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Montrose Voice, No. 38, July 17, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 38, July 17, 1981 - File 001. 1981-07-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2253/show/2228.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-07-17). Montrose Voice, No. 38, July 17, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2253/show/2228

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 38, July 17, 1981 - File 001, 1981-07-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2253/show/2228.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 38, July 17, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date July 17, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Montrose News- The Nation- Identity Ordinance on hold and the Gay Chili Cookoff paeeJ Fire destroys Z7 buildings in gay ghetto of San Francisco Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, ISSUE #38, P UBLISHED WEEKLY Boa1i Feature, page U ''The Politics ol Romo· sexuality'' paee7 Friday July 17, 1981 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Fair and warm with a low of77°. Sunrise: 6:33AM. Saturday: Fair and hot with a high of 97°. Sunset: 8:22PM. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I J ULY 17, 1981 our mattresses are all firm. <It's our prices we're bending!> ~PRICE! TWIN s1sa00 REG nn $15800 SOLD IN SETS ONLY FULL QUEEN s1aaoo REG 380 s22300 REG 450 KING s31a00 REG 840 BASWAL BEDDING INCLUDES A 15-YEAR WARRANTY Gifts & Accessories, 604 Westheimer, 529-8002. 12-8 Mon.-Sat. Environmental Designs/Fine Furnishings, 608 Westheimer. 10-6 Mon.-Sat. Major credit cards & checks welcome. Ample free parking. Special Factory Discolllts ACT NOW-THIS FABULOUS OFFER GOOD FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY! JL p ei tc o: Ho Jul be< hie wa ap m I pe< the I Ch t ra on Le1 I can told (Mel gun. JULY 17, 1981 MONTROSE VOICE 3 Police told not to enforce "failure to identify" ordinance Houston police were instructed. in early July not to make an arrest simply because a person refused to identify himself. The instruction to the officers was made pending the outcome of an appeal of a recent federal judge's rul­ing on the subject. In the past, officers have arrested people simply for "failure to identify" themselves. It was reported that Assistant Police Chief John P. Bales said an adminis­trative notice was issued to all officers on the basis of an opinion from the city Legal Department. Bales claimed the new instruction would have little effect, since he said citizens were usually cooperative in revealing their identities to officers. One citizen who was not cooperative was KPFT station manager Ray Hill, who was once arrested for failing to identify himself when requested by a policeman. Hill said an officer should only be allowed to demand an identification if the citizen is driving a car (to prove he has a license), consuming alcohol (to prove he is of age) or perhaps if he was a witness to a crime. Bales said the city would be appeal­ing a June 25 ruling by federal Judge Woodrow Seals. The judge found unconstitutional the section of the Texas Penal Code which made it an offense for a citizen to either refuse to identify himself or give a false name to a peace officer when asked. "It's a charge that's not used very often," Bales was quoted by the Hous­ton Chronicle. "We're still counting on our good citizens of Houston to identify themsel vee when they are ap­proached," Student gets probation in traffic death A law school student who pleaded no contest July 10 to involuntary man­slaughter in the Montrose traffic death of another law school student was placed on five years probation and ordered to pay about $4300 in restitu· tion to the victim's family, the Houston Chronicle reported. According to the newspaper: Charles E. McDonald, 23, of 1117 Peden, was sentenced by state District Judge Dan Walton. He pleaded no con· test April 14 in the January 14 death of Michael J . Hale, 33, of 403 Avondale. The judge withheld adjudication of the sentence, meaning McDonald, who told investigators he wants to be a pro­secutor in El Paso when he finishes school at the South Texas College of Law will have no criminal record ifhe completes the probation terms. Hale's father, Walter Halkoski. of Wausau, Wis., had opposed probation for McDonald. 0 Llfe isn 't worth much if someone can get probation for this," Halkoski told Harris County investigators. "He (McDonald) might as well have had a gun," McDonald lost control of his pickup truck while traveling north in the 2700 block of Waugh just past midnight, according to court records. The truck jumped the median and hit Hale as he was getting out of his parked car at Waugh and California. McDonald told officers at the scene that he had had "a few" beers, and a breathylizer test showed the alcohol content in his body was 0.08 percent. Anyone registering 0.10 percent or more is legally drunk. McDonald, a part-time painter and security guard, must make restitution for funeral costs and other expenses. The victim's father told investiga­tors Hale had just started law school when he was killed. Final plans set for the Gay Chili Cookoff Organizers of this year's "Chili for the Masses from the Brazos River Bottom Asses 2" is scheduled for the final weekend in July and the invited guest list has been expanded to selected C&W clubs in Austin, Dallas, Ft. Worth and San Antonio. 0 0ur spurs are just spinning to host the Second Annual Texas Gay Chili Cook·Off," said Ben Dover, one of the organizers. "Yes sir'ee, we'll be proud to be Texas and proud to be country with twoC&W bands playing on our stage, jalapeno eating contest on our patio and free Texas brew poured throughout the afternoon to quinch big thirsts of our chili eating amigoa," said Dover. Last year, 1500 were said to have attended, including city council members and other politicians. Montrose News The event ts set to include a "Pre­Heat Party" Saturday night and the contest Sunday afternoon, July 25 and 26. Bookstore suspect caught Craig Anthony Mitchell, 17, ofthe6200 block of Guadalupe, was charged July 14 with the June 25 robbery of the Ball­park Bookstore, 1830 W. Alabama in Montrose, it was reported. He and two other men were also reported to have been charged with several other robberies in other areas of the city, including the July 3robbery of Spats, a straight southwest Houston disco in which 14 employees were herded into a beer cooler and $7000 taken. He and the other men were arrested July 12 at a northeast Houston motel where robbery detectives found wea­pons apparently used in the Spats hol· dup, news reports said. Man sentenced to 20 years for rape A man charged with raping a woman abducted from the parking lot of the Old Plantation, 2020 Kipling, was sentenced to five years in prison July 13. Timothy James Snow, 25, of 10200 W. Bellfort, who pleaded guilty in Jan­uary, was sentenced by state District Jud1re l.D. McMaater. The Houston Chronicle reported: Prosecutor Wayne Hill said Snow and co-defendant Thomas Brown Manuel, 21, abducted the woman at knifepoint August 21. The woman, 29, was waiting outside the dub for friends who were having car trouble, Hill said. The prosecutor said the two men took the woman to Snow's southwest Houston apartment where they raped her repeatedly for about five hours before releasing her. Police arrested Snow and Manuel several days later using an address the victim said she memorized from a change-of-address form in Snow's apartment. The woman identified the two men in a police line-up. Manuel was sentenced to 20 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to aggra­vated rape. City Council holds firm, denies license to Golden Girl Studios The Houston City Council July 8 unanimously upheld a Tax Depart­ment decision to deny Golden Girl Stu· dios at 321 W. Alabama a permit to operate a sexually oriented enterprise, reported the Houston Post. The newspaper reported that the initial denial was based on the grounds that the business was within 300 feet of a place of worship although attorneys for Golden Girl asserted in an appeal before the council the week before that the example cited could not be defined as the location of a religious gathering place. -----B- en Sargent Montrose Montrose man slain in northeast Houston Houston police said Julio Bonilla, 20, of 1006 Mason in Montrose was walk­ing with a male friend in northeast Houston about 11:00 p.m. July 11 when they were approached by a car with two men inside. When the two men asked for money, police said, Bonilla began running, at which time one of the men fired a gun, hitting Bonilla in the back of the head. He was pronounced dead at the scene, officers said. Wayland Flowers cancels tour Comic ventriloquist Wayland Flowers has apparently canceled his entire upcoming national tour-which wee to have included two shows August lat the Tower Theater-to tape a TV special. His official reason given to the Tower management and reported in the Houston Post, though, was that Madame is sick. Ticket refunds or exchanges can be made at tho Tower box office, 1201 We.theimer, or by calling 522-2452, they said. The Nation Dozens arrested in Chicago CHICAGO-Police claim it is not a case of a crackdown on the gay com­munity but thirty men were arrested in a one week period ending July 7, reported the city's Gay Life newspaper. The arrests occurred outside three gay bars and one theater, the paper said. The police claimed the arrests were either the result of routine license checks or as a result of complaints, the newspaper said. The paper quoted Fred Kramer, the owner of Carol's Speakeasy, as saying, "Three of my best customers were arrested out on the street for doing nothing." TV group announces new goal The leader of the Coalition for Better Television. the conservative group that threatened an advertiser boycott, ha, decided to urge its members to fight congressional attempts to dereg. ulate broadcasting, it was reported. The Rev. Donald Wildmon, the coali­tion's chairman, said he would be mak­ing that request of the coalition's 350 member groups in July. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 Letters Dear P&G From Pam J ones of Lesbian and Gay Media Advocates of Houston (Editor's noU?: the following was an open letter to Proct-Or and Gamble, Cincinnati) Recent media broadcasts have been stating the fact that you have publicly endorsed the goals and aims of an organization called "Coalition for Bet­ter Television," headed by Jerry Fal­well of the "Moral Majority" and Donald Wildmon. One of their aims is to prohibit any fair, or realistic, or objective portrayal of lesbians and gay men on television. Do you realize that by endorsing this posture, that you, in affect, are alienat­ing and inviting a nation-wide boycott of your products by the millions of les­bians and gay men living in this country? Are you ready for such a boycott? I think that you would find the les­bian and gay communities across this country even better organized and financed than anything that Falwell or Wildmon could produce. It is a sad commentary on your com· pany that you knuckled under to the Gestapo tactics of the "Moral Major­ity" and the "Coalition for Better Television." The MONTROSE VOICE is published every Fnday. Offices: 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houoton. TX 77006. Phone (713) 529-8490. Contents copyright Cl981. Office hours: 9am-6pm. Henry McClurg, publisher/editor. Les Williams, production and distribution. Ed Martinez, editorial assistant. Member Gay Press Association and Texas Gay News Association. Items appearing in the Voice accredited to Copley News Service, San Francisco Chronicle Features Syndicate, Surburban Features, or United Feature Syndicate are copyright by those concerns and are purchased by the Voice for use in this newspaper. All other items in the Voice are copyright by the Montrose Voice. POSTMASTER Send address corrections to 3520 Montrose, suite 227, Houston. TX 77006. Subscription rate in US: $39 per year, 52 issues, or $24 for six months, 26 i88ues. Joe Keener, advertising director. Randy Brown, Houston advertising representative. Johann Stahl, Hou1ton advertising representative. State advertioing repre•entative: Roy Hall, Metro Timts. POB 225915, Dallas 75265, (214) 526-9944 National advertising representative: Joe DiSabato, Rivendell Marketing, 666 6th Avenue, New York 10011, (212) 242·6863. Advertising deadline: Every Tuesday, 7:00pm, for issue to be released three days later. Serving Montrose and Houston UNITED CAB CO. 759-1441 Drivers­Taxi Excellent earnings if your are over 25, have a Jaxi License and have excellent driving safety record. Work your own hours by leasing a taxi cab. 1514 Leeland 759-1137 - ers evision. ing this alienat­boycott is ofles­in this ycott? the les­oss this ed and Falwell fr com­• to the Major­Better F Tuesday, July 21: "Cleopatra" starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, 9:30pm 1022 Westheimer, naturally JULY 17, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 6 MONTROSE VOICE I J ULY 17, 1981 A message for Liberty Bank, Allied American Bank, Standard American Bank, Chemical Bank and South Main Bank-and Republic of Texas Savings ... Did you know- there's a new-spaper that reaches JUST those people in the neighborhood surrounding your business? Yes there is, and we're it. The Montrose Voice, with 14,000 Montrose readers each week, many ready to be your new customers and many others who are already your regular customers. What do we offer? • Large circulation-] I 3 of the population of Montrose. • A professional publication for this unique neighborhood. Each issue of the Voice has Montrose news, music and theater reviews and listings, classifieds, great cartoons, and special features. • An art and typesetting production staff that's eager and happy to work with you. •Published every Friday. •Low advertising rates. • A clean, professional community newspaper with journalistic integrity. A very surprising number of our 14,000 readers respond each week to the advertisements in our newspaper. Our readers are extremely loyal and appreciative of those business which make their newspaper possible. Try the Montrose Voice. We'll send more new customers through your doors this week (and at the same time remind many of your present customers, who are our readers, to come back soon). The Montrose Voice 3520 Montrose Blvd., 529-8490 All figures and comparieon• used in thi1 presentation are aa compiled by Montro&e Voice Reeearch and are believed to be correct within 10%. JULY 17, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Fire destroys 27 buildings in heart of SF gay area SAN FRANCISCO-An arsonist's fire erupted in the early morning hours of Friday, July 10, in a closed gay bath· house and then raced through 26 other buildings in the gay ghetto district known as the Folsom or South-of. Market area. The area is known as the city's gay leather district. Half a city block was destroyed and sixty people were left homeless. The bathhouse, known as the Fol· som Street Barracks, was being remodeled. Damage was estimated at $6 million, including the destruction of thirty cars. Part-time house painter Otis J . Bloom, 38, of Millbrae, Calif., was booked later in the day and held on $25,000 bail on felony arson charges. Cases of Rush, a butyl nitrate pro­duct marketed commercially and used for sexual and dancing enhancement, was said to have ignited and helped caused the fire to spread rapidly to the aging wooden buildings. Open gas lines also fed the flames. Jay Freezer, owner of Rush, had recently moved the cases to the Folsom Street location after a judge ordered him to remove it from another location, saying it was a fire hazard. Several people suffered minor inju-ries, including five firefighters, but no bodies were initially discovered. The large number of apartment houses that were burning made officials fear they would discover fatal casualties. Fire Chief Andrew Casper said the fire was the biggest in San Francisco since the blaze that accompanied the 1906 earthquake, which devastated the city. "We have a true disaster on our hands," he was quoted by news services. The blaze, which grew to the Fire Department's highest five-alarm designation only twenty minutes after it was reported before dawn, enveloped a half-block area of Folsom Street between Seventh and Eighth Streets. Broken gas mains fed the flames until gas company crews arrived to close them off. Fifteen people asked the Red Cross for shelter out of a total of thirty that Jost their homes. Gay men and women, many in leather and chains in this leather­oriented section, watched the city's entire complement of 200 on-duty fire­fighters battle the blaze as it leaped from rooftop to rooftop. Although there are some apartment buildings in the South of Market dis· trict, most of the structures in the area are used for industrial purposes. The bathhouse collapsed early in the fire. A four-alarm arson fire in 1976 caused one death and more than $1 million damage to the same building. Fenibo Jicks, who fled his apart­ment two doors from the bathhouse, said the Barracks 0 was just in flames, that house went up in an explosion." "There was a little boom" before the FRIDAY, .JULY 11 GARDEN PARTY WEEKEND KICK-OFF 75• WELL DRINKS O.J .JON MOTT AFTER HOURS WITH .JONNY CONTRERAS • • •I Pv'll'. ll'\I ~ , " Craig Ferguson, 24, a resident in one of at least four apartment buildings involved in the fire, said a newly installed smoke alarm woke rum. Fer­guson, who escaped with only the clothes he was wearing, said the fire destroyed several cars, several busi­nesses and all of the apartments on his alley. Air Force can prevent transsexual from cross-dressing, judge rules SAN ANTONIO-A federal judge ruled in July that the U.S. Air Force may prevent a transsexual, who was in the process of becoming a woman. from dressing in women's clothing, reported UPI. The news service said that U.S. Dis· trict Judge William S. Sessions denied an injunction request and claim for $25,000 damages by Dorothy Parker, a civilian employee at Kelly Air Force Base who alleged the military pre­vented him from wearing women's clothing. Parker, known as Raymond Parker for most of the 27 years he worked at Kelly, said the Air Force denied his constitutional rights by requiring rum to dress as a man, reported UPI. But Sessions agreed with the Air Force, which claimed allowing Parker The Nation to dress as a woman would cause dis­ruptions, demoralize other workers and cause 11some confusion about which restroom plaintiff (Parker) should use," the news service said. "It seems likely that the initiation of cross-dressing would occasion at least another round of gossip and curiosity seeking, at some cost to the Air Force," Sessions was quoted . "The desire to avoid this effect alone is a rational basis for this decision." Parker, 61 , who has a son, underwent hormone therapy at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and the therapy caused him to lose most of !tis facial and body hair, and to develop breasts and wide hips, UPI reported. Despite nearly two years of chemical and psychological therapy, physicians were said to have denied Parker a final sex change operation because he Hdid not project a sufficiently feminine presentation ." UPI reported that Parker, who had his name legally changed to Dorothy after his 1978 divorce, charged that the Air Force's dress requirement, making rum wear men's clothing, caused him to be denied the final operation. Although Sessions agreed that cross-dressing may be considered essential by medical experts to aid the success of a sex change operation, he said the Air Force is within its right to require Parker, who works as a mainte­nance parts clerk, to dress as a man, UPI reported. One of Parker's attorneys, George Baugh, said a decision was not imme­diately made on whether to appeal Ses· sions ruling, the news service reported. THE PARTY SHOW US YOUR PARTY FAVOR AND GET IN FREE BEER BUST AS ALWAYS TWO SHOWS BPM & 11PM HOT CHOCOLATE, ...,. NAOMI SIMS, DANA MANCHESTER ... ANO THE ENTIRE CITY OF ~USTON IN 08AQf 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 The Wine Seller THE WINE SELLER. 1408 We•theimer Reviewed July 1981. OVERALL ***II SERVICE *****· FOOD QUALITY **** FOOD VALUE *** ATMOSPHEkt-: *•* f"[.£ANlJ..'iESS **** • 'arr'lt • • * prxJI'. * * * ......aa;•, ** * * socd. * * ** * •Upet'b By Jonathan Dough !fl had the tlll!k of selecting Houston's best waiter-waitreso team, I'd award it to Sue and Brian at The Wine Seller These two, by working so well together, by being so knowledgeable The Voice is the Choice for over 14,000 Houston readers each week about the huge variety of wines and cheeses available, and simply by being always ready to smile and laugh, have brought me back time after time. You'll like them too. The rooms at The Wine Seller are bright and sunny with large windows. One of the ceilings is made of fabric; there's a small wine bar, and one room "'just lined with racks of wine. It's not "ritzy,'' just nice. If you are interested in sampling some of their finer wines, I understand the wine tastings they have pack the hou"c. I haven't been to one yet, so I can't say much more. You might want to call for information. The Celluloid Closet and other fine gay literature available at Wilde 'n' Stein 520 Westheimer 529-7014 1---------- l If you're gay, the joke in this scene is on you. THE CELLULOID CLOSET Homosexuality in the Movies -VITO RUSSO I've never been disappointed by the food at the Wine Seller, whether the roast beef sandwich, the chicken salad, or the chef salad with the wond­erful taragon dressing. My only word of warning is this: watch the prices. My friend and I were there for lunch last Wednesday, and were totally unprepared for our check-just over $20. (Two can eat there for $10, but we overdid it.) From a wine list as large as the Houston Yellow Pages, we selected imported beer ($1.50), served in large flared glasses. My friend ordered the roa"t beef sandwich ($2.50), which is available with about ten kinds of Euro­pean cheeses. The sandwich. served on Restaurants French bread, was delicious. My chicken salad ($4.50) was served with slices of orange and apple, with French bread and butter (always more than I can eat), and was lightly spiced and flavored with celery and almond. This is my favorite chicken salad. We finished with fancy cheesecake ($2.75). Hie was made with Grand Marnier; mine with Mocha. The Wine Seller is a great place for lunch. I'll keep going back time after time-and hope you'll try them too. Notice: The Vo1t'e'• wttkly restaurant revi!'w t'olumn ia written without Tf'Kard to restaurant adveorti1ing. The r.-viewer remain• anonymowi to in11u~ hi.a obJN:llvity. ly :h ·h I ,d is :e d JULY 17, 1981 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 Montrose Theater/Concerts/Art 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 Art This Week in Montrose (Saturday, July 18, through Friday, July 241 Art League of Houaton-1953 Montrooe-523-9530 All Media Open Show noon-4pm Saturday, !Oam-4pm Monday through Friday. Contemporary Arts Mueeum-6216 Montrooe Blvd.-526-3129 Neil Jenney: Paintings and Sculpture, 1967·1980 tn the Upstairs Gallery (Saturday and Sunday on]y); Charles Schorre: Page• from &o"8 Unpub/Uhed in the Downetain (Perspectives) Gallery; 10am·5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday. and 10am·5pm Tueaday through Friday. Hooko-Epotein Gallery-1200 Biuonnet-522-0718 Leonard Schwartz sculpture and Anthony Piazza jewelry 10am-5:30pm e:1:ceptSunday and Monday. Moody Gallery-20Uh.I W. Gray-526- 9911 Suzanne Bocanegra and Malcolm Bucknell paintings and Bruce Houston BB8emblages 10am·5:30pm except Sunday and Monday. MuoeumofFineArto-1001 Biuonnet-<126-1361 New Acceaalona in Photography: Lower Brown Corridor. Sunlight on Leaves: The lmpreaaionist Tradition: Maeteron Study Gallery ; Impressionist and Post · lmpreHioniat Selections from the Becle Collection : Jones Gallery; 10am·5pm Saturday. noon·6pm Sunday, and 10am·5pm Tueaday through Fnday. Robinson Galleries-1200 BiaBOnnet­< 121-9221 Andrew Bush, Perry House, George 0 . Jackson , John Shown. Dana John Steinheimer, Sharon Stewart and Linn Swanner'• works lOam..fipm except Sunday and Monday. Rothko Chapel-1409 Sul Ross Mark Rothko abstract expressionist paintings and Barnett Newman's Broken Obelisk sculpture. Speedby'o Old Print Gallery-20ltl·F W. Gray-521-9662 Will Bradley art nouveau prints 10am-5pm daily except Sunday and Monday. Wataon/de Nagy-1106 Berthea-526- 9883 Michael Richardaon 10am·6pm except Sunday and Monday Wat.on~Willour &. Company-2000 Peden Laura Russell and Otis James daily except Sunday and Monday. Wildcatter-3t117 Waabington-869- 5151 Oil industry-related works daily except Sunday and Monday. Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, July 17, through Thursday, July23) (Nina Vance) Alley Theater (large otage)-61(1 Texao-228-8421 Agatha Christie's The MoUBetrap 8:30pm Friday, 4 and 9pm Saturday, 2:30 and 7:30pm Sunday, and 8:30pm Thursday. Comedy Workobop Cabaret and the Comix Annn-190(1 S. Shepberd- 524-7333 The Two-Bit Opera 8:30 and 11 :OOpm Friday and Saturday, 8:30pm Tuesday through Thursday ~ improvisional comedy 8:30pm Sunday. Stageo Cabaret Stage-709 Franklin- 225-9539 Mime. All Mime (comedy) 10:30pm Friday and Saturday. Stageo Main Stage-709 Franklin- 22tl-9tl39 Oliver Hailey'• Father 's Day (comedy) 8pm Friday and Saturday and 3pm Sunday Concerts This Week In & Near Montrose (Friday, July 17, through Thursday, Ju)y23) Ab and the Rebel Outlaw& (country band) Friday and Saturday evenings at the Exile, IOll Bell, 659-0453; Sunday afternoon and Thursday evening at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos, 528-9192. Randy Allen and the Double Eagle Band (country band) Thursday evening at the Exile, 1011 BeJI, 659-0453. Paul EngliAh Group (contemporary jazz) Evenings except Sunday at Cody 's (straight), 3400 Montrose, 522-9747. Bob Henschen Trio (jazz) 9pm-lam Tuesdays at Las Brisas (straight), 614 W. Gray, 528-9959. Dr. Rockit (R&B) Monday ev.ening at Rockefeller's (straight), 3620 Washington, 864·6242. Philip Settle Band Uazz) From 9:30pm except Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers (straight), 907 Westheimer, 527-0595. Trinity River Band (country) Friday and Saturday evenings at Badlands, 304 Avondale, 526-2160. The Montrose Voice the community newspaper of Montrose the only publication in the world JUST for Montrose MINUTE TAN'S IUef GRiefG& "THE ULTIMATE TANNING EXPERIENCE" MINUTE TAN'S SUN KING OF CALIFORNIA'S NEWEST LOCATION: 3837 RICHMOND (JUST WEST OF GREENWAY PLAZA) 840-7653 OUR GRAND OPENING RATES ARE THE LOWEST IN TOWN. 9AM-10PM MONDAY-FRIDAY, 9AM-8PM SATURDAY, 9AM-6PM SUNDAY All products comply with the Federal Performance Standard. 21 CFR 1002 and 1040.20 HEW publication 79-8035. and arr re~istered with the Bureau of Medical Devices. 81 <Z) '• t), ly fr. It Kaye O'Rear owner/gen. mgr. JULY 17, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Our Place 1419 Richmond Ave./528-8903 Live, Live, Live Entertainment!!! Every Thur. & Fri. Nights Two Great, Great Shows!! Featuring: "Little Bobby's Variety Revue" with-Robbie Roberts & Shawna Roberts plus-Special Guest Stars Each Week Electrifying Performances!!! Every Sat. Night, Great Country Music. Live On Stage "Tommy D. 8 the Rockets" (Greatest Thing Since Mustard) "Ka~e's Pia~ House Now Open" (membership only) (really, really different] patio activities: Every Sun., Bar-b-Que (if not raining) Every Mon. & Tues., Hamburgers Every Wed., Covered Dish Night plus Pool Tourney ($2 entry fee} "The only place where everyone is welcome" Pool, Dancing, Beer, Wine, Games, BYOB (we sell all set ups) 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 Raul & his staff welcome you to c.Rauf11. !B'ta1.1. c.Rub-Ging c/I cf(utau.iant and 'Win£ !Bai OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 11-10 WINE, BEER & CHEESE HAPPY HOUR 4-7 with 2 for 1. Free Hors D'oeuvres. LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY (except Thurs.) Featuring Jawad-Jazz, Blues and Folk on Acoustic Guitar OUR REGULAR CUSTOMERS SAY WE HAVE THE BEST QUICHE IN TOWN. TRY IT! • Best Hamburger in Houston with French Fries or Baked Potato and Relish Tray • Soup & Sandwiches • Mexican Selection • Daily Specials-3-course lunch-$5 • Our Specialities: Quiche Lorraine, Beef Casserole, Homemade Pate & Homemade Cakes (The Best Cheesecakes in Town) (third in a series on Ra ul's Brass Rubbings) Anon, Man in Armour Thu filf1lttofa kniicht H'Nqlll"' w•nnr th• Lant'Htnanhnrycollarof Em.es ha. ao ilno10o·n pronnancir. ThP co!Jar of t:a.- firtt appeoan 1n rte10rd11n lh•latu 14thN"nturyandhaa~c thl'1ubJect<>fmuch1pa-ula· bon. ttiir up1tal lirtWT S lwlni' \l&noealy Hplamtd Pntuq. the rno.t hJr..Jy 1Jo. iii that lt 1iood fflr Si:>nmcharlu, thP ol!ice of Strward of Er1¥land brine held bJ John of Cia11nt, [)vb of t..n<'ll-"1', who.em• lo b.ve pven th. collar to mnnb.n of his ho-hnkt t~ampln of actl,181 C'OIJan1c:an ti.- ID th•J-plJf'I')' aali.ryat th1 ~UMWrl M'lttodworw 1n which tJw bnuea are Hhibliled.. It wu SIVt'ft in irokl or .. 1,,w irilt lo klUl(lll9 and nobl•. while trequ1,. ,._.lld it 1n •ilv"' It wu later u«I by Uw 1..anc-.. tnan kinp ud u atlll worn u .-rt of theoar 11w1gnw It)' H"'alda. A~l14.JO. Emo hei1ht: M .. On dt.pla)I" at R.ul'• DINE IN OR TAKE-OUT ORDERS 914 <}Jlut ~-lffa&ama 529-062·1 ~b40 ,::, 0 r:FJ In the 941-9796 middle of the woods! t 1034 Almeda Genoa Sunday 25¢ Draft Monday$2 beer bust Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland, Houston 77002 659-0040 "g:Jfay fl L 7-l '30LLLE111 Saturday Mldnight-2am Sunday: noon-8pm Mon-Fri: 4pm-8pm open 10om Mon-Sot, noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE 1 b ~ 11 1 "' o: ti ti tr r a d tr n s n n 0 di a 0 T H th th di ho to ri ho ch as JULY 17, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 "The Politics of Homosexuality" Reviewed by Joe DiSabato THE POLITICS OF HOMOSEXUALITY by Toby Marotta. Published by Houghton Mifflin, 2 Park Street, Boston, MA 02107. Publication date: May 25, 1981. Hardcover $16.95, paperback $9.95. In The Politics of Homosexuality, Toby Marotta has presented us with what will undoubtedly be referred to as the definitive history of the beginnings of the gay rights movement in the Uni­ted States. The book itself is a revision ofMarot­ta's Harvard doctoral dissertation and traces the way in which the develop­ment of gay political activity­particularly as it evolved in New York City-enabled gay people to emerge es a force in modern America. Marotta points out that the 1970's will be recorded as the decade in which gay life won legitimacy: "People with homosexual feelings more easily, openly, and enthusiastically engaged in homosexual behavior, defined them­selves as lesbian and gay, participated in the lesbian and gay male subcul­ture, and insisted that the freedom to express themselves sexually be respected by the people around them and by society at large." "There was a proliferation of bars, discos, restaurants, galleries, resorts, travel agencies, publishing compa­nies, bookstores, bathhouses, sex shops, escort services and other busi­nesses catering to the gay community. Openly gay people joined together in every variety of ad hoc group, orga­nized community centers, founded pro­fessional associations, formed politi· cal clubs, settled neighborhoods, mobilized voters, consulted with busi­nessmen, civic leaders and public offi. cials, won coverage in established communications media, and pressed successfully for laws to ban discrimi­nation on the basis of sexual orientation." "They were courted by political can­didates they won elections and were appoinied to major positions in the Democratic and Republican parties. They were even invited to the White House." The Politics of Homosexuality is the detailed account of the emergence of gay people from the shadows to take their place in society. It traces the story of the gay movement in this c?untry from its beginnings in 1951 WJth the publication of Donald Webster Cory's The Homosexual in America and the founding of the Mattachine Society by Henry Hay in California. Cory's book was the first to state that few homosexuals can change and that their probems stem from societal disapproval rather than from homosexuality itself. He was the first to publish a work that applied civil rights ideas to the case of homosexuals. Hay was a Marxist and his Matta­chine Society was originally conceived as a vehicle enabling homosexuals to organize. to explore their s~xuality, to become aware of how it equipped them to rontribute to a more humane socitty, A book by Toby Marotta and to prepare them to join with other organized minorities in the struggle to replace capitalism with socialism. By 1953, however, what Hay referred to as "status quo types" gained control of Mattachine. Thus developed what Marotta referrs to as the basic "homophile" outlook-"the belief that prejudice, ste­reotyping, and discrimination were the source of the homosexual's prob­lems and that education, policy reform, and help f~r individual homosexuals would bnng about the recognition of basic similarity, equal­ity of treatment, and intergration that were tantamount to social progress . . the society's educational aim is directed toward the public at large, with a view to spreading accurate information about the nature and con­ditions of variation, and in this way to eliminate discrimination, derision, prejudice and bigotry, and also toward the members of the variant minority, emphasizing the need for the defini­tion and adoption of a personal behav­ior code which will ... eliminate most­if not all-the barriers to integration." Hardly the stuff of which revolu­tions are made. In 1956, in San Francisco, a lesbian couple, Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, formed the Daughters of Bilitis, a women's homophile organization dedi­cated to "promoting the integration of the homosexual into society by ... edu­cation of the variant" and "of the pub­lic at large." In January 1956, the Mattachine Society of New York (MSNY) was formed to be followed in the fallofl958 by the Daughters of Bilitis-New York (DOB-NY). The gay movement from the early 1950s until the mid 1960s was thus dominated by the homophile outlook­an outlook that stressed the integra­tion with, education of, and acceptance by society rather than the develop­ment of a particularly gay subculture and agitation for civil rights and politi­cal influence. By the mid 60s, however, the black civil rights strugle had influenced many Mattachine members, and agi­tation developed for adopting different attitudes and goals within the gay movement. A prime leader in this agi­tation was Frank Kameny, founder of the Mattachine Society of Washing­ton, who had been fighting his dismis­sal from the Anny and who had, in the process, become convinced that gay pride and political action and not merely informational and educational activities were required for elimination of discrimination. Moreover, the countercultural ideas put forth by the youth movement in the late 60's and the revolutionary outlook espoused by New Left groups like SDS and SNCC also influenced the atti ­tudes and activities of some members of the gay rights movement. Thus the late 1960s and early 1970s •aw the splintering of the gay movement and MSNY into several factions and saw the emergence and di.sappearance of a whole series of gay rights groups. Marotta goes into all of this i.n great detail, and his book is a fascmatm11 account of the philosphical differences and organizational disagreements which both furthered and impeded pro­gress in the struggle for ac_ceptB:nce and civil rights. Several mom points can be briefly summerized. The single event which is regarded by the gay movement as the beginning of the modem gay liberation struggle is the riot which took place following the police raid on the Stonewall Inn in New York City's Greenwich Village in June of 1969. It was at this time that gays acted upon the new countercultu­ral belief that they should be free to express themselves and ~ socialize with one another as they wished. This event also served to crystalize Toby Marotta the opinions of the cultural radicals that exploring homosexuality was political in itself and led to the creation of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF). Marotta describes the philosophy of its founders: "Because these radical homosexuals rejected traditional standards of behavior and celebrated unconventional ways, they had no compunctions about glorifying their sexual orientations publicly or about reveling in gay lifestyles. Because they believed that the approval their group needed had to come from those also seeking libera­tion, whom they represented, and not from members of the establishment, whom they vowed to enlighten or to overwhelm, they felt no need to equivo­cate about the health or morality of homo•exual behavior." Thu• the homophile outlook that gays are just like non-gays except for their sexual ontntation was i;;up- Book Feature planted by the view that gays have their own culture and lifestyle of which they should be proud and should not deny their true cultural selves just to be accepted by the establishment. Radicals in GLF were also joined by another wing of the movement-the revolutionaries-who lacked the radical eagerness to explore the persona} in the name of the political and were little inclined to think of sexuality in political terms. They were attracted to GLFby the idea of &S8ociating politically with their own kind and by the prospect of develop­ing homosexuals as a new category of recruits for the fight against capitalism Eventually the revolutionaries Receded as the Red Butterfly, "angered by radical impatience with Marxist exegesis and by the radicals' unwiUingnea;s to agree that activists seeking to retain influence with socialist groups and carry on Marxist propagandizing sometimes had to hide their sexual orientations." The sec~ssion of others whom Marotta referrs to as "reformers" sounded the death blow to GLF. The impetus for this secession was the radical view that conventional political involvement would inhibit the spread of liberated consciousness. Reformers, however, felt that flexing the gay muscle in a traditional politi­cal sense would do more to further the gay rights cause. Thus in December 1969, the reformers founded Gay Acti­vists Alliance (GAA ). Marotta describes their attitudes: "The political reformist founders of GAA wanted to help homosexuals to feel comfortable expressing their sex­ual feelings and enjoying the company of other homosexuals. The way to achieve this, they thought, was to organize homosexuals into a bJoc so active and influential that politicians and public officials would have to respond to it by acknowledging that homosexuals had rights and status, thereby encouraging others to grant recognition, respect, and representa­tion to people who were openly gay and to their lifestyles and institutions." Another reformist element, however, found its way into GAA-the cultural reformists. These were the people who felt uncomfortable with politics, fund­raising, and organized management and who felt that their contribution was in helping to buHd a distinctive and open gay counterculture. The poli­ticos complained that their efforts were being compromised and diluted by the convention-challenging behav­ior that was neither gay nor liberated. Eventually politicos withdrew into specialized subcommittees or founded other gay groups exclusively con­cerned with conventional politics. Radical newcomers to the GAA from the now-defunct GLF began to chal­lenge the cultural reformers, setting the stage for GAA's disintegration. Bruce Voeller was elected president of GAA in the fall of 1972, and attempted to reorganize it so that it was run by a board of directors and a salaried staff-reforms that caused opposition among radicals and revolutionaries. Voeller resigned from GAA and in 1973 formed the National Gay Task Force (NGTF), the first national, professionally-run gay movement organization with a board of directors and a salaried staff. Marotta also details the activities and accomplishments of these various organizations, but only their philoso­phical and organizational differences. Throughout the hook are numerous 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 accounts of political "zaps," demon­strations, riots (including Stonewall), media coverage, election campaigns, attempts to pass a gay civil rights bill in New York, and all of the other events and activities that made the early years of the gay movement so exciting. The role and philosophy of every sig­nificant gay leader of the era is explained. lesbian liberationists made to per­suade homosexuals to think positively of themselves and their peers, to join together in political blocs and cultural communities, and to force those around them to accord them recogni­tion, representation and rights. Marotta contends that liberationist politics resulted in the formation of gay and lesbian groups of every kind Book Feature and in the proliferation of identifiably gay and lesbian lifestyles, subcultures, businesses and neighborhoods. Finally, great attention is paid to the emergence of the lesbian feminist movement-with three chapters devoted to the development of the "woman-identified woman" con­sciousness, the formation ofRadicalee· bians in 1970, and its subsequent disin­tegration, the disintegration of DOB-NY, and the formation of Lesbian Feminist Liberation in 1973, led by Jean O'Leary-later the C<H!xecutive director of NGTF. NEXT WEEK in the Voice: The Politics of Homosexuality is being published at a most opportune time. The gay movement is now enter· ing a new phase of its existence with the coming to power of the New Right in this country. In the coming years the gay movement will be confronted with repeated attempts by many newly vocal conservative groups to push back the clock, to reverse many of the gains made over the last ten years, and to force gay people back into their closets. Part 2 on the "Politics of Homosexuality'' It is time for the gay movement to take stock of its situation and its options. New groups and organiza­tions will be forming to pursue the goals of gay liberation into the 1980s. Marotta details both the lesbian struggle for recognition by and full, open participation in the women's movement and organizations such as NOW, and the problems faced in inte­racting with male-dominated gay movement organizations. Thus Marotta in The Politics of Homosexuality shows that what he ref errs to as "the contemporary explo­sion of things gay" is the result of three different historical waves of gay politi­cal activity-the homophile move­ment, the gay liberation movement, and the lesbian feminist movement. Part IV, "The Explosion of Things Gay," presents the book's conclusion that the legitimization and spread of gay life can be traced to "liberationist politics"-the efforts which gay and Toby Marotta Toby Marotta was born in Boston in 1945. He attended Harvard College, and earned graduate degrees at Har­vard from the Graduate School of Edu­cation, the Kennedy School of Govern­ment, and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. From 1977 to 1978, Dr. Marotta was Co-director of the Tenderloin Ethno­graphic Research Project in San Fran­cisco. He is now a Senior Research Associate at URSA, Urban and Rural Systems Associates, a consulting firm based in San Francisco. The Politics of Homosexuality is MATTRESS SALE SIMMONS, Beauty Rest FLOOR SAMPLES-SLIGHT DAMAGE-MIX, MATCH s 12 9 FULL SIZE SET TWIN SET QUEEN SET KING SET sge •1s9 •225 NIAGARA-By Spring Air New 15-Year Guarantee s 17 5 FULL SIZE SET TWIN SET •tso (length 80 inche1) (length 80 inches) QUEEN SET *275 KING SET s395 PHONE 977-3541 BEDS &BRASS 5875 S. GESSNER-CORNER OF HARWIN & GESSNER based on seven years of research into gay political activity, beginning with the homophile movement in the 1950s, through the emergenceofthegayliber­ation movement and the lesbian femi­nist movement in the 1960s and 1970s, to the legitimization and spread of gay life in American culture and politics today. Dr. Marotta is currently engaged in two projects: writing a semi­autobiographical book of interviews with gay Harvard graduates, in con­junction with a gay alumni group he is organizing; and a book on male prosti­tution and pornography, adapted from his federally-sponsored report pre­pared on these subjects. Already this year has seen the for­mation of the Gay Press Association, one of whose immediate goals is to bring the communications capabilities of the gay media into the 80s by estab­lishing a gay wire service based on electronic microcomputer technology. But in this effort a sense of history is needed so that the gay movement can learn from both the successes and fail­ures of its past. To know where you're going you must first understand where you come from. The Politics of Homosexuality pro­vides the gay movement with the detailed account of its history which is so vital to its continued progress. It is truly the Roots of the gay liberation movement. 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Alabama 528-8245 "Serving good food for the good people of Montrose (Where the Steam Table used to be) e >ly es, is ne er­. th ·ht he th •ly sh he ~d ir ~ !s. ~: to is n 1- n n JULY 17, 1981 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 "There is a definite difference in our complete beauty training" COMPLETE BEAUTY SERVICES now offered for both men & women: Shampoo & se t . ... . s400 Haircuts . . . . . . . . . . . 500 Haircut, blow dry . . 1000 Permanent waving ...... . . 1500_4000 Lash & brow tints & arching . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Nacleic acid conditioner ...... 3"'-7"' Scalp treatment ..... 7"' Manicures ........ 3so Pedicures ........ 1000 Facials ... . . 750 plain Braid ing ......... 30"" Hair Relaxing .... 1250 Bleaching . . . 2500_4000 Frosting .... 2500_4()00 COUPON JULY SPECIALS YOUR CHOICE HAIRCUT & HAIRCUT BLOW DRY s400 StOOO !MON.-THURS.) IMON.-THlJRS.) COUPON VALID TIL JULY 30, '81 Are you satisfied with your present job? If not, this could be your chance of a lifetime Start your new professional career today by enrolling in Bellaire Beauty College, where you'll receive the most comprehensive & scientific education in the field of cos­metology offered in the Houston area. We now offer a schedule to fi t your needs with daytime, afternoon and evening classes. Meet Mr. Vern ... Mr. Vern, director of educational research, has a total of 12-plus years in the ever changing field of cosmetic instruction. As Jhirmack's chief educator, Mr. Vern gained vast knowledge as a hair coloring & permanent technician. Mr. Vern, while working for Jhirmack, acquired a national reputation for being one of the coun­try's top stylists. For a number of years, Mr. Vern worked hand in hand willi th e pres tigeous Jerry Redding. Mr. Vern now brings all of his training techniques, knowledge and talent to Houston. Indeed. Bellaire Beauty College, under the direction of Mr. Vern. is des­tined to become the finest cosmetic training center in the South. Come by today & let Mr. Vern introduce you to the rewarding field of Cosmetology. / J/n~ J6U B~ff~tUTY~ ~ COllt Of 5014 BELLAIRE BLVD. BELLAIRE, TEXAS 77401 666-2318 BELLAIRE BEAUTY . COLLEGE BELLAIRE BLVD. 5 c ""0"' :E 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 Are you missing Houston's huge GAY MARKET? Did you know Houston has a huge gay market? Houston has one of the largest gay populations of any city in the country. 50,000 is a conservative estimate of the number of openly-gay people in Houston. The "gay ghetto" of Houston is Montrose and the nearby Binz and Heights areas. But gay people do live in all areas and the typical gay person is very mobile, traveling throughout Houston for shopping and entertainment. Do you know what a gay market is? It's rich, for one thing. Gays-being single-are able to spend a higher percentage of their income on entertainment, fashion and leisure. The gay community is loyal, too. Gays know which businesses are interested in them and heavily support those companies with their patronage. "Why would I want to reach the gay market?" You're in business to make money, aren't you? Gays have money to spend. Others-including Pearl Beer, the Houston Symphony Orchestra, Houston Ballet, the Galleria Cinema-have discovered this and use the Montrose Voice to reach Houston's gay market successfully. And, whether you know it or not, you no doubt already do business with many gay people. Gay money is green too. The Montrose Voice is what you need to reach the Gay Market We're two publications in one: the Montrose neighborhood newspaper and the city-wide "gay newspaper." Our news coverage includes local Montrose events and national gay items. Plus, the Voice contains special local columns each week on art, music, theater and movies. We'll present your message to the gay community in a clean, professional environment-and we'll present it effectively. Need more information about the gay community? Have a question? Call us. The Montrose Voice 3520 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006 • (713) 529-8490 TEXAS FIRST THE 2306J Open 7 nights, 9pm-6am weeknights, to 9am weekends 2306 Genessee (Fairview at Tuam) 528-6235 at the Hole House welcome the MONTROSE SPORTS ASSOCIATION BOWLERS Monday Night­After the Games Happy Hour Prices & Free Hors D'oeuvres to all MSA Bowlers HAPPY HOUR 7AM-NOON & 4-7PM OPEN 7AM-2AM DAILY 109 TUAM 528-9066 JULY 17. 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 MEN, WOMEN, KPFT STUDENTS ARE YOU COUPON INTERESTED IN BOOKS STAYING AND FREE STUFF! LIVING IN Take advantage of HOUSTON? KPFT's Inflation WE HAVE GOOD-PAYING Fighters Coupon Book. JOB OPENINGS. 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Jerry ~::~:ii; ~~,~~~no~·n~;~.~i:s!:r;,:~::.~:.~ ~ ,,,.~~~.a;:~r,u:;,:irn:.~·!':ir d~n°b Wed_ A Thu,.. evtmnf1; rovtt charp a.ftclf' HJOp111 m&"htly. c0vJ.:-..:291£i;Cshrphrrd~4-0iro­• D1..-n·:R1-:NT DHt:M ..:-17:12 wf;thftmtr- 1'128-~8' 1a:t' men exrlu•ivrly; dreH cod• ~rr~!':~!::'rs 1~·~: ~~./.:1 ~v~~~~i.~!~~j:~ aftfr-hour• l'fi &8at.&2:30pmMon'. lhl'Oll&"h 1''ri., l>H'r hu•t. Sat. A Sun. aftttnoon•. liquor !~!~\~~.~f~b ~i:~:n~eJ>7'ho~:CA~,~~!~ Lrathrrmtn •>.DIRTY ~8Ai..LY'8=22fi A--;ondaTe-.:_529. ~~,n~~:r ofdi•,t !u~kt :i~\~ t~n.~ .~:a"k ni1ht Wed • E°~·il~1213 Rie"hm~0071 - •°AEXii.E-IOll_B_ill=~Abi" th• Rebel Out1aw• Fri A Sat nenin1•. 7pm buffet A 8:30pm 1ml)tr1onatton •how with i:~~; ~1~~Y~n~urh~ ~:bi;'~!;::~~j Thu,.. even1n1. home TuH rudtn *GALLEON 2303 Richmond 522-7616 U'ln.~i:tfet'81;:¥ba~y; JDOVIH 6 6 9pm •GRANT STREET STATION 911 Fairvle•-628-8342 •TIIE HOLE HOUSE-109 1\lam-628- 9088 We welcome the MSA bowlers Mon. night See our ad elsewhere this issue. Bffr •Pecial Sun. afternoon; •pecial !or MontroN Sport.. AHoc:iation bowltn Mon evemns. eJUST MARION A LYNN'S---817 Fairview- 52&9110: 1ay women pndominantly • KINDRED SPIRITS-5246 Buff•lo Si-dw•y~9756: l•Y WOnMn predomi· nantly • LAMPOST-2417 Tim• Blvd.--628-3921 l•Y women prwd.ommantly •LOADING DOCK-1736~W-..~.- . ,-.,.,.--620-- 1818: bur buat from 6pm Sun.; 1ay mtn predominantly; music: by Mike Drnrett •AMA RY'S 1022 WH&hehaer-1528- 8861 Shop Mary's 7 Nights for After-Hours See our ad elsewhere this iHue. ~~~~i~~~~o~1~t~d.f~~~r9 !!M:o';!tr:·~~o~r.·~Jo:: ~!.r: .. i~:u; Hou•ton Motorcycle Club •>.MIDNITE SUN-534 W~ 7519: irnpenonation ahowa Sun. A Wed evtn1nca. •MONTROSE MINING co . ..:..PP.c:Ttk- 529-74AA- fay men predominantly; beer bust Sun. alt.moon The Voice is the Choice among more people in Mon trose JULY 17, 1981 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 •PINK ELEPHANT-1218 LHland- 868-0IMO A Montrose Alternative-The Pink Elephant •2308CLUB-2308Genenee-528-8236 Texas' best. The 2306. See our ad elsewhere this iaeue. Gay men udusively, membenlup r.qwred, Opt!D n1ahtly See our ad elsewhere this issue. "Pla)'Jirl Folli•," Court of the &n,le Star talent 1how, 10~30pm S.t. with Laura lM aLnonveiv, eLneanray Kpaanrtey, EAyud1i e Mat; 45th •----------- I; 1ay men predominantly. HAIR CARE :•fRl7A!N;C tH 6620'1i: Main 528-8730: beer ·----------- ~hf'M~~umty Sun. happy hour ~~NEL Hair o.ip-3220 Yoakum-526- •ROCKY'S-3416 W Dallu--628-8922: &"ay .SALONDANIEL.-1544 We.theimer-520- wonwn n:duiwly 9!27 •tMSOl-U97T9H8 .C0-1103.C Al•ed• -Genoa- • ----------­A Bar in the Woods-The South 40 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Bees' 1p«ial9 Sun A. from 8pm Mon. •TWINS-MS WutheiDer-522..r,o:,A-.J:i ;a:~; ~:!:':h!~'g._ i5's.~~ 8pm. •VENTURE-N 2923 11..bt 522-0000- MachO Men, Mucho Music, at the Venture-N. See our ad elsewhere this iaaue. ~;3~~~:~/~UieP!!tl~uhntl!~o!eA tf!~~'d::"'n !~,._AMoci•tion niaht • WILDWOOD S•loon-1504 Wea-t­helmer-& 28-l)(MO "La Cage aux Folles" movie Thurs. at Wildwood See our ad elsewhere thie iuue. Sundant't' Cattlt Co. Mntfit for MonU- ~~· t!_· ~!i:~aJ't°J.1f~:;btM~!:.: ::_.tou::e~~~~;A ~.t_~ ~:~ t!~IO:°dr:~m~y~:M~~-Sundanct The Voice is the Choice among more people in Houston GAY BATHS •-CL~UB~ ~~~~~~~~­HOUSTON- t~,-:; Fannin-6.'>9 ::u~~~~s!i'24 eh0c~!11vely, membtnhip •MIDTOWNE SPA-3100 Fanni.n-522.2379 PY men uclusively. open 24 hov,. HELP WANTED HOME FURNISHINGS •·BY-M-AN~"S- -ln~ter~lo~re~-8~08~ W~u­t-heimer_, 29-8002 Byman'sime furnishings, custom interiors. See our ad elsewhere this issue. ........K...E.Y... .S. HOPS ~--~ .......... REED'S-1812 We.tbelmer A 1820 Commonwealth-823-2927 Reed's Key Shops in Montrose, 2 locations. LEATHER SHOPS LITERATURE •-W~ILD~E ~'N-' S-TE-JN--3~20 ~w~-t~he~i-­r-su~ e!«;" n!>ald C~!e~~e~1 529--7014 A bookstore with books-Wilde 'n' JULY JULY Stein 17 18 See our ad elsewhere this issue. JULY JUlY JULY JULY JULY 19 20 21 22 23 LODGING Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Interact, Houston'• Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midni1< ht at 3405 Mulberry • FRIDAY: Lambda Alan on meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin • SATURDAY: Benefit for the Montrose Clinic by the Sundance Cattle Co. at the Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Westheimer • SU~f?A Y: Montrose Sports ~~h"u;:~lp~~kll games 2pm • SUNDAY: Montrose Sports softball league games at Levy Field, with teams from the Galleon, Bri~r ~atch, Jim's Gym, Montrose Mining, Brazos River Bottom, Venture-N, Different Drum and Saddle Club • MONDAY: Montrose Sports sum~er league bowling, 9pm, at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • THURSDAY: Montrose Sporto A88ociation tennis matches 7:30pm, Memorial Park • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-midnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events Later :H~O~U~ST~O~N~G~U~E~S~T--H·o·u·s·E·--.-•• Avondale-152()...9787 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." MAIL BOXES • IN 1 WEEK: "GayRun '81" 1n ·------------ San Francisco July 26 :~~~KALL Mail Boz•--.c ff' Montroee- U N 2 WEEKS: Reno Gay Rodeo ·----------­July 31-Aug. 2 U N 2-3 WEEKS: Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches general conference in Houston, Aug. 3-9, Shamrock Hilton, with services by the Rev. Elder Troy Perry 10:30am Aug. 9 • IN 7 WEEKS: Texas Gay Task Force Conference VIlI in Houston Sept. 4-7 • IN 7-8 WEEKS: Second Annual West Coast Women's Music and Cultural Festival, near Yooemite, Calif. MUSIC :,•Xl•I>•".< .• B•EA•T.. ...-. ,n-i.•-21•1.' .I.U~ :-hmo-od-­~ 23-~1<1 •RECORD RACK -'.1109 S ~-----;(I~ 160" ORGANIZATIONS ~TTF.NTION ORGANIZATIONS Call tht Voic. with your or1ani1alion'• new• and meftln1 data. 629-8490.. ACA P ELLA C'h 0.-.- .---,,~.~.~ M•-•- .-,..-.~, Church of Chrillt. 620-K ~·.Wuner-523- 613" AC~WGray~ AMERICAN LEATHERMEN 11oc1el ~-:.~=~~~!b~~:v.~.1734 A.STRo Rainbow AJhanot--629-,r,,,s14 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 Houston Grand Opera Pearl Beer Professional Bartenders School Prestige Travel Houston Symphony Orchestra United Cab What do these companies have in common? The~ are all satisfied regular displa~ advertisers in the Montrose Voice, the weeJd~ eommunit~ newspaper of Houston's unique neighborhood. Maybe YOU should join the list-and discover what they've discovered. The Montrose Voice 3520 Montrose Blvd., 529-8490 Montrose Classified BERING Memonal Method~t Church 14.0 H•wthornir-626-1017: Interut1 Hou1ton'1 f~u~rt!!r ~~:~iu.!:~h3p:~:~;~ Son 8-t':iwE-EN TWO Workh--529-1913: me.tint ~t.-ti~.~W"°H'°'1TE=M~E~N~T~.,...-th~.,_.,..-=tl006= . 774-3691 1MontrouJ CHURCH OF CHRlST-626.K We1thei~r-774·2368. 774·4643 c'HUR.fH Ot' CHRISTIAN FAITH-413 WHthtimer-529:8005: G•y_ YounJ Adult& mHbn1 Fri e\·irnm1; wor1h1p wrv1CM Sun :i~d~1 ~0~ i.:11i\!1!1 !.~~.~~h~i~~~!~:! W~ evemn« CITIZENS FOR HUMAN EQUALITY (CHE>--609 F1nn1n #1301-236-8666: t:io.rd me.uni Alli'- II COLT 45'8 (M>Ci1l dub)-c, o Bruos River Bottom. 2400 Briu09-628-9192 COMMl.fNfuCOF~'EEHOusE-a pro)ect of Interact Houtto."'n~~~--~ ~~[-~~[~ ;f!:~~~~~il-i37's~52.~~M~ •rvi~ & .ocial flpm July 24 cOURT m-'T~finnNGT..E~ST-AR~--m-...,.-. Pink Elephan1, 12HI Leeland-859-0040: talent 1how IO:;Ktpm S.t ffti~IS H0TI.JNF._:-228-IM>6° --- 0-ATAP-RO~'Jo:SSJQNAl:s:.mefl~ ~;.~~22~~~~~69-h~~~~:A'uhg.,lel•l OlANA FOUNDATIOl'i-2700 MUO"n-5""24. 5791 DiGNJTY=rb""te-t1 .t""C;lh~ ,C,A,.n,\e.r . 1703 Boleover-528-7644 ma. ~pm EPISCOPAL INTEGRITY-meN •l Au°b.y HOUM, 6265 Mai.n-52.0-8298: IDM'bn17~ A,,.,-.11 ~'t~~Y~/g~~!t~i~f:ia;~~~:; A111. 9 FfRST-ffNTTARI-AN Churr.-~ Fa_nnin-526-1571. l..l.mbd• Alanon mettine tni:_v;:~nfin~v0e~~1r~~G.~n!c~~~~.m=i:i~ Sun •ftemoon Discover the power ol the little Montrose newspaper. The Montrose Voice now reaches over 14,000 people each week. Discover the power of a llstfne or small ad In the Classified section. 25¢ a word or $8 an inch. JULY 17, 1981 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 GAY ARCHIVES ofTn: .. ~ Mul'-"ry- 529-1014: • proJed of lnt.w.<1. HOQl:ton GAY ATHEISTS 1-.pe of A.mtrica-52f ~M524-2222.:m.eet.1ncil:p..-ni.bon8pai. GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS-529-4(84 GAY NURSES A: PHYSICIA-NS Or Houaton--cto GPC, ~ Main •217-777. 2287 GAY PARENTS---S20-9H3J GAVPEffiiL[ti,-M:ed~- GA Y POLITICAL CAUC'US-4600-M•ln #217-521-1000: .elf.defena r.oune 3.:JO{)pm Sat •l B•bylon. 300 We.lh~mer. aenu•I bu.1ne. DM"tting 7:30pni AllJr fl. HOMOPHILE ll'ITERFArTH Alli•nee--623- lll60 HOU!,-ro=N""'c"'oM"'M=uN"'ITY="c"'LO""wNS-862 8314 Coming, Frida~, Jul~ J~ ''LOOKING GOOD'' THE MONTROSE VOICE'S FIRST THEME ISSUE DEDICATED TO PERSONAL APPEARANCE, FEATURING Discover the power of a dfspla)I advertisement that reaches our loyal followfne. Call 529-8490 daily, 9am·6pm. Yes. The Montrose Voice. • Physical Fitness • Clothing The power-full little newspaper. Getting away with a group. a friend or just by yourself. Let us help. B •• ,, •• '#ii..,.,, Serving the travel needs of Montrose. B ,.•.,•.,, ."..'.,. ••• Yoar Travel Expert. 522-l.922 3205 Montrose Houston Max • Beauty • Spas • Modeling • Diet • Health • Much More • Tanning • Sports The ~1ontrose Voice welcomes appropriate editorial copy from organizations involved in the above INTERESTED ADVERTISERS SHOULD CALL 529·8490 ·us Avocados were MUCH more fashionable at a dollar each. ~~l'J1'·l' 'I 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 17, 1981 THE BED HOUSE 2115 Norfolk 523-8278 Thur-Fri 10-8 Sat 10-6 (call for laf9 appointment) MATTRESS SALE SIMMONS BEAUTY REST FLOOR SAMPLES, SLIGHT DAMAGE 1/2 PRICE SPRING AIR-CRAFT MASTER TWIN 99 FULL 119 QUEEN 169 KING 199 SIMMONS HIDE-A-BEDS QUEEN 450 SOFA LOVESEAT 495 l!01JSTO!f'S FRIElfDLIEST C01J?ITR Y l WESTER!f BAR WISHES SUCCESS TO IRENE, GLENN AND MAGGIE AT THE :NATIONAL RENO GAY RODEO 710 PACIFIC MCCR Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection A member of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Communitv Churches proudlv announces and nv11~ \.'->Ur attendance and part1Cipa11on m the UFMCC · .. 10th General Conference This conference is international in scope with repre­sentation from most of its 170 churches in 8 countries (induding Texas) . The week-long agenda Includes: •Worship services •Keynote speakers •Workshops • Entertainment •Robin Tyler •Montrose Singers and Band •The Reverend Elr'<>r Troy Perry, Founder of UFMCC •Dr James Tinney •Mrs. Joan Clark •Dr. Loretta Williams The Reverend Elder Troy Perry preaches 10:30 A.M., Sunday, August 9th Shamrock Hilton Hotel Grand Ballroom (Seanng l1mrted to 3.000) This conference: Endre week of Aq. 3·9 Shamrock Hilton Hotel Call MCCR, 861-9149, for specifics No sir. We are not kidding! STAR PIZZA WILL DELIVER* HOT & JUICY TO YOUR DOOR "within 2 mite radius. * New York-Style hand thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep dish pizza * also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian Pizza * Starburst Deluxe Pizza (the worksl) * Super Sandwiches & Salads * fantastic Desserts * Imported & Domestic beer CALL 523-0800 PLEASE ALLOW ONE HOUR FOR DELIVERY MENTION THIS AD AND GET $1 OFF * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOM 'lu • I I If •i 2111 NORFOLK HOURS Mon: 11:30am-11:00pm Tue: sorry, closed Wed: 11 :30am-1 I :OOpm Thurs: II :30am-11 :OOpm Fri: 11 :30am·mldnlght Sat: 4:00pm·mldnlght Sun: 4:00pm-10:30pm Montrose Classified HOu-sTON MOTORCill-ECLuB-c10 Mary'•. l()'l2 We1the1mer-628-885l HOUsiONTAVERNGUILD: members 1ndude the Badland•. Barn, Dirty Sally'•. Ex1k, Mary'•. M1dmte Sun . -1NTfii:ACT-HOu--.--tOn I: Colnmu;\i). CoCfeehouae-34M M_ulberry-529- 7014. 694 1732 ~ Commu_n1ty Coffeehouu 7:30pm-m1dn11ht Fri,_ bu11neH meetrnlit' 7:30pm Au1 6.; educat1on1l forum 7:30pm Aua.~ • KPFT Rtidfo~ io'M-90-419 Lovef.-t Blvd.-628--4000 Wildt 'n Stein l•Y radio ;;:~~m~~~~tC-'~"'m"°':-"~.-.~ 1.~1~Un-,<ano--n· Church. 6210 Fannin-621·9n2: meetin1 Fri. even1ni LUTHERANS CONCERNED-me-;t, at &:.re ~~:~r;.,~~~11~1;_wau1h-621. • METR0P0LfTA-N COMMUi'ifTY ('hllJ"('h-1918 l>Mah1r-881-9149 10th UFMCC General Conference Aug. 3-9 See our ae1 elsewhere this iuue. ProtHtant worahip Hrvicea 10:45am 6 7 !~pm Sun_ .l 7.15pm Wed_; Montron Sin1en meHin1 7pm Mon: Conr. Beth ~~1r:w·~..-1~~er"M~~~~,i~~1~ t4~~!:!~~i:~ Churche. general conference Au1. 3.9 at Shamrock Hilton with pre11 conference 12:4.5pm Au1 4 and .ervicet 10:30ilm Aur -9 MONTROS1-:C1Vicc1ub- N .. rio-w:n-Mu at O.nn1 Church, 1440 Hawthorne--622 1000: mM!t1n1 July 2tl ~~~R&s;~!~-~7~U~o ~il~~TlfO~~" gi-~~~~ :s~:!!1~~1!!~1~nd::.'J,~!!~ venereal d1-aH i.u daily weekday,, rape coun.Hhnr ... ion for women Wed. everunc MoNTROSE-cOiiNsELING~OOO ~J~~~=~O~l,-6~=20~w-.,~.,-e~- li~2273 M6NTR0SESIN0ERS_:m~ MCCR 1919 Oecatur-627-'lhl'i9: tnflil'lina 7pm Mon ~~~O~t:J.~~~~~!,1:t;~7':~l:~~ Mimmtt bowlin1 lnrue ram• 9prn Mon. M0!'ffR0S.:8P0RT8 C AMPlf\'.G-666-1734 M-6NTR6s~SPORTS~·uc-.'OOTBAu:;.. 961-0!>02 \10NTRosfS:PilltTSJOGGINa=5"23-87M M6NTR08~:g-PQRTS soFTBAL.L...:.pj;y, at'""")' Fif'ld-&>4-4264: itoftball 11am .. ~n with t.Nlm1 frum the Galleon. Bnar Patch. t'i~:.Yv";n~~~N~r~~~~~t~:~s .8ddf. Club ~?!'~~B~:-~~. .~ ~~-:-TcEfn~~5~1tbL7~ 529-7437: pract1c. 7.:JO.t{)ptn Thun MONTRO.'i-E 8..0RTS-----voiIEYBALi.-=­~~~~ r;;~~ChHT)"hUnt Park-522.,:W,7: same. M0NTR0.r;;ESYMPH0NIC ifANI>i Mon~ Marchina Band· ...~. Z"7-9669 The Montrose Band is looking for a rehearsal hall. Help! Call Andy, 527-9669 PERSONALS W-HITE ANGLO m.IT" (Inly~ overweir.htl: Complete body ma11a1e. nibdown, m your home, $20. By white ma1e health attendant. Evr1n1 appointment, a·~A"Y""A"T" HEiSTs IAa111~-ofAm;r1C& Will :T,i;:~!t~c1::.:ti~~:r/~=~ ~~~~or time and place call 522-7531 or BWMT: BLACK& WHITE Men Toc•thtt, a r:r~~~ati~~11~al~0fn~'vce~,~~.~~~·l~{ 77"'6111 TEXAS (};~.-Y-COiffERENCE VIII in ¥:=l:;. 8:f!~:h7m~~ .. n~~f~e~!~~~~~~ 529-7014 or 52().9767. PLANTS -~~~~~~~~~~­MONTROSE PLANT CO. inwnor, aw-nor planu. ln.tallat:ion.lmamlt'nant'!. ~Fl . PLUMBING PRINTING -~~~~~~~~~~­• KWIK-KOPY Printins-3317 MontroM- 522-U196 PUBLICATIONS -~~~~~~~~~~­INNER- VIEW-610 WeetheuMr-522-9333 •M O;;t-ro99- vOTC9--s5 20 Montro u "227-629-8490 The "Montrose Voice," the newspaper of Montrose. Deadline for next iasue: 11~1i8.i~~~r !~v~~~~~~~r 1ubscription1. Next issue to be relea&ed Fri. evening, J uly24. TWT- .Jxi3Sm1th •t03--527-9lll RESTAURANTS •-BA~JA~'S~-40~2 L~o,~,.U~-62-7·9-86~6 ~­Baja's for Lunch! See our ad elsewhere this issue. Champasne bninch 12 .1pm Son · 8RA8.q1-; ru1-:-61S w AJ--.b--;,,a-US-8744 ~H APtiLTAPEC-lil3 ib"ihm;.nd-Si~- 23& • HOUfOE0iiPJEs.:..ali2"Ki";b,--5.21-3816 • PAUL"°T CAtc°r-iACTORY-3207 MontroM-624-6666 • ftAUi.~-B ifASS RtiBBJNc::ii41f. Alabuna-629-082'7 You'll Really Like Raul's Brass Rubbimr See our ad eleewhere thia iaaue. -8fAR PlZZA-:i1l1 N0rfolk-6ZS...0800 Hot Pizza Delivered! 523-0800. See our ad elsewhere thia iuue. ·'ifEAK.- ---N'f..GG-4231 MontroM-628-8136 -TEDDrS-243 W• theimer .nM'&:l~26w.-.,~.- . --~~~.= ... -- ROOMMATES Roommate Connections Share expenses, build a friendship. We provide the reJernla WIU. nferen· r:,:;...:!~~!.~!~~~-t· 626-8002. SCHOOLS :BLUE WATER Divine School- W..tbelhMI' at Montuu .=112~8-0~6"'-~-~=~ a:.~1J!.~~"3tfc:l1ool-IOI• New classes forming at Bellaire Beaufy College See our ad el11ewhere tha iaue.. MONTROSE VOICE 23 JULY 17, 1981 SHOPS -~~~~~~~~~~­• AU. THAT GLJ'ITERS-·4.12.5 Montl"l»f- 522-6976 • HYMAN'S ~ .. sorfe.-=i-04 Wfftheimer-529-8002 New, now open-Byman's Gifts See our ad elsewhere this iBBue. •FACETS-1412 W•thei.mer~ •TEXAS JUNK---00.:.'hnat Wekh- 624-8257 Come Shop With Us-Texas Junk ComP.anY. See our ad elsewhere l.hia issue. e'TREYMAN-407 W•lheamer-~~ .T ALENT AGENCIES •LONE STAR Syndicate-3"00 Travii-628- 6556 .T ANNING CENTERS EUR OTA N-1108 Berth e a /6215 Yoakum-629-6100 Get that summer tan without the work Eurotan See our ad efeewhere this issue. S,.U .N. - KINGS-3837- R 1chmond--S.Co: The Ultimate Tanning Experience-Sun Kings See our ad elsewtiere this i88ue. TAXI -~~~~~~~~~~­UNITED Cab-759·1'411 United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Houston, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY •-PR~ES~TI~GE~ T~ra. ~.l -~82-05 -Mo~nu~o.­e-- 522-1922 Prestige Travel Agency in Montrose. See our ad elsewhere thia iasue. TYPESETTING & GRAPHICS a"..:':!8'!.N!'~a. l!.?..~! !-,~ -J-7~-J-!-lt-S-:-ul-n-1-- Fast, accurate, computerized typesetting-and printing. Small and larse Job9, Pubbcauou, eataJo_.. b rochun1. fo rm • W1 •p•c:laliae 1n :'):~un•.a.IJWOJlda.1At1a111veyou ·_V-_-A-_C-_A-_-_T-_I-O-_N_-_ -R-E-_-S .-O.;-.R._ -T-HAITI Guest house. Dial direct for details. 011-509-16-4182. YARD & GARAGE SALES ......... ""!"""!"""!" ......... !""9 HAVING A YARD SALE nat .-a7 0.. at L!':'=-~~lty7,..~yto SamanthaReads Your Stars If you were born this week: You are generous, optimistic and usually even-tempered. You may be a push-over for flattery, but can ultimately tell if it has the ring of truth. In jewelry, you prefer gold over silver, Clothes are important to you, and even in your oldest duds, you always look great! ARIES: You can fly as high as you want to this week, Aries, on two conditions. One, that you've kept your pilot's license up to date; and, two, that you've checked out your aircraft. Full moon brings lovin' galore. TAURUS: You rarely beat around the bush, Taurus, and this week is no exception. I know you don't like to mince words, but see if you can be diplomatic at the same time. There's a chal· lenge for you. Days whistle to a close. GEMINI: Revamp your budget and wind up all sorts of loose ends during first days while you still have time, Gem. Read between the lines of any documents you sign. Later, you'll need skates- lote of places to go and people to see. MOONCHllD: Even you can't do justice to a dozen matters at once, Moonbaby. Make a list of priorities. so you can give each the concentration it deserves. Later, you set the pace. Full moon sees money move like the Galveston tide-in and out. LIO• Make your bi rthday wish, Leo, then do your part toward it.s realization. Your agenda includes a party, words spoken in confidence and a secret yen. FulJ moon finds you in the lead role, center stage. To an S.RO. houne, of course! VIRGO: This week you and another party may share the same goal. Though you two are quite different a nd may never become close, you can be of mutual benefit. Later, friends are full of good ideas. Finally, don't hide your light, Virgo . UBRAr Review recent events to glean insight that will be valu· able in the near fu ture, Libby. Then, though you love peace, you may have had it with a certain person and the sparks may fly. Later, friendship grows. SCORPIO: Short-term gains could be almost canceled out by long-term consequences. Think ahead, Scorp; examine total picture. Later, outside prea ures build and there may be a chal­lenge you just can't refuse, SAGITI"ARIUS: You're a doer, Saj, but you have your own free­wheeling style. Picky people are your nemesis. The weather's hot enough as it is; don't let these naggers make you steam­split for cooler pastures. CAPRICORN: New project has many benefits, Cappy, but you may be working with some to whom ego satisfaction is just as important as the pro1ect it..eJ f. Sorry about tha t! Lat.er. poin t.e to ponder and days may come to romantic fini. AQUARIUS: New faces on your scene are likely to be more than passing acquaintances. How nice,Aquari. Wrap up a number of tag ends and lend a hand to one in need. Zippy week continues with an I, for involvement and ice cream. PISCO: News and visitors get your week off to a busy start, Pisces. Cupid is ready to play an active role, too, and he's in a tricksy mood, with several aces up his sleeve. Full moon brings a new task with spotlight potential. To advertise in the Montrose Voice, call 529- 8490, daily 9am-6pm. The Voice is the choice, read by over 14,000 people every week. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 10, 1981
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