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Montrose Voice, No. 147, August 19, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 147, August 19, 1983 - File 001. 1983-08-19. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2279/show/2254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-08-19). Montrose Voice, No. 147, August 19, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2279/show/2254

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 147, August 19, 1983 - File 001, 1983-08-19, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2279/show/2254.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 147, August 19, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 19, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Hurricane Alicia's Show is Spectacular Mess; Now the Cleanup By Henry McClur11 The eye of Hurricane Alicia passed directly through Montroseat8:45 a.m. last Thursday with surrounding wind gusts over 100 miles per hour and sustained winds near that, uprooting trees, knock­ing out power and sending billboards, signs and windows crashing to the street. Briefly through, for the half hour the eye was over the area, everything was rela· lively calm. M~t Montro8E' reAidents stayed awake all night, rithn partying or worrying about the rains, the winde or the threat of asso­ciated tornadoes By the timl' the a;torm reached this far ml and, sht' had lost some of the punch she had struck Gaheaton nnd southern Hous· ton with a few hours earlier. But in Galveeton, the waters from Alicia "drowned" Mirror Publishers, a commeri­cal printing company that prints the MONTROSE VOICE and other community newspapers, causing the delayed release of the newspaper this issue. By nightfall Thursday, electrical power and phone service had been restored to some of Montrose. Tower Theater, hosting Greater Tuna, had a "hurricene-half-priced" sho"' Thursday night, but operated on portable liWnt-rator powE'r. Major MontrMe e:upermarkets, KroiZ'er and Weinjlarten, had large crowds stock ing up on food prior to and during the ~torm. With shelves nearly depletE'd., Krogt'r closed Thurt<day niJtht. Picturesque Montrose streets, such as Lovett and Avondale, were blocked by fallen trees and debris. The Highway 59 underpass at Shepherd became one big lake, closing the highway. Alicia did to the Lower Westheimer row of portable signs advertising modeling studios what City Council has been unable to do: she removed them. The neighborhood's largest billboard. the Gannett-owned one that sat on the top ofTilla's Cafe, 600 Westheimer. crat;hed to the tlfOUnd. The frizzy.haired blond is no 1on5!'f'r there lighting up a Camel. And Tilla'11 "Noon Time'" sign n(lw has only a barely-flickering six Some- Montrose dub" were open Thur~ day night w1th largt' crowds. Mary's. 1022 WetithE'imE'r. was operating on a portable MONTROSE V 0 I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Aug 19. 1983 Issue .. 147 Published Every Friday Bauman Speaks on Coming Out, Conservative Politics and His Future By I. ·ry Bush Fonner Maryland Republican congrE'S8· man Bob Bauman made headlineB when he appeared in late July at the American Bar Aaoociation convention to announce h1a support for gay civil rights. Bauman, a founder of Young Americana for Freedom and past international chair· man of the American Conservative Union, lost his seat in the 1980 election after he faced criminal charges for solicit· ing sex from a 16-year-old boy. Since that time, he 1aid he has been ehunned by his former conservative col1eaguea in the Rea· gen Adminiatration and on Capitol Hill. He now ia providing free lobbying assist­ance to the Gay Rights National Lobby. What fo1low1 are excerpts from more than an hour's interview with Bauman on July 29, which included participation from the Washington Blade. o On the 1980 Circumstances Resulting in His Political Defeat "I waa ~ever arrested. I voluntarily appeared m court and submitted myself to it.a juriediction and pleaded not guilty to BOJicitation. The 16-year-old was, as you know, an adult by the lawa of the Diatrict of Columbia. It'1 a little bit different I think, being involved with a male proati· tute than with a kid in the 1chool yard. It'• a diatinction that wa1 lost on the general public and probably doesn't make much difference to them anyway. I don't aay that ae a justification but for accuracy. "I would point out that the attorney gen· era] of the United Statee wae Benjamin Civiletti, a prominent BaJtimore lawyer who had managed Paul Sarbanee U.S. Senate campaign, and I wee prominently mentioned ae a candidate againet Sar· bane• in 1982. And, in fact, I would proba­bly have been the Republican nominee against him. There is certainly a political advantage to eliminating an opponent. "I waa told eub&equently by people con· nected with the investigation that after their retirement from government, that there were 10 membera of the House and St-na~. all of whom were undtr im:t8tiga tion by the D.C. police department or the FBI for homosexual activities and that two of the, Joe Wyatt (a conservative Texas Democratic congressman also defeated that year, who later switched to the Republican Party and lost again in 1982, ae did Bauman) and my8elf, were the two that were fingered and someone said, 'Go get those two.' "I do know •• theextenaivenatureofthe investigation .... They were doing every­thing they could, including photographs at night ..•. They were directed to go to the trouble from the way I understood it I understood it came from either the Justice of U.S. Attorney's Office, but I have no proof of that. I have asked for, my attor­neys have asked for, the investigative report for the FBI. I still have not seen them. I don't remember the name of the Assist· ant U.S. Attorney ... who was handling the case. We had gone through two weeks of negotiation• and they kept saying, 'Well, the congreasman had a drinking problem, and this, that and the other, and he need• to correct these things. (My repre· aentativea) argument waa 'Look, he faced this fact in February, hia wife forced him to. He'1 going to a clinical paychologist, he haan't been drinking, you haven't seen him in the Cheeapeake House (a gay strip bar) and he hasn't engaged in any of these thinga. He's not in any danger based on clauified information or anything else .... Why can't we eettle this in aome less than public manner?' "And that guy'• (the aHistant attorney) respanee waa, ~e people of his district have a right to know what kind of man he is before the election.' My people said, 'Look, if that's the baais you're operating on, we'll see you in court. That'• not law, that'• politics.' "But the cat wae out of the bag. I gave them enough to work with, but they could've done anthing they wanted to, and they did. I do say that there wu some politics involved. I don't say that in an after-the-fact, &0ur grapes (fashion).'' o On Coming Out of the Closet "AA far as I knew in 19AO, I wasn'ta homo~ sexual. We all travel dieeimilar but like road• to finally accepting being gay. That'• 80mething that I found at the very last and only accepted it within the last year or two. "You know, I certainly went through the generator, doing a record busine8s. Texas Renegades, 1318 Westheimer; the Barn, 710 Pacific; and The Ripcord. 715 Fair­view, all had full power. J.R's and the Montrose Mining Company, both on Pacific. were closed and totally dark on into the weekend. Virtually all other types of businesses in the neighborhood were out of commission or dosed Trursday Most remained closed Frida\· !-'amt' aspects of life lD Montrose began to return to normal Friday afternoon. Taxis and bus s rvice and street hustlers were all back to th r regular routines. Alicia Puts 'Voice' Printing Press Out of Commission Wttter and wmd from Hurricane Alicia hea\'il)' damagl"d the "ll'wspaper prt~s facilities of Minor Publishen m Galve~ ­ton last Thursday morning. Mirror h; the company which prints the MO!\IROSE \'OIC'E and other community nt-wspapens. A foot of mud CO\.ered the floor at Mirror in Galveston late Saturday, with electric· ity and phone service still non-existent and UJ>E"Cted to stay that way for many days. Two newspaper companie8 m Hou~ton, Foru·ard Times end the Southnn Chinese ~'Veu·s. serve_as back up printers for the VOICE but both remained withoutelectri cal power through Saturday. ... kind of phaaee that a lot of people do. Self­denial WH a strong part of it, and I was • able to mentally compartmentalize my life and activities in an insane sort of way. I think my lapse into alcoholism was in 80me respect an attempt to deaJ with it. I mean, it was an eacape-a refusal to face things. It waa much easier to get drutik and then eay it happened because you ront1 nued page 6 2 MONTROSE VOICE/ ALIG 19, 1963 FULL MOON MADNESS Tuesday, August 23 Texas Riders Present Bathing Beauty Contest at 11pm on the patio Plus Chicken Tacos Extravaganza Home of Houston Motorc'(Cle Club&TexasAders 528-8851 LEATHER NIGHT Au15it C~~ ~~-~m all in Leather EVERYDAY SPECIAL 1/2-pnce dnnks to all am~i~:t~~~~~ on Pl'\RKING IN SIOE LOT 5PM-BAM WEEKOAYS, ALL OAY WEEK ENOS !TOW MAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) MVS>CbylarryFought AUG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Texas Eastern Appeals to Community By Hollia Hood Numberous gay political leaders and busi­nesspersons were told that a downtown convention center will stimulate the Mont­rose economy, as well es all of Houston, provide jobs and solve the problem of mil­lions dollars lost by the city annually in missed convention trade in a dinner meet­ing with representatives of city govern­ment and Texas Eastern at the Four Seasons Hotel, Thursday, Aug. 11. The purpose of the dinner was "to woo Houston's large gay community for a yes vote in November on the project," said Lee Harrington, political activist who is involved with the project. The proposed downtown convention hall site would be in an undeveloped and ailing section of the eestside of downtown, in close proximity to Montrose. Texas Eastern, a prominent Houston corporation, has agreed to donate half the land needed for the site and will develop the remainder of its holdings there to com­pliment the proposed center with shop­ping and hotels. During construction an estimated 1,200 jobs would becomeavaila· ble plus some 9,000 expected permanent jobs staffing the convention center proper, and the ripple effect through the surround­ing area. "We would need more restaurants, more entertainers, more of everything that serves the convetion trade," said Council­man George Greanias, a proponent of the new center in an interview later. He envi­sions that building the convention center at that Jocation would help start theevolu· tionary process of "cleaning up lower Wes­theimer" from the modeling studios that are blighting the neighborhood. The proposed convention center project, which has already received two unenim· ous yes votes from two different city coun­cil administrations, will go to the voters with November. According to Harrington , what the city is offering the voters is a guarantee that no money from the general fund will be used on the convention cent.er project. Revenue to pay for the center would come from additional hotel occupancy tax, not fro.m the city budget. But building it, accordmg to proponent&, would generate $431 million dollars per year in ripple benefita. Thie year thue far, Houston has lost (from left) Community actiuists Lee Harrington, Larry Bagntris, Marion Coleman and Steue Shiflett being wined and dined by Texas Eastern Corporation at Four Seasons Hotel $233 million because conventions do not chose to locate here. Harrington expressed concern about what he considered misinformation regarding the convention center coming from the Houston Sports Association, operators of the Astrodome complex. He remarked that the Astrodome is not ade­quate for very large conventions because of lighting and electrical limitations on its floor, and besides, it's a sports arena. By building the convention center downtown, the entire downtown area would be infused with new life, he said. Rep. Debra Danburg, Councilman Jim Greenwood and Eleanor Tinsley were all in attendance at the meeting. Danburg termed the Astrodome "a vast waste­land," and Tinsely assured attendees that the council had researched the matter throughly and that it was deserving of public support. No other alternate locations were sug· gested. Gay business leaders addressed the pro­position in favorable terms. Larry Bagne- N~ 1ll'IE 'lOO 5Ef ~ oo ~ t'.~ ris, president of the Gay Political Caucus said: "The Texas Eastern Corporation's invitation on Thursday night acknowl­edges once again the political power of Houston's gay community as we continue the tradition of speaking with one political voice and one bloc vote through the Houston Gay Political Caucus. Steve Shi­flett, past presidentofGPC, said "The con­vention center issue provides us a good opportunity to promote our city and dem­onstrate our commitment lo the quality of life in Houston. Working with and being solicited by the professionals at Texas Eastern evidences our clout as well as a level of maturity in the political arena." "We have never failed to meet a chaJ­lenge head one," said G Van Ooteghem, GPC founder. "In the matter before us, we have an opportunity lo once again assist our fihe city's development. As acting, contributing and participating Houston citiznes, we must set aside our personal differences and act as one force to this end. It can be done, but it's going to take all of us working together to do it." FUGI«, ~t:., YOO M~ ~ 'ft.\.l.l~ "~\~, ~!" OR'~'S IT GOit( JKle..!# ···· ~\~wr ''Mt~!" Montrose Mouth Alicia was no lady Altcia was not nice. not as far as we are concerned. since she incapacitated the company on who's presses we print this paper_ The Voice and many other commun­ity newspapers m Houston-plus our sister publication. the Dallas Gay News-are all prmted in Galveston- one block from the beach. As this is being written Thursday night, with the National Guard patrolling the streets of Galveston and the warehouse-size press s1ttmg under water, the Voice may not be out until about Tuesday of next week (If you're reading us before Tuesday. you know we must have pulled oH some miracle ) Numbers' was packed last Friday night and Saturday night-Just like old times. with Frank Collins and Otis James playing music till after sunrise -o- The University of St Thomas· art depart­ment announces the opemng of its first fall art show "Props, Sets and Costumes for Life as a Pageant." by Susan Smith. which will be Aug 29- Sept. 30 m the Link-~ee Mansion. 3812 Montrose Blvd Fundmg for a proposed documentary film on pollution and problems on Buffalo Bayou ts being sought by the Bayou Preservation Association KUHT (channel 8) will fund 55 per cent of the $17.000 budget. the rest is being sought by Richard Hyde. who has often written of his love for the area If you beheve the Amazonian splendor of the bayou should be mamtamed. support the documentary by sending contributions to BPA, Room 423. Graduate School of Social Work. University of Houston. 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77004 A retrospective photography exh1brt by Jim Estes is on drsplay m the mam gallery of the Art Institute of Houston, 3600 Yoakum. through Aug 26 Jim Estes. an instructor at the Art Institute and the University of Houston. has pre­viously exhibited at several umversity and school galleries including group exhibitions at the University of Houston and Albion Col-lege in Albion . Michigan - Haze/witch and Choices. a women·s per­former collective and lesbian group. respec­tively, will co-sponsor ·Make A Splash." a women's swim party this Sunday. Aug 21 ,at the Trop1cana Swim Club. 2114 Peckham. 630-10pm There will be swimming. BPO towel. vol­leyball. cash bar and unlimited conversa­tion. Admission is $3 at door with $2 for kiddos Ramdate: Aug 22 -o-lnteract will help to put a little hfe into the end of summer blues with a special August coffeehouse The one-t1me-only-end-of-summer­c0Heehouse will be Saturday. Aug 27. at Bering Church. 1440 Harold. and will be a reunion of sorts for the former part1c1pants of the now defunct Community Coffee­house and a social and educational function for the community A special presentation of the videotapes from the Gay Archives of Texas and Interact collections will be run non-stop. These include the movie La Cage aux Foiles II. news reports on AIDS. local and nattonal gay pride week coverage. and a Donahue Show featurmg a debate between Gmny Apuzzo and everybody's favorite comedian. Je:-ry Falwell Doors open at 7:30. admission 1s free -o- Here's your City of Houston mobile VD screening schedule for the remamed of August: this Saturday, Aug 20, at Club Baths, 2205 Fannin. 9pm-1am; and this Sun­day, Aug 21, at JR's/Montrose Mining, 808 Pacific, 5-9pm The Church of Christian Faith m Montrose 1s having an open house at their new buildmg Aug 27, 2-7pm NEW MONDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS ALLDAY­ALL NIGHT HAPPY HOUR PRICES AUG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Did We Cause Alici.a? They aay when rou wash your car, it's guaranteed to ram. Well, the weekend of Aug. 13, the Montrose Voice softball play· ers washed 75 care in the parking lot at Texas Renegades in the second annual Montrose Voice Softball Team Celebrity Car Waoh. Also that weekend, Alicia formed in the Gulf. MONTROSE V D I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentscopyrlght • 1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm "'~~~~n~~or Ch1~1~.::~•th JonCheelwood Joseph lee COflf ObullflQ • flf• r• Bob Jones, Mary Caden a. Julie Hollingsworth. John Cooper. Larry Popham con111bcmng photograph•rr Lyt Hams 1o~•rt11rng d1rKlot Mark Drago ld...,.frsmg JonCheetwood cJ.,1d.-d~~f•SJ1'tg :=A~~7.:' Gr .. rer MOt"ltOM Bus•neU Guild. G•y =~!'"''UJll'll•m11.on1IG1yN ... Agency.P1cil1tNew1 Au1t1n81x .. u C1pitoi:New1:s.vic1 Syndtt;ll«I F111ur1 S.rv•tlt & Wrr••• tSan Fr1ncotc0) ChroNC1t1F .. 1urn. Ur"'1.oF .. 1..,,•Synd1c.1e.JellreyW•llon, A1ndy Allr.cl. SIOfl•w•ll Futures Syndlute. Buen t.kNqn~ Joe811<er POITl.l..,STEA S.nd*k:lr ... correctoon1103317 Mool1ose • '.IM HOuston Txnooe • $uOICtlp/IOf'lflllll"IU$111H~9nve/ooe $4Qpery .. r(52 :~=-~ ~2.'u:;••xm0"1tn1t26 1ue1J or$1 25oerweek(lell N• l>OllMlkdv•ff•ltnQretw9•.nr1t,...• Joe01S1tMi10. Aovendllll M1rilel•ng Me6th Av9nue New YOl'k 10011. (212)242-6883 ::;::~~~deldhn• Tueldly. 5 lOpm. IOf issuv released Fr1- No/1r:• fo lldv•rtt••rt Locel1cNen11mg rateacl'll'clule f 1V9-A ;,-:: ...· ~;.;': .~.::,,:~ ~~! 1L~:i edverl•t•ng r•te acnedute RNpom•D•lify Monl•OH Vo•ce .. dOAS not 1uum• r11pon11• ~~':.1~0·:~:~:1~~:·~~~~~,. thould ellft MontroH People with AIDS Urged to Apply for Social Security Benefits Computer Cruising Computer systems designed for dull work like analyzing budgets are finding a new role in romance, says the Philatklphia Inquirer. ~~ou~:!ta~n SJ~l':i:~ th~~°?tih~::i~d~ Youn.g~ single people around the country permanent it.a temporary April 26 di.rec· 8:re cru1amg computer net~orks for poten· tive authorizing people with AIDS to col· tial lovers and friends. Uamg code names lect aocial security disability benefits. :~;.a:r~!;:::::e~:h~:1t~::d~l'; The National Gay Task Force recently tronic dating to be a non-threatening way urged AIDS victims to apply for benefits. to check out a possible love interesL One young man who lives in Washing· ton D.C. says, "There's something relax· ing about sitting in your pajamas with a cup of hot tea and having a conversation with someone in California. You don't have to worry about how much of a slob you are." People with AIDS may qualify for a var· iety of government services. Supplemen· ta.I Security Income is a needs-based grant program available to people with limited income and resources. Title II "early retirement income" grants, on the other hand, are available to FICA contributors who are no longer able to work because they have AIDS. ·--------- Dan White's Parole Not Halted International Gay New1 A1ency The governor of California cannot legally delay the January 1984 release of con· victed assauin Dan White, the state's attorney general has decided. Responding to a formal inquiry from Gov. George Deukmejian, Attorney Gen· eral John Van de Kamp said that White must he released from prison next Janu· ary 6 because he was sentenced under California's determinate, or fixed term, sentencing law. The opinion drew a protest from J ohn Wahl, the lawyer representing the estate of the late Harvey Milk, the gay San Fran· cisco supervisor (councilman) killed by White. "Dan White has received speical treat· ment from the beginning," he said. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG. 19, 1983 Conservative & Gay: Former Congressman Bauman continued from page 1 were drinking. Boys in the Band. Christ, was I drunk last night. I've had someone tell me that his psychiatrist say if ever there was a cry for help, that was it-the type of situation where you want some­thing w happen, but you don't know how to make it happen. If there'• any point in anything I went through, it's got to be that some good can come out of il There a.r-ecert.ainly hundred ofthouaands of gays in this country in the closet who are suffering similar circum· ~;ll,~e-:::!:~r~a:::~~~:r~~~ a congrenman out there eomewbere who might ~a:'1t to do it. Certainly there are some eligible. But I'd like w bring some I~ out of the mieery, that's really the point. "My gueaa ia that a great majority of us auffer and struggle and tear at our minds and our flesh in trying to deal with thie thing a good part of our lives, many of us, never having faced it. And that is so insane. I mean, I don't believe in reincar­nation, but that this is the one chance I have w live, and I'm lucky that I got to the point where I can live, as myself. It'• a miracle, it'• an absolute miracle, for me. "l don't know, others can look, sit back and say, "Son-of-a-bitch, he's a politician, he'• going to run for Congresa, that's why he'• doina it, alwaye had a big ego.' I'm au.re ego plays a big part in anything we all do. But if people can understand the inner peace I've been able to achieve, they'd all come out of the cloaet. Maybe some of them wouldn't. Everybody'• dif· ferent. But for me, it'• like eomebody'e taken the whole .. arid off my back. "'I think that the emergence of the gay movement- definitely bad it'a impact on me. If for nothing more than, othen are dealing with UU.. Othera are the way I am. 'I am not alone' wa1 an important factor. It waa mainly, 'Gee, I'm not one ofthoee, am I? But if lam, thereareothers.' ltwaa a curiou.a sort of thing." o On Being a Gay Conservative "I've gotten a litUe bit tired of the renewal of the laat few days of this fag basher image. The truth of the matter is that I voted for the McDonald amendment (bar­ring Legal Services Corporation aid to gaye) t~ce and I cosponsored the Family Protection Act. You will search in vain in my public remarks for anything about homosexuality or gayneBS. I've never spoken out on the issue for reasons that ought to be obvious. Let us hear from you Letters to the Editor Montrose Voice "You see, I'm from a different genera· tion of conservatives than the New Right .. . I've never been totally comfortable with the Religious Right. Not that I don't think they have a right to say their piece. I just found some of their views more strident than my Catholicism permitted. HJ don't know whether it (the closet) shaped my coneervatism. It certainly, I think, shaped the manner of my public life, my conduct. my style. I made a con­scious decision aomewhere in my life, and having reflected on this, I think I can aay it truthfully: that if the world didn't want me, I didn't need them. I was going to ehow them. And much of my public career wae devoted lo showing people. It may well have been compensation for things I was feeling. .. There'• a certain comfort in a pre­determined and established set of doc· trines and dogmas lo which one can adhere-being a conaervative philosophy, although it'• certainly not that pat by any means. It'• much easier to say, 'Here'• a body of thought that I've adopted, let's now espouse it and pick up the fight.' "Lincoln was the reason I became a Republican. I read a book about him when I WBll seven. I was so impressed with the man's life that I aay, 'Hey, if he could do that with hie origins, maybe I could be aomethirll!.' I like what he thought. Bob Taft, Sr .... is my hero. There was a stodgy, straight-if you'll pardon the expression-sort of politician who knew exacUy what waa right and wrong and wae willing to speak about it. And I loved Bob Taft. I was heetbroken when Eisen­hower was nominated. "I can't say that my personal sexuality or thing• like that made me a conserva­tive, anymore than somebody might turn out w be a clooet gay and liberal. It might have had something lo do with it. I'll leave that w the experUI. "Cruel, I think, would have been the more apt term conveying the things I said in public. You know, we gays have a cer­tain cynical and acerbic wit which I think ie a defense mechaniem. I think I overdid it many times . .. privately and publicly." o On Gay Civil Rights Protections "Any conservative ought to be comfort&· ble voting for a bill that says, 'Hey, you may not like civil rights laws in the abstract ae a principle, maybe you don't think the fed.era~ government should legis­late agamst pnvate discrimination , but we do have ci vil rights laws, so therefore, ergo, why shouldn't they be extended to every American "Why should their civil rights be pro· !«ted? Hey, I don't like government tell· mg you what lo do privately, the laws are o ~ the .books, and_ By God, we're being d1acnm1mated against, why not get a con­servative sponsor ""I know of no great mass attempt to t=tAViCL -- L.I ... ..... rn11 TRAVEL TECH IS TRAVELING Around the corner Sept. 1to2519 Sunset Blvd Our phone remains 522-8227. l1e need your business more than eve' Come v1st at our new office Serving the Gay Community -.I.\. influence conservatives. I can think of a few congressmen who, like one from Cali­fornia , was impressed when a group of about 20 gays in his district came to see him for the first time about two years ago. They were getting really stirred up out there. It'• not a San Francisco district. That's one instance I can think of where it'• had an impact. I mean, I know he's not going lo aponsor any bills, bu the sat down and talked and his comment was, you know, they weren't unreasonable at all. 'There are all kinda of prejudices aU around the world, and aome of them can­not be corrected by any laws. The kind of prejudice that gays undergo, say in the family, rejection of their very being, can­not be addreaaed in law. You don't have to there hasn't been as much political criti­cism from somequartersaswemighthave suspected in giving assistance in research of AIDS. And I think someone in the Administration said, 'The heat hasn'tgot· ten nearly a1 bad as we expected, maybe we better do something ourselves, and if there ia aome credit lo be gained, maybe we can do something at the same time.' "I don't know whether as a political advisor I'd say w the President, 'You should addre88 these thing111<1uarely, per· 1M>nally.' My advice would be, 'Don't you get involved with it, Mr. President. We'll take care of it by these other things within the Reagan Administration. That still givee you the insulation you need." ' ~e~eC:;:nf;~:;~toe~!v~e~;h~icba~! D On the House Censure down at a lunch counter. That'• the whole of Reps. Studds and ~:: :C~a~~~~ i~~~~~1~0b.~ remedy Crane for Sexual '"The confusion, particularly on civil Misconduct ~:~~ ~·:~~~ ai~d ~:r~:r~r":o~~~~~ . "What else ie new? I wasn't expecting it, ality, two eeparate and distinct iBSuee. So but then it wasn't a surprise. Certainly one of the inhibitions for politician• not to :~~u~e~:t: ~~~~P!:0f:t!!i:wi:a ~eth ~o~~ !~Y~?S:r;,o~!t:yas~~~dri:eh:fh~~~ PBS last week for TM Lawmakera. I think rights.' is 'You're in favor of sin. You are !~~ d°e!To":s~Bu~ ~:~~r:emr!~~ endoraing immorality.' And you're not. tionshipbetweenpagesandcongre88men, You don't espouse Catholicism when you maybe I do think censure was more put religion in the Civil Rights Act, or Jud· appropriate than what was the mildest aism or Proteetantism, it 's to protect the form of reprimand. clal8 (of people). "And I aay that reference not w the sex- "1 am now able to eay to a person, look ual iuue involved, but rather lo the rela­them in the eye, and say, 'Look, John or tionship. I think that if Gerry has been Mary, I'm gay-so what?' I'm not one bit faulted by even those who are aympa­different in any respect-I was gay then. I thetic, and I certainly am, it was the way can still make a point of order as a con- he handled that page/ oongreBSman rela­greeaman. I can •till give you a valid con- tionahip. Politically, it wu probably not aervative viewpoint of this legislation the beat thing for him. that'• pending, and this is what it is- "I'm not eo sure that contrition is there'• no reason why you should support required, but at least the recognition of the gay civil right.. •pecial relationship that did exist and per- " I don't have to justify homoaexuaJity. haps the admiBBion that it would have It i• a condition of human nature and been better had it not happened. I'm not always has been and always will he, 10 I writing a list of who people should and really feel no need to have to, no compul- should not go lo bed with. eion to in any way to justify it. And 80 Gerry's never been terribly closeted. It's having established that fact, it must be been an open secret on Capitol Hill for ae dealt with. I can see no rational, reasons· long as I can remember, that he was gay. ble constitutional basis once that fact is He'• been seen in gay places in D.C.-1 accepted. To discriminate against people heard four or five years ago, that the Bos­on that b&1i•, any more than one would ton paper were about, the next day, to discriminate against a heterosexual that write about Congre86man Studds and a commits adultery. That's one of the things page-it never happened." ~:!s ~~~~~a~ee n°: r~:ti~~~hl!'11~ie::i D On Being Gay and ~~~~r=~: ~~!~~~·;n~i::';~~h.~ reli· Catholic D On AIDS and ;~uw;::,~t:;!~~v~~~l:~mda:: a~: Washington's Response ~~·:t1~n~eu:0~ ~i~e~\!!/f~~Z:':! If the Reagan Administration and the pol- part of my life. But I think that my early ticiane at the head of the President's Re- views of the Church , or at least what I Election Campaign, which is now well thought the Church teaches, was that I underway, have a ny sense, they'll tell was inherently evil person with these ten ­M ar~aret ~eckl er to n ame a special aide, a dencies basicaJly what they were. I know 1pec1al a ss11tant, to some visible post at thatthatis not the positionoftheChurch . HHS (Health and Human Services "I still consider myself to be Catholic Department) to deal with this problem. It and I'm not about lo be driven out of the would be even more politically a dvantage- Church . Much of the reading I've done in oue to the Reagan Administration (to the last few years has been devoted to name someone gay). homosexuality and ethics and more "I think it would really cut across the recently, Bi1hop Sulhvan, who wrote the lines. It's not going to bring any grea t introduction lo Learning ro Love and to number of gays who are hberal mto the Bob Nugent's book. Reagan camp, but it certamly would mute ''The God of my understanding does not the cntJc1em I don 't know how many gays create human beings in a condition that is are polticically aware or concerned. I sus- automatically, ipso facto, sinful. The God J>e:Ct i~'s the minority, only a very small • of my understanding would not creat.epeo­mmonty_ But fo~ those people, at least pie who cannot love, who cannot express they'd have lo thmk twice and say, 'well, affection. I've come a long way in many Y~~I ~:~~·k~:!·:h~~~~~ ~~::'o~~!::~·ough ;~::~:~~~~~~~~~~~~';e~~~t~~~ research funds I was told that the Centers yourself, and they sharing themselves of Disea~e Control , the Office of Commun with you i• eomf'thing that is central to my icab1e Diseases, can't handle a Jot more existence. funds. I d~n't know the do1lar figures . I " lhaven'tbeenabletoachievethat.But thin.k the 1~eptitude was in not recogniz- iti•a very im~rtantpartofmylife. lmay ing1taean 188':'~ 8:nd dealing with it early, never achieve it. But I don't understand a ~~0~·~ ~~ c~!i~~m ;;:.i~~g~~ a~:~h~ ~ldw~:evC::;~~e~~ ~url!~:~°:d ~ri~ atarted, h~adhnee started appearing. Let lion• of aouls over which he has jurisdic· the fags die tion . l don'tthmk l 'lllivewseetheChurch "I have been pleasantly eurpriaed that change its position ." AUG. 19, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 l''L 11'7 o co c I .. LI Lt '' --' 300 !i.IEST:-:Ei'i":E:~- l-IGUSTcr: TEx:=:s 5,:'S-S55l SUNDAY AUGUST 21 - HENRY WINSLOW GUEST DJ FROM THE SAINT- NEW YORK SPARKS IN CONCERT 8 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG 19, 1983 Profiles in OverKill Get ready for a JFK blitz this fall, reports L'SA Today. Nov. 22 marks the 20th anni· veraary of President Kennedy's assassi· nation~ and a host of TV programs, books and other project.q won't let us forget it On the TV front, at least four Kennedy documentaries are in the works, and both N~C and AB.Care co~ing out with minis enes on the hfe 8nd times of JFK. In Chi· cago, a musical ven1ion of the Kennedy ~~~· Ont Shimng Moment, is extending its At leal4t seven new books are due this fall about Kennedys past and preRent. and there are proposals for JFK statues in Houston and Dallas. Nancy Dickerson, co­producer of one of the documentaries. says all the attention will give Americans time to remember. •·You may not have liked his politics," she ~y:i;i, ''but to people everywhere he epi· t(lmtzed everybody's hopes and dreams for America." Ant Shakes People who hw in t'1£> South havt> llt't-n pla~ut>d hy fire ants, "hiC'h bitt· and Mini{ Hut now researchcTs at Tt•xaN A&~1 han comt· up with tht· pe-fect rnbdott·. n·port.:o Outside magazint> Researchers Barr; Paull grind~ thetr•t ters ma bltt"nder,and mJect:-. thennt puret> into humans Dark Roots NER~'POL.JN GR~RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED r () I )> z ffi "JJ' The roots of violence may be in the roots of our hair. Chemist Williams Walsh of the Argonne National Laboratory told the ChiC"ago Tribune that extremely violent people may have abnormal patterns of trace metals in their hair Researchers who analyzed more than 60,000 hair samples found the critical ele· mente are copper, ."lodium and zinc. '"This," Walsh says, "is giving us the key to the root cause of violent crime." 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) § 523-2794 There is no trick to finding good value for your money at Old English Furniture 25%- 50% OFF, Sale Thru Labor Day Liquidation Prices Old E~glish Furniture ** Wide Selection * Reasonable Prices Custome*r S ervice * Major Credit Cards Delivery Available J.J.38 W. Gray SU·9145 Register Now for Your FREE LISTING in the 7th edition of the Gay Areas Business Directory Houston/Montrose Section now in preparation for nationwide d1stnbution Call for details at 713/757-7093 Or write us at Gay Area Telephone Directory P 0. Box 3554 Houston. TX 77001 4 WEEKS ONLY• AUG.17- SEPT.11 "SCORES OF CHUCKLES AND A BUSHEL OF GUFFAWS.'' -After Dark Magazine ''A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE IN THE THEATRE. HILARIOUS! SEE IT!" -Gay Scene "THE AUDIENCE ALL BUT EXPLODED THE THEATRE WITH LAUGHTER!'' - New York Post .--------ORIGINAL CAST-------. DIRECT FROM 9 HIT MONTHS IN NEW YORK AND 6 SMASH WEEKS AT WASHINGTON'S KENNEDY CENTER. The comedy about Texas' third smallest town ... where the Lions Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies. JOE SEARS JASTON WILLIAMS t;r~ttttr TUNA JASTON WILLIAMS JO"E SEARS ED HOWARD ED 0 HOWARD CHARGE TICKETS BY PHONE: 526·1709 BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN "\Jes Ttiur!i 8 I() ,., 730 S16.13. H Fri BO'· }at 700&\000.'lun 300$17.14 11 TICkf't~ cJ'.a11ab · at a T·cketmaster and T·:ket1 1"l :at1 m· Group Sales 529-2727 THE TOWER THEATRE 1Z01 Westheimer &r-uredPartt1ngAuattaw Critics Can't Pull Plug on 'Staying Alive' Staying Alit•e, the sequel to Saturday Night Fever, has opened to negative reviews, but it appears the new version of the Hollywood musical is here to stay, reports the WaJl Street Journal. Paramount Pictures, which made both Flashdana and Staying Alive, believes the new dance movies have the right for· mula for success: thin scripts, dominant soundtracks, and so-called music visuals "Reviews don 't make or break these movies," says Frank Mancuso, head of Paramount's movie division. What attract.a the youth audience, he says, are clips from the movie on cable TV, and hit songs on the radio. After that, says Man­cuso, word of mouth alone can make the picture a success Paramount'& got another dance musical in the works: Footlooi;e, about a city kid who brings fancy dancing to a small midwestern town Asner Seeking Reelection ScrN>n Actors Guild pre~ident F.d Asner whoHe first two years on the job were the mm;t rontroversiol in the union's f>O-year history, say~ he wanL~ another t.erm, reports Variety . Asner, known to television viewers as the star of "Lou Grant," has angered some of his Hollywood rolleagues, notably Charlton Heston, with his outspoken opposition to U.S. poliries in Central America League Presents Strategies Workshop The League of Women Voters will present an all-day confe rence Sept. 10, 9:00 a.m.- 3:30 p.m., in Stouffer's Greenway Hotel on Strategies for Arms Control: The Current Dilemma. The group will bring retired Admiral Noel Gayler; Beverly Byron , representa­tive from Ma ryla nd; Dr. Richa rdJ. StoH of Rice; J oachim Vogel, Counsel General West Germa ny; and Molly Ivins, political columnist for the Dallas Times Herald to speak on the issue. Workshops entitled Verifiability and Equity, Russian Pers­pective, Convetional Arms Readiness and Envi ronmental a nd Medical Effects will also be offered. Registration fee (includes lunch) is $15 for LWV members and $25 for others. Deadline is Aug. 31. Send to Houston League of Women Voters, 1947WestGray, Houston , TX 770019 AUG 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Otmer M:x>-Thur 6- 11 Fn & Sot 6-12 Reservations requested Shows9o30, 11 , 1230 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Happy Hour Mon-Fn 4-Bpm, Hors d'Oe<Mes We at TRAVEL CONSULTANTS are not new to the Montrose area-Only our name is Collectively, our staff has over 50 years of travel consulting experience. This assures you that you will receive the experience and level of professionalism that you expect. Before you trust your travel arrangements with anyone else, check over our qualif1cat1ons first : iiii'Located in Montrose, with ample parking • [!!"A Cert1f1ed Travel Consultant (CTC) on staff who has received !1fDel1very service for commercial accounts additional education (3 years) and a special license. i!r'Outstanding relations with local airlines and trade affiliations. \Ne !!(computer reservations and accounti.1g ar~ b of PATA ARTA and ASTA MKnowledge and familiarity of gay resorts. ~ A~~~o~;~erv1ces ~re free. We are paid by the airlines, hotels and l1r' Active members of Greater Montrose Business Guild. CHE, GPC tour operators with no add1t1onal cost to you M~h:ir~~~~~~~a~~i~~~ most economical fares avarlable Come by or call to register for a FREE TRIP TO MEXICO Call Bruce Woolley at (713) 529-8464 or Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 2029 Southwest Freeway, Houston 10 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG 19, 1983 Haitians Resent AIDS Stigma .-------------------------------------... International Gay Newa Agency An international controversy has arisen over whether U.S. officials have unfairly ca&gorized residents of Haiti and Hai· tians in the United States as having an increased risk of contracting AIDS Haitians medical experts say officials of the U.S. Public Health Service made a ~erious mistake. But U.S. officials insist that their categorization is correct !'iiew York City officials have removed Haitian Americans from the list of high· risk groups. saying that the number of cases is too small tojustifytheirinclu.!>ion and that many Haitian victims appear to be member::i of the other high·riisk groups. Haitian Americani; say that they have become obJecl.ls of discrimination among people with unwarranted fears that they ran contract AJDS through social contact. In Haiti itself, the government reports a drop in tourism of about 20 percent over last year. Tourism i!I< one of Haiti's chief industries Haitians have charged that the disease originated in the U.S. and was taken to Haiti by homosexual tourists who trans· mitted it to male Haitian prostitutes Federal epidemiologists say the rate of AIDS cases diagnosed in the United States among Haitian-born people is at least ten times higher than the rate for all Americans. The rate in Haiti is unknown Dr. Sa1del Laine, president of the Hai uan Medical As~ociation in Port-au France, said that U.S. officials committed a "groi;.s mistake" by asking Haitian patients if they were homosexual or IV drug u.sers and expecting a yes or no an.swer They gtt a 'no' answer,'' said Laine, .. because homosexuality or even I\ drug use is a tough subject to accept in Haitians·• It ia thought that fonhcoming research will clear up confusione as to h1gh·nsk groups if Haitian doctors show more wil lingnei-is to aeknowledge homosexuality in Haiti. Becauii;e of the strong taboo against hommtuuality in that eounty, doctors have hitherto denied it as a factor m AIDS there. Light Wine Dying on Vine Light wine tmunded like the perfect idea for a calorie·conscious !'lOciety But the lightest thing about it may be the sales, rt-porti-; the Los Angeles Times Lo-cal vino has captured only three per cent of the market. way behind the eleven per cent racked up by light beer John Martini, marketing director for Heublein, says part of the reason for light wine's bellyflop could be that people don't think wine is fattening "Beer is associated with the beer belly." he says. ·But wine is already thought to be a modest calone product. People don't think they need a low·calorie wine." Take off with Eastern and land on .Bro~dwa~ Introducmg Eastern s lively New York City for less than I Love New York you can imagine. at Night Show Tours. Call your Travel Agent, or (Includes Advance Theatre Ticket Purchase) Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 in From the cozy off-Broadway Houston for complete details. theaters to the shining lights on Then take off for Broadway. the Great White Way, the stars come out every night on stage in New York City. And now you can experience all the excitement of live theater and EASTERN America's favorite way to fly Foreign Translations International Gay New• Agency In an effort to provide modern English translations of hitherto hard·to-obtain works by early gay liberationist Karl Heinrich Ulrich& and others, a translator has made 20 translations of works origi· nally written in Dutch and German. Michael A. Lombardi says he has under­taken the translating chores because it "will benefit the entire community ... by handing down the lists of victims of homo­phobia as well as the list of heroes from past centuries." Readers without fluency in German and Dutch may now go to sources closed to them, to verify facts . One of the works is the 1967 article by Reimer Lenz, The Wholesale Murder of Homosexuals in the Th1rd Reich. One of the first treatments of the subject of the Nazi extermination of gays, this work provides comprehensive footnotes useful for further studies. Another early 1870 work available is Araxes: A Call to Free the Nature of the UrninR from Penal Law by Ulrichs. The book iR a plea for civil rights for all minori· ties, including those who practice "Uran­ian" love. This is one of the rare 19-century pleas for legislative reform on lewd con­duct. There is also a translation of a 1904 speech by Anna Rueling that brings gay rights and women's rights under one umbrella Most of the basic writing on homosexu­ality has been concentrated in the past 100 years, and for the first 50 years the major contributions were in German-until the rise of Nazism. Magnus Hirschfeld, Karl Ulrich& and Kurt Hiller all contributed to the gay cause by writing and speaking on behalf of homosexual expression. In 1921 Hiller wrote; ''Homosexuals, you know that for decades your leaders and advisors have been working tirelessly to destroy prejudices, spread truth and achieve justice for you. But in the last analysis, justice for you will only be the fruit of your efforts. The liberation of homosexuals can only be the work of homm;exuals themselves." Lombardi is selling his translation in care of Urania Manuscripts, 1206 Hyper­ion Ave., Loo Angeleo, CA 90029. Mommie Dearest ,June l.o<·khart, who made a fortune on televiMion portraying understanding moth('rs, Haid she enjoyed the money. but it was nil u put-on, reports the Philadl'i· ph1a /nquira The on<'time i-;tur of " Latoisie" and " Lofll in Space" soid, " Whilt• I'm thought of as t•nryhody'H lovablf' mom, I'm really ju!'lt ac·ting. I don 't C'Ook, I havt•no interest in it I'd rnth('r lw rt•uding u hook.' ' Lo<"khm t did 1-111~- ht•r TV role~ were 'highly n •mum•ralive-and n good dodgt• .. A lso, we can h elp you with these other problem•: •OVERWEIGHT• DEPRESSION •FAULTY MEMORY• STRESS •MOTIVATION• FEARS •SLEEP DISORDERS, ETC. THERAPEUTIC & FORENSIC HYPNOSIS INSTITUTE 11====523-3103 ====II 3400 Montrose (Suite 807) Houston A UG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 12 MONTROSE VOICE I AUG 19, 1983 Dallas Freedom -::::couPoN::::- Festival Nears The ~~::0~e;.~i;:~~\ ~~1~~lY~ ~=1~:·:~ Designer's Labor Day weekend, Sept 2-5, celebrating Room the anniversary of the landmark decision ~ s overturning section 21.06 of the Texas ~R Penal Code. The Dallas Gay Alliance is SM !!ponsoring the statewide event. Highlighting the festival, they said, will be the Texas Command Performance in the downtown Dallas·MajesticTheatreon 5 0 ¢ Sunday, S.pt. 4, 8:00 p.m Meg Chrii;tian, folk singer. will headline the event which includes the Turtle Creek Chorale, Laura Theodore and the Crazy Horse Revue. Ticket.is are on sale in Dallas at Cross roads Market. :3930 Cedar Springs; Union Jack, 3918 Cedar Springs: Half the Sky Book!ltore, 2018 Greenville Ave.; and in Houston at Union Jack, 1212 Westheimer, or by contacting the DGA office, P.O. Box 190712, Dalla•. TX 75219 Prices are $10 general admission. $25 rel"erved mezzanine and $SO sponsor seats in center orchestra. Sponsors will be invited to attend a champagne reception in the Majestic lobby following the perfor mance, they said. Box seat sections on the side wall are available to groups of up to eight for $500 with champagne in the box and an invitation to the reception. The Sunday night show will bea benefit for the National AJDS Federation Lobby Project. Other planned events during the wee­kend include a series of workshops on AIDS on Saturday led by a representative of the Gay Men's Health Crisis of New York City. The Political Action Committee of DGA is to host a statewide political meeting, NOW Lesbian Rights Task Force is to host a meeting with Don Mason on legal problems and Runners Cude is to diacuss total fitness and starting a gay runners club On Sunday the Oak Lawn Counseling Center is planning on conducting an AIDS educational forum with exact time and location to be announced. A DGA spokesperson said that on Satur­day evening at 8:00 p.m. there will be a fireworks celebration featuring speaker Ginny Apuzzo, executive director of the National Gay Task Force Donations are being accepted by the Razzle Dazzle Bucket Brigade to offset the expenses of the weekend Gay Activists to Share Ideas The Texas Gay-Lesbian Task Force is hosting a ''Who's Who of gay activists" from Texas cities to share idea~ at the 10th ~nniversary meeting of that organization m San Antonio Aug 20. Among the meetings planned is the first s~tewide meeting of gay switchboard d1rectors to talk about serving rural areas and small towns. The newly formed Rural Gay Coalition, including a number of gay fa~ers _and ranchers, will be among the special ii:iterest groups P:Brlicipating in the meetings. TGL TF said. A coalition statewide of businesses is also in the works. they said The weekend schedule includes "brain storming" at 1:00 p.m. Saturday with the Texae leadership meeting at MCC-San Anton~o. 107 S .. Pine. That meeting will break 1~to Bpecta) mterf'st groups at 3:00 p.m .. w1~ the TGLTF annual meeting commencing at 4:30 p.m., dinner at 6:00 p.m., and a reception i.:elebrating the defeat of 21.~ at 8:00 P·~ ·· they said .s~nday w1H be G~y F1.esta Day at La Vilhta on San Antonio's picturesque River Walk A Male Marilyn? A lA~nd n: taurant s plans to hire only Manlyn .\-foni • lk·alikee &ti waitrf"s<;.ts has run afoul of Britain:-; anti discrimination laws. \\'hen the owner tried to advertise for help. empha:-.izmg that a "wiggly walk"' was f'SSt>ntial, the Time!:i of London turnt.>d him down. saying the job was obvious!\· not opt>n to both sexe:s - WITH DRY CLEANING 224 Westheimer 522-7106 Hours 10am to 6pm _:::::couPoN:::::_ ...... 'Tiff l l TIU 1 ff BH,,.f.D POT 4 TO SPUDS AREA GIRESBEST FRIEND! 416 Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 520-0554 'Double Epidemic' Spreading, Says SMU Professor "A double epidemic is spreading across the lend," read the article on the "op, ed page" of the Aug. 7 Neu: York Times ''One, growing fear and intolerance of homosexuals, is fueled by thP other, the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and neither is being ade­quately addressed." The opinion, submitted by William Beauchamp, associate professor of French at Southern Methodist University in Dal­las, further stated that homosexuals had been portrayed as "rapists, thieves and robbers .. . sinners and liars. The group (G~y 1 Lesbian Support Organization, which had asked for recognition by the SMU Student Senate) would serve as a student-faculty sex club, a vehicle for orgies and recruitment. Worst of all, we were 'disease carrying, sexual deviants' because of AIDS, the health-the very hves of every person on campus would be at risk." As he wrote, "When the Senate voted 17·11 to deny recognition, cheers erupted from the gallery, and a familiar SMU chant was hear 'Steers and queers-only in Austin.' A young man shouted, 'Now we can shoot you."' Beauchamp relates that the spectacle at SMU is not an isolated event. The funda· mentalist right has seized on AIDS as the linchpin of their case against civil rights for homosexuals, spurred along through the effort.a of Paul Cameron, a psycholo· gist from Lincoln, Neb. In Chicago recently he stated that homosexuals were potential ma88 murderers and that AIDS could mean the demise of Western civilize· tion, Beauchamp reported. The story went on to delineate the patt· em of blame-the-victim for the disease: the sick deserve to be sick, becoming the scapegoat for zealotry, ignorance about AIDS and the "abiding homophobia of mainstream America." The "sluggish response of government to what some call the major health emergency of the cen· tury" has caused the erosion of civil rights, he aaid. "In the controversy at SMU, scores of faculty and many courageous students spoke out against both the inaccuaracy and bigotry of the homosexual group's opponenta. The administration on the other hand, remained etudiously silent until the day before the vote. That after· noon, in a strategic interview with the campus newepaper, the president said he had received only negative feedback from the trustees. And that evening, the Dean of Student Life authorized an off-campus dinner for 10 uncommitted student sena· tors so they could discuss the issues with an 'expert' none other than Paul Cameron himself. The next day, 8 of the 10 voted nay." "I am ashamed of my university," stated Beauchamp. "Its abdication of moral leaderahip; the betrayal of its trust to nurture truth and tolerance; its sur· render to expediency .... The result is the present social climate in which bigotry prospers and civil rights erode, the death toll mo~nt.a ~nd each day, little by little, both ep1dem1cs spread." LA Chosen as Gay Business Convention Site Tut National Association of Business Councils has announced its third annual convention wi11 bE' held this year in Los Angeles, Nov. 3-6 The theme of the convention is "Future Llnks," meaning that the future is directly determined by present time and present actions. It is also concerned with relation· ships, between the present and the future, between communities and between prof es· eional and personal involvements ~·GENERAL REPAIR• AUTO () -i :Il 0 z 0 -i c z z ~ Sum Specials ~ • * Oil Change & Lube ~ Carpet Steaming Painting ~ $1995 ~ g *Tune Up from $3995 ~ $10.95 any size room Interior & Exterior 5 * Air Conditioning 0 Deodorizing Free Dry Wall, Remodeling :l Check & Charge $21so ~ Upholstery Cleaning ~ 1411 TAFT ~ $29.95 any size Chair & Sofa ~•A UTOM5AT2IC2 T-R2AN1S9M0IS SION• s<( .._ _____5_2_9__-_9_9_8_5__ ____ . ~---::. ' 7~-~~---J-/:~~- .J-t~ Comfort, Convenience Absolute Elegance ' The St. Lauren is in the heart of City Post Oak, allowing easy access to the city's finest dining, corporate and fashion addresses. Located one minute fron the Gal· leria Mall. After the work day is done, sam· pie the cuisine at internationally·acdaimed res-ti~~:~~~:.~ s;s0N:i~~~~M~~~~1~. ~akowitz, Saks Fifth Avenue or Abercrombie & Fitch, all located within a two-block radius of The St. Lauren Relax in the lavishly landscaped courtyard undt·r th<' shade of magnolia trees or tak<' u lat<' night dip in the oval-shapt'Cl. pool SPECIAL AMENITIES c Swimmmg Pool o Walking Distance to Galleria Mall ~ 8~:!~~ cp~;~1~;1s C' Utilities Paid c Microwave Oven o 9-Foot Ceilings c Extra Larg<' Clos<.'ts c Real Marbl<' Vanities f--------. -sp~~i-;1-F;~; oiie~ ----------: 1 Lease a St. Lauren apartment during the month of : : August and receive absoluetly free- 1 1 • 1 Month Free Rent : : •Trip to New Orleans • 1 lncludmg air fare t1.nd French C.~uartl.'r hoU.•I for~ nights 1 : Pn•stnt thiR coupon when you visit th<' Sl. l.aurt'n : : 2323 McCue-960-1103 : •------ ---- ------- -- ------ ---- --·---- _: 2323 Mccue 960-1103 14 MoNrRosevo1ce1Aua19, 19a3 Montrose Live Risky Business Features "That's Entertainment" By Jon Cheetwood Imagine if you will Fred Astaire and Gin· ger Rogers breaking into a "Slam Dance" in the middle of one of their traditional numbers, or a fed-up Dorothy in the "Wizard of Oz" refusing to take any crap off of anyone. It's all here in Risky Business' new show '"Silver Screen." RB at 2700 Albany has newly interpretated a few of your favorite old movies and turned them into highly entertaining satirical segments of "The Way It Wasn't." Their 'nothing's sacred" attitude even puta an "r .. rating on "The Sound of Music." This is hysterical stuff served in a well constructed show by a fun willing ensemble whose comaradery is quite evi­dent. While show-stealing runs rampant throughout the evening, it's Jay Martino who must take top honors in the field with his jaded Dorthy in a totally sarcastic ver sion of "The Wizard of Oz" wearing ruby slippers that are a sin against nature he bitcheb his way through Oz guided by a wonderfully dizzy Good Witch. Kayce Glaue. who always has a spare word tucked away in here in cal:ie of wand break down. Glat-il:il" is delightul throughout the show. particularly as Miss Mona in '" Best Little Whorehouse" and as Joan Crawford letting Christian have her dues RuS8el Jones and Paul Hope, who ha .. ·e been solid contributors to RB's talent store since it's opening are top notch spookers ln this 1how. Jonel:i seems to have a tailor made part as Dr. Frankenfurter from "'Hocky Horror Show" as he slips into high camp and Tim Curry's leotard with ease. Hope is delightfully macagre in his necrophilic salute to Eli vs, and as always in superb voice. Micheel Larin, who has an uncanny resemblence to Barbara Streisand, does an equally uncanny vocal interpretation of Babs singing "My Man" and "People." This lady has a keen sense of humor as well as a versitle Polished voice. Her spark adds much to this already bright show Taking a swipe atthe50'sis Randy Jobe as the quintessential punk in "Greased Lightening" and Steve Stellenwerf and Delores Baum must have Jeanette McDo­nald and Nelson Eddy rolling in their graves Johnny V again has created a war­drobe for the cast that is as tongue-in­cheek as it is pretty. giving the show a coloful visual wit Directors Andrea Modisette and Jay Martino must be praised for pulling these shows off with such aplomb. This show, perhaps the best yet, and there's no excuse for missing it. It's got to be the best enter­tainment bt•y in town If you're the least bit fun-loving, you can't afford to miss "Silver Screen·-The Way It Wasn·t o HPT Seeks Actors Hout;ton Public Theatre is seeking actors of all nationalities for its upcoming pro duction Thrre'.o; Afu_,ays a Murder Auditions will be held on Sunday, Aug :Ill. 1:00-6:00 p.m. and Mon<lay, Aug. 29. 7:00-10:00 p.m. at Houston Community College's Fine Arts Center, 3517 Aufitin . For further info call 528-4819. We feature ••• • All Brands of Ice Cold KEG BEER • Delivery Service • Everyday Specials: Newport Vodka 1.7s Liter $7.69 Kentucky Tavern Bourbon 1:7§ Liter su.79 Jamie'08 Scotch 1.7s Liter su.79 BRING IN OR MENTION THIS AD and receive a Free Bag of Ice with purchase WAUGH DRIVE LIQUORS 1402 Welch at Waugh Drive, Houston, TX 77006 A UG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 (TLC) THE LA\\\ \EY C ORPORATION 1-4'.I'\\. \l,ih. Ill.I lh,..ton. lt•\.J\ ..... OOh -H.).!4.)80() ~~~~~ 1ic~n~~:i:-~~ ;;~~; ·:: .... e.~e:~~i~fe t~:::i~~~IT~; the opening of our All Year Costume & Make-up Dept. G\V'ICiS HAIR SPRAY EYELAFSAHLSEES MAfLfttEI MAIGE-UP PROPS HATS & HEADPIECF-5 CAPES FISH NET HOSE TIGHTS A merican Express I' 16 MONTROSEVOICE/AUG 19,1983 f17SteYeW•rr•n "H•,.,•nnahtoitU...onlythinaw<>tth ~1~-~.:::~=~::;'J!f'~nnn~ ::::1l•1nb>11011aboit•vioionol•b<t1tt "'Tho....,.1NC01ninthe......lditpovtrty, il111m1icy, •nyk1ndol"""oJ""d,..Biri°"" P"'l'°""'*- tdon'tb<h•voocounU)I ohoouklbt-n«lbyt-~-•olU.• =::::•·"btlonc-o&oLOOptt.,.ntofth<t n!"!::i,~ ~h!~. :;i:i.:r.i~~~.':~.!: ~m.. .~ ~-~:"!l.~h~~:~i:~ hood, at luot-to tho philooophy H~b7Z...t..,th<tchorlll'IHh• b,......ht&ohfoinU...l~lll<nZor/><>tM G .... •.ondnowbr!nao"'J..-Hollin H""8tOnAq2'&p1.4. "l'molU...old -•--ochoolofth<ot<r h .. ina•tortodwi•h•noffohootofu..'. 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VY"-~'f/hl in "h1<h "]do.rod "' chon .. myv<>i<ofor1t,oDCI ldid itfi ... ~':::'" bdo•• 1roin1 in fronl of tho Ofth•ch.,odo,.thotolfocloldhim- ~~~:,f. 2;~i:!:J:.' ::..tt.:::J h..-iflhodn'tplo~Goqin ... \l'ohad ~~~.children ud Gouain hiod fivo child Gottin1oroundtotho n>1o-he-.­known for,Q~inn.,.y0Zof'bodidn'toffoct him .. <nuchootho mon'o<rMtor, Nikoo K.uot .. kio,di.d. Qoinn"o,..dolloftht Gnokoulhot'•workt(he'oo-ocio\lo .-..d••)o.ndfiod11homln1<noolyopin1.,.L. ... ::~1~:~::::tr:::·J! finttim••-ndt-o ... hodidn1Ukttht Letters Family and Friends Garage Sale From Freda Jerrell Your only non·gay support organization, Family and Friends of Gays, is having a fantastic garage and bake sale on Sept. 10, 1-6 p.m. inside Numbers, 300 Westheimer. (Please use side entrance.) This is to raise money to send delegates to our Interna­tional Convention, Oct. 7-10 in New York City We need, and you need us, to go to learn better how to support and educate your parents, other family members and non· gay friends, as well as the general public and to support your right to be gay and live a good and happy life free of discrimi· nation "Gays are everyhwere" and so are we Every state in this country has support groupa affiliated with the international office in L-Os AngeleA I, as president of the local chapter, have been asked by our Intt>rnational preRident to represent, along with Jean of Pensac· ola, Fla .• all the southern states at the con vention. This mc>anA that I have been in contact with Jean and all the chapters in this area and you will be happy to know that we are among the top four chapters in the country. We also have seven chapters in this immediate area which probably tops any other city. You can be proud of the support you have in Texas We also have an international directory to reff'r prople a11 over the country and abroad. We know that you appreciate and sup· port us and will help us send delegates to the convention. That is what our garage­/ bake sale is all about. We expect to see you there on Sept. 10. Our dear friends in the gay community have been good to us and we value those friends and friend­ships. BEN'S BURGERS 808 Lovett 528-9211 Sunday Brunch! $2.25-3.00 Sunday llam-2pm Open Mon-Sat llam-8pm AUG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Linda "Lulu" Simpsc,n presents Bartenders Drag Show coming soon Happy Hours 7am·7pm 7 Days a Week •Bulfet­Sunday, • Steak Nite­Wednesday, $3.50 ~11 lfv;ld.,J/"FP'f.,11..,,. M~i;<J~ R.,J.,c.J 1>-' P...cu ~us..,..,.... 110.2 J!....ti 5.27• 9866 18 MOlrn!OSEVOICE/AUO 19, 1983 l.aylll)l1•Finger.lnc. AVAILABLE NOW IN SELECTED HOUSTON LOCATIONS. ' I /~~~;~ • HIM,. NATURAL VITAMINS MINERALS AND HERBS FOR THE ACTIVE MALE AUG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Softball Awards to be Presented at Banquet Sports By Chuck Meredith The MSASoftballLeague fonnallybrings D Renegades Take Title for third place, ~2 . Cyanide then took on the hard-playing undefeated Briar Patch Renegades in the title games. After six scorele88 innings, the Renegades at.sruck for two runs and mae them stand up as an exhausted Cya­nide team was retired in the bottom of the inning. The game was a classic example of tight defese and clutch hitting, as evi­dence by the Renegades seventh inning. which will to toward next year's tourna· ment. ita season to a close with an awards cerem­ony Friday evening at Treebeard's Res­taurant. Along with team trophies for the season 's accomplisments, individual awards will be given for each division, Rookie of the year, Moat Improved Player, and Most Valuable Player. An MVP will also be aelected for his play in the playoffs. Since the most valuable player award is one ot the moat coveted awards given each year, each of the nominees are listed below with their qualifications so that all of these out.standing players get the recogni­tion they deserve. The Awards Banquet was postponed at the last moment because of the Hurricane North Division Mario Arzola, Barn-As a pitcher for the Barn, Mario was one of the more con­sistent pitcher& in the league. He didn't olouch at the plate either, batting .349 with rive walks and seven RBis. Robert Arriaga, Brazos-Also a nomi­nee u moat improved player. Robert led his team in average runs, hit.a, walks and impoSBible plays at aecond base. His posi­tive attitude has had a good effect on his team as they proved to be a challenge to Dirty Sally's by the end of the year. Ryan MayM, Charlotte's-His .545 bat­ting average made him one of the league leaden on a team that seemed to lack scor­ing punch. Ryan's beat valua, though, seemed to be in the outfield where he ranged far and wide to make good plays. Jerry DeSak, Dirty Sally's-What more can you say about the "Captain" of the Dirty Sally'• team. Jerry has so far this year helped his team win their division, the league tiUe and he himself won the batting title. When you have as many good playero as Sally'1 does, and they still are able to get up for a big game, the credit has to go to the top. Fred Lopez, Mining Co.IJRs-Better known ae Fredrika Sims, Fred hae been the Mining Co's power both on and off the team. A true inspirational leader, this man lcnowe how to talk! South Division Galleon-The Galleon's centerfielder, who wishes, to be unnamed here, is a somewhat controvenial choice from a team that has swirled in controversay this year. Two things do stand out in hie favor-a .351 batting average and 14 RBis plus the factthathewasreliableenough to appear in all of the Galleon's games. Sammy Ramirex, Jim's Gym-An All­Star in both volleyball and softball, Sammy led hie team in hit.a and RBis. He a lso gave them a reliable third baseman, something several teams lack around the league. Reginald Osborne, Catch One-As the manager of the troubled new team in the league, Reggie Jed his team in average and hits while displaying 1teady defese. It is a lso to his credit that he continued to sup­port the league even when most of his teammates seemed to be too busy to show up for gamee. Bill Sansom, Briar Patch- Wherever you hit the ball against BP, Bill is sure to be there in a hurry. A true leader on the field with his defense, Bill also batted .351 and drove in 10 runs. It is also noteworthy to mention that several teams around the league have expressed interest in his servi­ces for next year, but he prefers to stick with his Patch teammates. Bob Jamea, Voice-No one works harder in a game than Bob. The man with the gun for an arm and flashy footwork sets standards in the league for short­stops. His .453 average and 17 runs scored pace hie Voice teammates as they look to him for an example of a great ballplayer. The First Annual Houston Women's Soft· ball Classic was brought to a triumphant conclusion last Sunday, but not without a great deal of Field Maintainance caused by a week of Houston rain. Since Levy Field was under wet.er Saturday, all games were moved to Cottage Grove, which still required several hours of hard work to be playable. The fruits of these hard-working women's labor became apparent Sunday with the trophy games at dried out Levy Field. Fourth Place was won by Dallas' Ray's Gays when they suffered their second loss in this double-elimination tournament at the bads of Houston Hya­nide, 10-1. Kindred Spirits then extended Cyanide to extra innings before settling After the final fame, an awards cerem­ony was held at the Budweiser Hospitality Room where more than 200 people enjoyed free beer, compliments of Budweiser. The Sportsmanship Trophy was won by T­Shirts Plus for their spirited play and posi­tive attitude. The Double R Saloon won the Beer Trophy as they were instrumental in raising several hundred dollars in dona­tions from tournament team players A plaque of Appreciation was awarded to Jimmie Hammond and Budweiser for their underwriting of the tournaments. Jimmie's help and enthusiastic support of women's softball was instrumental in the success of the tournament. Individual brass paperweights, shaped in the state of Texas, were awarded to first place team members and to the All­Tournament Team. The Most Valuable Player was awarded a trophy for her out­standing play. "The tournament was great. We'vecome along way in two years as a league to be able to put on such a great tournament," commented MSAIWSL president Martha Ritchie after the ceremony. "We hope to continue to put on an annual tournament Stanford Square TOWNHOMES The twenty-four townhomes at Stanford Square afford the convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a carefully-planned, secure environment. These one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minutes of the downtown business and cultural district, Greenway Plaza, the medical center and the speciality shops, galleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and River Oaks areas. Careful auention has been given to security requirments. An automatic entry gate permits controlled access Lo the townhome community, while automatic garage doors and well-lighted parking areas extend security within the perimeter of the property. As an additional feature, each home has been pre-wired for its own security system. Stanford Square Townhomes offer a variety of amenities, including: • Woodbuming fireplaces, • Private patios, • Kitchen appliances (refrigerator & microwave oven), • Washers & dryers, • Smoke detectors, • Pre-wiring for cable TV 8c Security Systems. SPECIAL BUILDERS BONUS• for purchasers acting prior to Sept. 30, 1983 1) A weekend for 2 in either of the sunny Carribean islands of Jamaica or Aruba (only air fare 8c hotel accomodations included). -OR- 2) A year's full membership for two at the popular Downtown YMCA. -OR- 3) A $1500 gift certificate at the furniture store or your choice to help you outfit your new home. •Sale musl be closed prior to the awarding of any builders bonus. •Builders bonmes may be changed o r , .... i1hdrawn by builder a t any time. OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KITTRELL REALTY 529-5981 20 MONTROSE VOICE/ AUG. 19, 1983 that will become a statewide event held in our community." She then went on to thank all the hard working people who helped put on the outstanding event. o Women's Softball The MSA Women's Softball Leagye, hav­ing just completed a successful tourna­ment in addition to its summer season, is showing not let up in its incredible momentum as these hard-working women plan for the fall. A three-day scavenger hunt is planned for thia weekend which will conclude Sun­day with a barbeque in Memorial Park. The Fall League will be organized at their monthly League meeting, Aug. 29, at the Budweiser Hospitality Room. Thia meet­ing also marks the deadline for fall season rooten. League play will begin on Sept. 11 with all games beling played on Sundays at Memorial park Field No. 1. Additional players are stiU needed for the fall league as the league is anticipat­ing the expansion of the League. While moet the MSA subgroups eeem to have reached a peak in membership, the Women's Softball League is definitely on the way up and excitment within the group is still growing. New players should call Martha Ritchie at 728-9371 for more information. o Bowling Leagues Set The summer aeason of the MSA Bowling Leagues is quickly coming to a close, and both Monday night a nd Thursday night Leagues have already begun to prepare for the winter season. The Monday Night League will offi­cially end its season Aug. 30 with an awards presentation at the Officer's Club. Their Winter League will begin Sept. 19. Team11 or individual members may call Steve McConaughy at 499-9036 or Sam Immordino at 528-4576 to sign up. Thursday Night Bowling ends on Sept. acknowledges Martha Richie Your unselfish dedicatwn, organization and leadership 1n starting women's softball, now in its second year, made the Jst Annual Houston Women's Classic another Houston first. Beside a great women stands another-Sudie Best wishes in the Fall Season 15 and will begin again on Sept. 29. Inter· ested teams or members are to call Richard Dauchy at 644'5479 if they wish to be included in the Winter League. Non-Sexist Softball Men and women should not be treated as equals on tl>e softball field, says Carole MSA Volleyball FINAL SEASON STANDINGS Humct.nes Houston Sol Dieh1rds Mag•c Remnants MSA Monday Night Bowling ROLL OFF STANDINGS FoOow1ng Aug 15 competition 1 Dirty Sally's StrOll;ers 4 Tush Ticlcters 25 Easy Pieces 5Teddy Bars 3HtghHeelRoll«<S 6BaddGirls HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Tommy D1v1s 234 Steve McConaghy 626 Larry Brown 226 Terry Wolbef 609 JOhnMoms224 Lou11Schn8lder602 Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Follow1nQAug 14competitlon A LADDER 1 Rich Ryan 2T1mC1lhoon 3J1nMeuld1n 40onK-sMtr 5Aonlandrum 8JimKitch 7JonColbert 8leste<Vela 9M1keGreen 10Donny Kelley MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS Following Aug 11 competition 1 Buar Patch Rabbits 2Thursday N1ghtTnclcs 3 Flirtet1on HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Lou1sSchne1der234 LoulsSchnelder600 Pam W•v•r 232 Pam Weaver 543 Steve Stepleton 225 Diane Kay Gizzi, a female right-fielder from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Aa reported in Sporting News, Giz.zi is suing the local amateur softball associa­tion and male center fielder J.C. Mitchell for $50,000 from an accident during a co-ed game. Gizzi says Mitchell cruhed into her and broke her colJar bone while chasing a fly ball. The suit claims the aBSociation should have instructed male players to "exercise restraint vis-a-vis female soft­ball players in co-ed games." Kansas City Captures Dallas Softball Invitational August 13 was the date that the Rangers of Kan11ae City made it known to Dallas, that Kansai City does have a softball teain. The Rangers went through the Pegaau1 Invitational undefeated, and stayed cool and poised all day long. Tak­ing second place was Throckmorton Min­ing Company of Dallas and Dallas Steel finishing third. With temperatures in the upper 90s all day, the heat was on all teams. TMC had to do the most ba ttling a ll day long by s neaking up notchces in the loser's bracket, to win the right to battle KC in the championship game. In thatchampionship game, exhaustion a nd heat caught up to TMC as they gave KC a good, defensive battle, but couldn't produce the hits that KC was producing. KC went on to win 11-7. Making the all-tournament team were Ken Gray and Jeff Belden ofTMC, Alvoy Talum of Dallas Gay News, John Moretta and Mike Parker of the Round-Up, Ray Ashwood and Ron Roes of Steel, Tony Pietachner of the Barn from Houston and Ernie Cutter and J oe Baggs of KC. The Barn picked up sportsmanship with the loudest and moat spirited team there. ~Fre~·Jun~n--------~ ;Jt)rleans * VACATION CLUB If you want to swing in New Orleans' French Quarter, call Linda Light for our $79 Weekend Special: Two days' stay in a l uxury French Q u ar­ter Inn, Dinner for two at the Imperial Regency Restaurant, Cruise tickets on a Mississippi River­boat, a bottle of champagne, and round trip air fare from Hou ston to New Orleans and return. Frenchmen Orleans Travel Club For reservation s, call Linda collect at (504) 943-3100 between lOam and 5 pm Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG 19 20 AUG AUG AUG AUG 21 22 23 24 25 F r•dd•1•oti•lmfc n•t1>n ph ien1 •ber1ltrevent lied below IOOklorme1po11aringorger 1- zai,on under ·orgar 1iat1 is· '" lh M• lln H! c1 n•f1ed Selected Events through 7 Days •SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays !0:30em-1:30pm, MacGregor Park • SVNDA Y: Gey Fiesta Dey, San Antonio, La Vilhta on the River Walk • SVNDA Y: Choices meete 12:30pm, YWCA, 3615 Willia • SUNDAY: Unitanen.t Universalist Gay Caucus meets, !st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannind- • SUNDA Y: Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm, Presbyterian Center behind 1st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main mMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meete 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 mMONDA Y: MSA Summer Season Bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDA Y: Full moon, IO:OOam •TUESDA Y: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets 7pm, Bering Church, 1440 Harold • TUESDAY: Lutherans Con­cerned meets Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh • TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Ha rold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDA Y: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Aug. 24 • WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Har old, 7:30-!0pm • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 • THVRSDA Y: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Gay World Ser­ies Softball Tournament opens Aug. 30 in Chicago, lasting to Sept. 2 •IN 2 WEEKS: Dalles Gey Alliance's Texas Freedom Festi­val Sept. 2-5, celebrating a nni­versary of repeal of section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code m!N 2 WEEK S: Sixth Biennial International Convention of Dignity, Seattle, Sept. 2-5 •IN 2 WEEKS: Tulsa gay softball league invitational tour­nament, Sept. 3-5 • IN 2 WEEKS: Labor Dey, Sept 5 •IN 2 WEEKS: Greater Mont rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm, Sept 6, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei· mer •IN 2 WEEKS: Rosh Hashun­nah, Jewish New Year, begins Sept 7 m!N 2 WEEKS: Gey Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm, Sept 7 •IN 2 WE.'EK S: "Come Out end Sing Together," lot North American Gay Choral Festival, opens Sept. 8, lasting to Sept. 11, Lincoln Center, New York •IN 3 WEEKS: Familv & Friends of Gays garagf. & bake sale Sept. 10, 1-6pm, N Jmbers, 300 WestheimE'r • IN 4 WEEKS: Yorn Kippur, Jewish day of Atonement. Sept 16 NOTICE t:. ~r~,~~Jzn:;: .;L~: · ~==:~~:~i~ ~;:a for me Ve :ea"d •tyorgan1u ::r~~ca.:O-:'n~hl• ll•ttn9 I•• MontmM Vok• dWlri· CARS & BIKES 1970 CADILLAC CONVERTIBLE Call for details Asking $5500 659- 5021 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES UNIQUE-EST MONTROSE STARGAZER Most unique tree-top loft apt m Montrose 1409 Indiana $600 elec Call 529-0090 UNIQUE DUPLEX-MONTROSE For lease. 2 bedroom. all appliances, central AIC, heat. fireplace, enclosed deck Nice place• $595 month. 529-5208 AUG 19, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 • • MONTROSEAPARTMENT Montrose Classified Large (900 sq ft.1 sunny 1 bedroom with study {possible bedroom). 1126 GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE West Grey. hardwood floors. new (A gay roommate service.) The best appliances. off street parking $385 business deal you will make tl"l1s 526-0804 year 523·3223 EASTWOODiDOWNTOWN.'UotH Super located updated 2 bedroom 1 bath house Formal living & dining room. sundeck. central air.1heat appliances+ washer/dryer included more $450 • ut1lit1es + deposit 774-7561 ext 2611 (days). 928-5495 (eves) ATTENTION MUSICIANS Severa! 1 bedroom apartments avail­able 1n recording studio complex at great location on Montrose Blvd 528·3147. 520-9485 HOUSE FOR LEASE Heights 3BR. 1 bath. central AH. fenced yard. 2-car (detached) gar­age S5501mo + SSOO deposn. 522- 9579 BAYCLIFF BAY HOUSE Small Lawn mamtance & part ut1l­t1es furnished 559-2286 MONTROSE APARTMENT Darling 2 bedroom. full kitchen appliances, central heaVa1r, hard­wood floors. covered parking 227 W Alabama $425 monthly + bills 666·6298 MEMORIAL OFF 5400 Modern 2 bedroom, new AC. refng $325 +electric & deposit. 1 bedroom, shower. combined hvmg. dining. kit­chen $275 + electric & deposit Guest house. 3 rooms. au electnc kitchen. $275 + bills & deposit Mor­ada. 861-3030 GESSNER AT BELLAIRE Beautiful 2-2 apt 20· ceilings. loft bedroom. full baths. many watk-m closets. beautiful view. pool, quiet. excellent maintenance. Spacious 1 bedroom. 771-0249. bills paid LUXURY UPPER DUPLEX Completely renovated 2 bedroom ,,. good Montrose location Many pluses including self-cleaning oven 1cemaker refng W D connections ceiling fan & mini blmds SBOO per month 666-3345 SMALL QUIET COMPLEX One i.>edroom. pool courtyard No pets All adults S310+eiectnc 521- 0972 or 521-0212 MONTROSE1RICEJMEDICAL Near SW Fwv 2-2· bath studio apartment. 1200 sq feet. each bedroom-full bath. walk-in closets. picture windows. 16-ft patio. ideal for roommates quiet. beautiful com­plex 523-5028. bi !s paid EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED ACTORS/STUDENTS Alley Theatre seeks telephone per­sonal to promote "83-"84 season Excellent pay A great sense of humor a mustl Call James Fowter 228-9341 ext. 87 10am-9pm GAY BARS ~~1••· 402 Lo~tt· S27-9866 d1r11ng ,,.. • Ba•n-710 Pec1t 528-9427 cou"''Y • Brazos Rni•tlf 8o!lom -2..00 Brezos ~28- 9191 CDUntry • B"ar Patch -2294 W Hok;t)-nlbe~9678 ~~~J;~11 Oiteo- 4965 Mer1t0 Lu!her K1ng- 9 Cr11cken Coo9· s: wes1ne.nwr -526-2240 ~h~:·-2631R:hlTIO'ld-52&-i>s9d•SCC""rtf1 • M·U Cl'l••4'1el 911 w or ...... 528-8840 e .v 1row-.. no co to5 Pac..: le ~29-7488 • Nu :t>ers2 -300Westneimer 526-651 toco e l')t1enC:1:> 2,.00AI~ J..4084 • Onecn~ 016Y.Gray 528-850 • ""neOut•- 1419Ric"mood s28-ilro :.::~ E•e&.-"8nt lUILMl•nd- 659-0040:..,,tri e R1peord- 7tSfa1N•- !:>£,-2792 • R•5kyBlllrl'lffl 2700A1beny--S28-36!1 ~~ixas Reriegadel 1318 We1fheuner- 521 :::~·::"":.,~~~~11;i::;trn:b•en • V8f11 t .. N-2023M.a1n 522-0000 e westPleyland 3012 ... •am 52~ e !:: ty$a YI 924J8Cka4in--"4S-9164 BEAU/oh.WT i ,;ope--3040r1Mna-.f32-42()6 • SYnoc .... .,er497Crockett-~ GALvESrON • Blue Room 21423f0- -753-9031 e Fty 21010 193-1&42 e KOl'>T1k12142)rc»i7~1 e Mary1 I- 2!>020 763-9'35 e Aoberl•Lafitta-21311(.empiner-765-6896- e S11,.er-Palace 2214 ... P.Ctlante-:..._~9334- 22 MONTROSE VOICE / A UG. 19, 1983 " Okay, now it 's my turn ... Bob want the cracker ... Bob wont the cracker . " The Portrait of Dorian Gray and his dog. "Oh please, Moml ... I've already handled him and now the mother won't take him back." The Far Side by Gary Larson " Wait! Spore me! ... I've got a wife , a home, and over a thousand eggs la id in the jelly!'' " Hey! Look at Red 8~:;',~~ l!;,Wa iiiiiiiit ... THAT t.AFAYETTE- ~.'/)~~~2~ M1uric. (W1nd-.oodShoPP,ng LAKiCHARLES-· i Pa-;;;on--1501 Bra.d--:_433:g389 ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATJONM. OAGANIZATIONS G~j/~~;':;.;~e 3360S. WUh•ngton G~~~)~;~l~~1POB1892.WHh•ngton HumtinR.ght1Campe.1gnFund--POB139fl Waan- 11191on.OC20013-·(202)~2025 l~O::-L~~~!°:!':M 132 W Ord New Yor~ NY Mid•• Fund lo• Hum1n Rogl'lll (Gty P•IH ~~·~~.:g.;~~i~::~ ~f~;,~~1~~?::: ~~~'s~::;"lf'lt: - !IOOI 221·7QU (°"!:tide New i::O~-~:r,~-::~:,. ... Foru-POB AK ~ton ~hr;~;~'r-~:rul-cMontrose) Chut"C/'I or A'P1ace1nlhi~CiO'G-rac•lyii°n8ook71CM F••l"t•--522-7695 tubgroupofl!Hlnc con­c• ta7prnTon AcLl1=123e w Gr1y --52•-5925 A1os-Hoth~-.CtOGey ·sw11Chb0ard-5M"2l-1 Amer---;c." G1y Aihe~.t.=451-ieecJ~ ~~:~~i" 6~=::~f=~~~:J~:1 club night Wed A.1roR&1iibow.f.i111nce-5:zir~51(w01ce).520- 0552(TTY} BeyOue-10 -M011troseChor1le =~:~:i~l~~ed~~~~~~!~~­~~& i!~~'.·~fr1hef{BWM'n:~Ci0 Gly ~~~=::+~::,:~l~r:~~~d Chr-11t;1n Church ol the Good Shepherd-1707 ~~~hu~cn 1prn Sun, B•ble 1lo<ty ~~i.~~~~l~e~h~~ .1J00M°'11~ Churcho1Ctv111•i"Floih--2"17F1•rv•ew-·529- aoo5 Ml"t•C:. 1045.lm Su11 & 715pm Wed ~:::~i:~=Tu.9 &Sur1.choirp1act1ce Criorch ol Pentec:ottal-U111ty__:850=1288. s20= 5699Serv•c .. 730pmFn.111mS011 C111ien11or Hom&n-EQoel•ty (CHE~ ~809 F;nn-.n 11301- 236-INl6e bolrd mMMg 2nd Tuudey1 ~:0~:·2~::.~~~>.;-2'i'9:92•1 er-uOI R.;.-.r ~~~~!ly GO.~-C9n1er-1100 Mon1rose- :~~~:~~~yi:,::::'~~1~1 ~~-2:!Il ConfoeAr••llmbd•Soctety~J•ne17~ orR1y1175&-4097 c;,,,,HOi1-;n.-22.:1505 ~~-1~1y-A1-he11t-457-eeeo A"1enC1n- G1y 011n1 FOUl'ld1to01'1-2700 M1t0n-524.57i1 Oo0niiy-"'"11""11CiihOhcS1u<Mn1"'Cen11r_1ifu Boll0¥1r· 520-9298 528-78" mee1mg1 7pm S11urdlys F.m.i. .. & FF .... dl ol o-.y;~ mMll ~l: ~~}~,:i'p::.~·~·~~h~~.,~ 111 U11t11ri1n Ct1un:;t1-s2lo Fannin ·526-1571 Mrv•Cl1115emSun Fron1Nnnef;:..529-121i ~iii &5:~::1h1nng E11P...ienee !GASEf-52&- ~y & L•b••n Archt~• ot Tius 1lhl1119ol llH Gey A1•1n Club-2$15 W1ugh •124 77008 ~7H=~~~d·fr.~~;~~~2New,;jen•12-521• G1Yn1111n Group--5"2&=98-44 G1yNurM1Alto•nc1---&80="9-486 ff.~;~~l!~~!~~~-.~~~77~ ~~~r:-:-:o.~~~~:~~?.~~~.: G1y 5.,,,lchbolrd - POB 3624---5~&3211 .,.,10,. tnel•Of'l.cOUnMhng ret1n1ta.TTY.AIOSHotbnl !~gi:E.~~~~J::°h?f~~! ~=1nt1FM19iJ A111 -Fir·AWIY Ff,.-;.;(!,_ ~~11 ln11l11•th Ailo•nce·-729 M1nor­Houston ..., .. -Gey & letb••n E;;g•neer• & Sc..,.,t•lll•-526-7386 meltl7prno4thWedn.· ~YI - - -- ---~ Hoo1tonCornmun11yClown1-a62-a:J14 HouliOf'l-0111 Prot•11on111-=:-rne.11---;n E111 Room. HollCl•Y lnri C1ntr11. 4640 S M••n-523- 5922 mffting730pm2ndTo .. dl)'9 Hou11on M0t0rCYc'9-C1ob 1iOC11lciUb1-CiO M1ry·1. 1022 WHlhl•~-_52~1 Hou.tonNor1t1Pro1 .... 0011s-=POB3&4ri:Ho;,.,­b6177338-- B•H •te21-1121 l/Hl;;c POB leCMl.77222--894-1732. 529- ~!~1;1d¥'ifl~1t~~::]~ tOH Clogg1n_ tio.rd ll'llltong 7 30pm 111 Thur11- deyt ('f'lfied locl hO,.). edtJCl hOnll forum 730pn"l3rdThurt<leya ~';&~~=~*?~i;-'*= =~'~:."~'!= 1265 M1on. & 4th Tlllldlyt; It ~=~7;;i2i;:~~*~~~~:~~~H Inc --POB iKPFT A1~FM-go-_,,9 Lovette~~ 4.000·w,1ese·ns1e1n··g•yr1d1oanowThurld1ys 7)0.-900pm ~~~~~Foundlt•Ol'l-1001 Wetl,;.mer e193.- ~~~:!5 B1cyC1e club- ·D1vld 682-0.56~ C.fOi ~~~:~~;~~;~;~A1COhOi1c1 & Alenon-1214 ~~~~o~_G:looA~~~n.S::1;,e_u7~,~~·~~~ ~~.~: s2:~ ~:~~~~~d~~lcm•· -880-9'86 L•b11n M0thera k!~rOUP -OiCho•c• m•t• 1111ncl3rclS1t.530pm.210F11r11-_1pt 1 Lu1n.m11 ·conc•m.c1=-mfftl•1 Grice Lu1tie­r1n cnurcn. 2s1s w1ugn-s21-o863. •~1143 mMt1ng2nd&4thTues 1v.n1ng1 ~OpohUincommunitYCnurChO!i'heR9.Ur­rect• on (MCCA)-1'119 0.C.!Uf ~861-9149 pol- ~E~:~~l.~ ~~~~=?~ MontrOM Ar1 ..1. 1• • nc";'-s21-=2°'61 1lhlo1l• 11H lnc,meets2ndThurtdlyt =~o:. ~k~ ·~~e,:ri7 :JT~~~.; 1te.t'1l'lgChurch. 1440H1rold ~/;:;o;:. .c :!rn;'c:~~~·~~cf~.~~ ~gm= Mulberry Mcintrole Crv•c Club '"Neartown Au'Oc11t1on • Mont rote ci.n.c--104 We11h9.mer- - 52~5531 open wMkd•y• 10lm-5pm (except Wed I and weeltd•y evff 6 30-9 30pm. womer,., emphas•s program 1-5pmSun ?~3~~·~r~·1inJ v~~~1·~up:'r1 ~~~~ meets630pmMondays MOf,lroM S1ngeu--Cart L1w1ence 774-359-1 ~Z:O ~01~ehearHI Mon eves, Bering Church MOf'troee T8nn11Club-Arch11524-2151 pl1ys S1,1nd1y1 9flm.M1cG1egorP1fk ~~-=~ra~~~~~~~lis':~Z ~~~=m r5w ~~s~:;.i:·~~~'Bm-'e'r'!':~a°:.''~1 MSA;GrNter Hovston (Mefl"•; Soltbllll- 523- 8802day1. 523-CM1311Yes MSA.Wornctn"1-So!tballLeag.-. 7?&-9371 ~!:1v~,1=1~1~:_:1~-~~1-g1a1~~~a~ 30pm ~~JF'CE'~:?~!~=~ a~::;.·~ MMlroMWllCh IUbgrOlJpNelrlO*r'IA.ioc. M<J1t1ngsjsoc•1lclubl mMt.tattheeirn.710 Pec1hc-529-9427clubnigh!Ttn.1,. Nearto*n AsMX•lhon iMonlrOM C1v1C Ciub) mMIS II Benno; Church. 1440 Harold-522- 1000 meet1n.g7pm4thTuesd1ys NewFreec1omCt1r11111nChUrch--912W llth- 591·1342 lerV1Cff10lmSun.7J(lpmWed ~.~~ou"S:~P~:;~;;~4 NHrlown Community ~"7 l~rac10n-~POB IKI0063. 77260--523· A.creatoon11 Land Fund Comm•tlet- Mustang Cl\lbprojtel ~;~~-Umv G1y1Lnbian Support Group 524 Te ... Bay Area G1ya--.332-3737 me.tong Thurs .... en•n.; fe•HBayArHGayYouth-J-32-3737 rneet•ngs bt-wt-ekly !:o:nG•y'l•boal\THkFOl'C.· eei-7231.969- ~~'!:~nn 5~2~~~4 Fo.ind1l1on 1915 ;:_~R;oet"• 00M1ry't,1022Westhe•tner- Unit1n1n1Un•verNl.11 Gay Caucus~ li1 UM11•an Church. 5210 Fannin-5~9767. 52&- 5&42. meet•n.g 3rd Sun 1ft.,.noon1 We1lay1nFellowsh1p-e64-8899 ::m:~rrri~~;~-::A~~~~b~! Women'• L~"'.Atl.an~e-.-C;-hel.;a"':~1-0439 LAKE CHARLE~S-Oignity- Rt 1.Box216C.Lon.g~111e.LA70652 Your dependable, unbiased source of community news in Montrose-the Voice PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more_ 500 members nationwide. lnfopak $3. NYWC. 59 W 10th, New York, NY 10011 HAPPINESS IS ... Being with a handsome, healthy, warm. fun-loving escort, model or masseur from TexEscort. noted for discretion & integrity 524-9511 Major credit cards AMWAY PRODUCTS MEAN quality & personal service. Try us & see Kent Naasz 520-6541. Gene 859-0418 Hank 529-7525·or 864- 7229. Trish & Phyllis 723-8368 TENSION EASING MASSAGE Relax tension & stress. relax & en1oy full body massage Call for appoint­ment In or out Tom, 524-7163 RELATIONSHIP, FRIENDSHIP GWM. 51. 5'7''. 150. masculine & straight appearing Looking for last ing relationship. Wnte ad 146-A, clo Montrose Voice BODY MASSAGE In or out. Bruce, 521-2009 YOUNG MAN locked away and lonely in prison seeks a sensitive and compassion­ate correspondent Please write to me. Carl E. Jordon. 352893, Route 4, Box 1100, Rosharon. TX 77583 GAY WOMEN Write/meet wi th dignity through "'The Wishing Well" Magazine Pro­gram Integrity since 1974 Confi­dential. supportive. prompt. Tender, loving. alternative Introductory copy $5. postpaid (mailed discreetly 1st class). Information Box 117 Navato. CA 94948 TRAVEL KEY WEST Free brochure and map included Accomodat1ons. restaurants. shops bars_ Write Key West Business Guild. POB 1208-M. Key West. FL 33040. (305) 296-7535 MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: a $2 for up to three bold capital words and CJ 30¢ for each remaming regular type word Total minimum charge per ad $3 There ere no other rates Advertisers who wish something different should consider run­ning a display advertisement. o Deadline for all advertising is 5:30pm Tues­day for newspaper released mid-day Fnday. o Bhnd box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up atourolf1ce. CJ Deduct 15%1fyou runthesamead4 ~~~~~o~~ ~~r:e ~~ts~.~~o~dhe full run in advance_ o Bring or mail your 3317 Montrose #204, Houston. TX 77006 Use this form or blank sheet of paper ,upro3normal·1•1eboliicapit11wor111.1ot1lcoi1SlJ Humber ol wHlls Ml 1$ IO run Amollflt enc/oll<J _ _ _ 0 Check 0 MoMy Order 0 Cuh (rtOI Or ma•IJ 0 VISA charge 0 MHlerCard ch11ge 111pd11•----- ARE YOU SPECIAL 7 GWM. 30. Warm. intelligent, stable, tall, slender, attractive&masculine Well-educated & a successful pro­fessional. Enjoy the outdoors, ten­nis, quiet evenings at home, good conversation & occasional weekend AUG. 19, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 VIDEO TAPES VHS/BETA Hardcore. gay. het. (62 titles). Clas­sics. musicals (Diana Ross at Cen­tral Park. Grace Jones. etc.)- Cheap Also buy, trade, rent, copy, etc Daniel, 526-9112 SHOPS & STORES ~r~~~a~t;ea~~{ ~~~tu?~t~~~ts;;i:i RELAX & ~ encounters_ Find bar scene shallow the Bodyworks massge. Evemngs =Stir Ad~ Newl--14-0rR.ChmQnd-528- iAn1.q09CO;ne----;-:.192lwUttie."*-s22"".«i"1 e Asy1Um Ad~ti eOOkl'iCH-e-__:1201 Riehmond - ie-.llParkA~11Bc>Okl!Of-1830W Alablm• & boring. Having mixed feelings and weekends. Call Bill, 526-2470 ~~bw9ti-l~quors -2036 "w8i1~ about placing ad. but believe there Gift certificates available are many others out there with sim-ilar characteristics & interests. If you HUSBAND FOR HIRE think you're a little bit special & are Plumbing, electrical, etc. I can do • Cut Flowe,.-5015 Montrose--s22.:-i775 - :::,ner1AOU11-Ne;1-=2~811he.mer-:..:.528- interested in possible relationship or just about anything 24-hr service just making a new friend, I'd like to 271-0403 ~bfav1-Jonn. the ,...,.no"ieclOlh•ng--19&3 W Gray--522-1088 =.;_.-nbi11 - R9C:Ord1-21l-iR.Chmond___:sn: ~::;~~~/OU Ad 147-A, c/o Mont- ~~ltl~~~~s~:g~~~nRo~~~-SJ~':e ~11o:ag1ttl-3224YO.tum-52&--5457 e Goog••• ~1C:I04 Cf,,.iorn•a-=-S2•~-­e Grk•etynn -Book.-70. f.-,;;;;...._522.7695 eGreetu~Q• P1ul--14,,----Wntne-;m9,---6JO-Oie.8 e K11by Newl1-lnc1--3115Kfrb).-s.20-02'6 :z~~· LU1hef ·a0ocis..:ei2wKrtl;riier- LOST RING At Garden Party Man's gold Lap1s ring with 3 diamonds Please call 552-1387 Reward SMOOTH NON-SMOKER w1M weeks masculine fnend that en1oys sports. exercise. outdoors & home Must be responsible & mature, any race rm 52. 5'11'", 175 lbs., uninhibited, desire to please No drunks or drugs_ Prefer clean, smooth body Ca11 John, (713) 645- 3116 eve to midnight Peace RUBDOWN YOUR PLACE Special attention to problem areas Caring, thorough. $201$30. Van (39- 71"'-160-GJ. 493-4850 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS e C11b-HouS!ct'IBllM -22'. F1rin1 ::;.~~~ Ouilrttt Tl'lell& 1201 l.)u 111n1 =~·:0~1~s-i~3~~:. ;;:;:19 RESTAURANTS • B•1a·s--•02-L'1vett·-527-9866 ~;:-::.::~~~~o::ch.~o:~,~~~~:--529 :.:r~.~m2!_r5~:_ .. ~ndw•ch Shop- 1536 e Houseot p,99_:_3112K•rbr-528-38111 :s~&UH or-Shlih-K•bclb-·2042 M1r111111 521 e 9·ets-1303Westhe•mer--528-8sz3 :3~- HoUslon 01n81--91' ·w-A11bama-524 i Pe;1o:y·1·-A•chmond1tK.rby 52•-0075 e R..C11t--17o2K.rby -52•·6272 e Spud~-llke- •16westheu•T'te1"--520-()55.4 • StirP>ua-2111 Norlolk 523-QeOO • ' hHk r Eg~_-•231 M~trose·-528-8135 :~m ()flee Shop 1525 w .. thffner ~~ 11SwomC.ub· 2 1'Ped,am SERVICES, ETC. VW REPAIRS At your home or offtce_ Factory trained. good prices Beetle through Sirocco. Call Ted Miller. 520-5778 PIANO/SINGING INSTRUCTION Pnvate instruction by professional teacher 723-3254 CHEAP AIR FARES A free service for gay travelers We guarantee to locate the cheapest fare between any 2 cities Travel planned for holidays needs to be booked ASAP Gay tours. cruises and hotel packages available. Grand Central Pipeline. 523-3223 MOVEMASTERS Hauling. packing. supplies. too 1925 Westheiner. 521-3155 PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 526-7911 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS Complete travel arrangements All services are free. 2029 Southwest Fwy 529-8464 ADVERTISING SPECIALITIES T-shirts, matches. 30.000 items John Estes. president AEEI, PO Box 1533, Austin. TX 78761. Call collect (512) 441-7070. Agent. pubhsher, records, shows 524-9511-TEX-ESCORT New telephone number Same great service' Have fun with the right guy for you' Major credit cards honored Monthly medical certificate 527-0S76 ~~nen Exchange--3307 -R-,chmond-524- ::;::.sco·• Ha•r Oet:ogn-901 R~morid4 :.~"f~~9~,nt House IOClg•ng--106 Av0n- :~~~.,,..,. Be1uty School· 3Z1 w .. u .. rner- ~1'-38Ms Hatr-Desogn- -906-we5me"~mer- 527 e uonel Ha•r Oesogn·-3220 Yoakum- -526-«94 :a~~ntrose Hair O••gn~ Cahlorn11- 522 :,~~cs EnQl!Sh Furn•!..ire- -1f3lw Gray- -521- ::;:::: .. N::·~:~:~::=--52• e rl.C--602 w Alabama 524-sMO =~~: ~0u10;:;;·,~;::.:~.,,.~~~~,,, 1ctdo1t11ng· 1212Wnthe•mer--528 :~ont~~:;ce nf'WSPll)l!r--3317 Montrose 960C :r~ Ori;,.~;;1ern .eatl'ler -BAB 2400 9 Ne1r1ownG111ge--1901 Tift- 523-279' :=~~~.~~~~~~~ems mu -bclxes· 1713 :2~~~~t' Barber Sl>Op .. 21~ Portsmoutl'l­• Tr•~e• COnsultlnt!-2029 SWF...,v· 529-&46' By Tycho e w .. th mer Fi.1 Mar11e1 17l3 Wes!heorner e westheome1 lritenon 1727 'lwesll'le•lYler !lZ0..1357 • W•lde&S1emt100111lore- eo..:wntri.uner­~ 29-701' Fortunes f(lf Friday ttvenmg August 19. 1983. through fflday e111 19 A( gL I 26 1983 ARIES - The Moon will enter Anes next Thursday evenmg. the 25th All systems are go. Combtning the strength and courage of your convic­tions with the grace of being able to accept your rewards make this a lime of great satisfaction. Then the basic playfulness of your nature appears Need t say more? TAURUS -Once you've pushed through, over. around and beyond that old problem that was bringing you down. you'll enJOY a new sense of assurance that may surprise you You may want to look up a Capricorn friend. partner or lover for a good time GEMINI You've solved a mystery, something that"s been puzzling you for some time. That allows you to make some plans for the future and go after exactly what you want A man who 1s older than you may figure nicely m this picture CANCER ·Falling in love again can·t help 1t Yet this falhng m love may have some practicality to it What this means 1s up to you But let yourself fall: waves of emotion will be released 1n a magn1f1cent way. And there's a bonus beyond itl LEO -In your sign this week Mars (all week) and the Sun {leaves Tuesday afternoon). If you"ve been putting off getting away. now's the time for it An unplanned vacation or a weekend m the country will be just what you need After starring so bnghtly on your own turf, it's time to take your show on the road What pleasures there are yours to find VIRGO-- -In your sign this week: Mercury and Venus (al/week) and the Sun (enters Tuesday afternoon). Though Virgos are not typically the most mystical sign of the Zodiac, you'll fmd your practicality giving away to an experience of revelation. It w1ll come in a flash, so be on the lookout Don·t be skeptical; 1t could-and will-happen to you LIBRA In your sign this week: Pluto (all week) and Saturn (through next Wednesday. the 24th). Are you ready to take over a place of authority and influence? Now's the time to make your moves. whether you're ready or not It's likely to be foisted on you Use your unique personality and your ability to mediate to their full advantage. SCORPIO-In your sign this week. Saturn (re-enters Wednesday morning). While others may see your drive as excessive. even possibly ruthless. you know that you know when the time 1s right. and when you have to go for it Your lover may have some good advice. so keep lines of communication open. But keep on going for 1t' SAGITf ARIUS-In your sign this week.- Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune The actor in you comes to the front of the stage. In takmg another"s part or role. you"tl learn a lot about yourself Costumes (even disguises) can be both fun and 1llummatmg Mystery is often deception. and deception 1s the fhp side of truth CAPRICORN-The Moon 1s m Capricorn as the weekend opens. will leave Saturday evening. A crowded and busy time Everywhere you took, there·s something to do or thmk about Rather than fmding this exhausting, you'll thrive Booy and mind are m tune with one another, both getting lots of what they need AQUARIUS- The Moon will pass through Aquanus Saturday evening to Tuesday morning_ Rome wasn't built ma day, etc. etc. You· re actmg more like an Aries than an Aquarian, and rt doesn't suit you at allt Sure. you want what you want. but be gentler and get there sooner' By the way, while you're slowing down. pay attention to your dreams PISCES-The Moon will pass through PJ.Sces from next Tuesday morning, the 23rd, to Thursday evening. the 25th. Confusion reigns_ It's all right to change your mind, but eventually you"ll have to make a decision. Part of your problem 1s generosity_ You have a lot to give. but there's a place to stop. Look for some hefp from a fellow Pisces or a sc.~:1 ~TONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE 24 MONTROSE VOICE/ AUG 19, 1983 HE TOOK THE CHANCE OF GETTING HEPATITIS B­AND LOST. NOW THE CONSEQUENCES ARE JUST BEGINNING. CHRONIC ACTIVE HEPATITIS, CIRRHOSIS ... OR DEATH. You undoubtedly know someone who's had it. The "bad hepatitis" that can keep you in bed for weeks and out of a job for months­that can cause lifelong disab1li ty and even death from cirrhosis or cancer of the liver. Where do you get it? From people who have become carriers of the virus. Tuclay, it is estimated that at least 100,000 gay men are carriers of the hepatitis B virus and spread the infection through intimate contact. That's the main reason why mor!!_ than half of all @Liil~. will .§Q9n!!_!'.Ql' later becom!) infected. How can you tell who's a carrier? You probably can't. Most carriers seem to be perfectly healthy, and many are themselves unaware that they harbor the virus. One!!_y9u g!!_U1epatitis B there's nQ)l~ifictrJ!atm~nt for it. But nQ_w th~re.'s som~thingy9u can dQ tQ help,prQ~t yourself. DON'T TAKE A CHANCE-CONTACT YOUR DOCTOR OR CLINIC AND ASK ABOUT THE HEPATITIS B VACCINE. It 1s highly effective m thooe who receive all three shots. Do 1t If you'd like more information about hepatitis B and the today because you never know where or when you'll make contact vaccine, call The American Liver Foundation at (201) 857-2626. with a carrier. This message is brought to you as a public service by The American Liver Foundation. Studies showed that the vaccine protected against infection caused by hepalltis B virus m 85'l to 96'i ofthooe who received the required three shots Hepatitis B virus 1s an important cause of viral hepat1us, a disease mainly of the liver Even mild forms ofth1s disease may lead to senous comphcauons and aftereffects, including liver cancer There is no specific treatment for viral hepautts \13ccmation 1s recommended for person:; who have a higher nsk of becoming infected with hepatitis B virus becau~ of frequent, cl~ contact wnh mfected people or exposure to body flu1dh from such people. It will not protect agamst hepatitis caused by viruses other than hepatitis B \.·irus Because of the long mcubat1on period for hepatitis B. it 1s possible for unrecogmzed infection to be prest>nt at the time the vaccme 1s given. The vaccine may not prevent hepatiti~ B m such patients. In three studies involving 3,350 pe1'80ns, the overall rate of adverse reactions did not differ ~ngn1ficantly in those given vaccine and tho.se given placebo (an inactive substancel. As with any vaccine, broad use often reveals rare adverse reactions not ob~rved during clinical trials Over 200,000 people are estimated to have received the vaccme smce its re lea SE>. and the vaccmecont1nues to be generally well tolerated Hepatitis B has a long mcubauon period, and unrecogruzed infedion may already be present at the time the vaccine 1s given. Thus, reported cases ofhepat1t1s are to be expected and do not appear to be caused by the vaccme. Reactions such as fever, nausea, vom1tmg, headache, and local pam have occurred Jomt pam has been reported; ra~h has been reported rarely Senous illnesses affecting the nervow:; system ­includmgGu1llain ·Barresyndrome-have been reporwd rarely, but no cause and t-ITl"Ct relationship has been established
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