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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 001. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/190.

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(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/190

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 001, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Prompted by the violent murder of a soldier believed to be gay, Vice President Al Gore said he would seek to overturn the ban on openly gay service members, falling in line with a host of other Democrats. Page 3 The intensity, passion and sexual tension of Simone Cunningham come through in the hip new work of this bold, lesbian poet who recently self-published 'Suite 69,' a collection of erotica. Page 17 ISSUE 999 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE . AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 17, 1999 new 1-a.icts en the net A crop of 'virtual' gay rights groups are clamoring for attention, but should it take more than 'dot-com' to earn legit imacy? by PA!GL PARVIN No members, no budget, no full-time staff, not a single offkl• or meeting. A flurry of on-line activist groups have come on the scene in the last year, and many are garnering attention inside and outsidl• the gay community. But docs is "dot-com" or "dot-org" by itself a substitute for a con­stituency, bylaws and the other traditional me,1sures of an organization's legitimacy? In ,1 recent controversy involving whether America Online was discriminating against gay users, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and National Gay l.obby.Org were referenced side-by-side in many mainstream and gay press news Jccounts, with both groups treated as equals. Gl.AAD, founded in 1985, has 15,000 members, an annual budget of $3.7 million, and offices in six U.S. cities. 1':.1hunal Gay Lobby.Org was foundl'<i earlier this w.u, claims a thousand members, no annu­al b~dgd ,md 1s solely Internet-based. While gay organizations of all sizes, shape:; and cause. have co-existed for decades, the Internet has sp.iwnl'<i a slew of new group namt-:;, raL~ing questions about organization accountability, credibility and what exactly it means to be a "gay rights group." Online activist Michael Romanello, who co· founded National Gay Lobby.Org and recently look on America Online and called for a boycott The fact that 1ust about anyone with a mouse and a modem can think up a name, put up a web-site and create a gay rights "organization" presents ups and downs, according to some gay activists. The good, the bad and the Net "It's a good thing and a bad thing," observed Internet acti\ist John Aravosis, him­self a part of this growing ''virtual" activism. "In a sense, I think the Internet will make you better known by name .... It makes you become an organization. It's very odd, peo­ple do perceive me as a gay organization," said Aravosis, the president and sole staff member of Wired Strategies, his on-line advocacy consulting business. Aravosis has earned this perception pri­marily by taking a stand on issues of interest to gays, including AOL's policies; posting inform.1tion on his web-site; and, as he has emerged as an on-line source, speaking with the press when contacted. He doesn't hide the fact that for now, he's a one-man show. But reporters don't always ask, either. Not all aspiring gay rights activists and groups are totally Internet-based. But the Net can often level the playing field for those seeking publicity, creating a realm where one person si tting in front of a computer can maintain a web-site and churn out press releases as effectively as a large national organization like Human Rights Campaign. "I think it's a good thing. Our movement is big enough to accommodate all who wish to participate," said HRC spokesman David Smith. "Everybody who wishes to be politi­cally active should be, and can be, in what­ever form they choose." Smith deflected the question of whether media references to such groups can be mislead­ing to many, including gay men and le<bians. "This is a democratic country, and nobody should be denied access to the mainstream media to get their viewpoints across," Smith said. "It's up to the journalist to determine a point of view and whether that point of View is represented by a constituency or not. Often, the gay press will quote a person who has a constituency of one just to put a con­trary view out there." :- Continued on Page 10 MM'btn:....,.,. Z4 11""9<'­P'h)" Ul.M mHtings: No W•hMt• HoN N~"°fttho ao.rdof~ : No M.mo.n· H sigtwd pa.dp ludg<tNono P'h)'\KM mtttings: No Wtbsrtt: ston.waJboc.t.ty.0tg founded: 1999 ~'"1frtNo loard of dirtcton: Ya M..-nbrtn. A.bout 1140 ludgl<c- .... ~- mHbngS: No W•blft•: n11Uonaig•ytobby.org MtmMn: About 15.000 11""9<' 137- , hysc.al rnffbngS; YH Wtbtrtt: 9lud.0tg k>und.d: 1"6 ........,r., Not I"' lo~ of dw'Kton: Not yt't MtmMrl! ltstMn<t of 1203 ludgtt­rh)' SKAI mHtings: Mo Wm.te; Mtewatch..otg found.cl· ,,,. Non-hofit No loafd of cWKton: No Membtn 20actrvt ludgtt­"')' M•lnwf't119 No Wf'btrtt: ~"1-°'9 Merntwn.;~l'Of 1f"¥et'al tho41und l~t-NON "'ytnl~~. No Wtbsf1•: W'lftdslr1tf19tt".Com A weapon of homophobia? Park rangers in San Antonio have arrested more than 500 men on sex charges in two years, sometimes releasing t heir arrest records to employers and the media, prompting an out­cry from local gay activists by GIP PLASTER Once every 36 hours for the last two years, on average, park rangers arrest a man on misdemeanor sex chargl>s in one of San Antonio's dozl"ns of city parks. Authorities say the men are hunting for sex in public places, flashing their groins and gropmg what, most often, turns out to be an undercover park ranger m the midst of a covert sting to rid the parks of men seeking sex with other men. ~fore than 500 men ha\·e arrested during a two-year operation by a team o underco\·er park rangers, aty official~ and gay activists sJJd. Some gay leaBers are P'\'lllg fOul; fid:ti811 the city and its park systeqi of targeting only gay men'fuid entrapping them in the newl'St demonstration o the region's long­time hostility toward gay men and women. "It's like a wl"apon of homophobia they're wielding here in San Antonio;'' said Michael lcGowan director of the ci\,Y's Gay and Le.Qian Community Center We're really P.is~ about this. We're angry" The h1gti number of arrests prompted MCGowan and the comm ·center last week to take the unusual step of issuing a press release warning gay men planning to travel to S.in.Antoruo to rethink their trip. The center also accuses the city of entrapment and of arresting men simply for being ga} The community cen issued the strongly-worded travel warning after attempts tD negotiate with the parks department failed, t-.kGowan said, 'Unwilling to negotiate' City of S.in Antonio Parks and Recreation Department officials met with commuruty center representatives in early November and admitted that they send park rangers wearing plain clothes to more than 20 of the aty's parks specifically to make arrests based on inde­cent exposure and other related offenses. "I had the distinct feeling that [the community c~'nter] thought we were doing thL' as a moral i.s~ue," ~td Don :- Continued on Page 13 2 z w a: 0 z WESTHEIMER ROAD ...... N Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 •Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer DECEMBER 17, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE HAPPY HOLIDAYS The new milleniwn zs qmckly approaclwzg. We are kicking off Danburg Campaign 2000. I appreciate and look forward to your continued support. Please call (713) 52-Debra and sign up to volunteer . I need your help! 713.520.8068 District 512.463.0504 Capitol For Auto, Home & Health Regina Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 H11un1 /, r"n r • WorAorr Cnmprnintlon <iruup llr11ltlr • I if,. lnsura11ct' & m11d1 morr 6575 lV. l.oop So11t/1, Suite 185 Bellaire, 'IX 77401 HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 17, 1999 NEWS 3 INSIDE NEWS Around the South . . ••. . . ... . ...•..... . 5 Judge sides with schools in HIV suit .. •. . .. . 5 Bush aide soys gay GOP too critical •. ••... .5 Ky. legislature, courts to rule on gay rights lows • . • • • . • .. . .. . • . .. .. .. 5 Goy prosecutor to face well-funded challenger 5 Sheriff criticized for anti-gay views .• . ... •. 5 Around the Notion . . •.. •• .. ....•..•.• .7 Judge allows death penalty in boy's murder . .7 l.Jmy recommends discharge for legislator . . .7 \Yells forgo Bonk charged with discrimination .7 Cbunty negligent in Brandon Teena's death • .7 FDA fries to hall ahernative remedies . . . .7 Police looking for jewelty in Big Easy murder 10 Hawmi court rules against guy marriage .. 13 VOICES & ECHOES Editorial: 'Don I Ask. Don't Tell' don't wo .. 8 Alvear: LCR ~oys the ciV11 nghls doormat ... 9 l tiers Gore, Bradley 1111d lesbians .. . 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU ting wllh Simone • . . . . . .. . ... 17 Pop culture crash course . . . . .. 17 Out m Print: 'Stiffed' • . . . . • . • • . . . .... 18 Bestsellers . • .. . . . . . . • . • • . . • . ..18 Stage: Reworking Sonny ond Cher ..•.. 19 feting Oul: Plucking o ~ate in o comfy place 23 COMMUHllY CA K Pride in lull swing .. • . ...... . Post Ou!: Astronomer turned adivisl .. . mmunity Calendar . . . .. ... ... . cosions Storst .24 . . 25 .. 26 .. 27 .. 31 CLASSll:IEDS . . . . . •• BUSINBs DIRECTORY . .27 ..28 • . 30 Issue 999 A matorlal hi Hous1on Voice JS pootectecl y I ral copyrrgh1 k•w and may not be mpr • d eel wtthout lho wnrtcn =ent ol Ho n V ice The s xual onen1alion of advertiser P tographers wrctms and car100ncSI$ pt • I fled herein IS netther lnlerrnd or 1mpl1ed T o appearance of names or pcciorlal repr • s nkllmn does not necessanly nd<cato th s ual ori0111a11on of thal person 0/ per U!lon VOK:C lli:Copts unsobc1ted editor teroal but canno1 lak0 rcspoos1bchty for retciro Tho editor reserves U>e tgh! to ace rewC1 or l'd1t any submJS5100 Alf rights revert 10 authors upon plftllication Guidelrnes for lreelance tributors are avadable upoo i6QU0SI Houston. Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., SI.lite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 First Bradley, then Hillary, then Bill, then Gore The nation's Democrats line up against the military ban as a jury convicts an Army private of murdering a fellow soldier believed to be gay by LAURA BROWN Prompted by the violent murder of a sol· <lier believed to be gay, Vice President Al Gore announced Monday he would seek to overturn the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" ban on openly gay service members, meaning both Democratic presidential candidates now oppose the policy. Former Sen. Bill Bradley, Gore's oppo­nent in the Democratic primary, said in September he would work to overturn the ban. In an interview that same month, Gore said only that he supported a more "com· passionate" enforcement of DADT. Gore's announcement several days of mounting political criticism of the "Don't Ask Don't Tell" policy, including shots from President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Clinton, who has announced her intent to run for the U.S. Senate seat from New York. But Congressional Republicans and mili­tary leaders quickly warned that all the talk doesn't mean the policy faces repeal in the near future. Sen. John Warner (R-Va.), chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, told the Associated Press Tuesday that revisiting the policy should not take place "in the heated rhetoric of an election year." Warner, who backed DADT and whose committee would oversee efforts to change the policy, said he was concerned about the soldier's murder and discrimination against gays in the military. But, he added, "the wise and fair course for future congressional action, particularly in view of the profound impact of these issues on mili tary readiness," would be for Congress to "await a complete review by the next administration, and then promptly consider any specific recommendations for legislative action." On Tuesday, the White House acknowl­edged Congress was unlikely to overturn DADT, and said the admistration's "time and energy" would be better spent working to improve implementation of the policy. DADT called a 'failure' "Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Don't Pursue" was passed in 1993 as a compromise when Congress refused to support President Clinton's campaign goal of overturning the ban on gay soldiers altogether. The DADT compromise, which allows gays to serve in the military so long as they do not disclose their sexual orienta· tion or engage in homosexual acts, was designed in part to help prevent witch hunts aimed at rooting out gay soldiers. But critics have long contended the poli· cy fails to protect gay soldiers from witch· Bill Bradley, Hillary Ointon, BiD Clinton and Al Gore in recent days have all criticized the mifitary's bun on openly gay members. hunts, discrimination and harassment, and discharges of gay service members have risen every year since DADT was imple­mented- increasing from 617 in 1994 to 1,149 last year. On the campaign trail in ~cw York, Hillary Clinton told a group of gay contrib­utors Dec. 7 that she would advocate over· turning the ban on gays in the military. The First Lady, a candidate for U.S. Senate in New York, declared the policy a "failure," those attending the private fund-raiser said. On Saturday, President Clinton told CBS News he was "quite sympathetic" with his wife's views. "What I'd like to do is focus on trying to make the policy we announced back in '93 work the way it was intended to, 'cause it's way out of whack now, and I don't think any serious person can say it's not," Clinton said. On Thursday, Clinton told leading gay and lesbian Democrats during a Democratic National Committee luncheon that the best way to bring about change in the controversial policy on gays in the U.S. military was through the ballot box. "The president said we had made a lot of progress in changing attitudes in the coun· try but there was a still a long way to go," an administration official said after the closed-door question and answer session . "He urged them to get involved in winning the hearts and minds of candidates for Congress in the upcoming election cycle." A 'sobering' murder After deliberating for less than two hours Ot.>c. 8, a military jury found Anny Pvl CalVUl N. Glover, 18, guilty of premeditated murder in the July 5 death of Pfc. Barry Winchell. Winchell died after being beaten with a baseball bat as he slept in his barracks at Fort Campbell. Rumors that Winchell was gay had circulated on the base, military officials testified during Glover's trial, and he was viciously harassed in the weeks leading up to his killing. But his superiors testified that the DADT policy had inter· fered with their ability to investigate harassment against him. In a statement released Monday, Gore cited the case as the impetus for the change in his public opinion on DADT. In the wake of the murder, the Pentagon said Monday it would order an investigation at major military bases over the next 90 days to determine if gay sol­diers were being harassed But two days later, Defense Secretary William Cohen said he did not expect the Pentagon to change its controversial policy toward gay~ in the C.S. military, and e~pe­cially not during President Clinton's remaining year in office. "I do not expect the policy to be changed-certainly not during this admin· istration," Cohen said at a press conference during a \'isit to Dover Air Force Base m Delaware. But the secretary said he was determined to sec that the "()(;n't Ask, Don't Tell" poli· cy on lesbians and gays in the military be implemented fairly and that was why he ordered the Penta1;on's inspector general to conduct a spot im·estigation at major mili· tary bases on the issue. Advocates for gay senice members said they question whether the sun·ey will pro­duce valid results, since a soldier would violate the DADT policy and be subject to discharge 1ust by acknowledging their sex­ual orientation to investigators or dis· cussing harassment because of it. 'The big question is can gay people partici­pate in this survey \\ithout getting fired from their jobs," C. Dixon Osburn, co-executi\'e director of the Senicemembers Legal Defense Network in Washington, told the New York Times. "How do you trust anyone, especially at a base where an anbi;ay murder took place?" Pentagon officials said those conducting will be charged with investigating those who commit the harassment, not those who report it. Yet anything short of removing the ban won't end the discrimination, Osburn said GOP opposition George W Bush, the Republican front· runner, has said he supports the ban on openly gay sen·1ce members. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Bush's closest competitor for the GOP nomination, also supports DADT, and has critiazed Clinton and Gore for attacking the policy without discussing the issues with militarv leaders. Another GOP pr~sidential hopeful, Gary Bauer, also criticized Clinton and Gore for their views on gays in the mili­tary Tuesday during a campaign stop in New Hampshire. Bauer said the military shouldn' t be used to "try out some liber­al idea"-whether it was women in com­bat, co-ed training or allowing openly gay soldiers. "The purpose of the military 15 to win wars and defend the United States of America," he said. "It's not to be a socio­logical playground for either Bill Clinton's theories or anybody else's theories." 4 • KOLBE PROJECT ' No Dues, No Membership With Franciscan Hospitality CALENDAR Friday Dec. 17 Communion Service 10om Sunday Dec. 19 Advent Series 6pm Healing & Reconc1!1otion Monday Dec. 20 Eucharist 7;30pm Saturday Dec. 25 Merry Christmas Office closed Monday Dec. 27 Euchor•st 7 30p"'l Friday Dec. 31 New Year's Eve Office closes noon Kolbe Prayer Line 713-861-1844 e-mail: Kolbe@neosoft.com or visit our website at lrnW.neosoft.com/- kolbe PH.(713) 61-1800 • 1030 Heights Bh'd. Houston, TX lltl08 Friday Dec. 24 Christmas Eve Communion Service 1 Oom Office closes at noon NEW 2000 JEEP s299fe999 PER MONTH! C>c:::>W ....... !! 5'M>ral to Choose Pm! based on $999 dwn + $1500 rebate • 'T&L 35 pmts of $299 wilh hnal pm! of $16 369 ct 6 4% APR. 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"He was not hired because he fell for below our minimum test-score requirement. We didn't know that he was llIV {pos1ti\'C)." During a two-day trial last week, Ellsworth, 51, tried to convince Gilmore that HISD discriminated against him and violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. Ellsworth, who has a master's degree and taught in HISD for five years in the 1980s, }!aimed I IISD did know about his medical condition because a principal was aw•.ue he is gay and that his partner died of AIDS. Bush aide says Log Cabin Republicans too critical of candidate WASHINGTON-Texas Gov. George W. Bush's top campaign strategist defended the Republican presidential front runner's decision to snub leaders of the Log Cabin Republicans, asserting that the gay Republican group had been critical of Bush on several issues, the Nl"w York Times reported 0('(". 10. The strategist, Karl Rove, said the group's leaders have asked for meetings with Bush "with the stated purpose of coming in and explaining why Governor Bush is wrong on gay <1doption or why he is wrong on broadening the Texas hate-crimes bill." Rove added that the governor has "a limited amount of time, and we're just not going to set ilside right now a time to meet with [Log Cabin leaders) and talk about their dialogue," Rove said. Rich Tafel, the Log C<1bin's executive director, said Bush "has created what has become a confrontational situation. We have now heard five different reasons why they won't meet with us." An aide to Texas Gov. George W. Bush says gay Repubficans have been too critical of the GOP presidential frontrunner Kentucky legislature, federal courts to rule on gay rights laws I OUISVILl.E-Two Northern Kentucky lawmakers have announced a bipartisan push to prohibit local governments from en.1cting ordinances designed to prevent discrimination agilinst gays, the C111c11111at1 E11q11ira reported Dec. 10. Reps. Tom Kerr, a Democrat. and Joe Fischer, a Republican, say they will co-sponsor the bill during the General Assembly session that begins Jan .J. Meanwhile, the ACLU has petitioned a federal court in Louisville to join in defending against a lawsuit to overturn gay righ ts laws in Louisville and Jefferson County. Dr. J Harrett Hyman, the doctor who filed the suits, is being represented by the American Center for Law and Justice, founded by conservati\'e televangelist Pat Robertson. l lyman contends that complying with the ord inance interfrrl's with his Christian bl'liefs. The ACLU said similar religious arguments were used to fight federal and state ci\'il-rights laws in the 1960s and '70s Openly gay S.C. prosecutor to face well-funded GOP challenger Cl IARLESTON (AP)-Republican challenger Ralph l loisington has amassed a campaign war chest of more than $50,000 to run against openly gay incumbent prosecutor David Schwacke, who has accumulated only $1,600 for next June's primary. It will be Schwacke's first rl'-elec twn effort since acknowledging he is gay after he was charged with using his office compuh'r during business hours to solicit sex on the Internet. After an investigation, a grand 1ury refused to indict Schwacke. I lobington said he has no intention of making Schwacke's Sl'Xual orientation a ci1mpa1gn issue. At least two Democrats are also consider­ing entering the rnce. Sheriff criticized again for anti-gay views on county web-site FOR I' \tYFRS, Fla (AP)-Lee County Sheriff John \tc1Jougall 1s undl•r fire again for po~ting conservative per­sonal views on the officl' web-site, this timl' Wl'ighing in on the alll'gl·d murder of a tl'l'n-Jger by two gily men and China taking owr thl• P.rnama Canal. The text comp.ires the pub­licity generall'd by the death of Matthew Shepard Jnd the r.1pe, torture and murder of a 13-yeilr-old Arkans.is boy, Jesse Dirkhising, <1llcgedly ,it the hands of two gay men. "Are the libl·ral media and their pro-homoSl'Xual agl•nda trying to pl'rsuade us mto believing that a hate aime 1s only a hate crime when the victim is gay?" ~kDougall's first let­ter posted on the Internet in October criticiLl'd the ACLU, gay groups and pro-choice supporters. - from staff and wire n·110rts Florida Sheriff John McDougall has again drawn fire for post­ing his anti-gay views on the sheriff's department web-site. 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"Fun" - The Advocate "Cool Site" • Yahoo " Best online matchmaker" • HX Magazine 5 6 DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 17, 1999 NEWS Around the Nation Art<. judge pennits death penalty against gay men in boy's murder BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP)-A judge said Dec. 10 that prosecutors may seek the death penalty against two men charged with raping and killing a 13-year-old boy. Davis Carpenter, 38, and Joshua Brown, 22, are charged with capital murder and six counts of rape in the death of Jesse Dirkhising, who was found near death in the men's home at Rogers, Ark. in September. The pair is being held without bond in the Benton County jail pending their April 10 trial. At the time of Brown's arrest, he told police he had sex with the boy. Police say they were called to the men's home Sept. 26 and found Jesse nude and uncon­scious on the floor. According to court records, Brown said he and Carpenter had tied Dirkhising's hands behind his back, placed a pair of underwear in his mouth and secured it with duct tape. Brown then repeatedly raped the boy while Carpenter watched, police said An autopsy indicated Dirkhising died of positional asphyxia, the inability to breathe while in restrictive positions. A pre-trial hearing is scheduled for Jan. 13. Anny investigator recommends discharge for gay Ariz. legislator PI IOENIX (AP) ·A military investigator is recommend­ing the Army discharge a gay reserve lieutenant despite the fact that he discussed being gay in his role as an Arizona ~talc legislator and during a time when he was not on active duty. The Army began investigating Lt. Steve May, 28, after he discussed his homosexuality while addressing il lcgisliltive commitlt'C in his role as a stilte representative. "It appears the immediate commander has not an option but to rt'Commend initiation of a separation action to higher ht'.1dquartt>rs," Maj. fileen Norton wrote in her final report. If a !-t:paration hearing board votes to discharge May, the dt•dsion would have to be approved by the St-cretary of the Army, a process that could take several months. If May is ktcked out of the ,1rmy, he intends to challenge his dis­ch; irge in court, arguing the Army cannot limit his free spl't'ch rights as a civilian or interfere with his ability to rep­rL'Sl'nt his constituents as a state legislator May is also being considered for promotion to the rank of captain. Lt. Steve May plans lo sue if he's removed from the mili­tary for publicly acknowledg­ing his homosexuality during a legislative debate. Wells Fargo Bank charged with anti-gay discrimination LAS VEGAS-A gay man and his str,1ight busine:;s partner sued their former employer, Wells Fargo Bank, alleging they were forced to rL>sign after the bank discriminated against them because of the g;iy man':, sexual orientation, the I.as \'l'gas Sun reported Dec. 10. In a ft•deral lawsuit, Geoffery A Vanderpal and Michael Gordon accused Ralph Pierro, theu for­mer supervisor ;ind regional sales manager of Wl'lls Fargo Securities, of defamation, and of allegl·dly sabotaging their training and employment opportunities. The two men were hired in February as securities sales representatives and ll'ft on June 10. The lawsuit charges that Pierro v1olatl'd employment policies on sexual har,1s~ment when he allegedly referred to gays ,is "quel'rs" and made derogatory remarks concerning gay sex acts. County negligent, but small judgment in Brandon Teena's death FA1.1$ CITY l\Jeb. -A judge has awarded the mother of Brandon Teena a $17,360 judgment .1gainst tht' county for failing to ,1rrest the two men who would later kill "lel>n.l, who lived as a man, the Omaha World-1 lerald reported Dec. 8. Attorney Herbert Fnedman s,1id th;it the small award tn\'ialiZl•d Teena's dt•ath. "We're disappointed and will prob.1bly file an appeal regarding damages, but we're glad he found that the coun· t} w.1s negligent," said frit•dman. District Court Judge Orville Coady's found that the two men, John 1.ottl'r and Mar\'in "Tom" Nissl'n, bore 85 percent of the responsibility for the murder, Teena one percl'nt, and the remaining 14 percent belonged to the coun· ty. Fourtt•en percent of the $200,000 the judge ,1warded JoAnn Brandon, plus funeral expenses, equalled $17,360. Tcl'nil was one of thrl'l' people murdered New Year's E\"e 1993 in ,1 I lumboldt, /\:eb. farmhouse by l.oltl'r and Nissen, who had raped Teena a week earlier, t•nragt·d that Trena was dating local girls. The story has become the sub­ject of two films, including the .KclJimed "Boys Don't Cry." FDA tries to halt sale of alternative remedies for AIDS and cancer WAS! IINGTON (AP)-The government asked ,1 fedl•ral judge on Dec. 9 to stop sales of thrcl' altern.1li\'e reml'd1es that claim to treat cann•r and AIDS. The products include ~1CN-3, a rin•-bran extract claimed to tn•;it both cann'r and AIDS; Benefin, a form of sh.irk c,1rhlagc; and SJ...ini\nswer, a skin cream that claims to treat skin cancer. All three products .irl' from New Jcrsey-b.1sed Lane l ... ibs-t.:SA, whJCh now faces a permanent in1unclion sought by the FOA. "People should not bt' misled into thinking bogus reme· dies are going to be effecti\'c," said Dr Janet Woodcock, the FDA's drug chief. From staff and wire. reparls Selling your life insurance •I S a decision When yO\,'re gay, lving w lh HIV and It-inking of se!lng you lfe 1nsLKOnce.1hol.ldn'I you be g"'en o foce-to-foce consullohon 1n o no-p!'essl.l'e. noobigo•.oo envJonmenl~ Shouldn't this option be discussed Unked V10lical Benefits 8 praud ta be the only gay °":ied and ooeroted V10tico1 broke- with o 10co1 office"' Hou>' on. A Her al we oeleve tn pr(M(fong y011 lhe pmonol o!lerlian you deSerVe and gelltng yo., lhe mosl money n the lh0'1es1 1"'1e! 3701 Krtly Drive Sv!e 1036 tlous1on, TX 77098 7'3 528 6777 e-mo 1tx'<;hotmo com t~lefed In Texas Membef ol National Viatical Auoclatlan Call I ·800-275·3090 today! LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS Catch the Bering Spirit-A Place for Everyone _.a)f&.. BERING MEMORIAL v .,tr' U"llTED METHODIST CHURCH A Reco11ci/i11g Co11gregatio11 Whl•rc persons - n•gardless of sexual orcntation, gender, ethrunty, or age· fully parllapate m lhe church's lift Jnd mu•"tr .• ·" lo\'t'CI disaplcs of Chnst. - NEW EARLY SERVICE - Sunday WorslriJI ...................... 8:30a.111. S1111tit1y School ......................... 9:4-0a.111. S111ul<>y l!\'orsl1i11 .................... 10:50a.111. Rev. :\ianlyn ~leekt·r-Wilhams, Pastor 1440 Harold at ~lulberry • (713) 526-1017 www.benngumc.1lrg 184S - 1998 Celebrating I~ Years of Sl'rving, Sharing and Caring 7 8 Asso ciate Publish er Mike Fleming mike houstonvo1ce.com Editor Matthew A. Hennie ed11orOhoustonvooce.com Production Bethany Bartran - Graphic Designer Mike Swenson - Graphic Designer Contributors Rich Arensch1eldt. Kay Y Daym, Trayce Diskin. Earl Dittman. D L Groover, Robert B. 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We reserve the right to edit for content and length We will withhold names upon request. but you must inc i.de your name and phone number for wrfficatton Please send mail to Houston Vol(e, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006, fax 013) 521)-9531 or ~ail to ed1torOhouston voice com Op1n1om expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice VOICES AND ECHOES DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Ask, Don't Tell' don't work It was a remarkable week for gay and lesbian Americans, as three of the nation's most powerful political figures announced within a few days span that the seven-year­old policy called "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" didn't work and ought to be 1unked. Ever since a newly-elected President Clinton first felt political heat for his cam­paign promise to end the ban on gays in the military, we have searched in vain for a voice in the White House that would make our c.ise to the Amencan people. Instead, the Clinton-Gore administra­tion, terrified the new president's "hon­eymoon" would be squandered, caved to conservattves from both parties m Congress Most Democrats, including admrnistrallon lapdogs like Barney Frank, accepted the resulting compro­mise, an unpnnc1pled beast c.illed "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." Seven years of compelling constitu­honal challenges left the policy largely in tact. Lower federal Judges would strike OADT down as a v10lahon of equal pro­tect10n and the First Amendment, only to see more consen·ative appeal courts restore the policy. deferring to Congre:.s on milit.iry matters. Seven years of painstaking evidence­gathering from an unsung gay rights lobby called the Servicemembers Legal Defense 1etwork laid out in detail how the policy, which was supposed to have facilitated closeted service by gay men and lesbians, h.is in fact resulted in harassment, witch hunts and a steady increase in discharges. Memories of the 1993 political nightmare shll fresh m their minds, the Clinton-Gore administration did nothing in the face of SLl)>J's evidence except apprO\'e a report that suggested the rise in discharges came about because of fake claims of homosexu­ality, like that claimed by Corporal Klinger on "M•A•s•H." Only in the last 12 months has the Defense Department made any significant promises to improve DADT enforcement and correct abuses. Those efforts were too little and too late for Pvt. Barry Winchell. After weeks of vicious abuse from his squadron-harass­ment that a fellow soldier testified was enjoyed as "good fun" by all-Winchell was bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by another soldier embarrassed that a homo had bested him in a fist fight; a fight Winchell had not started If there were any doubt that DADT and 1ts proponents share some blame for Winchell's death, it was removed by further testimony, from a sergeant overseeing Winchell's unit, who said he was advised that under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," he could do nothmg about anti-gay harJssment. It was the blood of Barry Winchell, much like the scarecrow image of M.itthew Shepard before him, that finally moved offi­cial Washington. Or was it electoral politics? Hillary Clinton came first. Appearing before a gay group, she called for the repeal of DADT. "There are already gay and Jes· bian Americans who serve with distinction in the military. They should be able to do so without discnmination and harassment," she would say two days later The president, put on the defensive by I Iillary's attack and making note of Winchell's murder, took the unusual t.ict of cond!.'mning his own policy, admitting "it's wav out of whack now, and I don't think any senous person can s.iy it's not." Then along came the vice president, who up to this point had only gone so far as to urge a more "compassionate enforcement" of DADT, sounding every bit like the "com­passionate conservative" leading the polls for the GOP presidential nomination. By Gore was soon boxed in on DADT. His opponent, Bill Bradley, had voted against DADT in 1993 and had forcefully restated during the fall campaign his belief that gays should be allowed to serve open­ly in the military. Even Barney Frank, und!.'r questioning from :vtichelangelo Signorile, called for the veep to reconsider his stand. Finally Gore relented, returning to the position his aides claim he had argued behind closed doors at the White House since 1993. "In light of the Winchell case and other evidence," Gore said on Monday, "I believe the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy should be eliminated Gays and lesbians should be allowed to serve their country without discrimination." The dominoes had fallen, and the Democrats were on board. The Republicans, meanwhile, are staying quiet but standing firm. No GOP candid,1te for president favors repealmg DADT, except that several would reinstate an outright ban on service by gays. That means the debate over DADT is far from over, especially since President Clinton has again decided he's got no political capital to expend on behalf of gay civil rights, even when 1t costs lives. The White House announced late Tuesday that although DADT was broken, Clinton would prefer tinkering with it to facing down Republicans in Congress. That's the political cowardice we\·e come to expect over seven painful years of rhetoric without action- at least where It might have a political cost. Can we expect bett!.'r from the likes of Gore and Bradl!.'y, not to mention Hillary Rodham Clinton? Will they put our case to the American people, or will they restate their position and hope the conversation changes, the way the president has to date? If they choose the latter course, they will deserve the inevi table criticism that their position on DADT is political pandering, a bone to throw to an important Democratic party constituency. It's the same sort of special interest poli­tics that Republicans have practiced for years with the religious right: talk a good game, do little, and remind them they've got nowhere else to go with their vot6. Or will they step up to the challenge and stare down the opposition' Only time will tell whether our new champions will put our case to the people with that much force. But there's more rea­son than ever for hope. In their first debate, at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, Bradley and Gore both made eloquent appe,1ls to the cause of gay nghts, putting our cl,1im to a place at the table in the historical context of other proud civil rights b.ittles. lhose hvo New Hampshil\' speeches went miles down the road first trod by candidate Clinton eight ymr:; ago. With luck, we'll move even further down that road, and be tre.1ted to more weeks like we have sem recently. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 10, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT Log Cabin Republicans play the civil rights doormat by MIC! IAEL Al VEAR Beating up on the Log Cabm Republicans 1s addicti\'e. Like eating potato chips, you can't iust stop at one punch. 1 foci guilty, though, because the organization does a certain amount of good In a lurching, I rankenstem sort of way. Recently, LCR's Georgia chapter was instrumental in throwing a fund-raiser for George W. Bush. Attendees estimated that as much as 80 percent of the crowd was gay. Yet the speakers, including U.S. Sen. Paul Coverdell (R-Ga.), never once acknowledged that fact; never once uttered the word "gay"; and never once addressed a single gay issue, pro or con. Coverdell appeared again at Georgia LCR's Dec. 1 meeting, and again he never uttered the g-word. What kind of a loser do you have to be to give your money to a candidate that won't even acknowledge your existence? What kind of doormat would sit at a function and not ask the recipients of tens of thousands of dollars to acknowledge the contributor's presence? I've had LETTERS cheap tricks before, but ne\'er anyone willing to bend over so quickly. Well, not without dinner, anvwav. George W. Bush has gone 'on ;ecord saying he won't e\'en meet with Log Cabin Republicans, and that he would not appoint anyone to his administration if he knew they were gay. So what d()('s LCR do? Throw a party for him. A friend once told me that the Republican philosophy can be summed up in a two-sentence cheer-" Hooray for me1 fuck you!" If that's true, the Log Cabin cht'er should be "Hooray for them! Fuck us1" LCR should be taken to the woodshed. Or we could whack them right where they are, since their pants are perpetually around their ankles anyway. Though 1 don't consider myself con­servative or Republican, I actually believe in LCR's mission. I've given them money, supported their concept (if not its execution), and I believe Rich Tafel, the LCR national executive director, is one of the most articulate spokesmen of the gay movement, conservative or liberal. In a way, LCR is poised to make more important gains for gays than groups on the Left. Republicans are in control of the House and Senate. Loathing and re\'iling them makes for good sport, but poor strategy Even if the Democrats v.in back both hou,es, we're still left v. 1th a big prob­lem- no relatmnship with half of the US power base. And that's where lCR comes m. Common sense, which is a completely foreign concept to the I dt, 1s an LCR tenet: The best way to !>lop your enemy is to make him your friend. But whate\·er horse sense Rich Tafel and his well-intentioned band of neo­cons started out with, they fritter it away with some of the most asinine strategic moves I've seen since the Left burdened us with the weight of "LGBTQ." The Left may be a bunch of disrespect­ful, back-biting PC mongers who prefer perpetual victimhood over incremental victory, but at least they've managed to hold on to their dignity. Sort of. Moderating the Republican party through dialogue and influence 1s an admirable goal. Giving up your dignity in the process is not. LCR's preferred strategy in the face of abuse and ingrati­tude is silence. It's their version of "Don't Prosecutors should prosecute, not advocate umented and should' have been more accu­rately reflected in this editorial. kept rather mum about Bradley's ex1Stence and his plans for comprehensive gay rights To the I:d1tor: We fervently disagrt·e with the Ho11sto11 Voice's editorial expressing displeasure with the outcome of the Matthew Shepherd trial ("The defense got it nght in the Shepard case," l\m'. 12). The Ho11sto11 Voice unnecessarily criticized prosecutor Cal Rl'ru(ha for making the trial more about "a robbery gone bad" than the fact that 1t was an anti·gay hate crime. There was a logical reason for this. A prosecutor's )Ob is to pros­ecutl' and pursue justice, not be a gay rights advocate. A guilty \'erd1ct that assures McKinney will never ll',1\'e prison and have the oppor­tunity to terrorize another Matthew Shepherd should not bother the Ho11sto11 Voice. McKinney was punished to the fullest extent of the law, justice was ser\'ed and for this we are grateful. It is clear that any would-be gay basher who saw the out­come would realize that there is a heavy price to pay for his or her actions. This point is incontrovertible Perhaps the most specious part of the editorial is the section that accuses gay organizations of "whitewashing" the hate thilt killed Matthew Shepherd HRC has addressed this fact in every maier media outlet m the nation. We have produced two television public service announcements with Judy Shl·pard and ha\e held numer­ous press conferences to lobby for hate crime legislation where we discussed Matthew Shepherd's sexual orientation. I IRC's outspokenness on the Shepard mur­der ilS an anti-gay hate crime is clearly doc- Anabd £. Evora Human Riglzts Campaign Bradley bests Gore but gets no respect To thl• Editor: l'rrsidl'nhal candidate Bill Bradley has the best stands on gay bsues in this election and possibly in the history of presidential politics. Democratic ri\·al Al Gore places a dLstant sec­ond. ("Gore, Bradley spar over gay rights," news, Nov. 26). Bradley proposes non-discrimination in employment, housing. and public accommo­dallons; GorL~mployment only. Bradky's health care program specifically prov1dl'S for gay and lesbian families; Gore':-, to tl1e b0.it of my research, d0t.>s not. Although, neithN candidate supports gay marriage, Bradley proposes ugay unions" with all the benefits and rights of marriage; Gore's DP plan is still being fonnulated. With these stellar gay positions, you would think Bradley would be welcomed with open arms by our gay and lesbian leadership. It's been quite the opposite, however. Rep. Barney Frank publicly bashes Bradley over differences on how to achieve gay civil rights, our national organizations simply ignore Bradley, and the Human Righb Campaign misrepresents him in com­parison to Gore on its web-site. Just as our national organizations have not informed us about the other gay civil rights bill currently in Congress, e\·en though it would grant full civil rights. so too have they This silence contrast.~ sharply with pre\ious Democratic primaries, when the same organi1.ations made sure e\·ery candidate's pro-gay statements were publicized from coast to coast. Most disturbing howe\·er, HRC's web-site comparing Y2K presidential candidates on gay bsues fails to mention most of Bradley's pnrgay positions, and then suggest~ Gore IS the better candidall• on gay L'5UCS. Attacking a prcrgay candidate, inaccurate­ly l'l.'portmg his p~itims, silencing his mL'!i­s. 1gc, or just plain pretending he doesn't exist are all strategies we might exf)L~t from our right-wing adversaries, but certainly not from our friends and Icade~. Don George Atla11t.1 Lesbicm club opens its doors To the Editor: Recent critimm of a policy at Club Rainbow has promptl'CI my businL~" paruwr and I to offer an explanation of our intent to ameliorate the misunderstanding. We would like to clarify that we do not hate men in any capacity. We strongly belie\'e Ask, Don't Tell " Don't ask the Republicans to acknowledge you, and they don't have to tell anyone they did. It doesn't bother me that Sen CO\erdell, who's ne\·er ~en a gay issue he didn't vote down, addres~ed an LCR meeting I applaud it. It's the begmning of construch\ e dialogue. What bothers me 1s that the lCR lead­ership doe.~n't pull him aside and sa}~ "Look, I know we're miles apart on many bsues but even Arafat acknowledged brae!\ right to exist. We don't expect you to come out swinging for ENDA and against DOMA, but we do expect you to at least say the word 'gay' and express some gratitude to the gay community for its support of Republican causes." It seems like such a pitiful thing to ask for in exchange for the hundreds of thou­sands of dollars that gay Republicans donate to the party. But LCR apparently doesn't behe\'e it can rise to the level of pity. ~1ichael Al\'ear lives with his liberal boyfriend, his libertanan Labrador and republican Viszla, who refuses to acknowledge him when he gets fed. He can be reached at mikealvear@aol.com in the concept of unity. It was never our intention to discnminate or offend anyone in the community Club Rainbow's tagline "Exclusively for C.ay \\'omen" was ongmated for two rrosons: Marketing. It was our intent to inform the les­bian community that there was an establish­ment that cate~ to their niche Safety. From the club's mception we wanted to ensure that \\e prm1ded a 1><1fe em1ronment where les­bians could conpesate and sooa!.ize ,,,thout fear of har~ment from het<'rosexual males \\ho prey on lesbian women. While our methodology in obtaining our goals may s.."'em msensiti\'e, we a sure you it was merely na1\·ete If we had the fores1i;ht to comprehend the brouhaha that has ensued, I assure you we would have conwy,•d our message in a different manner Consequently, we ha\·e a taken steps to accomplish our goals and maintam a Sl'.'mblance of commuruty unity. Ke...tJ m nund that we are nonces m the realm of O\mmg and operating a nightclub. It b our first foray into the world of busme:-_.;. Although Club Rainbow is a lesbian establbh­mrnt, we have retired our tagline becau..-e we welcome any and all patrons who are willing to respt>et the clientele of our establishment. Alexis Wa,;ifiuldm Club Rainrow 10 NEWS DECEMBER 17, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Police looking for jewelry in New Orleans murder case by ~1ELINDA SHELTO:-.J :\EW ORLEA:"iS--Almost a month after fnends discovered the body of L.5t..: profes­sor David Sexton m his comfortable Bayou St. John home, police still have no solid leads in the puzzling case.' Sexton, 51, was found ov. 22 just ms1de his front door, st.ibbed at least 16 tames by .i perpetrator pohce believe may h.ive been mjured m a struggle with Sexton There were no signs of forced entry mto Sexton's 1 lagan Avenue home, but police now say they believe several pieces of 1ew­elry are m1ssmg from Sexton's home. Also m1ssmg are Sexton's wallet and keys, although his car was found m hb driveway. Pohce released a photograph of bracelets similar to that Sexton and a friend, Steve Loria, bought on a trip to Greece in September. The photograph shows several bracelets with distinctive Greek designs in multi-toned metals. Police also released the drawing of an ornate cross that is mbsing from Sexton's home The cross hung on a rope cham and may h;ive a c1rculJr design s1mi!Jr to a crown of thorns, although friends could not s;iy for sure, said \Jew Orleans Police Department Oct. lim Allen. uWe've had no new developments in the case," Allen s.i1d, "We're hoping someone will see this jewelry and maybe remember seeing someone weanng something s1mil.ir, or trying to sell it. And maybe a pawn shop owner will recognize it and remember who tried to sell it or did sell it." The grisly murder of Sexton, a distm­gu1shed scholar and researcher in early childhood development at the I.SU 1 lealth Sciences Center, has left police, family and friends baffled. Followmg an autopsy, Orleans Parish Coroner Dr Frank Mmyard determined that Sexton died ~ometime after 1:30 a.m. on Nov. 20. He "aid Sexton suffered long, deep gashes to his arms, suggesting that he attempted to fend off his attacker. days of newspapers on the porch, saw his car in the driveway, but still got no answer at the door, she called Loria. Loria and Scott retrieved a set of extra house keys, unlocked a security gate, and found bloodied footprints on the porch. When they unlocked the front door, they found Sexton's body on the other side m a pool of blood. Loria descnbed his friend of a dozen years as tall, 6-3, and physically fit. "He must have put up quite a struggle," he told l.\11'ACT News. Mm yard also said he believes Sexton was killed "by someone who knew Sexton and who he let in his house [or] possibly returned with to his home. This was not a random murder." I.aria and another friend, Randy Scott, were the last known people to ha~e seen Sexton before the murder. The trio went to dmner and a play on Friday, Nov. 19, and ended the evening with cocktails at the Friendly Bar, a smaU, neighborhood estab­lishment in the Marigny. Police fanned out across the Marigny and into the French Quarter, targeting gay bars Sexton occasionally frequented . Allen said that thus far no one rl•members seeing Sexton after he dropped off Loria and Scott Authorities mitially released limited mformation about the perpetrator, saying it was possible he was injured New Orleans police released a drawing of an ornate cross that is missing from David Sexton's home. The cross hung on "We think he may have been injured in the course of the struggle," Allen said He said the person could have had cuts or scratches to the face, head, neck and arms, and may have gone "underground" for a few days after the attack or may have been seen wearing bandages. a rope chain and may have a circular design similar to a crown of thorns. Sexton was murdered Nov. 22. Afterwards, Sexton dropped the two off at their homes near his at about I a.m., and Loria said he assumed Sexton was turning in for the night. By releasing new information about the bracelets and cross, Allen said police hope to develop leads to a suspect. !..SU Health Sciences Center m New Orleans. He was co-director of the E.irly Intervention Institute at the center's Human Development Center, and once served as head of the UNO ~pt.'Cial education department, friends said When Sexton failed to appear at a meet­mg that Monday morning, Nov. 22, a col­le. 1gue first repeatedly called and then went to Sexton's home. When she found three Sexton was a researcher and professor in the School of Allied I-te;ilth Professions at l le was nationally recognized as an expert in early childhood development and was president of the Council for Exceptional Children's Division of Early Childhood. S an Antomo is a speaal place during the holidays. It's transformed mto an exotic mix of festive charm and extraordinary hospitality Virtually something new and different to enjoy every day and night. The Plaza San Antonio dearly captures this spirit. You'll appreaatc our attentive, 4 Diamond service. The ambiance of superb dining, including extravagant Holiday Brunches. A n..'Sort atmosphere where you'll find a soothing massage followed by a warm, complimentary terry robe waiting in your lavish gucstroom and oh, so much more We cordially 1mitc you to experience San Antonio·s holiday st.-ason at a very speaal value. The Plaz,1.Just steps from the Riverwalk and the only downtown resort for the holidays. 0 N LY $79 Per Room Per Night (lnclutks U~thnds} Ta can. Spocc .mibblc Otra cn.i. t2!1Vl'I Snnr bb.;...r d.rrs .apply No! vaid"' - A MAAAIOlT HOTEL Toll-Free Reservations (800) 727-3239 555 South Alamo Street • San Anto1110, TX 78205 ... (210) 229-1000 •·•~•• www.plazasa.com Riverwalk Holiday Festival Nov 28 I.In. 1. Ovtr 60,000 lights illummatt the Rivt rwalk. Fiesta de Las Lumenariao O.C.S·7, ll·14, & 19 21 from S pm to 10 pm. Thousands of luminary candl" lint th• Riverwalk. Riverwalk Holiday Arts Fair Otc.10· 12. Art1"1n1 and aaft>mtn dolf'Wy tht or wa,.s .Jong tilt Rovtrwalk. ·coppelia" Ot<. 10-ll Prtwnttd by San AntOlllo Mttropolitan BaHtt "A Very Merry Pops• Ot<.17 18 Spon10<td bytht San Antanio Symphony ii Maj" tic Thtatrt. "The Nutcracker" Ot< 17 · 19 Pffiormtd by th• Tuas 8alltt Conctrto at LI~ Codrtll Thtatrt. Plus many more festivities! ~~reholiday ~ information V . www.expressnews.com www.woofbyte,tom/\anc111tonio/ HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 17, 1999 WHAT YOUR PROTEASE INHIBITOR CAN BE: VIRACEPT IS POWERFUL It's tough on HIV. 1n many people, VIRACEPT lowered the amount of HIV in the blood to levels below the limit of detection of the test used, and substantially increased CD4 cell counts after 24 weeks of triple combination for the treatment of HIV mfection when anti-HIV drug therapy is warranted It is not yet known whether taking VIRACEPT will help you live longer or reduce the number of infections or other illnesses that can occur with HIV Some corimon therapy. (The clinical significance of changes in viral ried1cat1ons and some HIV related medications RNA levels in blood has not been established. The virus may still be present in other organ systems.) VIRACEPT IS EASY TO LIVE WITH Take it three VIRACEPT nelfinavir mesylate should not be taken with VIRACEPT. For some people, protease inhibitors have been associated tablets and oral powder with the onset or worsening of diabetes mellitus times a day with your normal meals or light snacks. VIRACEPT IS GENERALLY WELL TOLERATED People treated with VIRACEPT may experience some side effects; the most common is diarrhea of moderate or greater Intensity in 20% of people In clinical trials. VIRACEPT WORKS It's Indicated *IMS NPA Prescription Data 8/98 - 5/99 and hyperglycemia, and with increased bleeding in patients with hemophilia. Ask your doctor. For more information, call toll free 1-888-VIRACEPT or visit www.agouron.com. .-~ ! (Refer to the important miormavon on the O!lt page) 11 12 VIRACEPT nelfinavir rnesylate w d c- r Information for Patients About VIRACEPT9 (Vl-ra-cept) Generic Name: nelfinavir (nel·FIN-na-veer) mesylate For the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Please read this 111!ormation carefully before taking VIRACEPT. Also, please read this leaflet each time you renew the prescnptiOn, just In case anything has changed nus 1s a summary and not a replacement for a careful dtSCuss on with your doctor. You and your doctor should discuss VIRACEPT when you start tilt no this med1caticn and at regular checkups. You should remain under a docto(s care when laking VIRACEPT and should not chanoe or stop treatment without rust tall< no with your doctor WHAT IS VlRACEPT AHO HOW DOES IT WORK? VIRACEPT is usell in the treatment of people with human Immunodeficiency wus (HIV) lnlsct1on. lnlectiOn with HIV leads to the destruction ol CD4 T cells, which are important to the immune system. After a large number ol C04 cells have beln destroyed, the Infected person develops acquired unmune deficiency svndrome (AIDS). VIRACEPI worlcs by bloelcng HIV protease (a protein-cuttmg enzyme). which 1s required tor HIV to multiply. VIRACEPT has beln shown to significantly reduce the amount of HIV 111 lhe blood You should be aware, however, Iha! the effect of VIRACEPT on HIV in the blood has not been correlated with long· term health benefits. Patients wbo took VIRACEPT also had signtfteant increases m their CD4 cell count VlRACEPT is usually bhn together with other antiretrovlral drugs such as Retrovi,. (z1dovudlne, AZT), EpM,. (lamivud1ne, 3TC), or Zent" jslavuduie, d4T). Talong VIRACEPT m combination .with other antiretrowal drugs reduces the amount o HIV In the body (Viral load) and raises CD4 counts VJRACEPT may be tllten by adults, adolescents, and children 2 years of age or older. Studies in infants younger than 2 years of age are now talung place. DOES VIRACEPT CURE HIV OR AIDS? VJ RACE Pl •s not a cure for HIV infection or AIDS. The long-term effects of VIRACEPT are not known at this bme. People laking VIRACEPT mar sttll develop opportunislle infecbons or other condrt1ons associated with HIV infection. Some o these cond1bons are pneumonia. herpes Virus infections. Myrobactenum avwm complex (MAC) infections, and Kaposi's sartoma. It Is not known whether VIRACEPT will help you live longer or reduce the number of infections or other illnesses that may OCCIJr. There ts no proof that VIRACEPT can reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to others through sexual contact or blood contammat1on. WHO SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT TAKE VIRACEPT7 Together with your doctor, you need to decide whether VIRACEPT 1s appropriate for you. In making your decision. tile following should be considered: All1f11111: H you have bad 1 serious allef11IC raaalon to VlRACEPT, you must not take VIRACEPT. You should ilso mlorrn youf doctor, nurse, or pharmaCtSt of any known allergies to substances such as other med1cmes. foods. preservatives. or dyes. H you arw prwgnant The eHects of VIRACEPT on pregnant women or !hear unborn babies are not rJ;mF./Jr!°u are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, you should tell your doctor before laking If you arw braast-feedlng; You should discuss with your doctor the best way to feed your baby You should be aware that H your baby does not already have HIV. there 1s a chance that rt can be transmitted through breast-feeding. Women should not breast-feed II they have HIV. Childrwn: VIRACEPT is available for the treatment of children 2 through 13 years of age with HIV There is a powder form of VIRACEPT that can be mixed with mtlk. baby formula. or foods ltke pudding. lnstructJons on how to lake VIRACEPT powder can be found in a later section that discusses how VIRACEPT Oral Powder should be prepared. H you ~aY1 liv1r diuau: VIRACEPT has not been studied 1n people with liver disease II you have liver drsease. you should ten your doctor before !along VIRACEPT. Otlttr medical problems: Certain medical problems may affect ttie use of VIRACEPT. Some people taking protease tnh1brtors have developed new or more senous diabetes or high blood sugar. Some people with hemophilia have had increased bleeding It Is not known whether the protease 1nh1bttors caused tllese problems Be sure to ten your doctor If you have hemophitia types A and 8, diabetes men tus, or an Increase In thirst and/or frequent urinallon. CAN VlRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER MEDICATIONS? VlRACEPT may Interact with other drugs, Including those you take without a prescription You must dlSCUSS with your doctor any drugs that you are laking or are planning to take before you tllte Vi RACE PT. Dnigs you should 11ot take with VIRACEPT; • Seklarie" (terlenad1ne, for allergies) • Hismanal" (astemtZole. for allergies) • Proputstd" (cisapride, for heartburn) • Cordarone" (arrnodarone, for irregular heartbeat) • Ou mdtne (for lfregular heartbeat), also known as Oulnaglute~Cardioqu1n~Oumide~and others • Ergot denvatiVes (Calergot" and others, for migraine headache) • HaJcion• (trlazolam) • Versed9 (midazolam) Taking the above drugs with VIRACEPT may cause serious and/or ltte-threatenmg adverse events • Rttampm (tor tuberculosis). also known as R1mactane". Rrlad1n", R1tate,., or R1famate• Thts drug reduces blood levels of VIRACEPT. 00111'9duaion raquirtd II you t1k1 VIRACEPT with: MycoblJ!Jn" (ntabutm, for MAC); you will need to lake a tower dose of Mycobut1n. A dlanoe of lll1rapy should be cansld119d II you '" bking VIRACEPT with: • Phenol>arb1lal • Phenytom (01lantin" and others) • Cart>amazep1ne (Tegretol" and otliers) These agents may reduce the amount of VIRACEPT In your blood and mak! rt less effective • Oral contraceptr;es ("the pd!") H you are tilting lite p1U to prevent pregnancy, you should use a different type of contraceplion since VIRACEPT may reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptJvaS HOW SHOULD VlRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER ANTI-HIV DRUGS? Taking VIRACEPT together with other anti-HIV drugs Increases their abifrty to fight tile Virus It alSO reduces the opportunity for resistant viruses to grow Based on your htStory of taking other anti-HIV medtetne. your doctor will direct you on how to lake VIRACEPT and other anti-HIV medteines These drugs should be taken in a certain order or at specific times. This will depend on how many times a day each med1C1ne should be taken. It will also depend on whether It should be taken wrth or witMut food Nucleosld11nalogu11: No drug interaction problems were seen when VIRACEPT was given wrth: • Retrow (z1dovud1ne. AZT) • EpMr (lamr;udme. 3TC) • Zent (slavudine. d4n • Vid~(didanosine. ddl) II you are bking botfl Vld11 (ddl) and VIRACEPT: Videx should be taken wrthout food, on an empty stomach. Therefore, you should lake VIRACEPT with food one hour after or more than two hours before you take Vldex. Na•nucteoside reverse tnnscripl111 Inhibitors (NNRTls): When VIRACEPT is taken together with: • Viramurie" (nev1rap1ne) The alllOIJnt of VIRACEPT m your blood may be reduced Studies are now laking place to tum about the safety of combining VIRACEPT with V1ramune. • Otlter NNRTls VIRACEPT has not been stud ed With other l<NRTls. DECEMBER 17, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Other prot1111 lnhlblto11: When VIRACEPT <S taken together with: • Criluvan• (1ndinav11) The amount of both drugs in your blood. may be Increased Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. • Norm"' (rrtonavlr) The amount of VIAACEPT In your blood may be Increased Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combinalton. • lnvlrase" (saquinav11) The amount of saquinaVlr in your blood may be increased. If used m combination with saquinavlr hard gelatin capsules at 600 mg three times daily. no dose adjustments are needed. Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF VIRACEPT? Like all medicines. VIRACEPT can cause side effects. Most of the side effects experienced with VIRACEPT have been mild to moderate. Diarrhea Is the most common side effect in people taking VIRACEPT, and most adult patients had at least mild diarrllea at some point dunnQ treatment In clinical studies, about 20% of patients receMng VIRACEPT 750 mo (three tablets) three times daily had four or more loose stools a day. In most cases, diarrhea can be controlled using ant1diarrheal medicines, such as lmodium• A-0 (loperamide) and others. which are available without a prescription. Othel side effects that occurred m 2% or more of palients receMng VIRACEPT include abdominal pain, aslhenia, nausea, flatutence. and rash There were other side effects noted In cUnlcal studies that occurred In less than 2% of patients receMng VIRACEPT. However, these side effects may have been due to other drugs that patients were taking or to the illness 1tsen. Except tor diarrhea. there were not many differences In SJde effects In patients who took VI RACE PT along with other drugs compared with thOse who took only the other drugs. For a complete list of side effects, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist HOW SHOULD I TAKE VIRACEPT? VIRACEPT 1s available only with your doctor's prescription. The light blue VIRACEPT Tablets should be taken three times a day. VIRACEPT shoutd always be taken with a meal or a light snack. You do not have to lake VIRACEPT exactly every 8 hours Instead. you can lake rt at normal limes when you are eating Tak• VIRACEPT 11actly 11 dl1'9ded by your doctor. Do not Increase or decrease any dose or the number of doses per day. Also, lake this medtelne for the exact period ol time that your doctor has instructed. Do not stop taking VIRACEPT without first consulting with your doaar, even If you are feeling belier. Only lake medicine that has been prescribed specd1cally for you. Do not grve VIRACEPT lo others or take medicine prescribed for someone else The dosmg of VIRACEPT may be d1Herent for you than for other patients. Fallow the dl19alons from your doaar, 111aly 11 written an the label. The amount of VIRACEPT m the blood should remain somewhat consistent over bme. M1SS1ng doses will cause the concentration of VIRACEPT to decrease; therefore. you should not mist any doses. Howt"er. if you miss a dose, you should lake the dose as soon as possrble and then lake your next scheduled dose and future doses as onginally scheduled. D01ing I• adults (Including chlldran 14[1111of1g1 and older) The recommended adutt dose of VIRAC PT is 750 mg (three tablets) taken three limes a day. Each dose should be taken with a meal or light snack. Dosing 11 children 2 through 13 y1111 of age The VIRACEPT dose in children depends on their weight The recommended dose is 20 to 30 mg/kg (or 9 to 14 mg/pound) per dose. taken three trmes daily wrtn a meal or light snack. This can be administered either In tablet form or. in children unable to lake tablets. as VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Dose lnstrucbons will be provided by the ch1kfs doctor The dose will be given three bmes daily using the measunng scoop provided, a measuring teaspoon. or one or more tablets depending on the weight and age of the child. The amount of oral powder or tablets to be grven to a child is descnbed in the chart below Pediatric Dose to Be Administered Three Times Dally Body W•iglit Number Number Number aflntl ofln•I of Kg Lb Scoops• TtllpoonS' Tabltts 7 10 < 8.5 15.5 to <18.5 4 8.S to <10.5 18.5 to <23 5 . l'/4 10.5 to <12 23 to <26.5 6 l'h 12 to <14 26.5 to <3 t H• 14 10 <t6 31 to <35 8 2 16 10 <18 35 to <39.5 9 21/4 18 10 <23 39.5 to <.50.S 10 2'h ~3 ~50.5 15 3¥· In measur111g oral powder. the scoop or teaspoon should be level. • 1 level scoop contains 50 mg of VIRACEPT. Use only the scoop provided with your VIRACEPT bottle. 1 1 level teaspoon contains 200 mo of VIRACEPT_ N'ote A measuring teaspoon used for dispensing medication should be used for measunno VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Ask your pharmacist to make sure you have a medication dispensing teaspoon. How should VIRACEPT Oral Powd1r bt p11p119d? The oral powder may be mixed with a small amount of water. milk, formula. soy formula. soy milk, dietary supplements, or dairy foods such as pudding or ice cream. Once mixed, the entire amount must be taken to obtain the fuQ dose. Do not mix the powder wrth any acidte food or jutee, such as orange or grapefruit juice, apple juice, or apple sauce, because this may create a bitter laste. Once the powder 1s mrxed. It may be stored at room temperature or refrigerated for up to 6 hours. Do not heat the mur.ed dose once 11 has been prepared. Do not add water to bottles of oral powder. VIRACEPT powder is supplied with a scoop for measunng For help lfl determining the exact dose of powder for your child, please ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. VIRACEPT Oral Powder conlams aspartame, a low-calone sweetener, and therefore should not be tllten by children with phenylketonuria (PKU). HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE STORED? Keep VIRACEPT and an other med!Cines out of the reach of children. Keep bottle closed and store at room temperature (_between 59°F and 86°F) away lrom sourtes of moisture such as a sink or other damp place. Heat and moisture may reduce the eHectiveness ot VIRACEPT. Do not keep medteme that is out of date or that you no longer need. Be sure that d you throw any medicine away, 1t Is out of the reach of children. Discuss all questions about your health with your doctor. If you have questions about VIRACEPT or any olher medication you are taking. ask your doctor, nurse. or pharmacist. You can also call 1.888VIRACEPT (1.888.847.2237) toll free. The following are registered trademarks of thear respective manufacturers: Relrovlr, Eplv1r/Glaxo WeJlcome Oncology/HIV; Zent. Videx/Bnstol-Myers Squibb Oncology; l11V1rase. Versed/Roche Laboratones Inc; Seldane, R1fadin, R1famate, R1fater/Hoechst Marion Roussel; . H1smanal. Propuls1d/Janssen Pllarmaceut1ca Inc; Halcron, MycobuliNPharmacia & Up1ohn Co; R1mactane. TegretoVC1baGeneva Pharmaceu!Jcals; V1ramune/Roxane Laboratories. Inc; D1Jantm/Parke-Dav1s; C11x1van1Merck & Co. Inc; lmod1umA·D/McNeU Consumer Products Co. CordaronelWYeth-Ayerst Laboratories; OumaglutefBerlex la!>Oratories. Card1oqu1rvThe Purdue Frederick Co, OulnrdexlA.H. Robins Co. Inc; CafergoVNovart1s Pharmaceuticals Corp t>omr 1s a trademark of Abbott Laboratories Issued 11113197 CALL 1.W.VlRACEPT VIRACEPT I& a rwglsUrtd trlOlmlrt at Agour-on -·ln C Copyright 01199 Agou""' -.In c w. "°"" raeMd •--<......,. La Jolla. Caldomia. 92037, USA HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 NEWS 13 Hawaii court rules against gay marriage HONOLULU-Hawaii's Supreme Court upheld a 1998 constitutional amendment against gay marriage last Thursday, closing the door on three gay couples who had sued the st,1te for the right lo marry. But gay rights activists say the decision does not reverse the high court's 1993 ruling that failure to rl.'cognize same-sex marriage amounts to gender discrimination, and that gay couples arc l'ntitled to the same rights and benefits as heterosexual couples. The 1998 aml.'ndment gave state legisla­tors the power to determine whether mar­riage licmscs should only recognize unions between a man and a woman. The Hawaii court ruled that the amendment protected the ban from scrutiny under the equal pro­tection clause of the state constitution, so the law, passed in 1994, must now be given full force. Still, gay rights advocates said the ruling applies only to the issuance of marriage licenses and not to other legal recognition for same-sex couples. "Unless the legislature passes a compre­hensive doml•stic partnership law, there arc going to be hundreds of lawsuits" demand­mg marriage-like benefits under the court's 1993 ruling, according to Dan Foley, the gay couples' attorney. Last we~k's decision did not bar future cases seeking the same benefits that come with civil marriage, agreed Evan Wolfson of Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund "Although raw power politics and the fierce, sustained campaign of our opponents may have prevented this case from getting us all the way to equality this century, the historic case has left us in a transformed position to fight on," Wolfson said. Hawaii became the hope of gay marriage advocates m 1990, when three gay couples were denied marriage licenses by the state health department and sued the slate. Later that year, the case was thrown out by a lower court iudge. But the Hawaii Supreme Court's historic 1993 decision reinstated the lawsuit, saying the ban violated the state's constitution unless the state could show compelling rea­son to justify it. The ruling set off preemptive legislating around the nation. At least 30 slates banned gay marriage, and Congress passed the Defense of Marriage Act, which denied fed­eral recognition of same-sex marriage and allowed states lo ignore same-sex unions licensed elsewhere. In an effort to clarify the state's position, the Hawaii legislature passed a law in 1994 limiting marriage lo opposite-sex couples. In 1996, Circuit Court Judge Kevin Chang said the state could not justify that limitation and ordered it lo grant licenses to the cou­ples. But he suspended his decision pending an appeal to the l lawaii Supreme Court. In the intervening two years, voters approved a 1998 constitutional amendment Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment I People ~ Planetout:com www.planetout.com f AOI. KeyMJrd PlanetOut engage -i enjoy giving legislators the authority to limit state-recognized marriages to opposite-sex couples, which they had already done. The couples were "de\·astated" by the court's decision, Foley said. Of the three, Tammy Rodrigues and Antoinne Pregil. and Pat Lagin and Joseph Melillo remain in Hawaii and still want to marry, Foley said, :\inia Baehr and Gcnora Dancel have separated and are li\'lng on the mainland. Melillo said the Supreme Court decision was more upsetting than the public approval of the constitutional amendment because he expected the court to be a guardian of civil rights. 'We have never lost a court case until this memo was issued by the Supreme Court today," he said. "It's very difficult to see how they anived at this decision. It's really a cop-out." Sue Reardon, a teacher al Kalahco High School, cried when she was told of the ruling. "Oh, God, this is awful." said Reardon, an activist who was hoping to marry her female partner. "It's just scary. If you can help create laws to segregate and discrimi­nate, then no group is safe." Opponents of gay marriage cheered the Hawaii decision. "Thank you to the Hawaii Supreme Court for affirming what we've known all along­that marriage, by God's definition, is between opposite-sex couples," said Mike Gabbard, chairman of the Alli.mce for Evan Wolfson of lambda legal said that even with the Hawaii court defeat, gay couples are entitled to all marriage rights short of a license. Traditional Marriage. Vermont a possibility Vermont is the only state whose top court 1s currently considering gay marriage. Three gay couples sued there for the nght to marry in 1997, but a Superior Court judge dismissed the case, ruling that there i;, no fundamental nght to gay marriage. The couples appealed The Vermont Supreme Court is expected to rule soon on the case. aQP), ~ loin us in our excitement as we anticipate the coming of our Lord and Saviour, the Baby Jesus at MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Comer of :-.tontrosc and Hawthorne) !l~1lecf:~~~~~~~ An evening of l ive praise & worship, coffee-shop style. $5 Cover charge • $1. Flavored coffees and desserts. This event benefits the Maranatha's Building Fund. Emmanuel, God ivith Us! December 19 at 10:30am Special Worship Service in Story and Song to conclude the Advent season. Candle Light Service Sunday, December 24 at 7pm Reception to follow. 14 NEWS DECEMBER 17, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE new J.a.icts en the net Wired Strategies' John Aravosis has created a one-man, online activist effort through his web-site. ::.- Continued from Page 1 Aravosis agreed, but indicated that a source's credibilitv, and value, should not necessarily depend on a long membership lbt or a large staff. . "Any web-site can pretend to be anything they want, but ultimately they have to put up or shut up," agreed DaVJd Goldman, executive director of HateWatch, an Internet hate watch­dog group. "You offer up data, and if it shows itself to be honest, true and insightful, it will grow and be helpful to people" Like Ara\'OSIS, Goldman's HatcWatch, currently made up of six volunteers, has made a name for itself by taking up the issue of on-line bigotry-including the enforcement of AOL's policy against hate spet.'Ch-and has become a web source for information and discussion on the topic. Goldman expects HateWatch to ilt!aln non­profit status in a few weeks, and plans to grow the orgaruz.ation to include a membership and full-time staff. Goldman takes a kind of Darwinian approoch to on-line adV001cy work. "Hatewatch has a very i;ood name ni;ht now," he said rnattcr-<>f-factly. "I think we have offered a good voice on on-line hate and big­otiy, . . but no organization has the. ~ghl to exist forever. If HateWatch loses credibility. or loses popularity. and it's time for us to go away. !hilt's what \\ill happen. We are part of pubhc trust. U people like what we' re doing. and they support us, we will be h 're " Few voices, loud noise One recent example of a small group PERSONA L TRA I N I NG S T UD I O -~,n tl'~uf'1u /e,lunl /<'-1 Crn,-/:u - 4316 Yupon - By Appointment - 713•523•5330 1& CAPITAL BANK 3007 S. S h e pherd @ W . A l a b a m a 713/529-0001 FDIC lllSUred Rates sut>iect 10 Change SUCstantial penalty for early withdrawal. • ..,. !"mum t 00 000 CD If 10 am Slate<:! APY Annual PP~en111 Voe making a big statement, Aravosis pointed out, 15 the publicity generated by the group Queerwatch when it vocally opposed the death penalty during the trial of Aaron McKinney, one of two men charged with the murder of Matthew Shepard. "But in the end, they raised a legitimate Lc,.~uc in the community It reflected a debate that's really gomg on," he noted. Michael Petrelis, one of the founders of Quecrwatch, described the group as a loose network of about two dozen activists all over the country, with no formal structure or m1SS1on. He believes this flexible strcct­activist approach allows the group to work most effectively. "We don't represent a large consl!tuency, which I think is good," he said. "A handful of people can change the world." Bill Dobbs, a member of Quecrwatch and a leader of the Ad Hoc Committee for an Open l'roccs.s, a similar network fonncd in opposi­tion to the Millcnruum Mardi on Washington, also claims an "ad hoc" is.5uc-bascd appro.1ch eliminates wasteful bureaucratic process and gets results. The Ad Hoc Committee won't e\"en exist after the mardt is over, Dobbs said. Shaping an image "Dealing with the Democratic Party is very similar to getting fucked m the ass, the first time 1s usually the most painful," began a press release circulated last month by National Gay Lobby.Org. "But, after sev­eral good screwings, almost everyone gets comfortable with the experience." The commentary, about the failure of the I late Crimes Prevention Act, was penned by Michael Romanello, a founder of NGL The group afuacted attention recmtly when Romanello called for a boycott of AOL on the NGL web-site; the group alc,o threatened to send street hustlers and transsexuals to prott'St outside the suburban Washington home:> of AOL executives. With a core volunteer staff of about four, Romanello said they plan to grow NGL mto a full-fledged gay rights organization with a non-profit arm and a registered political action committee. The group asks voluntary foes from members to cover operating expenses. Romanello acknowledges he is more outspoken than some other activists. "Because we are not politicians, and have no vested interest in keeping our jobs, we can say things the way we see them," he said He defended the effectiveness of pro­fanity and extreme language in NGL's public statements. "It was meant to get attention, and it did," he said. Another Internet group has taken a very different approach. The Stonewall Society was founded by Codi Penance in Baton Rouge to comb.11 what he views as destructive infighting among gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgen­dered people The Stonewall Society con­sists of a web-site where supporters can log on and sign a pledge that they will seek to end ~eparatism and discrimination and $eek to promote acceptance among gays. "The organization is more conceptual than bureaucratic," he said, saying th.it 69 people have taken the pledge The Stonewall Society may develop local chapters, he said, but the web-site will remain the center of the organization . Employers told of park arrests .- Continued from Page 1 Smudy, the city's assistant parks din'Ctor who was acting dm.'Ctor of the parks depart­ment when the covert operation was startt'Ci m August 1997. "This 15 not a moral issues. Everyone is welcome m our parks, but anyone that breaks the law will be punished," he said. Bui when park rangers arrest a man dur­ing the operation, details of the arrest will be shared with the media and his employ­er if he JS an elected official or a city, coun­ty or school system employee, Smudy said. If the person works for a private compa­ny, officials don't rule out notification of the arrest to the employer, Sumdy said. And Smudy and, other park officials don't n.'Call a woman ever being arrested during the string, which uses a team of five, male-<>nly park rangers. The tra\'el warning, patterned after U.S. State Department notices about dan­gerous conditions US. citizens could encounter in other countries, accuses park rangers of incitement to commit ille­gal acts, entrapment, false arrest and fal­sification of arrest reports. "Gay men living in and around San Antonio, Texas and those contemplating tra\'el to that location are warned that the City of San Antonio operates a covert oper­ation that targel~ gay men.'' said the six­paragraph warning, issued primarily to media outlets outside San Antonio. McGowan said the community center has a contract to use workers who have been scn­tenm: I to community service by the courts. The center has potential workers fill out a questionnaire !hilt, among other items, asks ilbout treatment by law enforcement officers. Through that questionnaire, the center learned of a large number of people arrested for indecent expo:;ure and related as.•;ault ch.1rgcs, McGowan said. That prompted a meeting ~ith city officials m which they admitted the undercover operation. Parks director Malcolm Ma s as well as Smudy and others from the department attend­ed the meeting, along with a city attor­ney and a representative for the mayor. "We were attempting to negotiate with them," he said. "~ut two thmgs happened that made 1.t a~pear they were not going to negotiate. McGowan sent a letter to Matthews with suggestions for other ways to cle,m up parks and decrease indecent exposure incidents. But McGowiln said the response he received focused on the tone of his letter, rather than the attempts to end the undercover operation Sepilrately, McGowan submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the city to acquire records related to the operation to help substantiate that could prove some of the center's allegations. City officials hedged at the request, but later said they would consider it. McGowan then issued the travel warning. ::- Continued on Page 15 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 NEWS 15 San Antonio park sting nets more than 500 arrests _. Continued from Page 14 'Community outcry' Parks department officials said the under­cover operation started in 1997 after com­p! Jints from the public and a report on a local TV news program about public sex in city parks, Smudy said. While offici,1ls confinn that more than 500 men h,1\'e been arrested during the sting, allegations that the sting targets gay men or entraps thl·m an• false, he said. "I'd s.1y it's an accurate number. There was a tremendous community outcry to stop indl'­Cl'nt exposure 111 parks," Smudy said. "My sis­ter uses the parks quite often to wall.; her dog. She has s.11d she has seen people having sex and pl'ople n111ning naked for can;." During tht• sting, Smudy said a pair of p.irk rangers will pose as park users, but won't make contact with others in the park. "TI1ey arc forbidden from making contact. If someone approaches them and makes con­\' l'rsation, they will make comwsation," Smudy said. What often follows, he said, 1s the person who talkt•d with the undercover officer than e\f:>OSCS his genit.1ls and sometimes grabs thl• crotch of the park ranger Most of the men arc handcuffed and .mestcd, rather th,m tid.cted. because grab­b111g an offICer 1s Cllns1dered an assault, Sumdy s.ud. fhl' r,mgt•rs don't haw time to stop thl• incidl·nt and issue a ticket bdorl' it esc,1l,1ll•s, he s,1id "Norm.illy tlwy try to [write a citation]," Smudy said. In San Antonio, the city's park rangers are charged with handling minor offenses that occur in parks. They are certified peace offi­cers and rl>cei ,.e special training from the San Antonio Police Department's vice squad to conduct undercover operations. Park rangers patrol the city's 160 parks and its well-known river walk. Five of the city's 101 rangers are 1m·oh·ed 111 the opera­tion, whICh uses only male officers and con­centr. 1te:-. on two-dozen city parks, said Richard Honn, chief of the city's park rangers. Although Honn said he has a ~ million budgl'I, he would not say how much money has been spent on the two-year-old sting. &inn said no women have been arreskd for indcn•nt exposure since the operation began. "We've had some that were dressed hke women, but none of them I know of were actually women," he said. Smudy !«1id that many parks have warn­ing signs near arl'as where indecent exposure incidenb have occurrl'<l. The signs caul!on users that parks are patrolled by unifonned and underco\'er rangers. But ~mudy could not explain the !ugh number of arrests m l.ght of the wam111gs and publicity of the shng operation. "We ha\'e made thb public knowledge," he s.1id "\Vp ,1lmost compll'll'ly blew thl• CO\'l'rt shadow of this operation." Bonn s.11d the covert operation v.-.1s started at thl• request of the San Antonio Police Department, which had predously organ-w~ - 'ARS{w44~ Pmvidec dedicated to secving the HIV commumty Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem ized vice operations m parks. The warning signs were also erected at the request of city police, Bonn said. Sumdy decided to use the undercoH·r operation rather than close some of the most troubled parks, which was what the pohce department had addsed, Bonn said An arrested man speaks out But one of the men arre;ted in the opl at on chalknges the statements of at\' olhciab that they don't target gay men. · "It was clcarlv a "'t up and dearly wa' entrapment," s.1id Doyle Bridger, \\'ho wa' arrested in March at a San Antonio park for indecent exposure and assault. Despite the arrest, Bridger "'1id it was time to speak out because something nl'l'ds to be done about the stmg operation. "I've been going to this one park e\·eryday for Sl'Ven years and I cat my lunch then.• e\·eryday. On this particular day I had to go to the restroom," Bridger said. I le said he h,1s Sl'l.'n and taken part in sex in city p.1rk.,, but wasn't cruising for SC\ when he was arrl~ted nine months ago. Bridger said he saw a gray-haired \\ hite m.rn and a l hsp.m1c man outside the rest­room rubbing themsch·es as he appro.1ched The gray-ham·d man followed him into the n•stroom and looked o\'er the stall at Bridger three times, Bridger said The other man also walked into the restroom. Afll'r the third attempt by the gra)-haircd man to look o\·er the stall at Bridger, he shmn'Cl the man his genitals. '']said, 'Okay, you old queen, if you want to see II here 1t is,"' Bridger said The men were park rangen; and part of the covert operation. Bridger was arrested, handcuffed and stood b\· the n.':'troom tor 15 minull's before being transported to a nearby parking lot and seated m a patrol car for two hours, he ~1d. Bridger said he never touched either one of the officers, though he was later charged with assault. County court records confirm that Bridger was charged with indecent expo­surt.', a Class B misdemeanor, and \\ ith assault for h1tt1ng thl' Hispanic off1ct•r, a Cl.1ss C misdemeanor A 1udg<' !'U"ltenced Bndger to one Y<'ilf of pn~ bahon, hundm:ls of dollars in rml~.md :;4 hours of commurut\' ;.en ice, he said. \\'hen asked why he exposed himself to thl' ofhcl'r», Bndgcr ;.aid the men _played their roles Wl'Il. ~ "My response 1s thcsl' guy;. are good," lw ;.a1d. 'They \\ere \'cry good l\0 1th_ the body language.." Dan Ca,tor, co-chairman of the San Antonio &qual Rights Polittral <;aucus, called the two-year !-lmg "atrocious " "It 1s dangcrou~ for anyone to bt.> doing an) thing in a park in San Antonio, because we ha\•e a longtime issue with over zealou' entrapment by law cnforcc­mt• nt," ca~tor said. 'Do you wa11t a baby? oot questions? All Aspects of Infertility Artificial Insemination • In Vitro Fertilization Specialist Donor Bank Information Hormonal Therapy Dr. Michael A. Allon, M. D. office hours by appointment phone (713) 467-4488 fax (713) 467-9499 www. drmallon. com 8830 Long Point • Suite 801 Houston, TX 77055 16 AVAILABlE AT LOCATIONS THROUGHOUT HOUSTON YOUR WEEKlY FIX SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Ouming Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health. DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE - Big City Video & Emporium 1 01 OS Gulf Freeway Houston, Texas 77034 ~ ~ ~ Whv Pav More? Ren • Videos Priced to Sale! L:••RWiTCH l r Big Daddy I lllOSGYWblSblllldMI '19.9s _J L $21.95 s19.95 arge selections o previously viewed movies startin at $4. 99 Paperback Romance Novels at $1.99 Greet in All Ratings Available Big City is Bigger and Better! Don't Settle for the WannaBees! HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME Chattin Simone Cunningham's charm and intensity are easy to SH in 'Suite 69,' her new work of erotk ltsbi111 poetry. WITH The intensity, passion and sexual tension of Simone Cunningham come through in the hip new work of this bold, lesbian poet by KAY DAYUS For starters, she's had O\ er 25 lo\ ers-not counting the men, she spent 10 years in accounting, and she's been a prolific writer of poetry and prose smcc the age of nine. And she's only 26. Simone A. Cunningham, a charm­ing but deep and intense author, says she has only just begun. "Suite 69," her self-published book of black lesbian erotica, is mostly steamy, sometimes soft and sad, and often angry. It's easy to see why. In "I've fucked dicks," she writes, "l'\e fucked dicks in my time/ls! at the tender age of 9/violated, mutilat­ed by hands of black man some call uncle .:ousm and step dad.' Cunningham \\as raped, she Sa} s in a matter-of-fact tone, se\cral limes by male mem hers of her family "I was introduced to men at an early age and I grew to hke sex with them until I went with a woman, C'unnmgham says "Suite 69" fir t sa\\ the hght of d.iy on ( unnmgham's self-des1~ned web 11 'Lrbanlo\ suites." It w.is thcr she fir~! sh.ired hu work with oth r md, he \HII a \\el med "The s st.is wd omc:d m 1\ 1th opm arms F r the f rst time m my lrfe, I began to take my gift senousJy, she says But Cunningham was only able to share her gift for about six months before her Jnternet provider pulled the site because of its conllnl She admits that many people view erotica as "tasteless porn, but Cunningham argues otherwise. "So many women, particularly Afncan-American women, arc oftentimes left unsatisfied after sexual encounters. Millions of women have yet to explore their full sexual curiosity. Women need to take time to find out what they wani in a sexual relationship," she says. And Cunningham says that erotica can help. > Continued on page 20 The founders of New York's Paper and its dishiest column ist) are celebrating the style bible's 15th anniversary and its new guide to what's cool by DAVID GOID~1A'.'\ It was 1984. Ron and Nancy twirled mernly in the White House, ignoring the new dbease slaughtering Its way through the nahon's gay male populahon. Computers were high-priced and clunky and ;.till out­numbered by typewriters in most office;.. The activation of the World Wide Web was f11 e years away Busy people kept m touch usmg call forwarding: If you'd fished a tiny phone from your bag and begun bab­bling mto 1t on the street, you would have been clocked as a dangerous, delu~1on lunatic. And m ~ew York, Oa\id Hershko\"its and Kim Hastrciter founded Paper, yet another flake in a flurry of funky 'zmcs founded to chart the cultural ~s-rnrrents in ever-cvohing do1mtown ~lanhattan. Today Paper is an extraordillary publishing success story. ~ot only is it still in print after a decade and a half, it al'-0 has an inter­national following (70,000 readers monthly) and a hugely popu­lar web-site (650,000 page views per month). It has been crowned "the hippe;t magazine on earth" by the Los Angeles Tunes and "the magazine of culture information among the seri- > Continued on page 21 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Out In Print BOOK NEWS Men caught in the patriarchy, too by JAY VANASCO Ever smce her book "Backlash," feminist Susan Falud1 has been plagued with a ques­tion: Why don't men abolish the patriarchy that is keeping women down? The .inswer Faludi has come up with .ifter six wars of research 1s detailed m STIFFED'. THE BETRAYAL OF THE A.\.1ERICA:-.: MA'.'\-men can't abolish the patnarchy because they're trapped by it, too. Falud1 in ten 1ewed dozens of men on the fringe and in the loop, from the editor of Det.i1ls to astron.iut Buzz Aldrin, from Promise Keepers le.ider Bill ~1cCutncy to the abusive boy::. of the Citadel She asked them about rehgion, entertainment, work, family .ind recreation. She was expecting a d1vers1ty of\ 1ewpomts, a collcct1on of trav­esties of individual circumstance. But evcrv question she asked seemed to have the same .1nswer-mcn .:ict the way they do ~ause their World War II fathers made them a prom•sc that they would be useful and mstcad, men of the post·w.:ir generabon.s fmd themselves caught up man medi.:i-dnven soctety "drained of context." Falud1's most starthm; theory 1s that men today arc locked m the 5,1me box as house­wives bdore Betty Friedan Thnr lives are out of their control. Thev are downsized, their societal utility is d~valued, they are left to be nothing more than a pretty body to sell a product. Yet they are deeply invest­ed m learning to "act hke a man." But being a man m the 1990s, Faludi says, is different from being a man prior to World War II. Back then, she says, they didn't need to "be masculine; they were seeking some­thing worthwhile to do. Their sense of their own manhood flowed out of their utility in society, not the other way around. Conceiving of masculinity as something to be turns m,:mlincss mto a detachable entitv, at which point it instantly becomes orn~­mental. and about as innately 'masculine' as false eyelashes .:in.' inherently 'feminine."' Faludi spends some time talking about ornamentation in gay male culture. She secs the Stonewall-era Jrag queens ,1s the true heroes of the gay movement, noting that they dn~ssed as women both to wink .:it the strict gender rules of society and to identify with the opprcss10n that women felt under male Jomination She mourns those days. Though Falud1 lauds gay male mobili.1:ation arounJ the AIDS cmis as a "monumental social move­ment" that has generated "in this homo­phobic nation a wellspring of admiration Books Make Great Gifts! __ ..,.,-.., The Sixties by Richard Avedon & DoonArbus Photographer Avedori"s famous portraits and 1oumahst Arbus compelhng interviews combine for a remarkable Journey through the tumultuous decade $75.00, $60.00 with IQ Not For Ourselves Alone by Geoffrey C. 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Based on the riveting PBS documentary this hand­somely illustrated book celebrates the history of the de facto world capital $60.00; $48.00 with IQ American Visions by Robert Hughes Now in paperback, the Australian-born art critic Hughes has produced a massive "love letter to America· a 350-year history of art in the U S $39.95; $35.96 with IQ Crossroads Market Bookstore & Cafe WWWECLIKT COM'Crossroads.htm 1111 Westheimer Road, Houston 713-942-0147 and respect" and masculinized gay men in the eyes of America, she believes the gay movement has sold out. Gav men have lost their sub\-ersiveness, she s:i'ys, m favor of Ikea. "Shopping h.1s been redefined as a form of activism," Faludi says. Gay men have submitted tothecorpor.:itecul­ture m order to have designer couches. Additionally, she womes about gay men who we,u Ihm hair like M.uincs and who have enveloped themselve~ in the leather scene. This "aggressively macho pose," she fears, is an obse~sive search for masculinity. In other words, gay men-who originally escaped the trap of the masculinity crisis through the sarcasm of camp-fell prey to the very "culturally dictated masculinity" that tyrannized and betrayed them. Faludi could probablr write a book on gay male culture-and she should. The short pages on the gay movement arc some of the most interesting in the book. Still, Faludi is interesting throughout, drawing us dt·ep mto the individual lives of men so that 660 pages whiz by. It gets a little tinng, though, to read anecdote after ,inecdote of man-as-victim. Aren't there any empowered men out there? You begin to wonder how represen­tative her chosen men arc. And, sifting through 11 chapters of md1vidual stones you might well wish for a little less amusing detail and a little more heavyweight theory. You can not help but ask a question that reflects Falud1's own: If men are not the problem, and women are not the problem, then who exactly is controlling the culture that we're all imprisoned in? If Falud1 can't answer that one in her next tome, maybe we'll need to turn somewhere else-like the "X-Fib." Stiffe d : The Betraya l of t he Ame rican Ma le What yo"!-'r neighbors are reading . . . Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11 95 2 Comfort & Joy by Jim Grimsley. $21 95 3 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 4 Murder Undercover h Claire McNab, $11.95 5 Every lime We Say Goodbye by Jane Maim.in, $11 95 6 Let Nothing You Dismay by ,\lark O'Donnell, $12 7 7th Heaven by Kate Calloway, $11.95 8 Innuendo by RD Zimmerman, $21.95 9 Infidelity by W111Jam Rooney, $14.9'i ]0 Latin Lovers bv Fr.1~mu Gurrra, $15.95 Crossroads Market BOOKSTORs_ & CAH: 2 ~ 4 5 6 7 8 9 IO 111 I Westheimer 713-942-0147 Chop Sucy Club by Bruce Wcbu, SfO Best of the Superstars 2000 l.'d1ti d by Jor-ri Patrick, $11.<l5 Whole Lesbian Sex Book by Felice Newman, $21.95 Openly Gay Openly Christian by Rev Samm•l Kader, $15.95 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smtih, $24 Murder Undercover by Cl.me Md'-J,1b, $11.95 Falcon Best of Legends $8.95 Innuendo by R.D. Zimmerm.m, $21.95 Confes~ions of an Ugly Stepsister by C.n•gory M.1guirc, $24 A Woman Like That by Jo.in I .arkin, $24 LOBO ~;~"" 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 17, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU On Stage THEATER NEWS & REVIEWS Reworking Carol, Sonny and Cher by D.L. GROOVER Stages' premiere of the off-Broadway hit musical I LOVE YOU, YOU'RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE, still running in New York City, possesses grace and charm. The cast showcases Its considerable musical comedy talents with delight, the staging is clever and polished; the score hummable. So, why did I begin to tune out? Because this show is something I've sc·en one time too many, for years. Comprised of ment in her now-empty life, revealing much more than she intends. Bonasso delivers this monologue with quiet, unassuming power. Casey Burden is all cute and huggable in his various roles, and anv mother in the audience would be pleased to have him as a son·in-law. He comes into his own with the haunting ballad, "Shouldn't I Be Less m sketches highlight­ing the trials and tribulations of the dating/mating game (Act I) fol­lowed by the joys and pitfalls of mar­riage (Act II), this musical has been resurrected and recycled from vari­Joanne Bonasso, Pippa Winslow, Casey Burden and Jeffrey Gimble in the TV variety-show-like ' I love You, You're Perfect, Now Change.' ety·show favorites like Carol Burnett, Andy Williams, Sonny and Cher and even "The Bell Telephone Hour." The play attempts to be up-to-date with a smattering of "shits" and the plaintive cry of "she won't go down on me," but you could take your aunt to see this show and rest assured ~he wouldn't need a blindfold or car plugs. It's too sweet and old-fash­ioned to shock. Toothless as a teddy bear and just as cuddly, ''I Love You" is so harm­less and willing to please it's almost quaint. In this day and age when most musicals are rated PG-13, a breezy, entirely weight­less romp should be eminently embrace­able. All we ask is that it entertain without reminding us of chamber musicals like "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" or "The Fantastics." But the exceedingly pleasant actors hold the show together by their sheer exuber­ance. They sing up a storm, mug like vaudeville troopers and even manage a few smooth dance steps. They make this show eJsier to sit through, even when two full acts of this run-of·the-mill variety show shtkk is one act too many. As written, the quartet plays a kaleido­scope of char.icteri.. Each vignette finds them in a different guise, and they all play some v.iriation on the stereotypical guy and gal, husband and wife, widow and widow­er joJnne Bonasso is the show's Imogene Coca. Whether she's the much put-upon single girl caught in the "Single Man Drought," or the quintessential Jewish mother hen-pecking her husband and whining kids, she's wonderfully versatile. Her shining moment is the "Very First Dating Video of Rose Ritz," a poignant and well-written cameo, in which this 40-some­thing di\'Orcee attl'mpts to find a replace- Love With You?" Sung to his wife over a breakfast routine they've accepted over the years, the temptation to stray just doesn't seem all that important, or interesting, any­more. It's a subtle moment that Burden sings from the heart. Jeffrey Gimble possesses· a polished, effortless voice. With his rich baritone, he can belt o~ croon with the best of them. He certainly makes the pseudo-pop numbers written by Jimmy Roberts and Joe DiPietro sound better than they are. Leggy and lithe, Pippa Winslow sings the show-stopping number "Always a Bridesmaid" to perfection. Winslow makes the most of this country-western anthem to staying single. With a primary-colored storybook set consisting of house fronts and a garage door, part of the steps might flip down to reveal a restaurant table already set for din­ner, or a bed might materialize out of the porch stoop. Most of the time these scenic changes, accomplished by the actors, are more intriguing than the scenes themselves. The performance I attended was sold out, and the audience heartily enjoyed itself, so 1t obviously appeals to a great many. Perhaps it's because there aren't any variety shows on TV anymore that something so tame and uninspired as "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change" can strike a nerve. I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change Stages Repertory Theatre Through Jan. 2 3201 Allen Parkway 713·52-STAGES www.stagestheatre.com 19 20 Chatting §11111 SIMONE .- Continued from page 17 She sits erect in a straight back chair and her face 1s serious durmg a recent interview in a Houston coffee shop, but she often flashes a big smile and some­times even appears embarrassed by her own boldness. But she must be bold to write the way she does-without shame, without fear, fully confident of her power with words. "I am lost m the wetness of your body/the sweetness of your mouth and tongue/dancing against mine/the sweat on your neck and breasts/ as it dampens my fingertips," she writes in "Suite 69." It's easy to see Cunningham's passwn for poetry and prose. And she doesn't write only erotica. Jn the works is a book about the trial and tribulations of two Texas girls. Within the passion and boldness of Cunningham's writing can be a softness when she discusses love and life. "I am loving her like I once loved you/kissing her hps gently caressing her breasts/just ,is you caressed mine that very first time resting her head on my shoulder/hiding behind closet doors and between satin sheel~/I am loving her and she 1s IO\·ing me," she wntes in "Suite 69 " But to fmd her voice m writing, Cunningham has had to overcome trou- OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE bles at home, which started at age 9 with the effects of domestic violence among her parents. "I was there when mv mother killed my father," she says, adding quickly it was in self-defense "I loved my father and he was good to me, but he abused my mother I never blamed my mother for what happened." Despite that tragedy, Cunningham remains close to her mother, even if she doesn't like her daughter's writings of crollca. "My mother's pissed. She w.ints to be able to show my work, but she says, 'How can I show this,"' the younger Cunningham says. Passion also strikes Cunningham when talk turns to feminism and her African-American heritage. "Women should be seen and I don't think we're seen," she says. Cunningham wants to help put women in the forefront where she believes they should be and hopes one day to become .i filmmaker to help. She wants to make films "that need to be seen so that people feel more comfortable with their sexuahtv." Although she's ·been in relationships with a few men, Cunningham says she has never been confused about her sexu­ality. She shared her fi rst kiss with a girl­friend when she was four; her first sex with a woman when she was 14. She exudes a boyish charm and says her young father "raised me like .:t tomboy. lie treated me like his brother." Some poems in "Suite 69" are short a result, Cunningham says, from the little thoughts that constantly pop into her head. For instance, about a one-night stand, she pens: "When I said good-bye and kissed you on your cheek with your body on my breath, did you cry?" Another poem, "U So Fine," 1s the product of pulling alongside an attrac­tive woman at a traffic light. She looked over, shamelessly flirted, daring the woman to look her way. Immediately, her poet's mind went to ~ork: · "lJ so fine and I can tell by the way you smile you know ti. I see it in your eyes as they hide behind your ray-ban tinted shades/I wish you'd pull over so I can get your name and perhaps a number or two cause I'm really digging you/Shittt, I want to get to know you and possibly gain a touch or two." Yes, she wanted to get to know that woman. 'Tm a big flirt, but it's pretty harmless nowadays," says Cunningham, a refer­ence to her year-old relationship. Uke her mother, Cunningham's girlfriend ~ isn't too pleased with her erotic writings. But I!: ..._....i...._ ....... ....:11-.:...:..t.::..r...~;u;.;._..u...:.-. .... she'll have to get used to it, Cunningham says. Simone Cunningham is passionate when talk Admittedly preoccupied with sex, turns to feminism, her heritage and sexuafity. Cunningham easily admits that her work is laced with the undercum'l'lt of sexual prowess. But mu lti-faceted in life and conversa­tion, Cunningham shifts gears to her enjoyment of dressing in drag and hit­ting gay bars for blacks. "When I really want to step out of Simone's shoes, I dress up like a boy and lip sync," she says. Cunningham enjoys the tips, but most of all, the a ttention. "I like being seen," she says. For more information about Simone Cunninslram's work, call 713-601-0455, or write Urban P11blislrm, P.O. Box 300635, Houston, Texas 77230-0635. Conquer Aging ... a fresh approach for restoring the skin you were born into. Introducing the most innovative· skin technology for men and women available today: MICRO-DERMABRASION. 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"It's almost our claim to fame at this point: that we've managed to stay in business, stay independent, yet still remain competitive in content and ideas with th~ other [large publishing] companies," I !ershkovits said last week from New York. This year in celebration of Paper's suc­cess, 1 !ershkovits and Hastreiter have pub· lished a book, "From AbFab to Zen: Paper's Guide to Pop Culture." Why a book? "We always wanted to do a book," I lcrshkovits said. "When it came time for this 15th anniversary, we wanted to do something that would reference the past and everything we did, but was still new." Hershkovits sees the book filling a his­torical niche. "Today young people tend to take it for granted that things were always like this. It became even more important to try and point your finger at history and tell people, 'This was John Sex. He was this really amazing guy. And he influenced Keith 1 laring and Ann Magnuson, and she influ- OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 enced Joey Arias and Joey influenced Madonna. It's like this great chain." Hershkovits and Hastreiter met while working at Village Voice rival SoHo Werkly News, which eventually folded. Some News staffers formed Details, which has since been sold and reformatted as a men's magazine. 1 lershkovits and Hastreiter soon abandoned their lofty plans to raise big bucks for a slick magazine, choosing instead to publish the best product they could at the time. The first is.'iUl'S of Papi:r were printed as a fold-out poster that sold for 50 cents. "Everything was based on not having money." said Hastreiter. But today Hastreiter m.'Clil!i this financial realism \\;th being "the reason why we're still here." Through the years, the magazine has changed repeall'Clly. Its logo is still redesigned for every issue. Its leadership takes seriously the cover tagline "Where Things Start." Somctiml'S, Papt'r has moved too fast even for its super-hip market. "People were horrified when we put a girl with tattoos on our cover," Hastreiter said. "We lost advertising. People were gagging over it-ma bad way. not a good way." The rise of AIDS was tragically concurrent with the ascent of Paper. "The magazine suffered during those years of the late '80s when AIDS was at its peak," Hershkovits :;aid. "Those were dark days for the magazine and for New York. You were going to memorial services instead of restaurants." Another story was especially difficult to cover: the fall of "club kid" ringmaster Michael Alig. After reigning for years as the undisputt'Cl king of the downtown scene, Alig Papers founders: David Hershkovits and Kim Hastreiter slid mto a hellish world dominated by "Special K," cocaine and other drugs. I~ 1997 he pleaded guilty to murdering his drug dealer and is now serving a 10- to 20- year sentence. "You can't really believe it when somebody you know is m a situation like that," Hershkovits said. ''That's what happened with Alig. having known him as this great cre­ative force that arrived in New York and took the town by storm. I cannot really believe it now, even though I'm sure he was guilty." Both editor /publishers are straight. "One thing that Paper did, which I'm really proud of, was I think we were one of the first magazines that was a tossed :;alad-like a mixture. We have a really large gay readership and a really di\·erse multi-cultural readership." In 1991, Paper inaugurated Joey Arias' "Chitchat" column, m which the noted actor and Billie Holiday impressiomst pres­ents a transcribed phone interview with a star. An image of Arias as Lady Liberty was chosen to represent "A" at the book's beginning. How did that make Joey foe!? "I was like, oh my God! My heart start­ed pounding. I started feeling very sen­sual and excited, very Statue of Liberty. Like, 'Welcome to my world, bitches! I'm the queen! The goddess!'" Anas said from New York. Arias is currently on screen with Robert De Niro in "Flawless." Paper, Arias said, "is almost like a crys­tal ball for the hip. It's so quick and so current. People always pick up Paper magazine to find out what's going on. Especially," Arias added with a wicked laugh, "if they want to get down!" Do the Math and you'll see how the all-new Saturn LS-2 has become a benchmark in its class. To arrange for a test drive contact one of these Retailers The 2000 LS-2 V 6 Sedan (fhat's funny, we haven't seen this chart in any Camry, Accord or Passat ads.) FEATURES 2000 SATURN LS·2 V6 6CYL STD 8WAYPWRSEAT $325 ALLOYS STD FOG LAMPS STD LEATHER $1095 HEATED SEATS STD WILEATHEA AMIFM CD CASS STD .l£SS STD PWR ROOF $725 PWRWINDOW STD PWR LOCKS STD CRUISE STD INT VOLUME 97 WHEEL BASE 106.5 Pl«l:. 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I 5 p<r m;k o~r )9,000 •ilc1 01999 <i1tum Corponbon -. ... utum COii Saturn of Houston l\'orth F 1uway 8355 .\'01th fll"CWa)' 281-IH7-8700 Sawin of Hous1011 Southwnl Frw}· l 0050 Southwnt FrwJ 713-777-6100 Saturn of Hou\IOn Katv F m:i< a\ 11602 Old Katy Rd 281-556-1400 Saturn of Houston Gulf F1t"roay Acro's from Almeda Mall 713-944-4550 Satui n of Houston N<lllh\\OI 290 18700 North" est Fmy 281-894-3100 Saturn of Humble 59 North 2 blks south of FM 1960 281-540-8855 ~·- SJ\T~N. A Different Kind of Company. A Different Kind of Car. ww1<:\atu1 n.com 22 Soar 111to the 21st Century on the Wings of lrn.JgiMtion ..• in the futuristic spirit of our Millennium Fant.isy revelry. 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GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 541 '4 Katy Freeway @TC jester • Houston.Texas 77007 71 J.961-9-455 fax: 713-850-0856 Bernie Johnson Realtor _2/i1.___ _ _ KEUER WIU.WIS I t '°' l I Direct: 281.364.4862 Office: 281.364.1588 25303 1-45 North • The Woodlands • 77380 An Independent Member Broker soecialmng in lootgomert and Nortll Harris cauDIJ I DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Experience the Art of Dining "If my husband would ever meet a woman on the street who looked like the women in his paintings, he would fall over in a dead faint" -Mrs. Pablo Picasso Mon-Thu Friday Saturday Hours Lunch 11 OOam until 2 OOpm Dinner 5:00pm unt1110·oopm Lunch 11 OOam until 2 OOpm Dinner 5 OOpm until 11 :OOpm Dinner 5 30pm until 11 :OOpm Sunday Brunch Buffet 10 30am until 2 30pm 905 TAFT HOUSTON, T£XAS 77019-2613 713.523.5fOX Proudly seNing all hungry Houstonians! Reservations Recommended (713) 978-DECO (3326) 2990 Briarpark Drive at Westheimer Enjoy exquisite culinary creations at the Adam's Mark Hotel including made-t0-0rder omekts, homemade pastries. sat'Ory seafood, mouth· uatering pasta, seasonal salads, de!ectabk e11trees, p!llS an tmbel1etable array oj our finest desserts. Then sit back, relax and sip champagne u·hile l1stenmg to some of Houston's finest jazz m1mcians. Every Sunday, 10:30am , 2:00pm Adults: $22.50; Seniors: $20.50; Children 5-11: $12.50 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 23 Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEWS Plucking a plate in a comfy place by TRAYCE DISKIN I have to admit, I first stumbled into BENJY'S, an eatery serving "modem Amencan cuisine" as an act of desperation on a recent Sunday. A friend and I found our­selves approaching the doors of several I louston st.mdbys, only to be turned away by closed doors or private Christmas parties. We were in no position to be choosy, but I longed for a comfortable, casual, Sunday night kind of place-an establishment that invites you to reach over to your The House Smoked Salmon Shortstack ($7.95) offered uneven slivers of salmon between roasted com cakes, with grape­fruit and avocado on the side. Although I got the California-like mode of the dish, it was a strange combination. The com cakes were Oavorless and doughy-a dose of shredded scallions might have done the trick. The salmon was suspiciously non­fishy and added to the problem of too many different mingling tastes. The Smoked Shrimp Spring Rolls ($4.95) were nearly exquisite, with succu­companion's plate to pluck a roastt>d tomato from !'Ome star dish. Who would have thought our prayers would be answert>d at the classy and comfy Benjy's? Nestled betwCt.>n a brew­ery pub and Italian spe- - ~ benjy s lent, • soy-soaked shrimp hidden in a crusty, baked wrap. The habanero sauce drizzled in zig-zags along the plate made a piquant dip-imagine a sharp pepper laced with maple syrup and oa!ty store in Rice Village, 1 N T H E Benjy's atmosphere is minimalist and soothing with its sleek metal and Formica tables. While the downstairs bar seems lodged awkwardly in the middle of the spacious dining room. The lovely, fist-sized glass bulbs, tl'ardrop-shaped and hung on long rods, provide a homey elegance. A basket of dry French bread and small com muffin..~ appeared as soon as we were seated Thl• muffins were fresh and boasted slivers of peppl'r. The humus, served as dipping s.1uce, didn't exactly fit with these starters, but the greaseless muffins stood alone. Our server was friendly and informed, and rattled off a list of specials that made ordering an ordeal. I opted for the special soup, Crab and Com BisqUl' ($4.95), which featured seamll'S..~ly blended tomatOt'S, com and crab for J wlwty texture and spicy, rich taste Benjy's 2424 Dunstan • 713-522-7602 Food: t>t>'t>'t> Service: t;> 't> S> S> Value: t>S S>t Scene: 't> 't> S> S> t l> Opt for bread, water at home ,,,S>oK, 11 you really must t, &~, & Worth the drive, so live a little b ., ~.,~, As good as 1t gets V 1 L L A G E tomato. The shredded apple slaw was impressive as a garnish and included shredded radishes, zucchini and pecans, which made us wonder why this wet and crunchy salad didn't earn itself its own place on the menu. Often minimalism errs on the side of being too minimal. Such was the case with the Spinach Pizza ($7.95), which consisted of barely steamed spinach on a thin, wheat tortilla, with scattered calamata olives and conservJtive dollops of feta cheese. While I appreciatt>d the frl'Shness of the spinach, this dish was more like a salad on tor­tilla- a little too simple and plain for someone who at least requires the deca­dence of more cht.-ese or a rich olive 'aute The Asian Salad ($8.95) was huge and although the generous portions of chicken were tender, there seemed to be nothing especially Asian except for the over<ibun­dance of fried wanton noodles. The gin­ger- lime dressing was likable, but didn't do much for a fairly pedestrian salad. The dishes we didn't have room to try will tl•mpt us to return. The Wild Mushroom Enchiladas with charred corn relish ($7.50) or the full dinner items such .is Corn Crusted Chilean Sea Bass ($19.50) or Wood Oven roasted Duck Breast ($17.95) all sound scrumptious. One of the big turn ons of Benjy's is its ability to sl'rVl' diners who want a calm, relaxing place to munch on quality fare, to those who prefer a dining experience replete with hearty entrees and any num­ber of good wines. Then then• was the two of us, one lazv Sunday night, who chose to finish a promising, 1f uneven, dinner with a devi· ously rich p1en• of three chocolate mousse c.ike, featuring a layer each of dark, milk Jnd white chocolate on a graham cracker crust. Although Benjy's may not be per­fect on e\'ery dish, the highlights arl' enough to make it one of the first plaCl'S on my list an} dJy of the week. Music! Jamie Casco & Julie Johnson every Thursday - Beginning Dec. 16•h 1209 CAROLINE AT DALLAS 713.759.9323 ' FAX 713.759.6812 Lunch: M·F 11am - Spm Dinner· M-Th Spm - 9:30pm • Fri & Sat Spm • 10pm "HOME COOKING - ITALIAN STYLE" Delivery to all lofts & apartments in Downtown Houston Catering available for lunch and dinner meetings, banquet facilities, and take-out available• Plan your Christmas party with c1£~~s~I~ Amilahle for the Holic.hys L t>f; ='F""'T"'--......,.+H ,~ QO~Pn~ine.1~ cJITAUAN °'Ufi1STORANTE • . J;. ~- . ' J;. CONSTABLE J. Chocolates bV ffiark Gourmet Fresh Ground Coffees for sale bv fhe pound JACK F. ABERCIA'S J. ' ANNUAL TOY & FOOD ROUND-UP ~ BRING IN A CANNED GOOD • OR TOY FOR A ~ ~ FREE DESSERT! J. J. ~ .... ~~ow THRU DECEMBER 23 ~ . J. ... ..................... : ( ( ! !" I N (, : .:. . ......\•(.1•(.).N.. ........: community DECEMBER 17, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE PAST OUT • COMMUNITY CALENDAR OCCASIONS • CARMART • CLASSIFIEDS BUSINESS DIRECTORY • MY STARS Y2K Pride in full swing as hunt for logo continues by ROBERT B. HE\JDERSO. The Pride Comrr.:ttec of Houston hopes to select a logo for next year's festivities on Tuesd.ry, marking the start of a busy season of orgaruzmg for the armual event. Organizers are also SCl'king nom:nations for four grand marshals, which will be armounccd March 9 after community-wide voting. The Pride committee also has adopted a motto for th<? 2000 e\·cnt, drawing on interna­tional organizers for some hclp. "Take Pride­Take Joy-Take Action," the motto for inter­national organizer~, will abo serve as Houston's motto, said Jack Valin~ki. executive director of Pnde Committee of Houston. "This is one of the first years we've actually gone
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