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Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 001. 1982-06-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-18). Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2170

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 001, 1982-06-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 18, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript v 0 I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #86, Published Weekly Friday June 18 1982 Good Evening 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 2702 Kirby 524-6272 NGTF official due in Houston for Pride Week The National Gay Task Force and the NGTF Fund for Human Dignity have announced that members of their staffs will be participating in several regional Gay Pride Week celebrations in June. Lucia Valeska, NGTF's executive direc­tor, will keynote the Gay Pride Rally in Houston on June 27. She will also be keyn­oting the Gay Pride Rally in Albuquerque, New Mexico, J une 19, and in Dallas, June 20, where she will be the female grand marshall in the parade preceding the rally. Mel Boozer, NGTF's director of Civil Right Advocacy, and Virginia Appuzo, executive director of the Fund for Human Dignity, will be the keynote speakers at the Gay Pride Ra lly in New York City on June 27. In addition, Boozer will be speak­ing at the Gay Pride celebration in Nash· ville, Tennessee, June 20. Gay Switchboard celebrating first Pride Week The Gay Switchboard of Houston is there to inform. And listen. And counsel. Begun only last December, it's rapidly becoming the source for the gay commu­nity to get facts, referrals and a friendly ear. And, the switchboard takes pride in being " in the know." People are calling (713) 529.:1211 to fi nd out the symptoms of herJ)("s, the topic of the next Gay Political Caucus (GPC) educational forum, what to expect if arrested, or even which bars have the cheapest happy hour drinks. The range of questions is limitless. Thirty-two trained volunteers staff the switchboard seven days a week from 6:00 p.m. to midnight. Phones are answered, sure. But there's a lot of legwork involved in keeping up with Houston 's gay commu· ni ty. Countless hours a respentcontacting organi za tions and gay E't; ta blishments to make sure information that's given out over the phone is current. "On any given night, there are at least six to eight gay events going on in Hous­ton," said Rich Neil, director of the switch­board. "These are events that people might not find out about elsewhere." Anyone can just answer a telephone. But, it takes a trained switchboard volun­teer to "be there"for a caller. Someone who knows when to speak and when it's better just to Jisten. It also takes someone who understands what it's like to just come out, lose a lover or get a sexually transmitted disease. People call the switchboard, Neil said, because "we don't hassle the individual like a parent or friend might. We try to be objective." To be a switchboard volunteer means investing 30 hours of time in intensive train ing. Volunteers learn accepted hotline practices, counseling and listen­ing skills, which they use during their three hours each week staffing the switch­board phones. Neil said volunteers are taught noncom­mittal responses, mirroring, paraphras­ing and other counseling techniques. Volunteers learn to avoid asking "why" questions; ra ther, they learn to concen­trate on the caller's feelings. "We try to help the caller make his or her own decisions. We're not therapists, but we can let the ra11ers solve their own prob­lems by helping them to see things more clearly," he said . Most of the time, Neil said, callers already have a prob]em solved, they may need only a sounding board. Founder of Houston's switchboard, Neil also helped form the Gay Switchboard of Philadelphia and worked with the organi­zation for 10 years. Because of his back· ground, he can help Houston's volunteers deal with the legitimate, as well as the manipulative, threatening and crank <'alls that sometimes come in. Even though volunteers are trained to respond to a wide variety of caUs, they also a re trained to be aware of their own limitations. "We have to know when a counseling call is beyond us, and the caller needs to be referred to a professional," he said. After informationa l and counseling tele­phone calls, re ferrals a re the third most freq uent type of call handled by the switchboard. A caller might request the JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 name of a doctor, lawyer, dentist, accoun­tant, or other professional. For these calls, the switchboard keeps an activelistofpro­fessionals who either are gay themselves, or understand the gay lifestyle. "Often it is very important to have a doctor or lawyer who understands your lifestyle," he said. While the switchboard is in close touch with the gay community, it also keeps tabs on other social services available in this area. "We deal with gay people who have problems-and these problems don't necessarily have to be gay related, "he said. Montrose man dead after scuffle with neighbor William John Hall, 50, of 1504 California, was shot and killed during a scuffle with a neighbor, Tuesday, June 15, reports the Houston Post. Investigators said they had no motive for the killing. A neighbor was in custody. Police said the neighbor told them he emp­tied a .22·caliber revolver into Hall after knocking him down. Homicide division Detective D.L. Moor­man said investigators did not know why Hall was in the man's apartment or why the fight started. Survival of the fastest Pacific News $£'rv ice Scientist say joggi ng may bean evolution· ary trait that's protected humans from dis­ease for tens of thousands of years. University of Michigan researcher Joseph Cannon says jogging raises the body's temperature an average of four degrees, producing a mild fever which helps ward off infection. Cannon says the same thing happened when our prehistoric ancestors had to run away from danger or chase game. Their fever triggered an anti-infection response which protected them from injury Montrose Mouth 'Slave auction' for KS research The Amertc.n LHthennen. a social club, will hold its third -·s1ave Auction" at the Different Drum Fnday (tonight), June 18, at 10:00 p.m A Kaposi's sarcoma research committee has been named to receive one half of the proceeds raised at the event Bidding will be led by professional auctioneer Fr•nk Spencer and ··currency" will be raffle tickets purchased in advance or at the auction. Or. Didier Piot. member of K•rposl's Sarcoma Committee will start the event by g1v1ng an 1nformattve speech on the cancer Allan Llpcan. the club's chairman of the stave auction co'Tlmittee. said advance ticket sales have been ·nearly overwhelming· He added. ·every club member on one level or another is working toward an event that will benefit something we all bel•eve in. Lewis Pace co-chairman of the committee. said that 'the slave who brings the most ·points· (each raffle ticket is valued at 1000 points) dunng the bidding will receive an expense pa1d tnp to the Gay Rodeo in Reno. Nevada. and from there be flown to San Francisco_ .. Additional prizes have been offered by local gay businesses for other participants •·Mac" of the Different Orum. a victim of Karposi·s sarcoma. will be the dungeon master at the event -·- Gay Pride Week 1982 has started. and this is the fifth year Houston has celebrated the event ma ma1or way Of course. the h1ghhght of the •·week .. (11 days) 1s the June 27 parade and political rally That's all next week But this week there are several important events Interact and GPC have 101ned forces to present this Monday night's educational forum at 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. Guest speaker will be Houston pohtical expert Or. Richard Murray of the U of H Also. two films. Pink Triangles and Greetings from Washington. D. C. will be shown. The first 1s a film on homophobia and the second is a film about the 1979 National March on Washington by gay people -·- ThtS Saturday. 4pm. the Montrose Sports Assocl• tlon All·Stars take on a team from the Houston Fire Dept. But before you go to that. check out Cherryhust Park. noon-Spm, for the Juneteenth Festive!, being JOmtty staged by the MSA and BWMT In case you're wondenng why there·s no Houston Police Dept. softball team play.ing the MSA. they're weren't m111ted -·- The "Gay Pnde Day' fundra1ser last Tuesday night at Kindred Spirits raised a whoppmg $2000 for the Gay Pnde Week Committee Hundred attended for music. comedy and feeling proud -·- The Montrose Sports A11ocletlon held a nice appreciation party last Friday. June 11, for the businesses (Which mcludes the old VOICE) which sponsor MSA teams Ttie event was at the Trevelodge on the Southwest Freeway (Everything was 1ust peachy. except the food Sorry, but those Travelodge restaurant .. horse derv1es·· stunk Next time. let"s cater them in from one of our fine gay estabhshment.) Sponsors-without the t~am members--of bowltng teams. softball teams and volleyball teams got together to socialize-and brag about their teams For many. 1t was the (irst time they t-iad met each other Thanks to Jim Reagan (no relatron to Ronald) and other MSA officials for thinking of us • A new cartoon strip starts this week m the VOICE ... A Touch of Color' by Joy. featuring the adventures of Red Necque It will alternate with Murphy's Manor' on the classified page 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Nu ma C ti 5 300 IJESTHEJl'IER 11 u I\. HOUSTON. TEXRS 11006 .-----... ~#--773-526-6 557 -----------.. ~ GAY PRIDE WEEK CELEBRATION Saturday, June 19-Free Door Cover 9-12 Sunday, June 20-Gay Pride Beer Bust, $3 cover, free draft, 75¢ schnapps Sunday, June 27- NONA HENDRICKS (of LABELLE fame) LIVE singing "Busting Out," "Do What You Wanna Do," "Itching in My Heart," and more Advance tickets available at Numbers Show to begin AFTER Spotts Park Rally Nona Hendricks will also be riding on Numbers float in the Gay Day Parade Always "A Part Of ... Not Apart From" \ 1,,'.\.\ ' NU fl 8 6 R 5 ~88NiJ.~i:'lf 11006 ~ /.A , ----..... ..--713-526-6551 _______.. ......i iiiiiii ..... ._.. ~ Always "A Part Of ... Not Apart From" 1 YearAgo June 18. 1981 · Gay Pride Week began Houston's I 1 day celebration of Gay Pride Week 1981 began with a commemoration of the raid the previous year by police on Mary's Lounge, a popular gay club at 1022 West­heimer, June 20, 1981: Thousands protested in Canada About 2000 gay rights supportera staged a noisy Gay Pride Week demonstration in downtown Toronto to protest police raids the week earlier at two gay baths. Twenty-one people were arrested in the baths raid. The demonstrators frequently broke through police lines and surged into the streeta, snarling traffic, but there was no vio­lence and no arrest.a in the demonstration. June 20, 1981: Gays played firemen but no cops The Montrose Sports Association softball doubleheader in Memorial Park with a Hous­ton fire department team brought out hundreds of onlookers. Houston Police Officers Association offi· ciale had declined an invitation to send a team to play and used the occasion to make homophobic remarks. Junr 22, 1981 GPC forum heard from 'Advocate' owner The Gay Political Caucus's educational forum for Gay Pride Week heard guest David Goodstein ofThe Aduocate and The Advo­cate Experience speak on "Our Challenges During the Next Decade." June 23, 1981: N eartown announced fight on prostitutes Members of the Neartown ABsociation, a Montrose civic organization, voted to make the problem of prostitution in the neighbor· hood their "priority iSBue." Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm Henry McClurg publ•1her,fl(J.IOf Biiiie Duncan •nterl•1nm9nl$1)()ff.Sfl<lilot Ed Martinez Johannes Stahl Acel Clark f1,.ph1U Wilham Marberry ldvMfqirtg t11r«:t°' Randy Brown ttdvflll•Slnfl David Pelluck .,,,.,,,.,,,fl LytHams fldifflrtismg Founamg M•mt..r G•r Pr.., AUOC>•l•on N..,.s S•rv~H tn1,.rn•l•on•I Gar Nf'wt Agencv. P1c•l1c Nf!w1 StfVIU Syfl<l•cll~ FHtur• S•rvitH & WM•u (Sin Fr1nc11Co) Chron1clt1 h•turet. United FHlure Srnd1e111e. Jeflrey Wilson Randy Allred. Stonewall F .. lut• SyncllUlle. Bn•nMcN1ught POSTMASTER Send 1ddre11 c°'rect•ons to 3317 M()ntrose 1306. Houston. TX 77006 &•l>lct•Pl•Oll rel• in US S•9 per )"Nlr (521~). $29 P9f l•1t morith1 Ile •ues). or S1 25 per waek (lets thin 2e ..auetl N•tlOIUI *1~titil•fl ••P'•Pl"llltiv• Jot! 01SINto. R1vendell J,t1rket1ng. t1ee 81t\ Avenue. N•w YoB 10011. (2121 2•2·8863 Advflr1,.1ng ~ Eich Tund1y 8 OOpm. for 1uue r.......O .. chFnd1yewtni1"9 GPCers participate in 'Democratic Gettogether' Let tht·m eat steak! Hot dogs and bt-erwere served at the June 15 Harris County Exl.'C utive Committee's "Democrats of Texas Gettog<'ther," an evening of toe--tappinf{ mufiic barbed humor and down-homepoli· ti king. This informal gathering at thE' Shl'raton Houston of Democratic nomin('('s, office holden~. hopefuls and supportt>rs was quite a contrast to the GOP $1,000-a·plate fundraising dinner attended by President Ronald Reagan across the street. An estimated 2500 to 3500 Democrats were entertained by famed "Orange Blos­son Special" composer1fiddler Pappy Selph, who dedicated "Please Release Me" to Governor Bill Clements. Bob Ann· strong, who came in third in the Demo· crntic primary for governor, auctioned off democratic memorabilia. The theme for the fete was "Kick 'Em in '82" and was brought to the crowd by such speakers as Bob Slagle, the state party chairman; Gary Mauro, nominee for Land Commissioner; Ann Richards, nominee for State Treasurer; and Jim Hightower, Man receives 40 years in neighborhood murder The man accused in the kilting of Mon trose florist Robert Clark pleaded guilty Monday, June 14, and was sentenced to40 years in prison, according to the Houston Post. Keith Ray Hatley, 21, had been arrested in l<'ort Luudc·rdale, Fla., driving Clark's car after a woman with whom he had been traveling tried to buy gasoline with one of Clark's credit cards, police said. Assistant District Attorney Bob Burdette said the men had met Thanks· giving day and went to Hooker·Clark JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5. State Rep. Debra Danburg fright) and local attorney Richard Prmz nominee for Agriculture Commissioner. Hightower received thunderous applause to his comment: "Reagan's only problem is that he never met a millionaire he didn't like." Mark White, Democratic candidate for the governor's race, faced a technical problem as State Rep. Craig Washington tried to hold the phone to the microphone and White's voice couldn't be heard. Washington quoted him as saying if Flowers at 524 Hawthorne, where Clark's nude and badly beaten body was found the following morning by his partner Burdette said Hatley, whose original indictment also included a capital murder charge, had no prior felony convictions. but had been convicted of a male prostitu­tion charge in Dallas. Michigan House passes bill to keep library records private International Gay New& Agency The Michigan House of Representatives passed a library privacy bill that prohibits disclosure of who is reading library books. GPC president Larr)' Bagneris fright) and L·ic-e president Terry Harris Republicans raise S3 milJion at their dinner, they'JI "need a lot more than that to beat Mark White." Montrose was well represented at the event. State Rep. Debra Danburg as well as several Houston City Council members were seen meeting, greeting and politik­ing. The Gay Political Caucus was in strong attendance including president Larry Bagneris Jr. and vice president Terry Harris. The bill forbids revelation of the readers of any books unless the book borrowers con­sent or a court orders disclosure in connec­tion with a specific crime. The bill has special relevance to gay peo­ple because repressive organizations had started a campaign to identify people who use library books that present a positive view of homosexuality or who use other books offensive to them. The bill was supported by the Michigan Organization of Human Rights as well as the State Board of Education and the Michigan Library Association. The Michigan Education Association has said, "The right to avail oneself freely of the resources of a library .,...;thoutfearof how others might interpret one's choice of reading matter must be protected .... " The bill now awaits action before the Senate Committee on Education. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Texans take part on Oklahoma ERA rally Photostory by Bonnie Dombroski On June 6. members of the National Orga­nization of Women (NOW) marched with other organizations to the steps of the Oklahoma Capital Building in Oklahoma City. The demonstrators hoped the rally would pres.'lure Gov. Nigh to call a special legislative Setision to consider ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. The deadline for ratification is June 30 of this year Linda Lavin of TV's Alice was a fea­tured ~peaker Three additional rallies were held in the capitals of the "unratified" states of North Carolina. Florida and Illinois. An esti­mated 11,000 attended the Oklahoma rally , 10,000 in l'iorth Carolina. and 8,000 in Florida. Florida's rally was the largest political rally ever to be staged in Tallaha­see, the state capital. Judy Goldsmith, vice president of NOW said, "There will be a time when the oppo­sition will regret having made us work so hard and learn so much." A national "call in sick to work" day has been scheduled by feminists for July I. A similar event caJled "Alice Doesn't", short for "Alice doesn't work here anymore," was staged a few years ago. IS YOUR TIME FOR LUNCH LIMITED??'? PLEASE COME TO INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 528-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT .•• Only $3.75 1. Pepper Beef 8. Oriental Chicken 2. Moo Goo Gai Pan 9. Clwp Suey 8. Sweet & Sour Pork 10. International Fried Rice 4. Egg Roll 11. Chicken Almondine 6. Sweet & Sour Chicken 12. Won Ton Soup 6. Fried Wonton 18. Chicken Rice Soup 7. Teryaki Chicken 14. Daily Dessert J, LUNCHEON BUFFET 11AM-2:30PM Monday thru Friday 1/ DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY (4-10:30PM) * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE)* * CHIEF COOK WITH 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE-JUST CAME FROM HONG KONG* *DIFFERENT SELECTED DISHES SERVED EACH DAY* Delicious Food-Reasonable Prices Relaxing Atmosphere-Fast & Courteous Services FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA ORDERS TO GO, Tel: 523-2795 .nq ~~ll ill' JIJ "Friday-Happy Hour prices to all wearing Gay Pride Week T-Shirts 'Sunday-4pm Beer Bust Monday-Pool Tournament & · Leather Night Tuesday-Movie Night, 'Adventures ~~¥"'-£, of Don Juan' starring Errol Flynn -,., _ · -~ 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 lJllone UNITED CAB COMPANY "Growing with Houston" 24 Hour Radio Dispatched 654-4040 j By popular demand, our · ' Weekend Booze Special expands 7 Days a Week s5 Liquor Bust, 4-7pm Houston's Wettest Happy Hour , .. ""'-.. .. . .. ,. ··:.·. ..... ··:-,, ' ' ,, ..... 220 Avondale 529-7525 'X: Madison Avenue pursues gay customers, sort of International Gay Newe Agency Increasingly, major advertisers are trying to woo an attractive segment of the consu­mer population-the white, single, well· educated, well-paid homosexual. According to Karen Stabiner of The New York Times, tht:se advertisers are using two distant approaches, one through ads in identifiably gay-oriented publications, and the other through "gay window" ads in the general media, the lat· ter meaning ads that are subtly pitched to gay men. Those who make their living seeking recognition and acceptance for gays regard economic in-runs as the first step toward social integration, and cite the parallel assimilation of middle-class blacks and single working women. Others, mindful of black unemployment and women's uphill fight for the ERA, are more skeptical, because profit, not integra· tion, is the goal. . Advertisers are trying to interest poten­tial customers who are gay without at the same time losing customers who do not wish to be identified with a "gay product." The main approach at present is to speak to the homosexual customer in a way that the non-gay consumer won't notice. Calvin Klein's jeans ads are often men­tioned as examples of mainstream mes­sages aimed at gay men. One billboad for men's jeans featured a young, shirtless blond man lying on his stomach. Another showed o young, shirtless blond man lying on his side. "You have to be comatose not to realize that it appeals to gay men," says Peter Frisch, publisher of The Advocate. a national gay tabloid. Paco Tabanne men's cologne, Pour Homme, is another product that comes up in discussions of "gay window" ads, pri· marily because of a magazine ad that showed a man lying in a rumpled bed talk· ing on the telephone to someone the dia­logue portrayed as a just-departed male lover. Both C. Michael New brand, the account executive, and the creative director of the advertising account at Ogilvy and Mather, an advertising agency, deny any conscious effort to reach a gay market. But Newbrand knows that "prestige fragran· ces" sell best in urban areas. He is also aware that "gays represent a good market." "If we have a high percentage of gays using the product," says Newbrand, "we certainly don't mind." Gay people have mixed opinions about being wooed by Madison Avenue. Stuart Byron, a former New York Village Voice film columnist, believes that what may seem to be an attrative image is merely another incomplete stereotype that will in the end do more damage that good. For all the talk of economic overtures to the gay market, advertisers have not yet constructed anything vaguely similar to the ads that show single women, blacks, or ethnic characters selling everything from Italian food to cameras. No television commercial has shown two childless, attractive men as they brush their teeth side by side at double sinks or discuss the aroma of their morn· ing coffee The homosexual still remains a highly invisible minority in national advertising. Moi;it providPrs of goods and services still choose to dt>ny their interest in the market or evade the issut• altogether. 2011 SW. Fwy 526-6940 Half block east of Shepherd on Service Rd. Open 10am-7pm daily (Noon to 6pm Sunday) (Closed Wednesday) Good selection of fresh and saltwater fish & exotic birds Complete supplies Under new management Stop by and say hello ~~~ JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 11:30 AM to 2 00 AM 1408 WESTHEIMER 528-3878 Wine Bar and Restaurant Three Blocks west of the Tower Perfect for after the theatre ... 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Congratulations to our Softball Team for winning three straight . I NOW ONLY IN MONTROSE A SALON WITH YOU IN MIND AT 901 RICHMOND (FRANCISCO'S) Reasonable Hours Likeable Prices Hours: Mon-Fri 10am-10pm Sat noon-8pm Call us 523-0438 GAY PRIDE WEEK SPECIAL Custom frame your Gay Pride Week Poster Frame of Reference l'l'.J.3 \\n1ht·imer 520·0il0 •,,11 J1 .. pl.t\ n I 1m·, C11lf<•t· "'ho1o During Gay Pride Week. June 17-27, BASIC BROTHERS is offering a 15% discount on mer­chandise purchased If wearing a Gay Pride T-shirt or button. BASIC BROTHERS 1220 Westheimer 522-1626 Open 10-8 M-S We Understand ~a Your Type~ • Lette<head/ §::C Envelopes ~~ • Business Cards :i: !~ • Party Invitations ~ • Ad!;lflyers ~~ • Brochures ~> • Layout Service '/. ~~ CaUBill 522-4251 ~~ Patricia Anne O'Kane Attorney at Law • Criminal matters • Estate planning • Corporations • General civil practice • Seven years experience 3323 Yoakum 526-7911 Wouldn't you rather get bombed at home? Federal government plans to evacuate American citi('i; in case of a nuclear war are completely unrealistic, according to a sociologist who studied the reaction of local residents to the Mount St. Helens eruption . Behat'lor Today reports that Dr. Robert I.Rik says Civil Defem;e planners are wrong to believe that pc'Ople will instantly leave their homes, even in the face of immim·nt death. I.Rik, who intervit:wt'<I more than 200 familiE.'R living n<'nr Mount St. Helens, says many of thE·m disrussl'd moving, but few did, partly ht.'Cause th<'Y felt running awav waM tm ndmii;sion of dt.•f(•at That fN•ling, h(' says, may have be<>n responsible for the dE•athg of60 people who ignortod repNlh.'<i warningi; to leave Mount St. Hel('ns. SpNiking of thl' volcano'"' most fnmo1:1i-; victim, the r£>st•nrcher 1:1ay!o!, "ThE·re's a ht· tlr Harry Truman in all of us." For thtt government's nudenr evacua· tion plans: "Th(•y're tnlkinl{ about moving flO percent of the Population." Leik .sayR. ''That's absolutely not going to happen." Born-agains follow Oral Roberts prescription Warning: fundamentalist religions may be hazardous to your health, reports the Chicago Tribune. A Purdue University study says those who profess the strongest faith in God have the least faith in preventive medicine. Paul Femea surveyed 1500 born·again Christians and found they're Jess likely than any other religious group to have a family doctor, visit a dentist regularly or buy health insurance. Splitting hairs with the IRS The Internal Revenue Service has combed its complex regulations to style at least one hair.raising tax deduction. From now on, hair transplants are deductible as a medical expense, reports the Los Angeles Times. The tax men also came to the aid of those with too much hair, clippmg rules that bar deductions for rlectrolysis treatments. But don't think the IRS is going soft. It has no plans to change the rules denying dedurtions for tatoos, pierced ears or pierced anything else ' Alcohol notions distilled early Pacifit' Nt-w• S('rvlce A new study soys young people feel the effe<'t.s of booze before they ever take their first drink. A Wayne Statt> University survey of adolescents show those who've consumed little or no alcohol in their lives already bt·li('ve liquor will r(•dure tenAion, improvf their soetal Jives and make them sexy. The rt-,sear(·hf•rs say kids pick up those ideas from TV, and by thfl timE· they're old enough to drink it's almost imposRible to convince tht>m that akohol has some bad 11de effects, too. Thursday, June 24, 10:30pm The 3rd Annual Jock Auction Come bid for your favorite MSA softball player and special Galleon uniforms! Spm Buffet, $1 donation 522-7616 2303 Richmond Open 2pm-2am JUNE 16, 1962 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 * *GRANT STREET* * * STATION * * * * * 2377 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 A People Place ********** 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Happy Open Grant Hour Everyday Jat k ?am- at ac son ?pm ?am 528- 8234 The Deep B w M T Buffet every Sunday, 3pm till CHERRYHURST PARK JUNE 19 - NOON TILL .... M s A BRUCE W. SMITH, D.D .S . GEN ERAL DENTISTRY EVENING AND WEEKEND APPOINTMENTS .AVA.ILABLE HOURS BY APPOINTMENT 529-4364 4410 MONTROSE ~ Bonded Insured ATCO ~ !~~c!esC•O~!~OF~eas • Ticks • Rats • Mice Home or Business FAST SERVICE STRONG GUARANTEE LOWEST PRICES 988-1331 lntroductorv Special 13900 Call Now for Information Sert•tng the gay community PERSONAL TAXI SERVICE 529-4311 Ron • Greg • Steve • Richard 'Gay Jiseases' making news lntt·rnational (~ay f'i('W8 Age-ncy Srientif1ts are now finding an epidemic of so-culled "gay diReruies'' among non-gays. according to the National Centers for Dis· ease Control. However, Hexual orientation was oht.aim•d by dodors from their patients and may not be completely accurate, since 1mme patients may be bii;iexual or "in the clost>t. 0 The median age for onset of the symp· toms of Kapot'i 1H 1'-!Brcoma, pneumocystis pneumonia, and relalt-d inff'<'tions was 36 years for gay men, 31~ for heteroRexual men and 29 for women The outbreak of "gay dis ase~" has finally been making news in non-gay pub­lications, with thl' California LwmR Sun· day 8upplement of the San Francisco Chronicle carrying a major article about them. The Los Angdes Times also carried a front-pagenewsHtory in a recent Sunday edition. Experiments with chemotherapy and inteferon continue, with the results incon· elusive as yet. Rt>search will continue to grow as the awan·net1s of the absolute need to diR<·over the causes and the cure be<·omes dear Schafly says ERA dead, 'Eagle' just taking off Declaring the Equal Rights Amendment dead. anti-ERA campaigner Phyllis Schlafly said she'll now line up her politi­cal reRourreH behind other conservative causes, reports the Chicago Tribune. Schlafly says her "Eagle Forum," a volunh-er ~oup which organized opposi· lion to the 1-:RA. is turning its attention to promoting prayt'f in publi<' Mchools and a strong naional d(•fens<', as well as striking down librrnl abortion lnws. "We have the most effective political organization in the country today," Schlafly says. "Wt• win." Light-headed treatment Paci(i(' New• S«"rvitt Get off the couch and head for the chande­lier. Psychiatrist.A say the best remedy for depression may be bright light. Re1'earchers at the National Institute for Mental Health say depressed patients who spent early morning and late night hours under bright flourescent lights all showed marked i~p~ovement in health, diet and sexual act1v1ly The doctors ••Y they decided to try the light treatment aftE'r noticing that patients who suf~er from depression in winter frequently improve as days become longer and sunnier. Getting high in Davy Jones' locker Instead nf gold, future treasure hunters may find stnMhes of drugs at the bottom of the aeo. reports th<' Walihington Post. N~~Y 8t'rretary John Lf'hman said mariJuana-sniffing dog8 havt• bet'n l'xtrf'mely t·fft·c·tive in surpriRe raids on Novy ships in the Indian (kean-so effec· live, in fart, that sailors throw their stasht·H overboard ru1 t1<><m as they spot an approarhing helicopter. Lehman says he's so pleased with the program that he's planning to send the dogs on dope.sniffing expeditions to Navy ships all over the world. Horrors Ethiopian Cuisin£ And Club A touch of Elegance, Intimacy and Fine Ethiopian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Reggae Music every Friday and Saturday night Tuesday is Jody 's night Free drinks 10pm-2om Wednesday Happy Hour all night COMING Thursday, Friday, June 24-25 Paul Hurlock Live Reggae OPEN for lunch and dinner Daily Lunch Special with complimentary gloss of wine f r om 3 95 A limited edition of 12 images signed and numbered by the artist, now available exclusively at 'Byrnan's "Phantasmagoric" - The Advocate _,, $20 each or $200 for the complete set of 12. A constantly shifting complex succession of things seen or imagined. JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal •Confidential James D. Kristian , Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep confidence self·worth. shyness, memory. concentra· lion, self·esteem relaxation. habits, love emotion OVERCOME: Fear. anxiety guilt. depres­sion, nervousness, drug abuse alcohol abuse. anger loneli ness. weight STUDENT AND SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977-2485 DISCOUNT FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD 14 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 18, 1982 r-----------------~--- We're doing our part ... FREE RESUMES 50 COPIES PRINTED FREE! That's right . . . Absolutely Free! What's the catch? There's really only one. In order to take advantage of this limited time offer, you must be currently unemployed and actively seeki.ng employment. Bring us a clean, camera-ready copy of your resume* (along with a copy of this ad) and we'll print 50 copies on quality paper absolutely FREE! Why are we doing this? Because we feel private industry must do more if we expect the government to do less. But HURRY, this offer EXPIRES next week, and is being honored only for the first 150 applicants presenting this coupon. Quality is the difference at SPEEDY PRINTING SERVICE Bellaire Store, 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 The Community's Quality Printer & Stationer *Offer limited to 2 pages; please, no artboards. ------------------------- Gay Pride Week Special Soft Drink 1/2 Price with food purchase & this coupon 1303 Westheimer 24-HOUR HOT SHOT Commercial/Industrial COURTEOUS, BONDED DRIVERS AND CARGO INSURANCE FOR YOUR SHIPMENTS Montrose Voice Clip U Use COUPONS Each week in the Voice, Montrose merchants provide valuable savings through coupons. Look for this page each week. Note: some coupons are valid this week only. Others can be saved for future use. -----G--Y-R--O- -G--Y-R--O-S-- ---~ SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 JUNE SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85 -with this ad Open llam-lOpm everyday (till midnight Friday & Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~-----------------------· .........................JU.NE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Texas Hospitality Deep in the Heartthrob of Montrose 106 Avondale 520-9767 Houston Data Professionals nearing fifth birthday For nearly five years, the Houton Data Prof£>ssionals CHDP) have been meeting to provide a forum to share their knowledge, enhance their professional skills and ei;tablish social contacts ""'ithin their pro­fes~ ion. HDP began their operation in Sep­tember 1977 and has steadily grown to a membership of nearly 100 people. Jn kf'(>ping with the club's goals of ser­vice. they offer their collective skills to other organizations within the commu· nity. HDP members have, as an example, provided the technical expertise necessary to help the Gay Political Caucus maintai­their considerable registered voters data files. They also have speakers available on a variety of data processing topics. Recently HOP gave a reception to wel­come gay and lesbian attendees among the nearly 100,000 persons attending the National Computer Conference here in Houston. The reception was well attended by persons from many locations in the U.S. as well as Canada and West Germany. Although the club is primarily a club of people in computer-related professions, hobbyists and persons who are interested m computers are more than welcome. Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of each month at 7:30 p.m. For further information including the location of the next meeting, contact Bill at 523-6922. Airtight Tupperware may be recession proof, too Pacific New.i S('rvice If the rece"Rion finds you short of cash, why not throw a party-a Tupperware Party, that is. While other busine"ses are strtiggting. Tupperware says it.a profits increai-ed 15 percent last year, to nearly ..,.250 million, and sales have more than doubled every five yearti since 1958. 'Juneteenth' VI as the day black Texans got word of the Emancipation Proclamation The Emancipation Proclamation didn't reach Texas until June 19, 1865. after Pres­ident Lincoln wa~ assassinated. General Gordon Granger read this document to the people in Galveston. The reading of this proclamation was the fir!:it time that the black slaveis got a foretaste of freedom in Texas and it was a prelude to ajubilistic age that has become something special to most black Texans. Since that time, June 19.1865,has become known as Juneteenth. The Emancipation Proclamation became law by the 13th A1l1endment to the U.S. Constitution on December 18, 1865, but by that time black Texans had already adopted June 19 as their special day of celebration. Open violence in the north greeted the proclamation and the Ku Klux Klan raised the spectre of racism and hatred against the black American. "Black Texans have much to celebrate on June 19, a celebration that all Texans can share. We must continue to let the world know that Juneteenth will always be a rallying cry for all black Texans," said Jerel Shaw, a member of Black and White Men Together, a mixed racial group of gay males. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 PROUD TO BE NEED SOME HELP understanding & accepting HOMOSEXUALITY? Coming out? Rebuilding family ties? Making love last? Dealing with the Church? A DISTURBED PEACE SELECTED WRITINGS OF AN IRISH CATHOLIC HOMOSEXUAL By BRIAN McNAUGHT SIECUS REPORT Sol Gordon, PhD: "The most articulate and effective spokesperson for gay nghts in this country presents an exciting, unique and revealing collection of short. terse essays [on] the struggles and the joys of growing up gay. I can t think of a better [book) for introducing straights to the authen­bc world of gays; and one for those gays whose self-esteem may need enhancing.· THE ADVOCATE: "There 1s wisdom, insight and humor within these pages. Bnan McNaught has put together a collection of his wnt1ngs that will both inspire you and bnng a tear to your eye~ TODAY'S PARISH: 'Please read this book . . . You may or may not agree with every opinion • expressed. but every reader, whatever his or her sexual onentat1on, will be healed in some way by this experience ~ YES! Please send me_ copies of A DISTURBED PEACE ($5.95 each.) Enctosed is my check Of money 0<der for _ , (no cash please) made payable to Dignity. Inc., 1500 Massachusetts Ave., NW., Suite 11, Washington, DC 20005. Name Street Ol_r ~ - --- - State Zip _ _ Award winning national political cartoonist Ben Sargent, each week in Houston in the Montrose Voice Classified ads in the Montrose Voice bring results. Get yours to us by 6pm Tuesday to be in Friday's Voice ... and you'll reach thousands in Montrose. A New Kind of Resale Boutique Jewelry, Clothing, Gift Items, Furniture, plus much, much more Consignments taken Hours 11am-6pm Monday-Saturday 1405 California 523-5552 Rodney Chapman, our HOT new bartender, direct from Lafitte's in New Orleans, invites all of you to come on down to meet him. Playgirl Follies This Saturday, June 19, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover Laura Lee Love Lana Kane Eydie Mae with guest BURGUNDY WOODS Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-8pm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Nancy Kissing( aquitted A judge acquitted Nancy Kissinger assault charge8 Friday, June 11, report UPI. Municipal Court Judge Julio Fuente1 , Newark, N.J . declared that the wife of the former Secretary of State displayed a "tmmewhat human reaction to an offen· sive question" when she scuffled with a woman at an airport. Mrs. Kissinger was accused of grabbing pro·nuclear activist Ellen Kaplan around the neck at Newark International Airport Feb. 7 as the Kissingers prepared to fly to Boston, where Mr. Kissinger later under· went open heart surgery. Mrs. Kissinger testified she took her by the neck and pinched her after Kaplan asked her husband, "Is it true that you sleep with young boys at the Carlyle Hotel (New York)?" She further testified that Kaplan asked if she was sleeping with the bodyguards, "She asked me, 'ls the tall one servicing you?'" Kaplan said she felt an injus tice was done. She was quited, "It's a First Amend· ment right to ask a question. It's not a First Amendment right to get choked." Gay Christians held national conference Delegates from 15 national gay Christian groups met in June in Washington D.C. for the first "American Conference of Lesbian 1Gay Christians." The coalition pledged them~elves to racial and gender parity and issued rebukes to anti·gay denominational officials. "Justic·t>" was the theme often repeated throughout the conference. Members went on record opposing nnti·semitism as well aK urging gay support for "a freeze .;tnd reduction of a ll nuclear weapons and the trnnsfn of funds from military budgets to human needs." The ronferenc·(• strongly supports Uni ted M(·thodiHt hiNhop Melvin E. Wheatll·y for n•appointinK on opl·nly-gay mini~ter in Colorado. Thl•y ali-;o said they support the rt'<'l•nt upplication of the Universal Fellowship of M(•tropolitan Community Chun·hes fa predominantly·goy denomi nation of 200 churches) for memben~hip in the National Council of Churches Symptoms of Kaposi's sa rcoma listed Kaposi's sartoma has indeed given the gay community a concern about their own health and well being. Here again are some of the symptoms that have been noted to aCC'ompany this disease. According to the National Cancer Insti· tute, HymptomH may include "vague com plaints of weight loss, lymph node swelling, fever and purpulish spot8 or aomE'times lumps a~.ywhere on the skin or mu(·us memhranl's •--fhest• ahnormal patches of skin are not confint"<l to the l•xtn·n'tities and frequently show up in the head and ne(.'k area. Thf d1seaRt' may be particularly aggressive and caust> death by its rapid spread to int~rnal .ori.:ans (often to parts of the gas· tromteshnal tract. such as the mouth. eso· p~agus and <·olon), or it may be associated with one or more lethal infections." "Experts are concerned that while o?vious .skin lumps probably assist in a d1agnos~s of Kaposi's sarcoma, the rarity of the disease combined with its resemb· lance to bruise& or even simple skin irrito· h~ns m early stages may cause it to be ~1staken for oth<·r, less threatening, skin disorders." If you have any of these symptoms or do.ubta concerning your health, the best thmg to do is to Rl-ek prompt medical attention. Gay Pride Week Special JUNE 18. 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 To be 'A Part Of' the Gay Pride Parade Watch the parade from the best spot in Montrose Friday, June 18-Sunday, June 27 cf""YPRJ~~ Tequila Sunrise 75¢ I···~ 7eavemr-y8dpamy 4et~ S3S WESTHEIMER-HOUSTON-526-2240 WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... 4£11ff~~ BC NOT APART FROM CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..... . PAID ADVERTISEMENT We are seeking businesses to JOln with us in becoming founding members of an organization to be called THE GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD which shall immediately seek to become an affiliate of the National Association of Business Councils and the National Chamber of Commerce. Any interested business or "d.b.a." may contact a sponsoring member for further information. If there is sufficient interest, a meeting will be hosted to bring together those interested in becoming found­ing members. SPONSORS· E/J'S CLUB 1213 Richmond-527-9071 FRAME OF REFERENCE paint & framing 1533 Westheimer-520-0710 MONTROSE VOICE newspaper 3317 Montrose, third floor-529-8490 SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire Blvd.-667-7417 SPUD-U-LIKE restaurant 416 Westheimer-520-0554 TRAVEL TECH travel agency 5719 Kirby-522-8227 -- 1..I 522-8227 5719 KIBRY I SUITE 20 HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 AIRLINE RATES EXPECTED TO INCREASE 30°/ol Protect your future travel plans­Buy your tickets NOW Current Low Fares Denver s149 Los Angeles s27a New York 5149 Ft. Lauderdale 5149 Call for Details Serving the Gay Community TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? Star Pizza will deliver hot and juicy to your door COME PLAY IN OUR NEW UPSTAIRS VIDEO GAME ROOM * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS * Vegetarian pizza * Starburst deluxe pizza (the worksl) * Super sandwiches & salads * Fantastic deserts * Imported & domestic beer TRY OUR NEW LASAGNA CALL 523-0800 PLEASE ALLOW I HOUR FOR DELIVERY 2111 NORFOLK HOURS: Mon: 11 :30am-11pm Tue: sorry, closed Wed: 11:30am-11pm Thu: 11 :30am-11 pm Fri: 11 :30am-midnight Sat: 4pm-midnight Sun: 4pm-10:30pm JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 Sports MSA All-Stars say they're ready for Firefighters By Billie Duncan The MSA is packing action in jumbo con· tain<·rs this weekend with the hottest athletic tug-of.war possible being the Sat­urday softball battle between the MSA 8oftball League All-Stars and the Hous­ton Firefighters. MSA hopE's to light some fires that the HFD cannot out out. The teams will start having a ball at 4:00 p.m. with the South Division All-stars being the first reps of MSA. The team includes power hitters Ken Johnson (A&K}and Don Kessler(Galleon), who will also be manning the outfield. Another strong bat from the ranks of the outfield will be Ross Gore (Galleon) who has bet·n hitting over .500 this season MONTROSE ShortRtop Arthur Castillo (Galleon) hes also maintained a batting average that topped .f>OO. Batting only helps if there is a good iob done when the other guys are up, however, and the rest of t he team looks like the kind of people who work well with fe llow play· ers, a quality that is essential for an n ll ­star line-up. The MSA All·Stars in the North Iliv1 sion have E:IOme incredible hitters. includ· ing the awesome power of Don David~;on CSallv's) and Mario Marchena (Sally's). Wayfw Rom<·ro (Mining Co.) and Jes~e Yo~ng (Sally's) are no slouchei,; in the hit­ting category either As fer as that goett the team includes horn(> run leaders Je~y DeSale (Sally's) Barn Jim's Gym Galleon Dirty Sally's MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, June 13 17 Brazos River Bottm 16 Bnar Patch 13 Montrose Voice 13 Monirose M1mng STANDINGS 11 1 Woo lM< "" GB South DIVIS/On Galleon 7 2 776 J1m·s Gym s 3 667 A&K Jewelry 2 5 266 Briar Patch 2 7 222 Montrose Voice 2 7 222 North 01v1s1on Dirty Sally's 10 0 1.000 Montrose M1mng 4 3 571 4'~ Mary's 4 4 500 5 Barn 6 400 6 Brazos River Bottom 6 250 7 THIS WEEK'S GAMES 1All Gii'* 11 Levy F .. ICI From Monlrc go OUI A°'hmood pis! Kirby i.tt °'' [811 te ) Sarurday. June 19 South All-Stars vs Houston F1ref1yhters. 4pm North All-Stars vs Houston Firefighters. 5 15pm women's Soltbatl league All-Stars. 6.30pm Sunday, June 20 A&K Jewelry vs Dirty Sally's. 6pm Montrose M1mng vs Briar Patch. 7pm Montrose Voice vs Brazos RIYer Bottom. 8pm Galleon vs Mary's. 9pm MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Twins Royal" A's Kindred Spmts Sunday. June 13 4 Hell Raisers 7 Ctiuok·s Angels 6 Special Blend and Ken Bailey (Sally's). Pitcher )11ike Gonzales (Sally's) should be counted on to keep the Firefighters off base as much as possible. The rest of the team are consistent, supportive and very talented people. The match f(>aturing the North Division All-Stars will begin at 5: 15pm. After th(> fun and fury of those two games, theMSA Women'sSoftballLeague will show their stuff starting at 6:30pm. The list of WSL All-Stars was unavailable at press time, but they were chosen in a different manner than the MSA Softball League. Each team chose its best players, rather than the entire League voting on an entire line-up. Should be interesting. Like, what would happen if every team picked a shortstop? Well, that question win be answered on Saturday and the results should be good fun and, hopefully, good softball. • Number one tennis challenge Friday night The last day to challenge for a position on the MSA Tennis League's Texas Chai· lenge Cup team is this Saturday, June 19. With that in mind, Rich Ryan has chal­lenged U>p-seeded Fred Lopez. The match is set for Friday (!<>night), June 18 at 7:30 p.m. This should be the moAt ext'iting pre-tournament match played thuA far. in a season that has seen some real smaRhers. Rich Ryen has been ins isting that h(' can topple Lopez, but Fred likes that top spot and he is not going to want to give it up. For those who have been wondering just how good the MSA wnnis players are, this would be an excellent opportumty to find out. Those a ttending the match will be asked to donate $1 to the trophy fund (and if Rich Corder can swing it, they may get something tangible for their support). The post-game celebration wil be at the Galleon. Whof"ver wmA this one will bf" in a real preAsure situation on the 26th when the Texas Challengf" Cup Tournament is played here in Houston. As Rich Corder put it, "I think our number one is bt-ttt>r than .~>alias' number one. We'll see next W('('k. A8 for the doubles teams that will repre-- Renegades Hell Raisers Ducks Twins Renegades Renegades Hell Raisers Ducks Twtns Armadillo Grph Ktndred Spir11s Royal A's Chuck's Angels 10 Chuck's Angels 8 Armadillo Grph 8 Royal A's 5 Kindred Spmts 19 Armadillo Grph STANDINGS Woo 1 "0"0 0 Special Blend 1 667 667 571 500 429 375 167 167 GB 2 2 2 .. 3 3·· 4 5 5 THIS WEEK'S GAMES IAtig1.11•r~•IF(ll\()9Parkhl•l_.5SoulhtoTelephonee••I T•U feeder I<) M11r'99f !IQ;tll Cln M..,,.,_ go 1 bb;I<,, ! ..... i.rt A St•r game el L...,. F .. ld. on Emstll>de (Ill R<ehmond. ,.. K"by J Sunday. June 20 Chuck's Angels\'$. Kindred Spmts. 2pm Hell Raisers vs Renegades. 3pm Twms vs Armadillo Graphics_ 4pm Special Blend vs Ducks. 5pm Chuck's Angels vs Armadillo Graphics. 6pm Renegades vs Special Blend. 7pm Ducks vs Hell Raisers. 8pm MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES Monday. June 14 HIGH GAMES Steve Mcconaughy Rich Corder Gerald Hagen HIGH SEA1ES Steve McConaughy 248 220 Rich Corder 217 Louis Schneider STANDINGS 01v1a1onA 1 Barnyard Hoers 2 Daddy's 3. Eurotan lnt'I 4 69ers 01Y1S10n C 1 C1t1zen Patn 2. Cock-TMers 3 Slow Hand 4 Strikers 650 577 575 Action from last weekend's Jim's Gym vs. Briar Briar game, which Jim's Gym won sent MSA Tennis next week, they will be determined this weekend as round-robin play continues. John Ryan predicted in the June 4 issue of THE VOICE that he and Rich Ryan would be the top doubles team. They are. Next is the team of Fred Lopez. Bobby Hopkins. Four other teams are in conten­tion for a chance to play in the tourna­ment, Two will be chosen. The singles compitition will begin at 10:30 a.m. the 26th, with the doubles com· petition following. All matches will proba· bly be through by 3:00 p.m. The awards party will be at the Galleon (a place that has been very supportive of ma ny MSA events) and will start at 5:00 p.m. Besides the ma in action of the tourna· ment, there will be a group of side matches that might be called a "get-aquainted mini-tournament," with intermediate and beginning players from Dallas and Hous· ton paired up with people from Galveston. San Antonio and other Texas cities. Thei:;e matches will take place at the same time es the main tournament action and will present the opportuntiy for other Texas citieA to gE't involved in future Texas D1v1s1on B 1 Bushwackers 2 E/J's Protein Supphments 3. Five Easy Pieces 4 LOIS lanes D1v1s1on D 1 Happy Trails 2 Galleon One 3. Gator-Aid 4 Sidekicks THIS WEEK'S GAMES IA.I! p,,_ •t Slmd•urro Bowl_ 8200 8r_,,.1n) Monday. June 21 Regular compettt1on, 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursday. June 17 Results next week HlaHGAAlf.S Ray Hubbard Kevtn Hull Thursday. June 10 Paul Buenger Steve Mcconaughy Bob Akins Donny Kelley STANDINGS (Through Jur.e 10) 1 Kindred Spmts' Aces High 2 For a Few Daddies More 3 Just Marion & Lynn's Tropical Fruit 4 The Rockettes 5. Chases 6 Salt & Pepper II 7 Thursday Knights 8 Gutter Sluts 9 Kindred Spmts' Leather & Lace 10 4 to 1 11 Thursday Night Tricks 12 Hang 10 THIS WEEK'S GAMES 4Arl~•t Sladlum Bow1_ 82008•-•n) Thursd-r. June 24 Regular compe1111on. 9pm 224.201 221 212 205 204.200 202 Challenge Cup play. It will also allow peo­ple who Jove tennis to meet other pe_ople from Texas cities who also love tennis. • A couple of streaks, a stomp and a squeal Praise the Lord and pass the cleats! That little old team with the big surprises has a winning streak going. The team is The Barn, of course. and they now have made it three in a row v.-'ith a decisive victory over Brazos River Bot­tom, 17·6. The wholf" team looked good, but a COU· pie of the guys looked great. Mark Hall apparently decided not to go up to bat without getting on base a nd wound up 4 for 4 on the day. And super-hitter BiJI Schmidt sent two balls to homerun heaven for his fifth and sixth homer!j of the season. The other winning streak that con­tinued last week is a little bit longer_ Dirty Sally's stretched it to 10 in a row to clinch thf" first place in the North Division. Mario Marchena. an unbelievably good player, had an unbelievably good day. He was 3 for 3, and that included his sixth Pool Tournam.ents THIS WEEK'S GAMES ,,_,, ~•y. Jt,,. 21 K1tw:1r9CI Spmta /5245 ButlelO Speedw•r- 665-97561 •t 8 30pm. 11ngle etomtn•hon. $2 entry . .,., ,nner t•k• •II M•ry·111022 Westhe•mer, 52&-8851) •t 9pm A.tin.ch (6820'4 M•1n. 521-97.'.Xl) •I 9 pm 11ngie ehm'"'''°"· $2 erotry. W•f\09r l•k• •JI 1$50 gu•r•nt-.J rueeo•y Jwo• 22 Umpost (2417 T11N11 Blvd 521-fi21) 8t 8pm. arngie ehmt­n• t•Ol"i, $2 9ntry winner like •!l Wecfnad•y ./lJne 23 Bn.,. Piich 12214 W HOk'.omtle, 865--9678) 81 9pm 11ng1e et1m1n.1tl(ltl. S2 entry. S50pnze G 8 I (1419 R•cilmond. 528-l8031 •t 8pm. 11ngle elnnm•­tl( Hl. $2 8f'llry . .,nner tlkM •II pli.. MW pool cue 1hun<My ~2' Barn 1710 PKihc 521-9427i at 9pTt,, doubleel1'"1~t10l"i. $2 e<'lll)'. s251,,.1 round pnze $15 MCOt"ll round pn.ze .hAl M•lion •nd Lynn• (811 h1rvoew_ 528-9110) •I 8prn E J 1 (1213 A>':hl'V,)IMj S27-9071) 81 IOpm. dooble •h'"IO.· eon $2 et'llry w1n ... tlk• Id• MSA Tennis TOP TEN STANDINGS BLADDER 1. Fred Lopez 2 Rich Ryan 3. Ron Landrum 4 John Ryan 5 lester Vela 6. David Robicheaux 7 Jon Colbert 8 Don "Ringer" Smith 9. Michael Green 10. Michael Houston 1 Rich Corder 2 Da111d Garza 3 Charhe Brown 4 Terry Rich 5 Eddie Chavez 6 Daniel Casillas 7 Jim O•son 8. Randy Jierscheck THIS WEEK'S GAMES !Coun:akleeiec!onltllll'IOr1fl141of Memonal 0ri .. lrl ~ P'llr11r. l Friday. June 18 Special challenge for •1-Rich Ryan,,. Lopez. 730pm court 7 Sunday. June 20 Regular compettt1on, 10·3<Mm. courts 1-5 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 homerun of the season. Poor old Briar Patch had a rough day last Sunday when they faced a determined Jim's Gym team. The Gym wrecked the Patch to the tune of 16-5. David Brown of Jim's Gym went home smiling with a 5 for 5 day and Mike Scog­gins walked off with happy feet after being 4 for 5. Jim's Gym is only one game out of first place with a team that is improving. The first place Galleon might be in for some stormy weather. The GaUeon did not exactly sail over the Montrose Voice last week, although they did win, 13-11. If Barry Pirkey or Bill Fike had not shown up to play last week, things may have been different. But they did, and his­tory is history. Barry and Bill each had two homeruns. And that kind of thing is hard to beat. According to Jerry DeSale, t.he Voice players said after the game that if they could have kept the baU in the park, they might have won the game. • Monday bowlers to play for position Soon the incredibly tight stadings of the MSA Monday Night Bowling League may loosen up a bit. They wiJI be playing for position, with the top teams pitted against one another in order to get a better spread. In the meantime, the top teams continue to be efficiency-apartment·complex close. In Division A, the Barnyard Hoers got a bit of breathing room when they were the winningest team in the top four. Daddy's Jost four, Eurotan International lost four, and the 69ers lost three. So, now those three teams are still close to one another. Breathing up their necks are three teams who are tied as far as games won for the fifth place in Division A: Gutter Trash, Lowest Lane and Tammany Haul. In Division B, only 71 pins separate the number one Bushwackers and the number two E/ J's Protein Suppliments. Division C continues to be a free.for-all with the top four teams within two and a half games of each other. Division D saw some shifting as Next·T· Last dropped out of the top four by losing all four to Boozers Too. Gator-Aid slipped down after losing one to Busy Bees, and Happy Trails maintained top spot. The team thathad the mostexcitment in Division D was Galleon One, however. Chimps 'talk' their way out of medical experiment Two chimpanzees who've learned to com­municate via sign language have put their skills to good use, reports the New York Times. According to a Humane Society spokes­man, the chimps used sign language to tell They not only won all four to move up to the number two spot, but they set a couple of Division D summer records. They had a record high team series with 3141 and a record high gnme with 1094. Rich Corder of Galleon One had a high series of 577 and a high game of 220. Teammate Rich Ryan (a top-ranked ten­nis player) bowled a respectable 211. • High Rollers continue on Thursday June 3 saw seven bowlers on Thursday with 200 games. On June 10, there were six, including three of the top pin-poppers of the previous week. Ray Hubbard not only had the high game, but he managed to come up with two 200 games all on his own (224, 201). Also rolling along with two 200 games was Bob Akins (204, 200) who had two 200 games plus the high game last week (235). Bob's Tropical Fruit teammate, Steve McConaughy, who had three 200's last week, popped 205 pins in one game this week. The efforts of the whole team were enough to move Just Marion & Lynn's Tropical Fruit to the number three spot in the standings. Kindred Spirits' Aces High (not Leather & Lace, as reported last week) have moved to the number one spot again over For a Few Daddies More, who have again moved to number two. Chases slipped down to number five from number three, but the top teams are still so close that anything can happen. Besides the standings battles, there were two new records set for the MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League summer session. Salt & Pepper II had a high series record 3098, while For a Few Daddies More had a super high team game oflll2! Roll, roll, pop, pop-there they go! • Last week of WSL Regular season play Although the Renegades go unbeaten into the last week of regular season play of the MSA Women's Softball League, they still have not clinched first place. Either the Hell Raisers or the Ducks could take it away. The second game next Sunday between the Hell Raisers and the Renegades should determine if the Renegades remian on top. The last game between the Ducks keepers they "wanted out" ofa New York University experiment of the effectiveness of hepatitis vaccines. After some prodding from animal rights groups, university officials finally decided to honor the chimps' requests not to be used as guinea pigs. Instead, officials will either donate the chimps to a primate refuge or to Florida's Lion Country Safari amusement park. The animal rights groups are lobbying for the primate refuge, since another chimp was bitten in half by a hippopota­rr. us at the Florida park, in what officials there call a "fluke" accident. and the Hell Raisers will either determine the top or the next two places in the standings. Every game should be rip·roaring and healthy. The WSL post-season tournament will be held on July 31 and August 1 and they hope to be able to play at Fonde Park where the season games take place. "If not," said Claire Vasilioy, "we will take anything with a concession stand." Women's Softball League first of its kind in America Montrose Sports Association's Women's Softball League is the first gay women's softball league in America. Martha Richie, Sudie Raif and Eddie Chavez are given credit with invisioning the league when they met on New Years Day 1982. The first step was to proceed with a for· mal publicized meeting to initiaU: col'!lmu· nity interest. The first ?rgamzabon~l meeting was held at Manon Colem!ln s Kindred Spirits. Publicity ~as p~oVIded by Martha Richie and Sudie Raif, who made posters and flyers that were distrib­uted in the community. At this first meeting, the league was firmly established and elected a board which placed Martha Richie as president, Kelly Caswell as vice-president, Claire Vasilioy as secretary, Mona ~pez as treasurer and "Murt" Bab1nt as The MSA's Women's Softball League at play coordinator. Later the league proceeded to adopt the rules of the Montrose Sports Association and also the same " purpose" which states that "the specific and primary purpose is to foster sports competition among the membership for the pleasure and recrea­tion of its members, with special interest to the gay community." Along with the specification of the league's purpose, a statement of non­discrimination was approved in which all of the community is encouraged to partici· pate in the Women's Softball League. After these important points were adopted the league was able to or'ganize into nine teams. Much has been accomplished in the league's first year, most notably the unifi· cation of women working for the common goal of excitement, fun and competition in the sport of softball. Participants also were active in fund raising events such as the Basket of Cheer, the garage sale and an unannounced event to coincide with Juneteenth. The league is also supporting the Montorse Sports Association float for Gay Pride Week. Next year the Women's Softball League has its aim set even higher. Additional sponsors would provide an opportunity for every woman who wants to play on a team. Another hope is for more organiza· tional togetherness and last but not least, less rain. The league encourages anyone who wishes to participate in this organization to join and become part of the league. The Women's Softball League has started a new tradition of competition as well as fun, in Houston and in America. A MAN'S PRIVATE CLUB LOCKERS SHOWERS 1625 RICHMOND PRIVATE ROOMS 522-1625 TUESDAY: Buck Night ($1 admission) •WEDNESDAY: Leather Ni9ht THURSDAY: Gym Night ($1 with gym card of T-shirt)• SUNDAY: Buddy Night (2 for 1) OPEN NIGHTLY, TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY Books 'Gore Vidal always delights, and irritates' Tfl!•:!-iE('.OND AMERl('AN REVOI.l TION AND OTHER E:-;SAYS by (Ion· Vidal Reviewed by Daniel Curzon lnh•rnational Gay ~ews Agency I alwayH grab the latest Gore Vidal houk of ~ssays, he<:au.se I know I'll be entertained, mforml'd, and probably even have some of my own opinions confirmed. Isn't that why we read WTiters? Vidal always manages to delight and to irritate, and no doubt that's why I keep coming back to his work. In his latest offering, TheSecondAmeri· can Revolution and Other Essays, the author continues his light·fingert'd tam· pt>ring with the body politic. Rarely does Vidal .stroke it, never embraces it. Hie approach is always that of the world· weary statesman manque who laughs at what deeply offends him. I must say, however, that sometimt>s I wonder if the author is quite sincere in some of his beliefs. He always stands up for "tht> people," but Vidal is also one of the mort' obvious snobs around. He wouldn't know ••the people" if he stepped on one, would he? I suppose he takes this approach because it would be in bad taste to ridicule the poor and the ignorant. Besides, if one cannot believe in the goodness of corpora­tions and government, one can at least comfort oneself with the illusion that "the people" are somehow better. Vidal has few illul;jions. but he has to offer something (to him1wlf, if no one elHe) in u crazy world Vidal also t•an 't seem to leave profesi:;ors alone-although they've pretty murh left him alone. I've finally derided that Vidal'H totally unfair stereotyping of thi~ group stems from several sources. One is that, yes indeed, some profes.sors do write constipated prose. But mostly Vidal is getting back at the academics who haven't praised his work enough. The other reason is that the author didn'tgoto college (calls himself an autodidact) and therefore he feels compelled to denigrate what he hasn't experienced at first hand. But let's not quibble too much. Vidal is somebody special, and gays ' can and should be grateful for his "Pink Triangle and Yellow Star" piece, originally pub­lished under another title in The Nation. With a deftness Swift would envy, Vidal slices off the heads of Madge Deeter, Nor­man Podhoretz, and other new conserva­tives who have learned nothing what.soever about tolerance from being members of a minority (the Jews) themselves. How long will it take for old stereotypes to fall into the dust? Even Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, while reviewing this very volume for The Neu• York Timt•s, couldn't help wondering why Vidal d()('!m't like "high-falutin' theories of esthetics." What 1s th(' thinking here'! Why, that "outcasts" like Vidal always like the nou· V<'BU fruity . Apparently evt>n Vidal's rll•vt·r diAmt•mhermt•nt of misperct•ptiorn~ about effeminacy and gayne!-;8 t·nn't niter the miHpf'rn•ptions of Lehmann·Hnupt t•vt•n as ht-'s di~C'UH1'ling the mi!-tpNC<'P· lions! Ho~ehow Gore Vidal keeps on rem· pmgnmg, in both the political and the litPrary wars, managing to be both knight and old war-horse at once. When all is said and done, one has to applaud the indomit· ability of the man. .JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW LEGAL SERVICES 3317 MONTROSE SUITE 318 (71 31 523-5006 JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 o!-'<~LJe l."t ,4/!!!:ff. 523-8278 Open 10-7 Mon-Fri 2115 Norfolk 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Montrose Live Automatic: rock and roll in Montrose The first guest emcee will be Jahonau Reis. Oh, and here is some big Copa news: By Billie Duncan If you have been wondering where to find good hard-driving, dancable rock & roJI in Montrose, look no further than every other Sunday at Grant Street Station. where the three-man rock group, Automatic, blasts forth their particular brand of rock mad­neRR. The group ts headed by drummer Larry Sotoodeh, who perches with his drums on top of a large industial spool in the comer of the back patio. while brother Kenny plays baSB and Mick Rose carries the vocals and guitar work These three people putout a great deal of romp and stomp music to the delight of a very mixed bunch of Montrosians. The gay population of the bar, both male and female, is joined by a compatible mixture of n(ln-gay rockers and a ~prinkling of intermediate trash. Within the broad catagoryofrock & roll , Automatic has a great deal of variety, being as adept ¥lith Stevit Wonder as with the Ca1'8. Betsides the copy tunes they do, they add a good sampling of their own composi· tions, one of which h; called "Hollywood Eyes" and wiH be released shortly as a single. Because they play on the patio, they cannot use their full equipment or they would probably be fl.hut down. As it is, they are playing with what they call rehearsal equipment, but the how they put on is no rehearsal. While drummer Larry looks on from his spool perch, which creaks and jerks with the beat. lead singer and git player Mick rips through the vocal!il with true rock gusto and tears into his guitar like a man po~d. One wonders how he keeps from getting shin splints from jumping on the concrete. He twista, he stl etche~. he leaps, he lands on key. His guitar chords craMh across the audience, then his lead work intricately weaves its heavy spell. Chang­ing up the pace, he becomes tender. Well, tender with a touch always of gravel and concrete This is not music for the laid-back. This is music to sweat by. This is music to take home in your veins. This is music to remember late at night when you are not alone. There are no dance cl&Bses to teach you to move to this music This music moves Kenny Soroodeh of Automatic Automatic at Grant Street Station you any Wily you H it. The heat of the sun and the beat of the drum combine to practicalJy personify Hot. And Hot s talks the patio of Grant Street Station. stoned and drinking tequila. looking for someone to share the beat. Hot fills up with beer and conversation and takes on the dance floor. Hot soaks up the vibrations of the multi-muscled after­noon and takes off his shirt. Hot speaks softly in your ear. And through it all, the fingers and fists of the music of Automatic work through the crowd. Even when they play a song that waa written and recorded by someone else. they do it in their own way. Do not go to hear cloned music. You will be disappointed. Mick Rose of Automatic PHOTOS BY ROGER GENTRY • Duncan's Quick Notes Good-bye, Good Luck, Come Back: Last weekend saw the farewell performan· ces of two very popular Montrose enter· tainers, Mr Tiffany Jones and Champagne. ChnmpnKne b id for~well to Houston on Saturday at the Pink Elephant to a packed and very enthusiastic crowd. In the crowd was Tiffany, whose fault it is that Cham­pagne is leaving. He got them both booked for the summer at some wonderful place in the far northeast. Sigh. Mr. Tiff then waved by~bye from the Copa stage on Sunday. G_ary Smit~ ~ays that the Copa will miss him. Mr. Tiffany has been emceeing the shows there. So now the Copa will be having guest emcees every two weeks. Divine will do a show there on July 16. Meanwhile, back at the P.E., regulars Eydie Mae end Jeresa are reported to have had a very sucessful show in Victoria at the Pitts. Taste~ticklers: There are a couple of thmgs happening downtown (we claim downtown Houston as part of the "Greater Montrose Area") that should appeal to the varied tastes of various Montrosians. Magician Doug Henning will be per­forming his incredible show of illusions at the MuMic HalJ tonight and tomorrow(Fri, day and Saturday). He is the guy that turns himself into a six-foot shark and can conjure up a 450 pound tiger, On TV you can say, great, but the camera can trick you. But live on stage .. Also this week, starting June 23, is the Jaffrey Ballet at Jones Hall, sponsered by the Society for the Performing Arts. They will be celebrating their 25th anniversary. Happy anniversary! More from Max: Max Pearson, who gave us Cleopatra (in drag no less) has a new and slightly more serious work up for inspection . It is titled That Sad Jar of Atoms and concerns the effect of Lord Byr· on's death on Mary Shelley. The Shelleys had a somewhat uncon ventional household that included Jane and Edward Williams. Edward and Mary's husband Percy Bysshe Shelly were killed in a boating accident in 1822. A funeral pyre weM erected on the beach for them and they were burned es Lord Byron looked on. In Max's play, the funeral procession of Byron is moving through London in 1840 es Mary Shellc·y end Jane WilJiams look on and remember their lives. The play will be presented at the Hous· ton Guest Hou8e June Z:J as a staged read­ing with Renee Pemoud as Mary Shelley and Natalie Roberts as Jane Williams. Fred Hinton appears in a Amell rolt> eR Ted. lt is part of a program for Men and Women Together, which is being put together by Roz Vecchio. New Musical to Ope n: The Girl from Golden Gate will open on Sunday night at Chocolat• Bayou Theater. 1823 Lamar. The musical was written by Gerald Bradley and Rebecca f"mn and directed by Jeff Galligan . It features several Montro· sians in the cast, including Roger Gentry who makes his country singing debut in Larry Sotoodeh of Automatic the show as the obnoxious, but greasy, Baxter Rebecca Furn, writer for "Girl from Golden Gate" JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 IJoug Hf·nnml! Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose tfrrlay Junel8. lhrough "'h.irsd1y. J1,ne241 •PIANO Steph•n~ P1rker I Doug Mowery 9pm nightly e11cept Sunday and Monday at Rascals. 2702 Kirby. 524-6272 Jim C•ler 830pm Fnday & s·1Spm Sunday. Kenton Parton 5 15pm Sa1urday and 8.30pm Tuesday. Tom Wiiiiams 8 30pm Saturday. Monday. Wednesday and Thursday. Greg D.vlt 8.30pm Sunday: and Ylrgll Dl1on 5. 15pm weekdays at Keyboard. 3012 Milam 528-6988 Richard A.Hin and Dana Rogers 10pm n1ghlly (except Monday and Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar). 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Aulh H11llng1 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon-day) , Uonthare 9pm Sunday and Monday at Ba1a·s 402 Lovett. 527-9866 Lff LaForge 8 30pm nightly (except Sunday) with Aleundr• Hau Fnday. Saturday and Wednesday at Arno·s. 4002 Montrose. 528-2993 Marquerite 8pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day) and Austin Mann noon Sunday at Bacchus. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 • ORGAN Keoki Kon• 5pm Friday and Saturday. 3pm Sunday and 5pm Wednesday and Thursday at the Hole. 109 Tuam. 528-9066 • COUNTRY I COUNTRY/ROCK Bob Willlamt and the Trail Riders Spm Fnday and Thursday al Happy Trails. 715 Fairview. 521-2792 Ab I the Rebel Outlaw• 9 30pm F nday and Saturday and 8 30pm Thursday at trie Exile, 1011 Bell 659- 0453; and 810pm Sunday at Brazos River Bottom 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Fly Ing Blind Bind nightly fexcept Monday and Tues­day} 11 Miss Charlotte's, 911 Drew. 528..s840 Muit.ng Band 9 JOpm Fnday. Saturday. Wednesday and n1ursday at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 • GUITAR l"' 9pm Friday and lrtsh Folk 9pm Wednesday at the PatlOur 2402 Mandell, 529--8069 SuNn Chrl1tlan Spm Friday: Lyra/Kat Graham & Linda A.um Rhyme 5pm Monday. Wednl!!lday 1 Thursday. and Raw1lyn Ruffin Spm Tuesday I Kindred Sp1nts. 5245 Buffalo Speedway. 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Dl•le Kings 9pm Saturday and 8pm Sunday at Happy Trails. 715 Fa1Mew. 521-2792 Mala Harl 9.30pm Fnday and Saturday at lamposl '2417 Times Blvd , 528-8921 John Day & Co. 8pm Sunday at E.J's, 1213 A1c:h­mond. 527·9071 • JAZZ Manning Music Company 7pmMonday. Tuesday and Wednesday at Happy Trials. 715 Fairview. 521-2792 Robert Ceballot Group 9pm Sunday and with Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday. Wednesday and Thurs­day at las Bnsas. 614 W Gray. 528-9959 Paul English 4pm daily (e11cept weekends) at Arno's 4002 Montrose. 528-2993, and mgriuy fexcept Sun· day) at Cody's. 3400 Montrose_ 522-9747 WlndroN 9 JOpm n1gr"llly (e11cept Sonday and Mon­dayl. and Horace Cris by 9.30pm Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers. 907 Westhe1mer. 527-0595 •REGGAE Paul Hurlock 9pm Thursday at Harrar's. 428 West­he1mer. 526-2895 /manTRnsE\ Now you can get movies without cable Movie Vision bring you what no other single tele­vision channel can-today's BLOCKBUSTER HIT MOVIES and SIZZLING ADULT ENTER­TAINMENT, all uncut and commercial free, and the best of all-cable free. So, get the best of Family Entertainment, Clas­sics, Sports Spectaculars, Broadway Specials and late night ADULT THEATER in your home today! ALL FOR ONLY 60¢ A DAY Subscribe now and save 70% on your installation* CALL 522-9005 ONLY AVAILABLE AT THIS NUMBER •offer good for limited time only • NU WAYE The Broadcatt9" and The Zea&ott 10.30pm Friday Cutturdn The lni.nt.te 1nd The Degeneratn 10.JOpm Saturday. The K,.we,,. and Verbal AbuM 10pm Sunday: and Th• Spadmens 10.30pm Thurs­day at Omni. 1$40 Westhe1mer_ 528-4230 • IMPRESSIONISTS Jahonau Reis. Donna Day Naomi Sims & Hot Choco­late Sunday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond 528-2259 little Bobby . Tracey and guest Sunday evening at Exile. 1011 Bell. 659-0453 'Playgirl Follies' with laura LM Love Lana Kane Eydie Mae and Burgundy Woods 10-30prn Saturday at Ptnk Eleptiant 1218 Leeland 659-0040 • MISCELLANEOUS Diana Foundation Show 8pm Tuesday at Nurn~rs 2 '300 Westhermer. 526-6551 MiN Gay Houston contest 10:30pm Friday. at the Cop.a. ~~ A1erimond 528-2259 .,.•lent shews T\llftday evening at the Copa 263' Richmond. 528-2259 Wednesday evening at M1dnUe Sun. 5.14 Westheimer 526-7519 and Thursday e.,.. ning at Twins. 535 We$theuner 520-0244 Best Congressman money can buy Pacifit' Nt"w• St"rvi'-'t" Finally, thert-'A a politician who offers a mont-~·-hack tcuaranh_'(_"_ Arizona Con~e~sman Morri.o;; Udall ha5t sent supporters a fundraising letter explaining he needs money to fight against a right-wing smear campai~. But Udall i;iay~ the smear campaign may not develop, and in that case, he'll return the portion of the contributions left unspent. There's one catch, though_ Udall reserves the right to pass the money along to other candidates fighting conservative pressure groups. TURN UNWANTED ITEMS INTO BIG IM1l (Q) ~ !EW CA$H LOAN$ on anything of value, Including TV's, Stereos, Tools, Muslcel Instruments, Cameras, Guns ••. ANYTHING OF VALUE! Now buying anything made of GOLO- ~~l86r~t{;o'W C:~~dh~~~8~ol~~~~ broken or damaged GOLD •terns. GOLD pocket watches. etc e COINS-any SILVER coin dated before 1965 Oonars. hall dollars. quarters. dtmes e ROLEX WATCHES-men·s or ladies· Stainless & Gold Up to $1200 each ~ denrs 18K. up to $5500 each e CLASS RINGS-Top pnces paid. $15 to $100 tor tad•' $35 to $300 tor men's e DIAMONDS-Top doflar paid Arly size $200 10 $4000 per carat • SILVER-Scrap. Slerfing. sets, iteWelry Anything made of SILVER e POCKET WATCHES-Any gold filled pocket watches From $5 to $500 each 24 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 18, 1982 Film director Fassbinder found dead By John W. Row berry International Gay New• Acency Ranier Werner Fassbinder, the openly­gay German film director responsible for the resurgence of the contemporary Ger­man cinema, died on Thursday.June lOin his Munich home. At the time of hiR death he had been working on a new film , his 42nd feature project in the space of 13 yearis. Fassbinder was discovered. nude on his bed by h ou~emate and film editor Juliane Lorenz. The official announcement of the cause of death was being withheld until an autopsy could be performed, although authorities in Munich ruled out foul play. Another German film director, Wolf Gremm. for whom Fassbinder had appE'ared as an actor in his unreleased film Kamikaze. was also in Fassbinder's house at the time of his death. Gremm told reporters and police that Fassbinder had been intently Workjng on his newest film project all night. A notebook and a video recorder which was still running were found next to the bed Fassbinder came to American attention in 1971 when his film The .Merchant of Four Season:; was shown here. But in his homeland he had already estabHshed a professional status as a filmmaker, actor and writer. Often involved in leftist theater and sen · t1ments, Fassbinder was too untrusting of political organizations, regardless of their political i aocial philosophy. to embrace any specific doctrine. Openly homosexual, F888binder flourished in an artistic envir· onment that judged him on the quality of his work and not his sexual proclivities. Fassbinder's first feature.length film was released in 1969, when he W88 23 years old. The film, LoL·e is Colder Than Death, began a cycl.,. of 10 films, all com· pleted in one year. that represented what Fassbinder termed his "pure passion for movies." A devotee of American gangster films, the elements of illegal countercultural activities oft.t>n filled his early works-in which the director and his mother, under the name Lilo Pempeit, often appeared in the cast. His 1970 film about a group of filmmakerti in a hotel during the making of a film . Beu·are of a Holy Whore, began the explosion of interet-1t and acrlaim for the rebel director. For the next decade, Fassbinder worked at a neck·break pace. He completed 31 additional feature films. including ~ome which became international successes like The Marriaf.:e of Maria Braun, The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, Effie Briest, Fox and Hil!i Friendl!i and Lili Marleen. His just·released Veronika Voss won the Best Picture award at the J982Berlin Film Fetitival and his Jast film. Querelle, based on the novel by Jean Genet, was shown out of competition at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival. Indifference to the films of Ranier Werner Fassbinder has never been an atti­tude of his critics or fans. Even films Hke LUi Marleen, which received universal bad reviews, were heavily attended. In Germany Lill Marlttn was second only to The Empire Strikf"s Bal'k in gross revenue. Fasebinder explored themf2:> ofindividu· ale caught in the social dictates of their personal environment.ti. Often using the protagonist to decry his own anti·social feelings. Fassbinder mastered an ability to tranidate his distrust of rigid social res· triction into an universal axiom. His dis­taste for following convention manifest itself in hie personal life. At a time and in a country that honored conformity as a nationaJ virtue, Fass· binder apptoared the •·mad genius·· to the chastisement of the press and the l'ieCTet delight of the public. Hts public notoriety was that of an indisptonsible, if un~ haved. national treasure. His treatment of homosexuality as a theme in his films surfaced most obviously in Fox and His Frienda, The Bit· Ramer Werner Fassbinder in drawing b)· Al'el Clark ter Tearaof Petravon Kant, Ina Yearu·ith 13 Moon.~ . and hi~ final work, Querelle But in many of Fasisbinder·a films there are obvlous homosexual sensibilitieti. Fassbinder also produced a good deal of television work that remains almost com­pletely unknown outside his native land. A major l 3·hour historical drama, Berlin Alexanderplatz, was the topic of heated debate in Germany-where some of the nationalized televi1mm stations refused to air it-when itwos seen in 1980. Financed by the German State Television system, the television drama centered around a particular se<'tion of pr~war Berlin that is now underneath the Berlin Wall. Only a handful of Fassbinder's prolific outpouring has been seen in America. Quere/Le is next set to play the 1982 Mont­real Film Festival. Trekkies take note: 'The Wrath of Khan' nearly flawless By John John W. Row berry International Gay New1 Agency Almost flawless, and a damn sight closer to perfection than you might have expected after Star Trek; The Movie, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan is just what the doctor ordered-a powerful and action· filled two-hour version of what made the television series a cult event. While the original crew is back for this second Star Trek adventure, they have managed to get over their delight at seeing each other again and get on to the busi· ness or exploring the universe. William Shattner turns in his best James Kirk performance-bar none-and the delightful surprise is the introduction of another Vulcan (yes, Spo<:k is still there), this time o woman. a starship cap­tain in training. Ricardo Mantalban. as the outlaw Khan, is the sexiest 200-year­old you'vf" ever seen, and also gives a highly.charged, right on -target performance. Except for a diche or two at the end (remember, I said "almost" flawletis), this adventure should guarantee at least a cou· pie more Tre-k films and give the Star Ware; crowd ti.omething to scratch their heads about, sincE' Th~ Wrath of Khan has a scret:•nplay that d()(>sn't embarrass the artors. A surprise at the end Cl wouldn't dream of giving it awayJ makes the whole thing mu<·h. much mnre bt·lievable. If you like science fi t tion at all , then you deservt! to treat yours•lf to The ll'rath of Kha11. Movies The ghost of a 'Haunting': Steve Spielberg's 'Poltergeist' By John John W. Rowberry International Gay New8 Agency There is a very good reason why Steven Spielberg's name is stamped all over the Tobe Hooper film . Poltnl(n'it; Spielberg co-produced, authored the story and co­authort> d the Mcreenplay. Beyond that, it is a Spielberg film from bt'ginning to end; it has the stamp of the famous director on every frame. Now that'H fine if you like Steven Spiel· berg's partirular brand of filmmaking; some parts magir and Mome parts high religious mt>taphor. But I have to wonder why Hooper was thrre at all. And beyond that. since Poltergeist is actually two and a half films, who really dirffted whom? In caMe you have never delvf'd into the dark mysterit•s, a poltergeii;t is a playful spirit, usually ronnt'<'ted to a personality 1n the concrete world, that upsets the order of ordinary liveK by moving things around : ('hairs, tables, watt-hes. televi· .i;ions, somt•times even people. But polter· geisbi, unlike ghosts, are univen~ially non-evil spirits. Part of the Hooper ' 8J)('ilberg film is about an average middle cla8s family liv· ing in a housing tract in middle America A father, a moth(•r. a teenage daughter who lives on the phont', a younger son, and a five-year-old daugahter It is the latter who attrnrta the playful (usually) spirit. Sht> rommunicates with it (or them) through a imageless channel on the television. That's all very well laid out. the family are inherently interesting peo· pie as a unit. and Hooper , Spielberg create a RE"nsl'of tt'nsion within the first few min· utf'~ of the film-a tension that is the one constant and dept:-ndable element for the next two hours. In fact , the suspt•nsE' is ('verything m Polter1w1st; tht• spt><·ial E•ffffO;, while intt'n·1>ting, do not go beyond the realm of what statt"-of.the-art moviemaking is all about. The big problt'm comt>s when Spielberg t Hooper try to m<·Hh their elever polter· geists with a real evil and destructive haunting. Too many contradictions. It sounds more like Paul Schrader, who openly claims to do no research for his films (Hardcore, Ameril'an Giggolo, etc.), than the very ingenious man who gave us Jau·s and CloJ>P Enl'ounters But tht>n again, maybe that's not as weird as it eounds, since both of those films. for ull their brillance, had slight structural problems. Poltergrist has more than slight problems; it tmffers from too much of Spielberg's influence. In a film that jm1t won't wash, given what little we know about the supematu· rel. we are trt'atcd U> a religious experienC't' straight out of Clolie Encounters, along with those beautiful, but alrendy-donevio· lent doud formations. There is a medium (a spiritual house cleaner) who brings a jarring note into a cast oth<·rwise artt·d out in a low key. There are some physical malfunctions: the spirits cam<• out of a television, but thl'ir source of power is a rlosrt in a child's h<"<i ­room, and the point of <•xit from tht'ir bright-lit domain is a spot on the ceiling in the living room. How you ~et·t from point A to point R to point C is just not vt•ry clt•ar, but J>('rhaps you •hould forget nhout tht' titlt• of this film und just tfO he &<·art'd half to death hecauHf' no one does it better than Spiel­berg and Hoopn Monday and Tuesday: The Manning Music Co. Thursday and Friday: Bob Williams & the Trail Riders 9pm Saturday: The Dixie Kings 3pm Sunday: The Hole and Happy Trails 'Turnabout" starring Torchy Lane. Brandy St. John. Maggie Hosted by Beau. with special guest Sally Strirermier and many more 715 Fairview Open Noon-2am 7 Days a Week 521-2792 528-9066 Wednesday thru Sunday KEOKI KONA, 5PM-1AM Brunch Sundays at 2:00 109 Tuam Sometimes you get more than you're itching for. Intimate moments can make for pleasant memories, but occas1onally, something a lot less pleasant lingers as well­crabs, for example. Now there's RID,• a liquid treatment that kills crabs in 10 minutes and provides rapid relief of itching. RID contains a safe, medically proven natural ingredient at al­most twice the concentration of the leading non-prescription product. Each package also includes an in ­struction brochure and fine -tooth comb for lice and nit removal. You can buy RID at your pharmacy without a prescription and begin treatment at once. But remember, 38% of the people with crabs have been found to have something worse, like VD. So if you think you may have been exposed to something more than crabs, see a doctor RID ~Sale , effective v:::~~'. ~ Pfipharmccs. Dtvl.i>n o4 PfiHr Inc N .. w Yv1k_ rw. y...,k 10017 JUNE 18 . 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Had a piece lately? T-shirts $6.50 OPEN 24 HOURS ltousE of piEs RESTAURANT AND BAKERY A part of ... Not apart from 3112 Kirby, 528-3816 OPEN 24 HOURS 6142 Westbeimer, 782-1290 Stop buy and have a beer with us both weekends 'The Ultimate Baked Potato' 416 Westheimer, Houston, Texas, 520-0554 Sunday, June 20 8-lOpm John Day &Company Introducing Sundance Cattle Co. Fish Bake, Thursday, 8-lOpm Watering Hole Munda}' · Free C&W Lessons by Dennis TuN~~~~~ ~Y&ht \frdnrBday Country & WesteLl,,~i~~~d Thur,.da}·: Pool Toumament-IOpm Morning Happy Hour 7am·Noon Evening Happy Hour 4-7:3()pm NEVER A COVER CHARGE 1213 RICHMOND • 527-9071 Eirtra parkina on the comer of Mt. Vsnon a. Richmond 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Neighborhood The many mini-parks of Montrose P hotostory by Ed Martinez One of the things that makei;acitylivable 1s parks. In Paris. where land is astronomically expensive. every time a piece of land becomes available. there js a widespread and heated debate as to do what to do with it. Almost invariably, the end result is another park. in 'ipite of the loss to the city in ec(lnomic value. taxes. and so forth This iB one of the reasons Paris is the world's most beautiful city. They simply feel thn.t the quality of life is more impor­tant than its financial value_ In Houston, in contrast, real estate developers and financiers seize every stra· tegic open space and throw up huge office buildings, apartment complexes and shopping centers. This is understandable smce Houston, a city in its adolescence: has a lot of open space W waste, with plenty of apace left to be devoted to future parks. Still, prople need !(Teenery, they need tret>s not jealously guarded by security personnel for the exclusive use of ten an ts People nttd free and readily available grassy knolls to lie on. to stare up at the sky on, for children to frolic in In short, prople need parks . · ot only that, they need not only big parks, like Hermann and Memorial Parks. which must be dnven to frequently from long distances, they need parks located in neighborhoods all over the city. These small parks, sometimes called pocket parks, abound in theinnercity,giv­mg Montrose much of iU; charm and sophistication. In no other section of Houston, a city slavishly bound hand and The park at Rothko Chapel foot by theo automobile and limited to enjoyment of places accessible by auto mo· bile, are 80 many open spaces there for the asking, and often in easy walking dis· lance. This is one of the most inviting fea· tures of the mini-parks of Montrose, that they are accessible on foot. RelJ Park. for in~tance, at the corner of Montrose and Banks, offers a block-long park with a stream wandering through trE'eS and lawns. Benchei; for seating are aval!able, and the whole i~ located less than a mile from both the Museum of Fine Arts and Westheimer Road. Fronting on heavily travelled Montrose Boulevard, Bell Park offers sanctuary and a quiet place for conU>mplation and rest. Cherryhurst Park, a square block on Cherryhurst two blocks from Westheimer provides recreation and sports facilities for nearby residt>nts. With swings. slides, basketball court and tennis courts, Cher· ryhurst Park is a natural gathering place for pe"Ople in Montrose who take their exer­cising seriously. Children can play, pets can be safely ignored and the pressure of life in Houston can be momentarily relieved. Rothko Chapel Park. at the comer of Sul Chlldren playmg m Cherryhurst Park Rotiti and Mulberry, offers ret>idents on the south side of Westheimer a place of repose and serenity. Located next to the rPnowned Rothko Chapel and the reflect· ing p<Xil with its obelisk sculpture, Rothko Chapel Park offers manicured lawns and MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 10-DAY EXTRAVAGANZA Depart July 30th •79900 RENO RODEO <3 nigh ts> HONOLULU (4 nights> SAN FRANCISCO c2 nights> ALL INCLUSIVE!! '"'~"·°"'"'""'•' ~~ 2506 RALPH-522-8747 ~ .:- - -~(~~'·"--'lJ Bikmx m Bell Park trees that make sculpture against a summer sky Here one can just be, with no great need to do anything. A neat, well-tended open pitte of greenery offers welcome change to eyes saturatt-d with man made structures - that are springing up everywhere in a city that st>t>m8 ob~wss(-d with new buildings. There ure many other porkfi like these, all adding up to inlE•gral pie<·es in a tapesty that is Montrose, Houston's most livable neighborhood. Young in Montrose, Old in Experience. A full service advertising agency specializing in exemplary graphics and creative merchandising, with the dedicated ability needed to promote and sell your service or product. Give us a call: Walters, White and Associates 3330 Graustark St., Houston, Texas 77006 713/529-6292 JUNE 18, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 27 Montrose A rt New girl on the block: the Dr awing Room Photostory by Ed Martinez It's always encouraging to see a new art gallery open. There seem to be so many convenience stores, junk food outlets and expensive "gift shoppes" popping up around Houston like toadstools after a heavy rain that it is a pleasure when Hous­ton gains another artgallery,especially in Montrose (where most of them are located anyway) and even more especially when it is a good one. (Yes, gentle reader, there are, unfortu· nately, good and bad art galleries.) The Drawing Room, located at 3209 Montrose on the southeast corner of Mon­trose and Westheimer behind what used to be a Texaco station and is now a liquor store, is definitely striving for excellence. The current exhibit, entitled "The Other Dimen8ion," will be on display through July 2. The show features the work of eight artists, all of them presently working in Houston with the exception of Kelly Fear­ing, who has been teaching at the Univer­sity of Texas in Austin for 32 years. The Drawing Room makes superb usE' of limited floor space in the gallery, taking advantaA:e of window8 to give as much natural hght on the works displayed as po~8ible for those viewing the pieces dur· ing the day. The eight artisit.a selected for thii. show arf' obviously very tall'nted craftsmen Ali<·t• Cahann, Mork Diamond, Kelly Veuring, I>cinald Fox. Bob Graham. Otis Huhand, Nancy Kt•rn and ,Juan Vela all pro!t•ct works ~f finished and profesi;ional artists, eaC'h with his or her particular otti · tudt' toward and vii:;ion of reality. Of the~t' nrtisit, several stood out as efipeciolly appealing, among whom are Otis Huband and Alice Cahana. Mrs. Otis Huband and "Rebecca Confused," ml on cam•as, at the Drawing Room Cahana was born in Budapest and was the unfortunate victim of German rnncen­tration camp8 in 1944-45. She was edu· catt'd in Tel-Aviv and Sweden, where many of her paintings are now in private and public collections. Jin work in this exhibit centeri. around several piPc<•s of mixed media which draw their inspiration from the Qumran or Dead Sea Scrollis manuscripts. These abstract works invite close scutiny, for they sttm to contain more than is readilv apparent at first glance. · TherP iA a dense kind of energy in these works, somewhat akin to closely packed "Qumran Bathsheba," mixed media by Alice Cahana moleC'ules. apt to burst at any mbment into something unknown or unknowable. They attract and compel attention, and at the same time, they disturb the mind of the viewer. Mrs. Cahana's talent i~ powerful and obvious. Mr. Hu band ha• studied fine arts at \\'ii· liam and Mary, with extensive further titudy in Italy. He has taught at thl" Must•um of Finf' Aro. in Houljton. Rice University and the University of Houston. Savs Huband, "Art, for me, pre1wnts the poSsibilit.y of reL1elation. A food work is a prefience in the room ... . " Mr. Hu band's work occupies a position somewhere between expre~sionist and repre1>entational, but unquestionably atronJr and unequivocal. His anthropo­: norphic shapes, the careful attention to color nnd line are tools to deliver a mes­~ age that differs from viewer to viewer Again, in the works of the orti,..;t. ". --we should be able to recognize some hidden part or aspect of our .. elves." Th<" Drawing Room, in bu~in('N' since Septemh<·r. 1981, has made a bold begin· ning in furthering the caliber of art it seeks to offer to the Houston art Rcene. This show deserveR the attention and sup­port of Houston art lovers. 61'ze 97Rd 9aez, ?YIRmolli.al cfJatt <fJJ7ik Week-~ June 26, Spm, Cullen Auditorium featuring The Montrose Singers The MCCR Choir The Oak Lawn Symphonic Band The Montrose Symphonic Band General admission $3.00 Free shuttle busses from Mary's & Kindred Spirits .1,., _ ... .•. ............................................1. _\ 28 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 Montrose Classified Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Frt Sat JUNE JUNE 18 19 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 20 21 22 Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Gav Pruie Wttkc Salute to Gay a·uio1inesses • FRIDA}": Interact1 Houston's Community Coffeehou~e 7:30pm­midnili( ht, 34o.5 Mulberry aFRIDA Y: Lambda Alanon meetmg at First Unitarian Church, 6210 Fannin ILSA TU RDA Y: Gay Pruh Wee kc Montl"Ofl;e Sporta A880ciation and Black and White Men Together's joint Juneteenth Carnival. noon- 5pm, Cherryhurst Park ILSATURDA Y: Gay Pruh Weekc Montrou Sport8 Association All­Stars va. HouMton Fire Dept. soft­ball gameH. 4pm. Levy Field -SUNDAY: FatheT's Day -SUNDA Y:Gay Pnd. Weekc Salute to Dallas Day -SUNDAY: Women's Softball League games, 2pm. Fonde Park -SUNDAY: MSA's Softball League games, 6pm Levy Field rUIONDA Y: Summer begins ..'d ONDA Y: 6th annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Feetival opens, laating through June 26 .. HONDA Y: Gay Pruie Weekc GPC & Interact Gay Pnde Forum. 7:30pm, let Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin, featuring political expert Or. Richard Mur­rey and films Pmk Triangles and Greetmgs from Washmgton. D.C. ..' dONDA Y: Montl'Ul'e Sports Bowling League games 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDA Y: Montrose Sports Volleyball League games 7;30 p.m .• Gregory-Lincoln School. 1101 Taft •TUESDAY: Gay Pr<de Weekc National Day of Remembrance. 7:30pm, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin, featuring Montrose Singers & MCCR Choir •TUESDAY: "The Be.t of the Diana Awards"' Spm, Numbers 2, 23 24 '300 Westheimer to benefit Mon­trose Clinic and GPC • WEDSESDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Bringing Men and Women TOK\'ther Day, with 2nd annual Gay and Lesbian Arti.iita Show. 7-llpm, Houston Gueet House, 106 Avondale • THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week Gay Youth Day with swim party 6pm-midnight, Houston Guest House. 106 Avondale • THURSDAY: Gay Pnde Week float committee meets 7pm, Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway • THURSDA Y: Wilde 'n Stem gay radio show IOpm·midnight on KPFT Radio, FM·OO Selected Events in Future Weeks 9/N 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Wttk: Gay Hispanic Caucus Day, June 25, with fiesta at 2504 Ma:;on, Spm-midnight •IN 1 WEEK: MSA spon80rs Texas Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennis Cent« 9/N 1 WEEK: Gay Pruie Week: Fred Paez Memoria1 Concert, Cullen Auditorium, U of H, 8pm, June 26, with MontroF1e Sym­phonic Band, Oaklawn Sym­phonic Band of Dallas. MCCR Choir and Montroae Singen •IN 1 WEEK : Gay Pride Week. Salute to Louisiana Day June 27 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pruie Week: Gay Pnde Parade, 5:30pm, June 27, down Westheimer 9/N 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Weekc GPC political rally at Spotto Park, Spm, June 27 •IN 2 WEEKS: The Lone Star Classic 1982 gay aoftball tourn a­ment in Houston J uly 3-4 •IN 2 WEEKS: Independence Day, July 4 •JN 2 WEEKS: Mustang's Recreational Land Fund Commit­tee organizationa1 meeting 8c30pm, July 4, the Barn, 710 Pacific • fl\' 2 WEEKS: Lone Star Clas­Hic softball tournament trophy presentations. 9:30pm. Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Rrazoa, July 4 9/N 2 WE.'E.KS: Full moon, lo32am July 6 • IN 3 WEEKS: Bodybuilders contest, Cherryhurst Park. July IO • IN 3 WEEKS: Annual confer­ence of IntE"rnational Gay Associ­ation opens in Wru;hington. D.C., July 12 • IN 5 WEEKS: "Assembly 'R2," 3rd biennia1 convention of Luthe­rans Concerned for Gay People, opens July 29 in Houston B~l N( SSO WNE R:. 1) We •tlrMeecll wwlt n °''- d•re<:tOtY caJ bu .. l'lett.-•taiblishml'flt• ~ngasd.str1bu1oonpoon1sl0tthe1WWIPIP9' lbl curren1 O•si'Qv llcl_,•MfS (c1 all Hout.ton vav Nr• & pr1vat&clubl {fOrthe be"9htotOUM)f­town 111 .. torS) •nd d) fl )1\-Plolrt IOOm"l'Ut lly • lndiutH MonlroM Voice d11lrlbutlon pl)lnl1 COMMERCIAL SPACE Office-retail space for tease $250· 400 monthly. bills paid. cent. AIH. near Westheimeri Montrose. com­pletely renovated large home 522- 2822. 869-4040 Come out and celebrate Gay Pride Week Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10C pei- regular word or 15C -PE.A ALLC-A°Pil-AL WORO in 6-pom! type.•• shown he1• (If u11ng t- wo1ds '" th11 au:• or •I c:enter•r>g on• l11>e compute •t eoc • hr>e, u11ng rna1umum lrtguiar words or 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to• line ) 25C: per regular word or 4~ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD m 8-point type. as shown here (If usmg few words in this size or 1f centenng on a line. compute at $1 .50 a line, using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PEA ALL CAPITAL WOAD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75¢ PER All CAPITAL WORD In 1 G-polnt bold type, as 30C per regular word or 45• PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In a-point words In this size or If cen­bold type, 11 shown here. (It using few words In th is size or u centertng terlng on a line, compute at on a line, compute at $1 .50 a line, $2.00 a line, using maximum using mnlmum 5 reguler words or 4 regular words or 3 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to• line.) CAPITAL WORDS to a llne.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or JO point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $.1 per classified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct J 5%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a ;~~:::~o~~ instead. Call our advertising sales department for WRITE OUT ~our ad on a plam sheet of paper. Include your name, address and szgnatu.re, and mall or brrng it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. IA/ ORDER "f'O FltW./f" 1"1./£. t:llY 11EN/IC'E1 I fHIN'k :£' S/l(J(.IL./J L£"1R'-' ,t;LL r <?/JN PL vs, Youl/£ '8E£N 86'[) Our or £V£1fY OTllEH 819R IN rHE AIEl6WBOll'h'OOJJ.' At}tJvT '£/"! ... DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES MAISON GRAY APARTMENTS, 505, 507, 511 W Gray. Luxurious, spacious 1 bedroom apartments-$450 & up. References mandatory. CVPAIGAL EONlfea On•bedroom.26S• b•lll ~,~;,:O:Ve~~~:~1~5~;~~~ 10 >' Montrose Quiet remodeled 2 bed· room , 2'1.r bath, 2 story townhouse 1n small complex Reserved. well lit parking. $650. bills paid 522-()899 Med Center- The Works from the 'ow $40s! 5% down• 115~ avail. New construction. Park on Cambridge. Call Gary Sykes. 797-0443. Acker­Blum & Assoc. Realtors EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED THE MONTROSE CLINIC, INC. • no1n-prolil. commun1tysponsoredclln1cspe­c•• l•11ng in se11u•tly lr•nsmlled d•H•Ms •nn0uncea • .,.•CUlcy IOI thefullt1mepo11t1on ol Adrmnl1trat1ve 01r9Ctor PleHe wrote to !he SHreh Commmee. the Montrose ChntC, Inc ICM W111thetmer_ Ho1.11tan TX 77006. for• copy 'l l l,._.. DI.'""- -... requorelfteflts Ttlf!chmCrs•n 9Qual opport' ty employ.,- w1lt>out regard 1c r ce :>r. rel'il' 11or,1uu•lprelerer SPANISH TRANSLATOR VOLUNTEER needed to help gay llberetlon In Letln America. Pocai horH. Paz Y llbereclon, 219 Mar­shall, #115, Houston, TX 77006, or call evenings 523-9061. POLICE OFFICERS WANTfo­W<> metT •nd m&11 Good u••ry •nd ber lits ~~ ;~~a~\1~M~~10:,.~11t~•a~ture Call Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-321 1 GAY BARS (A.)1-'outton T•v~·· • · Gui<I member 1nd1:•t•:in placed'"' 1h1s directory •I thetf request •IAJA"S 402 LOvett- --521-9&66 W1th- rest•u­r1nl. l•Yt1 •nlet1•uwnent See our ad else·.vhere this issue Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • ~ •ARN 110- P.c•hc-526-9427 country See our ad elsewhere this issue • BAAZO~ R1VER eQfTOM --2400-Br•:oa-- 521-il~~nlry ~~=!AA PATCH :2194 w- -HOiCombe= Ms- See our ad elsewhere this issue e CHASE5- 1418 Rre-11mond ~ 52():.1&.i" di.co • CHICM:EN COOP - 535- Westhe1m•1 - -52a: 2240 See our ad elsewhere this issue • COPA 2631 Rtchmond--= 5 28-2259 d•sco w1lh id'IOWI CO\IE 2912 ~ -Sl'lephe1d - -524-0110 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations • THE DEEP 22 12 Con.,.,..._ 521 -3751 See our ad elsewhere this issue e DIFFERENT DAUM 17:,.J Wntrteomer 528- t1Dl8 •1"9f See our ad elsewhere this issue • ~D I RTY IALLY'I 2iQ Avonclele-529="7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue e 11.r1 1213 R1cllmond 521-9ci1i See our ad elsewhere this issue • Afx1LE 1011 e. -&.1i!M>4s.: country MSA & BWMT present Juneteenth celebration Saturday, noon-4pm, Cherryhurst Park • GALL(ON -2J03 R• ·llmond 522-7e16 See our ad elsewhere this issue • GAY BOY INTERNATIONAL (GB I )- 141i A•' l'irN rtd 521-8803 •GRANT 1 n u:n STATION -1111 F.,,.,,....,.. - 521-1\34? See our ad elsewhere this issue e HOLE HOUSE 109 T.Jam-=528-9066 See our ad elsewhere this issue • JR , •. p-P1¢1l•c °521-2519 • JUST -M-AR10N & LYNN-S-817 Florv1ew 5~9110 1Mbo1n • KfYBOARD -30i2 M1l1m-s2e-6988 W•lh p1&ro1ntet11inment See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston tn the Montrose Voice e ttlNDRED SPIRITS 52•5 -Bullalo Sp •v 6'i' -9756 predom1n1nt1y lesb11n ~ Jr ad elsewhere this issue • LAMP ~'" • LAZY !12-Tuam-529-9343 e LOAOING -DOCK -1135 Weslhe>ITlet--520- 18111 luthef d1SCO • A MARY'S 1027 Westhe•,.,...,~- sii.ea51 See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice • •Ml l"!I E SUN: $3•-Wetththmer-526-7!'19 nei .... , • MhS CHARLontfs---911 w o..;,. s21. BAOcci.ritry e,,M,.O NTROSE MINING CO 805 Pac•l<e $; e NUMllERS 2- lOO Westhe1m1r- 526-6551 tl1":0 See our ad elsewhere this issue •PINK ELEPHANT 12-18 Leeland~-659-~0 .,,,,,1hsh1, .... , See our ad elsewhere this issue eRANCH- 6621,, M•,, 'l28-87Jri eRASCALS -2702 Kubl' 52.t-6272 ""'th tn· t•w•ril_hveltl'ltert•'1'lm....t See our ad elsewhere this issue Come out and celebrate Gay Pride Week • ROCKY" 3"18W Oatlas-528-8922 tnb••n •1~1N: --53$ Westl\euT•er-520-02•.t- lelb••"' e VENTURE·N -292, Ml•ii- .n-0000 ORGANIZATIONS A CAPELLA ChOfut ,P9r1 ol jMontrOM) Church o!Christ ACLU~ 1236 w" Gr•y-__:52•-s925 AMERICAN LEATHEAMEN-(1oc1ii"" club). mffll •t 01tlereri1 Drum_ 1732 Wes1he1mer 52~85~~ ~IU~ F'llghl W~_ Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ASTRO A•1rlbow Ai11a1 ~•- _-524-4-793 (vo :e & TTYl 8ER1NG ~moria1 Mett10d11t Church- 14'() H•wthorrie--526-1017 UMed Method•SI wor­$ h1p MMCtl 10 50lm &!ri BETWEENTWOwoiidl-529-1913 m..uftery other Thur1 _ _ _ _ _ BLACK , WHITE MEN r•''* <BWMTJ· -529- 5008_ 7'7-9112 fMontrOM) CHURCH-OFCHRIST - -~1<" Wet!· heimer--777-9288 worship ..,...ices 1230Jlfl'I Soo Max CHURCH 0FCHR1STIAN F AITH-413wes1he1- &:...-;~~~.:':Z:e,,';B~t19! ~~~yrr::,,'"I Tues ...-eri1" en. r pr1ctoceWed evenin_!_ Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice C1T1iENS FOR HUMAN EOUAuTY !CHE)- 809F•""'"'1301. ·238-8668 bolird rnNl•ng2nd Tond1ys Be 1 Sport· puty beneht fOf MSA June 17. Moss ChlrlOlltt's, 911 W Drew COLT 45·s !toc11I Cl'-'bt-meets 11 Br1zos Rover Bollom. 2400 Brezos-528-9192 C0MMUNITY-CoFFE6iouSE- -p~Oje<:I of lnter1c1 c-oNa- AYTZ CHA YIM meets II Mi:-CR 1919 Decetur-552-1340. 688-8997 serv•ce & soc111 8pm 2,,d & 41h Fr1d1ys CONROE° AREA GaY Women-756-0354 CouRT OF THE SINGLE SiAR-fneeis II P1rik E1eph•nl 1218 LMlal'ld--659-{)1)4C CRISIS HoTL1NE- 22 ·1505-- - ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations OATA PROFES....IONALS- mH1S al l.1 OU1,,\ll Motor lrin 4015 Soutr.wfft F•y 522-1809. 523-&9n: meeting 2F'ld TUHc11ys DIAL·l·Gl)'·Att>elll- 524-2222 prOje('.I .,JI Gay Atl'letal L .. g.ieol Amt'l'I":• DIANA FOUNDATION-2700 Mason--52A- 5791 "The Bes! (>I tf\fo D""' Aw1rd1 8pm ..... ne 22 Numbe11 2 300 WeS1"le1,,..r. to ber'lf'ol•t GPC & Mon11oseC11n"" DIGN!TY--meets 1t C.thQlk' Sludent CeMer 1703 Boisover 520-9289. 52&-76.U lflM'l•ngt, 7pm ~Ill rdly MSA & BWMT present Juneteenth celebration Saturday, noon-4pm, Cherryhurst Park FA.Ml':_ Y & FRIENDS o_!_ Gt)'S- '64-~ FIRST UNITARIAN ChurCfl-5210Ftnnin- -52&- 1571 ""orst\1p service 11 15am Sun GREENSPOINT FM1980 Area fi1-Aw1y FrteF'IOl--821-9681 GAY & ALIVE SP-er"'g E•perience 1GA$f)·- 52 13115. - 1 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice GAV ARCHIVES of Te•H pro,ect oll111eric1 GA-Y ATHEIST league ol Anler--.C.--S-24:2222 nll1on1t convent•on Oct 1S-17 Amenc1ria Holel. 3301 Soulli""Ht Fwy Houstori GAY HISPANIC C...Ucus--=..2122 N-f'wman 112-- 521-0037 meet• l<d Thurtc11ys GAY ITAUAN Group- !12tHHM4 GAY NURSES & PHYSICIANS ol Houllo" ·c/o GPC. 4600 M11n •217 - 777·2287 GAY- POL1l1CAL CAUCUS tGPc1--'800 Main •217-521-1000 gerieral business meeting 7 30pTl 111 Wednelclays. eduu1ton11 fOf\lm 7 30pm ltd Wednesd•y• "The Best ol tl'le 011oa Aw11dt &pm. June 22. Numbers 2_ 300 West­h. e.< mer. 10 benet.1 GPC & Montrose Chm<: - - There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAY PRIOE-WEEK 82COm;;.11tee- meets 11 Kmdred Spmls, 5245 lkillalO Speedwey-78'- 8699 mt19hng 2 )()pm June 13 '" ··1-d1y C1iender elMwn.e th•• •uue 101 dl)'-tl)'-d•y l•S11ng 01 ev.ri\11 GAY SWITCHeOARD- )29-:1211 GREATER MONTROSE But1nesa Gu•ld 1P00- 1<>rong mt,,,,bers include [,J s cll.tb. Freme of Reference Mor1trose \101te. Speedy Pt-1'1\,ng Spvd-U-L,ke Tr1vel Tech tr1vel agency See our ad elsewhere this issue HEPA.Tilus H0TL1NE--J·;;o, ·o;v•d 11 1n- 2287 a proiect ol GPC's MedlCll Comm11tee HOME COALITiON--1409 0.-kaale-s2Hl196 HOM-OP-HILE- INTERFAITH .... ,.--;,ce::ng Minor--523-6969 Come out and celebrate Gay Pride Week Houstotl Are1 GAY & LESBIAN ENGt°NEERS-& Sc1eril•SIS- -526-7386 meell 7pm '1h Wedri"· dsys HOUSTON CoMMU-N1TYCLOwN-s--:.852:8ii4 ,H.O.,U sTON HUMAN- RIGHTS LEAGUE Sit­HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE-CLUB. -CJO Miry"• 1022w .. t'Je1rner- 528-M51 See our ad elsewhere this issue 1NTfGR1TY HOUSTON 1former1y EJi~sec~1 !ntegntyJ-meeta 1t Alllry HOuM 6265 Ml•"' 526--0555 ~·"~1~pm21'1dTuesd~• e 1NTERACT HOUSIO'I ·I H Inc;; lormerly ntegroty HCUllOtl)-3"-05 Mllolberry-529-7014 "9'-1732 ConwnUt"lity Colleeflou11 7 30ptn· m1dn1ghl Fri t>oerd meet 'IQ 13'.lpm 111 Thurt­dlys iwarof'd toutt.ons) ecluclllO"•I !orull"I 7..lOpm )rd ThursdlyS Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard. 529-3211 e Kf>.-- R1clio FM·90- 419 Lovell Blvd 526 4000 W11cte 11 Stein gmy 11d., show 10pm­m• ONQM Tt>1 t1 LAMBDA ALANON" m .. 11 al hi Ut•taroeri Church. 5210 F1'1ml'I 521-9172 "'9Clt•ng Fri evemng LESelANS & GAY PEOPlE 1n Med•Cll\8-665- 060; m.etong 1 30pm hi Slturd1ys LUTHERANS coNcERiliED-meets •t Grace l"'!heren Church 2515 Wiugh-621-0863. 453- 1143. n'lef't'ng 2nd & 4th Tl.IM evenmgs Assembly ·e2 3rd t11enn111 cc,,,....,,t1on ol LlJlh­er1ns Concerl'led l0t Gay J>.ople ,1.,,29--AuQ I METROPOLITAN Commun.ly Ch..,,-cl' ct the Aesurre<:toon •MCCRl-1919 0.Cllur-861• :!:: ro~~~ ~~;::~" ~· '~~·~:r-memberlh. P 1nQU••ers <:laU 7 3Clpm Mori Aianon meeting 8pn'I Mon . Alcohc*es An011)'tn- 0us m.el<ng 8pm MOl"I & Thurs _ MCCR Chotr 0.y ProOe Week Fred PHl Memor11I Co'1Cll1 Cut• AIJO•lorll.lm u (ll H June 2& Tremendous circu lation in Montrose-the Voice MONTROSE c1v1CCiUb cNHrtown)- meets ai Ber"'g Church. 1A40 Hawlliorl\8-522-1000 meetmg 730Jlfl'l lourth Tuetc11ys MONTROSE-CL1Nlc- ~Welttieimer-528· ~.! l~u! 1 ~::;,,~i~:'D~::. ...& ;,~~::' Spm. June 22. Number• 2 JOO We1the•"'9r. to berMf•I Chruc l"d GPC MoNTR05EC6uNSEL1NGC.n11r--900Love" •102-529-0037 "40NTROSEPATR0L-52o Wnlhe•mer--52&:" 2273 MONT-ROsESiNGfRS--=-meei• 11MCCR.1i1i Decetur-528-0550· Gay PrnM Week Fred Paez Memor•ll Concert Cullert Auditcrium. U ol H 'M'"O'"N T26R OSE SPORTS ASS0C•ATl0N {MSAl- 622-3JO.t Be 1 59of1' JM!rty Juoe 17 II M•o Ch1rlCl18 s. 911 W Drew 190"torlld by CHE MOn1ro.. sPOrt1 eowuNG ~-pi.-yl 9t S11d1um Bowl 8200 8rH1ma1n--96Q.-1S18. 9e1·1523 g1,._ Mon & Thutt ew.mngs JUNE 18, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 29 Tongue in Cheek Only 7? I thought there were more By Peter Harrison 1982 Stonewall Feature8 Syndicate If you remember the Bible, and have always wondered whatthose foolish virgins did with the oil for their lamps, here's a scoop: it's been rediscovered in Jerry Falwell's smile. Rev. Jerry has been hot on the trail of sinners lately, you and I among them. Of course, that's nothing new. I've had so much sulphur and brimstone rained down on my head over the years that I could strike fire if rubbed against a scratchy surface. Ordinarily, I'd just let ol' Jercarry on and forget him. Buthejes' keeps a 'comin' across the teevee, cal1in' down the wrath of God on the likes of you and me, and a'gettin' thelikesofHon. Jesse Helms to write up a passel oflegislatin' about how us folks who oughtn't to speiik our names should live. Shoot! I thought Rev. Jer and Hon. Jess and I had an agree­ment. I planned on stayin · out of the pulpit, as long as Jerry stayed out of the Statehouse. Now all bets are off. I don't have no big-timeteevee show behind me, but you folks are goin' to have to show your faith by imaginin' the crepe de chine choir robe that graces my manly shoulders. the hint of blue in my silver hair, the swaying figures of the Heavenly Body Choir behind me (halle­lujah!) hummin' the anthem as I preach. (My Man? Strangers m the Night? "Brothers and sisters, lovers and possibilities. I've come before you this evening, or very nearly. Be that as it may, let me bring to your attention the Seven Deadly Sins. Already, I see by your smiles that you are relieved. You thought there were more, didn't you'? Well, you must remember that there are sins and there are specializations. "Let us not cast the first stones. But once the stones are tossed, let's get our rocks off at the oppostion. Who are the opposition? Be not deceived. Even though the speech and delivery of Rev. Ernest may sound likethatofTruman Capote, he is not of this flock. It may be the very fact that he has not been flocked in years that makes him uncharitable. "Let us rather look at God's eternal scoreboard, the Seven Deadly Sins. Let's take them one by one and see who's behind. Your dirty minds lead us from that unfortunate pun to the first sin: Lust. Ah, brothers and sisters, hunks and numbers, here we take a one-nothing lead. There is no doubt that we are lustful and horny, like unto that great sinner, Jimmy Carter. But how about Anger. No, my sinning siblings, that is not our fault. Anger maketh an ugly face, and who needs it? Rev. Jeris more likely to express that emotion when talking about us or the women who want to control their own lives. Enuy? Ah, we all envy the better-looking, the smartly-clothed. But what of our opponents? Is there no envy, one for the other, of higher ratings on the teevee? Verily, this sin is a draw. At the end of the celestial third, the score is one-and-one half sins each. Pride is the next sin, and those of us who celebrate Gay Pride are guilty of it. But what of theprideofnumbers of watchers, of size of the place of worship? Again, Sin Number Four brings a draw. Sloth is a trespass none of us can afford in the era of Reagan om· ics. This is a strikeout for both sides. Covetousness confuses some of you, due to the text of the bibli­cal passage, "thou shall not covet thy neighbor's ass." This is a snare and a delusion, a sin falling under ''lust." Covetousness has more to do with an evangelist who builds a glass temple, then cries out for money to buy Windex. Since every evangelist begs for money on each broadcast over a station that costs millions, score one for the oppostion. At the bottom of the sixth, the score stands evangelists 3, gays 2. Gluttony is the last sin, and I'm afraid the evangelists take us on that one, too. Rev. Jerry looks as if he's pretty big on the biscuits-and-gravy circuit, and the PTL Club has a pair of singers that have to pay excess weight charges on the airlines before they show their luggage. Compare this with the lineup on Polk Street or Third Avenue. Undoubtedly, the winners are the gays, with a two·sin lead over their opponents. "Be sure to join us next week when the Range Grazers Associa­tion of Montana sings "For We Like Sheep," from Handel's work, and my sermon is from the text, "Beware of false prophets." 30 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 18, 1982 " Wouldn' t you know it! ... There goes our marlc:et 10< those thingsl" " Oh. Now this is from last summer, when Helen and I went to hell and back." Gary Larson "Hol Just like every time, you'll gel about a I 00 yards out before you start heading back.'' " Grunt, snort ... grunt grunt, snort ... " " Hold it right there, stranger. We got us a hatcheck law in thi1 town ... So just take it off niiiiice and slow." ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations Mont;;°se S9o•t• SOFTBALL·-games al Levy Field. EHtllde olf Richmond- -523-8802 days 523-0413eve~ 1Nson play Apr•l 17-July 18.Gay Pnde Week all 1t1r games •pm June 19 agaonst Houston fire Dept teem. Lorie Star Classic July 3-• pl1yoll1 July 24-Aug 1. Gay Softball World Senet on San Francisco Aug 31-Sept 4 ~lrOM Sport. WOMEN'S SOFTBALL- ·728~ M°'1lroae Sports TENN1s-=T24-21s-1 -T9xlS Cup Jun• 26 •t Memor1el Tennis Center Mon.tiOleSport• VCiLLEVBAl.l_:_-880-29.ld' gemes 7 30pm Tu•. GreQOry-Lmeoln school 1101 Tell. toum•menl Aug 14 et Fonde AeerH­llonel Center MONtAOSESvMPHON1Ct;;"nd-"-IS 11 e.­'" 11 Church. 14'0 Hewthorne- 527-9669 meet '"II 7 30pm Tuet G•y Pride Week Fred PHZ M11tmot'••I Concet't Cullet1 Aud•tor1um. U of H Jv~26 MUSTANGS (IOC-;•l club) -/Mets •1-lhe Barn 710 P•cihc--528-9427 club mgfll Thurs AecrNttone• Lend f~ Committee <><11•0.U hone! IN9trr1g 8 30pm. July 4 OPEAAT ON OOCUMENTAT10N P1018Ct 01 GPC AECRE-AT10NAL Lend fund Committee proiecl ol M!lat•ng Club ~~~! Un•v G1y1L...;ian SuWort G-roup-- 524 TEXAS BAY AREA Q.yl· -J32-J1: 7 meet10Q Tf"Jf l'We~fl9 MSA & BWMT present Juneteenth celebration Saturday, noon-4pm, Cherryhurst Park TEXAS GAV CONFERENCE IX- -869-7231 coo­l• er>el Sept 3-5 1n Houston TEXAS GAY TAS-K FORCE - 529-7014_ 522- 1859 st•te conhtr9nte m Houston Sept 3-5 TEXAS HUMAN R1GHTs-FOUrlde110r.- t51i Meryl•fld- -526-9139 TEXASR10ERs·-CIO Mery·s. 1022-Wathet­mer ·521J.88.51 UNITARIAN. UNI VERSA UST G•y C•ucus- ~o Ill Unolerien Church. 5210 F1nn1n--520-9787. Sl&-6842 ll"lfff•no 3rd 5<111 elt111rnoons WESLAVAN FEJ.LOWSHIP- ~-889'.11_ Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice WESTHEIMER COlONY ARTS Auoc11to0n- 90fl W11sthe1mer· -521-0133 Ian leatv•al Oct 1&- " PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ~~n~~R~~cEe.he~1~""J:1r= 1~1~C:" ~~,!~ llOOr HoUlton TX7700I Ed1torreservesrighttu =1,~0:~-;ic ~~·~~;9~~p':!1~·: bt1Q•nnlnoot 1r.c ... ,,,'9d, Mete. 24 ""'th un1verul mind. aeeto;s someone ""'l'IO cen Mach me end Shere w1th me the re•l rnean•t1g ol l•le Not 100 much 1010 meter•el =1~1~~t11~~!r:1i-:::&;;O:S~~ MHOOwglen. •217 HoUll_~· TX 77042 ESTATE SALE. FRIDAY & SATUR­DAY, NOON-6PM,3901 GREELY AT SUL ROSS ITEMS $1 to $300 GOOD THINGS, NO JUNK Relax and en1ov the BodyWorks massage. Gitt certificates Call Bit!, 526-2470 t;~·~"c;~::~~c~~1 ~~in'oi~~·2~!~ There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice BODY MASSAGE Your place or mine Afternoon or evenings. Bruce, 521·2009 FOR AN A TMO~ERf ol toe1el venety •fld ,,..-rnony. )Oltl BWMT, ""here the empt\ISit 11 on ::S~-;'51'11'1' For lfl!cwmet•on. Cll! 523-2997 or 747 Come out and celebrate Gay Pride Week PRIVATE GAY CLUBS • ROX lh CE. 162!l R1cnmona. 5U-16' ""~ •CLUB HOUSTON Belhs· ~~05 hnn1n -659- 4~ m•te See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 • FRENCH QU,f,RTER Ttieal91'· ~Jl louill· .,... S27-07112 .... ie • MIDTOWNI!: SPA :J 100 Fal'll'Un 622-2379 ,~. ~ r;>ur Ad elsewher~ tl'ljJ issue. RESTAURANTS e 8ACCHUS--523 Lovell--S2J-3396 eeAJA"S ~402 L;..:eu~=-521-98&6 See our ad elsewhere this issue • BRASSERIE TOO- 1322 Westhe•mer--526- 0355 • CHAPUL TAPEC--813 Richmond-522-2365 eD-ECATUA CAFE-708 Vi- Alabama· -528- 8837 • GREEK ISLANo"--302 T~lim- -522-7040 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • GYRO GYROS Sandwich Shop- 1536 Westl'leo'tWt -6:.>8'-41555 See our ad elsewhere this issue •HAARAR'S Eth•OP•in ·cu .•. ne 428 Westl\el"*- !J2&.2895 See our ad elsewhere this issue • HONG THONG -424 Westhell't'ler-528-827!5 See our ad elsewhere this issue • HOUSE OF-PIES. "112 t<lrby-·5~3816 • INTERNATIONAL Clllb Rea11ur1ri1-i:i3 W9llh9N'he1 -523-2195 See our ad elsewhere this issue • JADE DRAGON 224 Westhe•mer· -526-2683 •MARCELO'S Ice ·c~ .. m:-.,-s21 Westhe~ml'r 522-6994 • t'ERS 1303 Wellhe•iner--528-8823 See our ad elsewhere this issue • OMARS--808 L0veu- 528- . 9 •RASCALS --2702 Korby --524-6272 S~e our ad elsewhere this issue •RAUL'S BRASS RUBBING -914 W Alablima- 529-0627 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations • . 'UI ·U-L:KE 418 Wetlhelmet- 5~ • STAR PIZZA ~111 Noftotk- 523-0800 See our ad elsewhere this issue Dear Dorothy Why are the good ones already taken? Dear Dorothy, Am I doing something wrong? It seems that every time I am attracted to or fall for someone, they are already attached to someone else! Help!! Dorothy Says: Rejection is hard to take. Being at the riRht spot at the right time seems to be a problem with many of us. Also, being patient is not one of our long suits. What have you got to lose if you tell someone you are attracted to them. Even though they may already be attached, they may be available Later on. Keep Looking, and keep pursuing-you will master the rejections, and eventually, find the happiness you yearn for Dear Dorothy, Is performance anxiety a com­mon concern? Or am I aaking too much? Dorothy Says: After checking wit~ several sources it seems that this concern is overplayed. J feel that sex is an importa~t ingredient of any relationship, but it's not everything. Talk to your lover about it. !Jein!I upfrount about any anxiety is always best even when the clouds seems the darkest. Whateuer is beat for both of your needs can be worked out. Keep at it! • STEAK 'N-EGG-4231 Monlfow--528-8135 • TIMS Coltee St'lop--1525 Wnt~•mer-529- 2289 •WINIE SELLER -1408 W•thelmer·--628-:>8711 See our ad elsewhere this issue SERVICES LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nanette Bruckner, psychologist, 523-2180. Attorney at Law General practice_ John p_ Barnich. 523-5006. Evenings 528-5566 AEMODELINGllMPAOVEMENTS Full carpentry including French doors, cabinets. kitchens bathrooms_ Excellent workmanship, experienced. references. 529-3869 CLASSICAL PIANO/SINGING. Pro­fessional teacher 723-3254 ATCO Pe•t ContrcM 133' See our ad elsewhere this issue BEE OUICk 0.1·~••y 723-59~9 See our ad elsewhere this issue • FITNESS EXCHANGE flln ... center- -3307 A1ct'lmonO- 524-9932 FRANCISCO'S Mir salon- 901 R-tet'lmond- 523-0438 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~:IRCRAFi"t'l11rcare- 211ole1ungton- :S26- MSA & BWMT present Juneteenth celebration Saturday, noon-4pm, Cherryhurst Park ::~o:zo_~~:,n HOUSE todQ•ng- Hl8 See our ad elsewhere this issue ::.,~;e~:!~~t79?2Huly School 27 EDWARD JONES booxke.pe. 2$5·~11 See our ad elsewhere this issue JAMES D. KRISTIAN PhD. t'lyptK>log .. 1.:-9]7. 2'85 See our ad elsewhere this issue • KWIK-KALL M111 Boxea- J317 Montros. 522-11196 :2~~:Ds Hair Oftign--906- Westh;mer See our ad elsewhere this issue .•.L.I.O NEL H11r oftlg;;: "1°22QV'Oflii°um-526= :~.~-~JaR-OSE HAIR-O..,gn-·4317 Mon1rose- Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice :::fNTROSE. TRAVU -2506 R11ph--52:i= See our ad elsewhere this issue •MONTROSE VOICE .. Bw~pet. -13. r Mon­lrote, thm:l flO<)f--529-3490 MOVING, HAULING. Movemasters, 521-3155. PATRICIA ANNIE O'KANE 1t1orn y- 3323 voakum--526·7911 See our ad elsewhere this issue • PRIVATE POSTAL SVSTEMS rn11 bo•et 1713 Wnlt'le1rner- -529-3020 _ • SAL6NDAN1El hl•r care- 1626 Cherry· hurst -520-9327 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice SPEEDY PRINTING -5400 Bellaire -Blvd -667- 1411 See our ad elsewhere this issue Come out and celebrate Gay Pride Week ~~VIEL TIECHtravelagency -5719K•rtly-522· See our ad elsewhere this issue UNIT'fO CAB 654-•040- See our ad elsewhere this issue WOROC"An 1ypMe111ng -~S2°2-4251 ~- See our ad elsewhere this issue SHOPS & STORES :2~;.;g;AR Adult Newt- 1407 R1ct'lmond :2~~~r~A T GLITTeRsQ.111- 4325-"'°"''°"­: J:~~Ro AlLEN F1on11 18'8W_;jhelm;t=° Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ~IC ISl.IE pet t11()p: -2011 Sw Fwy - See our ad elsewhere this issue • A.SYUIM Ac.ult Boo1<si0'; .... 1:!01R.ct1mond • BALL PARK .t.dt.111 80ok11ore- 183o W Ai8- bamo 9iASIC BROTHERS UHd clolt'lin9· 1220 Weslt'leimer-522-1626 See our ad elsewhere this issue •THE BED HOUSE 2115 Norfolk- 523-8278 See our ad elsewhere this issue Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • BLUE IRIS- 35185 St'leph rd- 52:.i--1827 e B00M TOWN BLOOMS flowers- 3210 ~ ~....,.~-5~110 ~t~~,~~~~--~'~es"::,'~~~t F•tl' See our ad elsewhere this issue •CARGO HOUSE -:iaru Paik 5~ See our ad elsewhere this issue e C..)NE -OANCfwEAR· 4i"O. Moril~OM-- 522- 167~ 9COMPANY B rn1 1tary wear 53116 W•lti.imer-96$-9753 See our ad elsewhere this issue ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose e~ch week, now with over a hundred distribution locations • DINER'S Adult News- -240 We1lhe1mer -528- 8950 • DOUBRAVA JONES, the Mantwle clolt'ling- 1983 W Gray- 522-1089 e 00wNBEAT-Recorcn -2111Rochmonc:I !23- ""8 • ORAMATIKA ;1111- m4 Yoekum· 528="5457 • FACET~ g•lts- 1412 Westhe1mer--523-i412 MSA & BWMT present Juneteenth celebration Saturday. noon-4pm, Cherryhurst Park •FRAME Of REFERENCE pa i1 & framing Vi33 WeMhelme1 ~2CMJ110 See our ad elsewhere thrs issue • FRIOAY'S F )ro•I- 1338 We1lt'le1tner 524· '"' . -KIRBY News!and- 3115 Korby- .f...l'0-02•e •MONTROSE JEWELRY and loan- 1216 Wesll'!l-1mer-5
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