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Houston Voice, July 2, 2004
File 018
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Houston Voice, July 2, 2004 - File 018. 2004-07-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2139/show/2127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-07-02). Houston Voice, July 2, 2004 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2139/show/2127

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, July 2, 2004 - File 018, 2004-07-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2139/show/2127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, July 2, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date July 2, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 2, 2004 17 IC ARJANTIMMERMANS World peace will always be job-one, but Yoko Ono is taking on a new cause, marriage equality for same-sex couples. Ono gives equality a chance LEGENDARY POP CULTURE ICON Yoko Ono shows no signs of slowing down. At age 71, she is enjoying a career renaissance with remixes of her classic "Hell In Paradise" hitting the top ten of the Billboard Club Play Chart. Later this summer, the human rights advocate plans to release the controversial song, "Every Man/Every Woman," which is a daring statement that tackles the gay marriage issue head-on. The first thing Yoko Ono asked me when we spoke for an exclusive interview was to pray with her for world peace. Ever since her relationship with John Lennon in the late sixties, she has become a spokesperson for the peace movement. Her request seemed bizarre at first, but Ono's relentless devotion to her ideals deserves nothing but praise. Ono is now"'determined to take a stand in the national debate about equal rights for gays and lesbians in her ongoing pursuit of peace and justice. "A lot of people are testy and angry about the situation in the world and they're trying to find a scapegoat," argued a feisty Ono. "The result is that people focus on things that really are not an issue, like civil rights for gays." Ono has built a reputation as a musical pioneer and visionary artist since the sixties. She spearheaded an avant-garde group in New York City that put her in touch with painters, writers, musicians and eventually John Lennon. After Lennon's murder in 1980, she has continued to cany their torch of love and understanding through music and art. Over the last few years Ono has used dance music as a way to spread her message. "I was always interested in dance music. I have been dancing since I was four," Ono laughed. "We have to dance through life. Let's come together and keep dancing." The pulsating remakes of Ono's "Hell in Paradise" from dance floor heroes Murk and The Orange Factory, as well as duo Chus & Ceballos and Los Angeles production team Minge Binge, have transformed Ono from a sixties hippie symbol to a new millennium club heroine. Her successful collaboration with the Pet Shop Boys on a remixed cover of Lennon's "Walking On Thin Ice" in 2003 broke the ice for other rem ixers/producers to collaborate with her. A MORE INFO Yoko Ono Every Mart/Every Woman (EP) Mindtrain/TWISTED Records, 2004 Currently only available in vinyl and on iTunes Yoko Ono is speaking out on the issue of marriage equality for gay men and lesbians. (Photo by Ole Christians) FOR YEARS ONO DID NOT WANT TO touch any of her old recordings because they represented something special that she and Lennon did together. But now she feels that others should have the opportunity to work on them. "When I put out my first records in London in the 1960s, I used to title the tracks 'Unfinished Song 1,' 'Unfinished Song 2' and so on," she said. "So in a way, the DJs are now finalizing what I started." Ono is scheduled to release an EP with remixes of "Every Man Has A Man/Every Woman Has A Women." The controversial track is a reincarnation of her original song "Everybody Has A Woman Who Loves Her," which first came out on the Lennon/Ono 1980 "Double Fantasy" album." The single will feature remixes from Basement Jaxx. Ralph! Rosario and Dave Aude. Ono re-cut the vocals of the song and inserted the new lyrics "every woman has a woman who loves her" and "every man has a man who loves him." The remix EP is a diverse set of remakes that combines carefree dance floor escapism with Ono's bold message about same-sex rights. The artist has always felt a special closeness to the gay community during the course of her career. "Their struggle is a human rights issue to me," she said. "I have suffered myself from racism and sexism all my life. I know what it feels like to be an outsider. I understand what position gays have been put in." Ono said she also feels a very personal connection to gays. "Many of my friends were and are gay," she said. "Many people I tune into turn out to be gay, so on a spiritual level, I'm in love with all my gay friends." JULY 1 - JULY IS BY IREDEMCK KNOTT JULY 11 AUGUIT S WWW.ALLEYTHEATRE.ORG 713.228.8421 Continental Airlines WJ..
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