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Houston Voice, July 2, 2004
File 009
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Houston Voice, July 2, 2004 - File 009. 2004-07-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2139/show/2118.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-07-02). Houston Voice, July 2, 2004 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2139/show/2118

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, July 2, 2004 - File 009, 2004-07-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2139/show/2118.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, July 2, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date July 2, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript Local Life HOUSTON VOICE JULY 2, 2004 PAGE 8 Pride Committee President Nick Brines calls Pride 2004 a success, but he's not sure what role he'll play in the organization for next year's event. 'Mother Nature must be a lesbian' Weather forecasts foretold the worst, but the clouds dissipated just in time By BINNIE FISHER As if on command, the clouds that had threatened the worst for most of Pride Saturday parted just in time for Pride as Big as Texas. Nick Brines, president of Pride Committee Houston, had visions of rain pelting parade participants, and ankle- deep water on Westheimer. "The last thing I saw on the news was a hundred-percent chance of rain and flooding," he said. When the clouds went away and the sky turned blue about an hour before parade time Saturday night, Brines remarked, "Mother Nature must be a lesbian." Brines, who has been involved with the Pride Committee for a decade, said the parade that made its way down Westheimer was one of the best ever. "My first impression was that it was thrilling and completely awesome," he said. "The quality of the entries in this year's parade was terrific." It was a satisfying culmination to a year of work, a year that begins immediately after Pride ends. "We're already starting to plan 2005," he said. "We have our next meeting next Saturday." The fiscal year for the Pride Committee ends Aug. 30, and Brines said, he doesn't know what his place will be next year. He has been president for two years. "I don't know what my leadership role will be," he said. "I'll have to work it out with my husband." Brines is partnered with hairdresser Greg Decker, who recently opened Azur Salon in Houston. The two had a commitment ceremony at the Magnolia Ballroom, but Brines said, they aren't likely to fly off to Massachusetts to make it legal. "We just did it for ourselves," he said. In attendance were Brines' parents, retired dairy farmers from Wisconsin who now live in Corpus Christi. Their attendance at his wedding to another man spoke volumes. Coming out in college Brines came out when he moved to Houston to attend college at the age of 17. "I didn't come out to my parents until I was 21," he said. Their initial reaction was "horrible," he said. "But it took me 17 years to come to grips with it. I can't expect them to accept it overnight." But, accept it they did. Now that his parents live close. Brines said, his moth- ft Nick Brines Age: 33 Residence: Montrose Birthplace: Shullsburg, Wl Education: Almost a master's Occupation: Director in charge of corporate sponsorships, American Heart Association Personal: Married to Greg Decker Pets: None. Tidbit Loves Pride and traveling er has her own personal hairdresser in the family. Growing up on the farm in Wisconsin, Brines said, he had absolutely no exposure to gay life. "I grew up in the same house my father grew up in and his mother grew up in. It was very Norman Rockwell," he said. That's why Houston blew me away A whole new world opened up to me here." It didn't take Brines too long to find the Pride Committee. He said it was a fortuitous find for many reasons. "It's great for networking," he said. "The reason I have the job I have today is because of the Pride Committee. They looked at all the fundraising I had done for the Pride Committee. I put it right, smack on my resume. There's no reason to hide it." To anyone looking for a place to con nect in Houston's gay and lesbian community. Brines recommends the Pride Committee. "All they have to do is just show up and do it," he said. "There is a lot of work to be done." In addition to that. Brines said, there is the satisfaction of doing something for the community. The committee works hard to keep the parade relevant, he said. Although the group wants to highlight the community Bines said, corporate entries have their place. "It's a way to show the community what corporations are friendly and which ones are supportive of their gay and lesbian employees," he said. Contrary to what was aired on conservative talk radio prior to the parade, Brines said, the parade does not place a cost burden on the city. "We've been hearing that the parade costs the city a ton of money," he said. "We pay for the trash to be picked up afterward. We leave Montrose cleaner than we found it." In addition to hiring additional security, Brines said, parade fees cover the salaries of Houston Police Department officers. The Pride flags that are hung on light poles lining Westheimer during the month of June, Brines said. "We pay for those, the installation, the upkeep and the insurance." And, as for the conservative radio jock who kept complaining that he hates to see men in leather thongs, linn. "1 didn't see any of that this ye
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