and he is an uncle many times ovei: That early dance training paid off, as Harwood spent several years as a profession· al dancer. After five years in New York he moved to Houston in1991, never missing the Minnesota winters, and now works as a bar· tender at gay piano bar Keys West HARWOOD AND RICHARD, WHO HAVE been together for six years, got Ranger because they love big dogs, and Blanca was a birthday gift to Harwood from Richard, because Harwood always thought solid white German Shepherds are beautiful, he explains. Ranger and Blanca get along well together, wrestling and nuzzling one another. but, "Blanca is definitely the alpha dog," says Harwood. Blanca loves toys and balls, and a~ fast as you can put them in her toy box, she has them out on the floor .again. If Blanca is receiving a little too much attention from Harwood, Ranger runs over to nuzzle Harwood's hand for some affec· tion. Harwood ~ays his dogs are like his children. In fact. he and Richard purchased a king-size bed to accommodate all four of them. Harwood says Blanca and Ranger are mostly indoor dogs, but they do have a doggy door so that they can come and go into the backyard as they please. Harwood says both are good guard dogs, but turn into affection·beseeching puppies when they know you. According to Harwood, Blanca doesn't seem to take to other animals or people very well; she's protective of her territocy A favorite past time of both is going out for a run on their leash while Harwood is rollerblading. If another dog comes into their Robert Harwood (pictured) and his partner Richard share their home with German Shepherds Blanca and Ranger. (Photo by Penny Weaver) vision or something catches their attention, the once leisurely rollerblading turns into an all-out chariot race with Harwood hanging on for dear life, he says with a laugh. Harwood and his partner's favorite hobby is shopping, evident by their beautifully fur· nished home. Harwood also e!tjoys his work in ftmd-raising and putting on shows in Houston, all to raise money for AIDS charities. Harwood also holds the coveted title of "Mr. Prime Choice 1996," which was the impetus in getting him involved in fund·raising, he says. IT IS EVIDENT WHAT PET-LOVERS THESE two gay Houstonians are. In the backyard where Blanca and Ranger romp so joyfully, lush greenery surrounds paths, a fountain and a pond of Japanese Koi fish. As I admired the scenery and the pond, Harwood noticed something disturbing about one of the Japanese Koi. The fish seemed to be lethargic and stationary on the bottom of the pond. Harwood prodded him a little with a small stick and the fish did not swim away, a sure sign of trouble. Upon closer inspection, Harwood found that the Koi had a small branch stuck in its mouth: one end protruding from its mouth and the other from one of its gills. Harwood seemed slightly distressed by this discovery and after some brief discussion about what to do he got a long-handled net and gently pulled the Koi closer to him. He reached out and slowly pulled on the end of the branch projecting from the fish's mouth and it slipped ever·~gently out from both mouth and gill The fish immediately swam off and con· tinued to glide gracefully through the pond as we talked with relief about how glad Harwood was that the "surgery" was minor and the Koi seemed well. Harwood and I parted company with a hug and a handshake and Ranger, Blanca and the Japanese Ko~ If I can read animal non· verbals accurately, seemed to be happy to be in a lov· ing home in which family encompas'leS those with paws and gills alike. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I communi SATURDAY, JUNE 21 Houston ,.,... Bears. Moothly soda! at Mary'~ 9 p.m. 50/50 raffle. 71>86MI EVERY SATURDAY ~SpnhWcmp~Es!riJal6p.m~~ p:jit.rl Cumuoty Oud\ 2026 W lltll 71J.30:B409 or m&l-9149 After Holn. KPn 901 FM l-4 a.m Oogrity mass. l'lO p.m for gay Catholics. 713-880-2872 Ftte HIVT~ Mcrtrw:> Cliic. ll pm-2amat Vt.ma's. ~300l Goy & ~ 8rukfast WI. 930 a.m 281-437-0636. Houslon Wrestling CU>. Practice. 1:30 p.m. 713-4il-7406. Unblo Cenl!I'. Alcolllli<:s Anonymous. 11:30 a. '1t Eye Opener Group, 8 p.m. SatUl1IJy N ght L"'- 930 pm. Willi:19 Ones Group, 1201 W Clay 713-521 U43 or 713-528-9772. wwwlambdahouslDTLOl1J MontnJst Socar CU>. 10 a.m. practice. Woodrow Wilson School. Fa.mew and Yupon. Nl'W ~welcome. but beglnne1' not cur rent!)' 1>tmo admitted. 7J3.862-949l httpJ/geocitieS-ccnVrnontros­esocar E ""' mon~ a.)ahoo.com. ~ ~ .... tll!s!!l'ets to ll!lp ire><nthatecrrne> 9.30 pm CorMn' at cormnfy cent«. 71J.528-SAFE. &nm Q>ltrolrc'.:al.Jolalm St Stephen's ~ Clutlt Rosary 8 a.m 1805 YI Alabama. 7ll528-C665. Houslon GlBT Cornnlnty Center. Drop-ti\ noon-5 p '1t • 3400 Manin:' < • 101 '"l-524 3818. WYIW.houstooglb!C!nter.org SUNDAY, JUNE 22 BllAG. !I g oft,,. Bl nd Fnends & ra1111ly of leSbians. <ndcn & Bisexuals. 2 p.m 4204 G.1rrott For more lnfor ma1JOn, call 7ll52tH>526 or e-mail WO~ houston.rr.com. Houston Outdoor ~ PotJud< and pool p.yty. 2-6 pm. For more 111!:::-naborl. call Peter at 281-448-5531 HOGUNL 713-KAMPOOI www..tisentrnirlincllhog EVERY SUNDAY Bering MemorlJI lMllttd Methodist Clutfl. Semces at 8.30 & ll>.50 a.m Surd.iy school 9:45 a.m 7ll52b-101Z C«d2r for Spi1tual lMng. Servtcts at 11a.m.forchildrenat10:50 a.m 6610 H.irwin. 713-139-1808. The center also tias commitment te!lllllnle\ met.lpliyYcal bookstore and d.wts. Cornnlnty !'.o5pel. Sorvt;;e at 11 am & 7 pm. Surllay School fur dlildn!n 10 a.nt 71.3-880-9215 or WWW.comrtU>!ygospel0!1j. CorMudty of Kinchd Spirits In 8eilrnonl Wonhip at 6 p.m 1575 Spindletop A'ie.. Beaumon~ Tws. 409-813-2055. E-mail cksrevl;ametmo.net Covwnt Cluth, EarneniQI, Ubenl Baptist SeMce 9 JO a.m & education hotr 11 a.m. 713-668-8830 Emenon lbWian Clvch. Adult educ;itlon, :o a.m. ScMce. 11 a.m. Lunch it noon. www.emersonhou.org. fnt tonoreg;itioNI Clknh (Memorial) Ser.a at 10 a.m. Ctl1$tian Education, llJO a.m 713-468-9543 or lcc-houstan.org. First UnlWlan UrMrsallst Clutlt Sm1cts at 930 & ll:10 a.m. 8nl1Cil at ll>30 a.m. 7ll52b-5200. church@fi .. tuu.Olg. Frft HIV T~ Montrose Clinic. 9 p.m."11idrightat CU> lnervY 7J3.830-3000. ~Boioq 1..K9a 7 p.m. Palxe ~ 4Nl ~EM 71H!61 ll8Z Cay Catholics of St Amo's-Houston. 5 pm. wonhip seMce. Dinner ...i sociJl. wcamalwtnet 7ll623-0930 Gl06AL. Gay UlbiJn Or Bisexual Aniance. University of Houston GlBT Wdent group meetmQ. 2 p.m at the Houston Lesbian & Cay Carmmity Cent"' 3400 Montrose. Suite 202 7ll524·38ta www Aedu/~ E-111Jil: gtob.11 bayruultedil Cract Al$ombly Churdl Gay/g.JY-affimwig congreQation 11 a.m. semce 567 Cedar CrM. Livingston. Texas. m5t 936-64&-m4 E-mail. leol easttex.net Cract Luthenrl Cleth. Sund.iv school for all ages 9 a.m. Service IO'JO a.m. 7ll528·3269. HAlc.H. Houston Area Teen CoJlition of Homosexuals meets 6-'I p.ni For meetillg lnform.ltior\ caR 713-529-3590. www.hatchyoutll.org Houslon RouQfn!cks Rugby C1ub Pr.lcbce from 4 6 p.m. For mort lnfonrotion. IOg on to www.roughnecksnig17;org. Hcx5torl Tervis WI. 9 a.m.'100!1. Me-nonal Pa'1< at the Tenor; Center houstontt:wselb aotcon1 lMTtda Cri!r AlcddG Anonyrn;x& 9.30 am Cane to 8eli.w ~ 1201 W 0Jy. 7JJ.521 l243 or 713-5211-'1772. www~ Mmnatha Felo"5flp Metropolitan Clutlt 10 a.m. StMCe 3133 Fainn. Stlte 106. 7ll528-6756. Northwoods lJlitM1an UrWenaltt a..m. Sem:rs at 11'.45 & ltlS a.m. Surd.iy school q 4 s a.m. 281 ·2'18-Z780. Rowrtdlon MCC. SerVlCl'S. 9 and 11 a.m. Children iV1(f Youth Sin11y School 10 a.m. Children's - 11 a.m. 7ll86Ml49. St ~ llfformld c.it110ic Mmiorl Sin11y MJss at noon. Holy lhans r.'J4Jble Group meets at Ill! Hair Express. 3310 DclJware. Bc.unont. Texas mrn 409-781-11152. E-mait bwJtsonl~ St stephen's Epi5copal Cluth. Holy Eucharl:.t Rite I. NS a.m.; Holy Eoc!lolllst. Rite IL a5S a.m.. Education l>:Jur, 10 a.m.; OIOral Eucharist. 11 a.m. 7ll528-666S. Sin!ay BrlllClt For HJV1JOSllM! men 11 a.m. Riva'~ lll7 Missouri St Paul. 1ll880-0690. e-mail: l'lllnBuffbJoi.com. The W°"""'s ~ Mt~bng and (isa.ission 10:45 a.m. 713-529-8571 Thoreau Unot.Wn U....er.;alist tonoreg;ition. Adult discus~ 9 a.m. SeMct UIS a.m. 281·2n·8882 www.twc.Ql9. l)wt.v1an Fellowship al Galveston County. 502 Church SL Servtct. 10'30 a.m. 409-76s.a:l30 UnllMian FtlowVlp of Houston. Wt forum. 10 a.m. Servic2. 11 a.m. 7lH8b-5876. IWstcn Cl.BT Camuity eentar. llrqH\ 2-6 p.m. • GlBT CcmnuUty Oud1 wtth Rev. Melissa Wood: Bible study 10-10:45 a.m. WOl1llip ll a.m. WWW~' Q.OBAI. ~ 6 pm. ' 3400 Mmlruse. Silte '107. 71J.524-38la WWW~.Olg. cal ndar MONDAY, JUNE 23 Log Cabin Repblicans. Monthly meeting with 6:30 pm. socbl and 7 p.m diri· ... RI"" C.fo, 3615 Montrose. httpJ/Hoo>tonlogCabi~ EVERY MONDAY Center for Spintual Liv1119. Med1t.Jt1011 !drop-011. 11:30 a.m.·l p.m 6610 Harwin. 7ll339-1808. Ft1e HIV T~ Ho1atn1 fvm Qmruity SeMces. 9 a.rnmri al .kis<P> t!inesClinic. 1710 ~t 25th St 713-526-0555, ext.231.227 or 226. FM HIV Testing. Montrose ClilllC. 4-8 p.m at Briel<~ til7taimew. ID-830-3000. Frost Eyt Clric. Fne eye exams for people with HIV. 7J3.830-3000. Gay Bowling Wguts. WOtrV'f{s lt.JgUe 6:45 p.m. [)ynanlc Lanes. 11121 Tam<?f Olive. 7ll86H18Z Gor F~ ... Fi.t Sl4:lnt qll4l 6-9.30 pm Benig I.blue Uil'd M.'l!ulstOud\ bn 71J.12bll73().~ Cract AswriJy Clutlt Cay/g.1y-i!ffimiiig ~ 7 p.m. aerobics d.m. 5"7 Ctdar Grove LMngston. Texas. 77351 936-641>-7214 E-mail: leol 4~ Grief"'~~ Gnqis. 7 p.m. Bering 713-526-1017. .n 208. Houston Rouglwlecl:s Rugby CU> l'r.lctia! from 6:3CHl:30 pm. For more 11form.ltJon. log on to www.l'tlllghnecksn.org. Kol>t Projocl Eucharist 7·30 p.'11. 7ll86H800. Lambda Center. Ak:oholks Anonymous. 8 p.m lk'ginnm' Group. UOl w Clay. 7ll521·1243 or 7ll528-9m wwwlambdahouston.Ql9. Montro!lt Ch: Of fas weel<ty Jll'O' SlJPPDr\ ~for gay and bosexual men with HIV. Spanish speaking !11l'.IP meets. 6:30 p.m. 215 V>l5ttleimel: 713-830-3050. c:.tJpo de ,.,,,,, para Latms gay y bistmlles V1H posl­tlvos. lln'S 6:30. P.wa nm l1formlaon lml al 7l3-830-3025. ~Voices Radio Show. 8-10 p.m. KPn 90.l Houston GlBT Conmnty Center. Dnlp-in 2J1 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, 5'ite 20Z 713-524-3818. www.houstonglblcenter.Q19. TUESDAY. JUNE 24 ..... Mtoor Cnq>. Germ mcrtllg and nt'W5fctlrr rmbt Don rd l!.l'f. 71.3-522.7009 tllCUNf;7l}KAMIWI ~ 'Uving with HIV."~ daytime support oroup. llJO a.m. Montrose Coll1selong Center. 701 Ridrnond. ID 529-0032 EVERY TUESDAY Bering~ Nei-tc. lJlnch Bin:h Gatv,j.11 a.m. 713-521>-10 1 Center for Sporilual l.JYilg. Meditation (drqHn), :.1:30 a. '1t I pm. 6610 Harwin. 713-339·1808. Ft1e HIV T~ lbJ5loo Area CumuitY Sl!Vas.10 am.-2 pm at ~CH:.1710 WstzJl'Sl ~exl.2lL 'll7 or 221> Free HIV Testing Montrose CliniC. 8 p.m-fllldni9ht at Club Houston. Also 4 8 p.m. at 611 Club. 611 Hyde Parle. 7l3-a30-3000. GlBT Pentecostals. Bible >tt.dy. praytr, 7 p.m. In the Heights. For Info. 9J6.931·376l ...,,.,il: wwwW1$Jl947 a.a.tool Houston Women's Rugby Team. No expenence necessary l'ractice. 6:30-8:30. Wostland YMCA Kay. ID·208·1529. lntroruction to 8udillsrn. All welolme al 034 W Temple 11 the Heights. 7 p.m Cartton 7ll862-8129 l!:lifuN ~Free WI drcc k>sar;. &ales lMI-Mrln Ni p.rto;r roxl'tl &?re 2 Sl!p. \~ srum. & ~ !Wp.m 7J3.52&.9192. Houston Cl.BT Canmlnity Center. Orop-«1 2·9 pm. • Ltsllian Cornuig Out Group. 7 p.m • 3400 Mon!lllse. 5'ite 207. 7ll524·381a wwwtioustonglbl£1'nter.Ql9. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 Ce'ller b-AIDS. ~ ITmr 7 p.m.1407 Haw1ltorre ~527-8210. HGl.P. Houston Gay & l.esllian Partnts .-letter mailout. 7 p.m Buffct Express. 8622 Stelb Link. For more onform.ltron. rail Raymond and Rich.vd. 261-403-9087 www.Jigtp.org. EVERY WEDNESDAY Center for Splntual l.Jving ~talion (drop-<n), 11:30 a. ll l p.m; SOM 01scUSS1on & E.xploration 7 p.m. 6610 fiJrwin. 713-339-1808 Crj\tal Meth Anonymous (CMA). 8:15 p.m. meeting Montrose CoumclinQ Cent,,.., 701 lbctvnond Ave, Room 15. Bering Memonal Unrted Methodist Clutlt Support Nclworl< Pot Llrl Dinner, 6:30 p.m. Vanous support~ 7 pm. 713-521>-1011 Bible Sl!Jdy Noon & 6:30 p.m. St Stephen'5 EplSCOpal. 7ll52b-6665. Frer HIV Tesq. Montr!l!e Cliric. 4-8 pm at Mari\ uoo Wcslhem.'r; 9 p.m.-ni!Dltll at RipaJd, 715 Farview: 10 p.m.·l anut EJ\ 2517 ~ 10 p.m.·I am at MidtlM'!1I! ~ 3100 Farnn. 7l3-830-3000 Frft HIV T~ Thom.1s Simi Cini:. 9 a.m.·I pm. 2015 Thomas St OraSin method Can for appointment. Sh.wn. 7l3-a73-4157. Gay Bowling Wguts. 6:30 pm. Palace Lanes. 4191 Belbi!! Blvd. ID-86Hl8l Gna AswriJy Clutlt Gay/g.1y-i!ffirmlng IXll1gr'9Jtion. 7 p.m. aero­bics dass- 567 Ced.Ir ~ lMngston. Texas. 7735L 936-646-m4. E-mail: lcol a.'t.1~tl'X.net ltutD1 Mle em~ rohM.i 7.30-9~ pm WY.£ 71.3ai.2·1488. Houston Roughnodcs Rugby CU> Practice Imm b:30-8.30 pm. fill' more onformatJOn, log oo to wwwroughned<snlJ17;.orv. Houston T ems CllA> 7:00-9 p 1t Memorial Par1c at the Tcnnrs Center hMtontennisctba.aoltom Spiritual Uplift """1Ct. 7 p.m. Rtsurrect~ MCC. 71Hl61.<Jl49 Houston GlBT Conmnty Centar. Oros>«\ 2.<J p.m. · Free HTV testing. l'ru\seling. b-9 p.m.. Houston Pride Band l!hearsal. 7:30 p.m.. 'l400 Mootn:: • . • '.'07 "13-524·3818. www~.org. THURSDAY, JUNE 26 EVERY THURSDAY ~Houston Grol4> for boseiwls; Mryooe wekllme.1.30 pm.~ Cife_ 2240 f\lltsmouth. WWW flashttt/-binJse ~7-4380. Centerior Spiritual Li<~ Medit.Jtion (drt>p.jn), ll10 a.m.-1 p.m. 6610 Harwn 713-339-1808. Cllrmu1ity !'.o5pel. Service. 7-30 p '1l 7ll680-9235. WWW commu- 11~ ~===~o~:si~ty~~j81~ Gallery Medical Clinlc, 5900 North Freew.I)'. and C1ub Toyz from 9 p.m.-midniQht. 713-526-0555, ed 231227 or 226. me HIV Tesq. Montrose Clinic. e pm.- nidnigllt at Brazos Ri'll!r Bottom (BRB), 2400 Srazos. and Coo!i1s. 817 Fairview ~3000 Free HIVTesting. 7·9pm.at All St.Jr N~341S Katy Ft'eeway He.il!h clinoc with free testing for HIV and >yphilis. 713-869-7878. ~ !ming clJb. 6:30 p.m. 7ll522-8021. Well s!lc http:/~tlm'houfr.htm.E-mal:balha•(a)s~t. Gay Bow1ilg Leagues. Luci Duos. 9 pm. Oynanic Lanes. bill Tvnef °""' l'll8bHl87. Gl.OBAL Cay, lesbian or Bisexual Alfianre at tile Univorslty of Houst....-..<:entral ~ Weelcly meeting. 6 p.m. o-mail: IWJllY'l1(l02l;a:hotmai!.com. He!> C ReaMry. SLwrt ~ 6:30 p.m. SemJ 7ll526-lOH Ext. 2ll Houston Women's Rugby T.-N•> expcnenc:e necessary Pr3ctict 6:30-8:30. Westland YMCA Kay 713-208-1529. Lake l.Mngslon GlBT Support Grol4> 7 pm. dinner and cisaJSSicn Grace Assembly Cluth. 567 Cedar GrM. LMngslo<\ T~ m51 936-64b-7214. E"""11: leol a.~tex.net umidl Sbbng CUt 8 p.m. TradeMnds Skating Rink. www.ncosolt.com/-lrsc. 7ll523-9620. Monlnlse Clinic. Offer< weekly peer support grt>llPS for oay and bisexual men with HIV English speaking group meets. 6:30 p.m. 215 Westlleimer ID-830-3050 R.luWN R.lngler>. Fne C&W dance lessons. No partner reqiired. Brazos River Bottom. 8:30 pm. 7ll528-'1192 Rea-y From Hlad Addiction (RfA). Meelong for 12-sttp program open to all Noor> l pm. Sl Stephen's [piscapal Clud1. 1605 W. Alabama st RfA 7ll67J.284a www.oeootJes.ccm/l'fa77235/ E· mait~aol.com. ~ Charla Canvtrsation Group. Cal~ Aq:xa. 7 p.m E-mail ctiar· lahaustor(a;mso.com. 713-41b-7201 Wlllflt!is Ci*. Montrose Clnic. 7J3.830.3000. Haustlll1 GUJT Camuity C..W, Drop II 2-'I p.m. • Montrose WnterS Pl'qect. 10 a.m. • Houston Gay & leslim l\;Wcal Cacus board of~ meeting. 7 p.m. • MontNy vobrtrer meeti'4 7 p.m. • 3400 Monlrt>se. Slitc 20Z 713-524-3818. www~.org. FRIDAY, JUNE 27 EVERY FRIDAY Center for SpmlllaJ l.i<ing Meditation (drop-in), 11:30 a.m ·1 pm. ~10 Harwin. 713-339-IBOa Frft HIV Testing. Montrose Cllnic.10 p.m.-2 am at The Me.itr.id<. 2915 s.n .banto; 10 p.m.-1 am at EJs and at Mtttllwne ~ 7llfilO.aooo. Free HIV Testing. Thom.ls Stmt Clinic. 9 a.m·I p.m. 2015 Thomas St OraS<re method Call for appointment Sharon 7l3-a73-4157. Frust Eyt Cine. Free fY' exams for people with HIV. 7JU30.3000. Gna AswriJy Clutli Gay/gay-i!ffi-,,.ng congreoation. 1 pm. atr· OblCS c1.m. 5111 Cedar Crave. LMngstOI\ Texas. ms1 9)6.t,4(). m4 E-mail:leoliile3stteuiet. HA TCR Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexwh meets 7-10 p.m. for meetJflg inlormJtion, tall 7Jl529-3590. WWW ~ Houston T ems CU>. 7:00-9 p. -n. M"'10l'ial Partc at the Temis Centtr~.orv Kdbe PrajocL M.."T111119 pra)\!r 10 a.m. 7ll861 l800. ~ Alzim. GI.ST Jrwish congregation. Sabbath SCMCtS at 8 p.m on the se<ood Friday of each month at Baby 8amJbyi. &02 Fairww Monthly .nxfy grcups wtt'i Coogreg.1tl0ft B<:tl! lv.iel S600 North Braeswood. M hpadiat A 11m PO. Box 980136. Houston. TX TI096 86b-841"1139 ext 1834 ~ \l:iJte!n d Ill!~ to~ Jml'l1l h31.!cmc.. 9J0pm ~at cormnt-Jctnttt 71J.528-SAFE. E-mail~ lbJl!m WIT Cmmnty Corar. Drop-112-'I pm • tdD1filmni\111.7 pm• 3400 Mor0W, Stile '1!Jl.71J.524-3818. WWW~~ VOLUNTEER/SELF-HELP E0CS. T!i>rmpit.ln'rillrydtfl' ~Outhdtfl' ~Gib> oml m llt*'9 p,qi?aaes tdhallsrii smu~ me rnD:3 ~rdQ,HIV, SID ad l;r4Jtil ~Cll b-dl!l'sad lm5dnv­m 96105.r.sn 713-~ E-11\lledlJs.lwilin~ Gor&le!lian~tblslDl ~<&afmdyuto~ 11 nttdd rib-m1lo\ ~~allnJ¥TW>Clll'fiY9 m tll!Q.BT amnnty.713529-3211~ ~ MprCllpl tlis m'91lfi1 nnleram!Hral nnn:em1 1s1 that~ b::itatl!a!luacy mini ~dfats 1tt ~ tb£tuin ()at;tyd ~5 Slli:tlylnMi ~ni.0:!1'1S> ~;rdadilrl akrts from m!l:m, lla!l! and kd !>'>'rd aled 01J» lrJ!ins.forrdoorto)Cllaa:es.www~~ Houston GlBT Canmlnity Certer. Volar!teers perform a variety of cntical tasks v.llich indud< staffing the onform.l!Jon desk during drqH1 ~ helping with cent"' progra!1111J!1Q and Mn!>; wortlng on ton1111111ity outreach efforts. fulll.raising and IJltiidty Can! play· ers. wnters and artists., p.1rliCtJar are needed. 7ll524·38la Petr Listening Line. Youth only Staffed by GLST youth for gay lesbian. bl<oual, transgender and questioning youth. 5-10 p.m Monday-Friday. 800·399·PEER. Pride CGrnnittat al Houston. ~ sought for Pnd• 2003 activities this month. www.pndehou<ton Ql9. £-mail:~~lon.Orll 7ll52%979 ~ To list an event. call 713·529-8490, fax ~ at 713-529-9531, or e-mail editor@ hoostonvoice.com. Deadline 1s Monday at 5 p.m JUNE 20. 2003 19 ap ts a weekly guide to arts & entertainment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL SATURDAY, JUNE 21 The annual Houston Billiard Open is hosted by the Independent Billiard League. The tourney is open to everyone and is a fund· raiser for area charities; this year's recipi­ent is PWA Holiday Charities. Food and door prizes will be provided. Billiard Congress of America rules will apply, Tickets: $15 in advance or $20 on the day of the tournament Registration: 10 am. Play begins at 11 a.m. Slick Willie's Montrose, 1200 Westheimer. www.iblhouston.com. lli-522-4814. SATURDAY, JUNE 21 Hank Gasper, a local contemporary artist. will unveil his latest artwork at a special showing to benefit AVES (Amigos Volunteers Education and Services, Inc.). In a series titled "Twenty Weeks." Gasper set out to create one watercolor painting each week for 20 weeks, focusing on events, both personal and global, as the source for the paint­ings. Gasper's art. predominately abstract. will be sold to benefit AVES, which supports persons living with HIV/AIDS or those who suffer from sub­stance abuse in the Latino and African American communities. 6 p.m. Artwork prices: $125 to $150. The Riv.er Cafe, 3615 Montrose. NIGHTLIFE EVERY THURSDAY FO, a local all-female rock band, hosts open mtc/cider nighL Musicians and vocalists of all styles and genres are wel­come. No cover. 9 p.m. to 1 am. Chances, 1100 Westhe1mer. lli-523-721Z www.chancesbar.com. FRIDAY, JUNE 20 "Summer Sweat Fest" weekend is a fund­raiser for ICOH Space City Empire Reign 1. with proceeds benefiting AIDS Foundation Houston's camp Hope, and AssistHers. The weekend-long leather/drag bar run cele­brates the group's one-year anniversary and includes cocktail parties. food. games and shows. Registration: 7 p.m. EJ's, 2517 Ralph. lli-527-9071. GALLERIES ONGOING Gulf Coast Archives & Museum of GLBT History Satellite Exhibition. The first exhi­bition from the GCAM collection presented at the Houston GLBT Community Center honors the NAMES Project Houston. Community Center, 3400 Montrose. Suite 20Z lli-524-3818. Positive Art Workshop Photography Exhibition. Artists living with HIV/AIDS created these pictures with accompanying text. Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 20Z lli-524-3818. 20 JUNE 20. 2003 CLASSIFIEDS COLDWELL BANKER UNITED. REALTORS W1•e yv;; CY Jer se g •rme. ~ a ruce to find a •eilftor t' ats 'he lam i' Ca Mark Be e. ~ _ s far.: Call Marie today! ''1) 521 5709 SALE I HOUSTON lRG MffiRLAND CONTEMPORARY Great for e.-:ertain-licme was CUSlllll' des<gned & has "' f1tfnt YM!WS f the sculpture garden l:M ~ 700 sqfr of IMng arra len garde view shower f<esh pa! I & cul New carpet S l39 900 832 76& 5 53 !or mere nfo. (Agent) STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD Is your heme speciail ·en QUI readers abcu! t Guara tee theywi see tt With our 'lfW featurts. Bold CJ< box your a!! IOf added attraCIJOn romaa our ,ustomef sen e reps b 'llOl'f deta s. R77) 863 885 RENT I HOUSTON • NEAR 610 I 2'0 New heme for tease 2 BR, 3 BA roll, LR/ > <:~ apph, f hdwd51berbe~ yard. 2 car garage. ~ let roomrr.ata Avail 811 S2.30<Ymo. (832) 444 3• RENT IT FAST W' OU' new lea+'..ns. 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When ma~1ng arrangements for your ruon, don t forget to noude the oxr; mpor<ant aspec1 of a .announc ng the dat Publish nq VC'- ~"'°" s easy & silrp1e can (87n 863 • 885 ext 223 to p;.1 the firwsh ng touch "S on your "eferr. ARTISTIC WEODING INVITES ~rvque & .olorfut wedd ng/ co= t-ie-t tat , for the rouple seel: .., to express the :.lua IV Please t website www~'ltfa om VIDEOGRAPHY For ,,.,, :ne I ceroonies & '1edd:"JS-Ca (770 636 2222 Of t-mail l'ldoofreelance<Ce~ ret for more info ANNOUNCEMENTS HOMELESS CHARITY DONATIONS AIDS shelter needs terns for rummage sale & ient re<yc e. MUSI be 111 won ng CJ<· der •ax rece pt& no p oTit. 1713 864-1795. (502 W 24th St; EMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING SALES rie Houston Voice. the regions GLBT med'ia le~ seek ng an advenisrng account executJVe vou II be resporU.t tor an phases of the sales process: qualifying. cold-calling. prospec1 dMiopmtnt; conceptua a ng. planning & de!Ne;-,g sales presentations; wnllng proposa s. negotra!Jng contracts & ctos:ng new business. One year of pmt Of on-line advertising sales expenence preferred, but no1 necessary. We cffei a 'ia 'tngll'lg & ex t.ng oppo:tJni!y 111 a last-pacl!d, goal­ooented (yt! fun) envtrlJlllWll We offer corrtpe1!1!Ve CQn1len­s. · spec;fic tra n:ng & a comprehensive benefits pacl:age In­duding healt!Vdenta fe nsurance. generous paid holidays, vacatlOll & mere tt you hawe a proven trad record "' sale;, are results-dri'len & want to help bYilcf a newspapt that has a ?O'" ruve ompact ;J11 comm;;: ?y, we want to hear from you. Send c:over letter & resume to. Generz Ma".J9'r. The Houston V0tet. 500 lulett. Suite 200. Houston, TX 77006. 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NEW LOWPRICEI MI m cussmm ADl«'H/I CAil rn 8631885 liMilWIADOOUT WWW.HOUSTOllYOICE.COM 14 17 20 24 37 40 43 56 60 63 Across I. ~s1ory 5 Nonheterosexoofy conceived ·man· 10. Sprint at the (jay Gomes 14 "F'irehird" composer Strovinsky 15. Become wife ond wife seaet!y 16. PenMOn mend of Maia MJelov' 17. Verrl''s tragedy of a fallen woman 19 Get_ (9flj0'( JJguno Beochl 20. Steve lhry and o~ 21 Jone Spohr and Mel White 22 Ad1y Obejos' womon 2 4. Home of Toys it Bobelond 2 6. Guy who uses COlllt«l lines 17. Rilke's ke 28. Endrted m Nyod 29. S1t1rt rJ on Ethendge olbt.n !Ille 32. ·_ rom· (poem rJ 38- Downl 35. ll:e snci~in 36. ' Alone Dov&in Movie" ("Grease') 37. Albert, lo Nathan 38. W~ and Groce shored one 39 Respond• lo "Bite me!"? 40. J!lll8S M. Home's one? 41 Ca1holicism, lo Mychol Jixlge 42. Utensi for grrog ~"more• 43. Ehon's john 44. Bannon and Northrop 4 5. &een _ (ooe le!Jn rJ Knixri' 46. Am1 Petei of ·aw 48 "Becrlning 0 /Mn" ou1hor 52. Members ot o bc!hhouse? 54 "(jay Ameriam Histay" outhor Jooo!hon Ned 55. St of Lon /rlaboo 56. S!rol:.e from Sper.ter-Oevlin 57. Wagner's l:ntglrt's tole 60. Shrek, for one 61.Too big for YOU' bntches 62 Siamese, if you pease 63. Peter lhe Great 64.More~ 6 5. Bush slOff er Down I. Cosh drowm 2. A l1lClble PoYer may shoot 1t off 3. Loals of • 4. Screw 141 s. Wade IXJ1ies 6. Dmb h<dy color 7. WrlljlS oroood drog queens 8. Throw in !he towel, wrth ·out• 9. "Love Songs" poet Saro 10. ROSl of 1he WIZ" 11. Wllh 34-0own, Barber's Sldespeore ~ 12. Fey le&ne fim faiOl1 Answers on Page 20 JUNE 20. 2003 21 13 MordikoYa. wOO beat Navrot 111 l!!e 1985 U.S. Open 18 CbineHllower Shaw 23. frequent ID1liootion lo!~ ond Hyde Pierce 25 Prefix wilh ltiibies 26 Up Ill ooej ems 28.Sings like'E llo 30. And olhers. for Coesar 31 Sotisfy fuly 32 Russian nver 33. Homosex, Ill ~ of Exodus 34 See I Hlowr. 3 s. River of (jay PlJee 38 1he Weczy Blues" poet Hughes 39. lroricolly S1roight Sliger Morrin 4 1._oa~ 4 2. 1he Gieot Uruso. stor Morio 45. Be a pain 11 lhe ass to 4 7 Lost wml of 0 ltiry !tie 48. Home for lioy Peay 4 9 Reogoo of the Big Lovely bcnl SO. EJA. FO!Sler's "'Mlere Angels Feor lo • S 1 I.le Kevill Willillnsoo's mmies 5 2 . ·Hot • (Michael Croft mys19!y) 53. Bea embroces? 54 . Hod Cll1lOi relations With 58. ·~ cnf [kjs" Cl)(laJb' Ill.nows 59 .• of 1he Boys fnrn 8mzl' 22 JUNE 20. 2003 June 22 • '•The Downfall & Redemption Rev. Janet Parker '..- ~ of a Macho Man - Part II" /~~ ~~ \\ Maranatha ~~ '"/ Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion• Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/ Children's area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week -Home Group" services on Tuesda~s and Wednesdays. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mal/ maranatha@ev1.net www.maranathamcc.com www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE Vacation Bible School July 28th - August 1st 5:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 2025 W. 11th St. @ T.C.J ester 713-861 -9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org r--------------------------------------------------------------, Ii I•l 1-.; (•Ji J: Classified Order Form • www.houstonvoice.com • Phone 877.863.1885 I" a 2 j as =-1 OUR RATES HAVE CHANGED VO 1ce1 IN PERSON: Bring COl!1lleted fom: w L~ payment :0 tie Houst')ll Voice offices (M·F. 9;im.5pm) 500 Loven Blvd. 51.b 200. IY MAIL: Mall COll'flleted form with payment., Housk>n Voice Classi~eds, 500 Lown Blvd, Suite 200, Houston. TX. 77006 BY PHONE: Ci!l In with CO!ll>leted form to 877.863 t 885 IY FAX: fax corrp eted form and ued1t card Information ID ATIN: CLAS· SIF EDS 888 <409 6768 IY EMAIL: Visit houstonvoice.com ID pace your order c~ ne. AD POLICY: The Housl!ln Voke r~ lhe right to edit. redll'.Slfy or reject ads not meeung Housk>n Voice standards. No refunds for tally cancellation. Misprints lhe HoJSIDn Voke .snot responsible fer 'llkprtn1S appearng after the ftrst wee~ Check eds promptly TO PLACE AN AD: DEADLINE FOR AD SUBMISSION • MONDAY AT 5:30PM FOR FRIDAY'S PUBLICATION PICK YOUR CATEGORY RATE S12.50 WRITE YOUR AD Pl..£ASE PRINT a.EARLY TEXT: ------ ~ TOTAL YOUR COST AD RATES Up to ?Swold1 fod12.50 per ISSut. Addltlonal wOlds al'l 50( eadl per llsut. Thi! irl<li.le Wob.lte pos11ng. ADDITIONAL FEATURES: PhotollDgO $35 addrtlon.it Boxed ad is SS add1l<ll\al. Boklod ad a $5 aldrt1011a~ H)l)eflink a S2 addrtional UP TO 25 WORDS: $12.50 AOOITIONAI. WORDS _050« ---­PHOIOll. 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Call now at 713.529.8490 to place your ad in the directory! www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE if your hair isn't BECOMING to you, then you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 Remode/mg Interior and extenor Additions: Any kmd of room added to your home. New Construction.· New buildings of any kind. home. garage, etc. Carpentry • Repairs • Remodeling • 936.563.5180 / 936. 760.5531 Lawrence Gilstrap a.l"!ttl HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JUNE 20. 2003 25 26 JUNE 20. 2003 The Ryan White Planning Council and The Center for AIDS invite you to attend the following presentation: Guest Speaker: Andrew Zolopa, MD Stanford University Medical Center LOCATION: The Center for AIDS 1407 Hawthorne Houston, TX 77006 To RSVP or for more information: 713-527-8219 -or­rich@ centerforaids.org CENTER AIDS HOPE anti REM~MllRA.NCE tiil•••M• wwwhouston voice.corn HOUSTON VOICE astrology JILL DEARMAN My Stars! June 20- 26 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) .- , The new moon on June 29 falls m your house of home and family. Make family a top priority. Start by asking yourself who your real family is. Include those who love you most, and err on the side of forgiving those who have wronged you. It's a deeply emotional time for you, Aries. Let gci and live with (okay, and get laid by) a Leo. TAURUS (April 21 to May 20) Your ruler \'enus tramits your house cf linaJm; this week, whidl means that }OOI' artJs. tlC talents rould 1aOO )UU some nmey in the lxlnk. Use }OOI' Dair Y<ilh texture and rolor in new ways. You could beame a tnnd name. Another Taurus cxmplements }ru beautifully ® GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) It's important for you to see God (or some big spiritual diva) in the little things this week. Love isn't about huge displays of grandiosity. It's about being thoughtful and giving a dear one (like another Gemini) all the love you can. Be a noble beast. And get back in touch with your bod}: You've been living in your head for too long. @ CANCER (June 22 to July 22) Your life is full of major questions and forks in the road now. But they are good turning points. It's a time for important decisions. Make sure you are honest with yourself. and only consult those you trust Implicitly for advice. A Sag can help your career but may not exactly nurture you emotionally. Your love life is hitting its peak. But you need to put pride aside and expose your true feelings to your partner. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) This is a grand time for ;oo to do what ;oo need to do in every way-spi.Iituall:,; emo­tionall}; physically- to get rid c:l the OOd vibes from an ex·lover who still haunts you. Do a ritual and get this creature out of your hair and out c:l your head. You have someone better to concentrate on. An Aries wants to be your new best friend (with privileges?). @ VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) The Sun. Saturn. and yoor planetary ruler Mercury are all transiting your house of large groups and community It's time to think big-which is not your specialty' Stop pick· ing and carping about the little details: your hair. yow· bank aexx>unt, your French cooking lessons. lnste.ad, try and come up with a grand plan for life! A Tuurus can help whip you Into realicy You'll be meeting key people soon, so start preparing your sound bytes. ~ LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) _ If you're making your home into the spiritual castle it should be, all will be well this week and in the months ahead. If you're Ignoring the importance of a stable place to live, then you may be feeling oppressed right now. Put some energy into your house or apartment. It's more than just four walls. And invite an Aquarius over to christen your.newly blessed bedroom with you. @ SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Mars and Uranus are spreading intensity and excitement in your home sector Go with your gut and don't overthink Issues related to where you li\e and whom you love. Your plotting ways have grown tired! Be true to your heart and stop being so controlling. A Virgo will help you release your real desires. SAGIITARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) This is a good time for you to overhaul one small area of your life. Clean out your office or change your gym, or do one significant thing to show that you want to bring new, productive energy into your life. A Gemini will inspire you to make the first move CAPRICORIS' (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Business partnersh!pS entered into now will have a major influence on your life m the months to come. Make sure you have all the facts before stgnmg contracts, then sign away Don't be an Idiot and do ever}thing on tmpulse Use }our head. babe' Collaboration 1S nchly favored now. You and a Pisces finish each other's sentences and complement each other's strengths and weaknesses. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Permanency holds more appeal than trickery this week, so be straightforward m love.A Vlrgocould offer you Just what you need. But is it what you \\'llllt'This week 1s all about compromising on the little things and letting go of some of your "my way or the highway" attitudes. But do not settle when it comes to the things that really matter. @ PISCF.S (Feb. 19 to March 20) • You can't help but laugh when bigwigs fmally start to tell you, "You have talent!" and "I want to make you a whore" . uh, l mean "a star"' Don't sell yourself to the highest bidder, darling. Hold out for what you behove in and for the best overall deal. 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CSU203372G-40 New York Summer Cruise June 22-29 More all-gay vacations Barcelona-Italy-Ibiza Cruise Europe's best cities - August 30 ·September 6 Mexican Riviera Cruise Carnival Pride from L.A. - October 19 • 26 2004 Eastern Caribbean Cruise Celebrity Millennium - January 25 • February l atlantisevants.com 001 01 001 SPECIAl ADVERTISING SECTION JUNE 20, 2003 3 Don't take a vacation, have an adventure For over 30 years. Hanns Ebensten Travel, Inc. has led the way In tours for gay men and other adventurous travelers. As the first company to orga­nize men-only trips - by rafting down the Grand Canyon and partying down at Carnival In Rio de Janeiro - Hanns Ebensten defined gay adventure travel. DO YOU HATE TOURS? Does being herded through famous sites and standing In line for buffet din­ners get you down? Are you fiercely Independent and hate buses? 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