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The New Voice, No. 679, October 29 - November 4, 1993
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The New Voice, No. 679, October 29 - November 4, 1993 - File 001. 1993-10-29/1993-11-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2049/show/2016.

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(1993-10-29/1993-11-04). The New Voice, No. 679, October 29 - November 4, 1993 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2049/show/2016

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The New Voice, No. 679, October 29 - November 4, 1993 - File 001, 1993-10-29/1993-11-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2049/show/2016.

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Title The New Voice, No. 679, October 29 - November 4, 1993
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date October 29, 1993-November 4, 1993
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 24648896
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript - ---- -------- ------- VOT Tues., Nov. 2, 1993 GAY NEWS FOR TEXAS ANO UISlANA • OC,.OBER 29 - "IOVE'MBE'R 4 1993 • 15 Jf- 679 AUSTIN (512) 478-4245 D BATON ROUGE (504) 346-8617 D BEAUMONT/GALVESTON (800) 30().8271 D HOUSTON (713) 529-8490 NEW ORLEANS (504) 524-3279 D SAN ANTONIO (210) 226-1833 D ELSEWHERE (800) 729-8490 TT T DATELINE: HOUSTON Tuesday's Houston City Conncil election offers nnprecedented opportnnity By SHAUN KEE.';AS GlL'iOS The New Voice/Houston Houston Mayor Bob Lanier doesn t have much 10 worry about. An unem­ployment line does not appear to be m h!S future. Some polls have indicated an appro\al raung in the 80 percent range for the mcumbcnt mayor. A range of City Council seats are m qucsuon however And five openly gay ondidatcs arc runnmg Each has a con­stituency of their own, and many of those const11ucnc1es extend beyond the gay and lesbian commumty. While none of the five, by their own admission, expect to wm outright, !>everal have, a.cordrng to many analysts. at least reasonable shots at appearing in a run­off elecllon Run offs are predicted in most of the Council scat races. The five openly-gay candidates have been workmg .,;ooperat1vcly to ~ome again'! each other. Pol11ical act ivist and Texas South· ern University Professor of Law is running in Dis· trict D, which now rnc ludes much of Montrose. lie faces District D mcumbent Al Cal· lo way Ihe other fo ur candidale) are running for a t ­large seats. Pohll· cal perennial Ray Hill " challenging rncumbent Eleanor Tinsley for at- large posn1on two. A recent Houston Chronicle poll predicted that Tinsley would be forced mto a run· off in her race. extent. None of the five are running AIDS ac11v1st Brian Bradley is chal· T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA lenging incum­bent Sheila Jad son Lee m a four­way race for at­Jargc posmon four. Rob Bridges, confident of sup­port not only from the lesbian and gay community. hopes to make a run off m his four­teen- way race (a run-off ts v1r1ually guaranteed with that broad a spec­trum of candi dates) through his 11es with the local arts communit~ an<I labor organiza­tions . Bridges " a professional musi· ciao and life-long AFL· CIO member lie is seeking at·large position three. Gary Van Ooteghem , a well-known political activist and founding presi-dent of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Poli11cal Caucus is challengmg Gracie Saenz' hold on ai-large posuion one Ooteghem said 1ha1 .. she ts certainly no friend of the commun11y . I know that I can't knock her off in the first round, but there is a chance m a run-off." Ooteghem says that "bile about half of his support " from 1he gay and les· bi.an communi1y9 he 1s also draYrmg sup· pon from his contacts 1n the busmess communny He has an extensive fman cial baclground and "orked as a C P.A. for man) years All five candtdues have been endorsed by the HGLPC The llGLPC 1s also supportmg the re election bid of Cny Controller George Grcnias. In other city council dis1r1c1 races, u ts endorsing Roslyn Smtth {B), Robert Wolin (C), Dennis Dougherty {F), Lsz Lara {H) and Ben Reyes {I). San Francisco study shows lesbians and bisexual women at risk for AIDS SAN l'RA..,CISCO, Wednesday, Oct. 20 (AP} Some women who identify as les­bians still have sc" wnb men, and that puts them at risk for HIV infection, two studies showed One of the studies by the San Fran· t1sco Uepartmenl of Health sho"ed .that one quarter ot the women who 1de nt1ficd 1hcmsclvcs as leshians bad sex with men m the past three years, Stephen Mills, as .stam clucf of preven11on tor t he lleahh Departrr> nt s AIDS Office saad fhe 'myth·d1ssolvmg" ddta s hould prompt health providers 10 target AIDS educa1ton at self-described lesh11n< whose sexual activity may be risl.1er than once thought , he said . ''They may hang out wtth the lesbian community but their sexual behavior does not reflect that," Mills sa id. Re.sea r c he rs fo r the San f· ra nc1sco Oepanme nt of Public Heal th revealed that the llI V·10fec11on rate among the two groups ~urveyed was I 2 percent. or three times the 1 ate for a ll San Fran­cisco w o 11H: 11 The surveys included bo•h lesbian and hisexua l women '"Both surveys show very high levels of unsafe sexual behaviors with male T T T DATELINE: TEXAS and female parmer.. hut suit no clear evidence of woman 10 woman 1~fec­tion. I One survey-of 498 women at popular night spots-found six cases of HIV infec11on. Overall, about 80 percent of the women surveyed said they had sex wuh bisexual men a nd roughly IO per­cent reported injection drug use 1n the past ten years. The second study found that 47 r er· cent of lesbian> and 58 percent of b1Sex­ua l ~om e n sa id they d id not always prdcllcc safe sex when bavmg sex wuh men. That st udy looked a t 483 women m various community locations. Said lesbian acllHst Judnh Cohen of the San Franc1,co-based group Lesbiao A•·engers: '"We need 10 stop the denial and apathy. and sun paying attention Lesbian women arc not immune. This 1s our wale-up call-and ,,.e, and the fed­eral government. should talc noucc • Public health o f fic ials echoed their demands. " Although the rates of HIV mfecuon among lesbian and btsexua women are currently low. these rates may rise aivc, the high levels of r1si.. behaviors 1n this population • said OC'partmcn1 o f Hcalrh epidemiologist Dr. George Lemp. Lesbian Air Force lieutenant drops lawsuit contesting dismissal DALLAS, Friday, Oct 22 (AP)-An Air Force office who was recommended for discharge because she had a lesb1an affair with an enlisted soldier is droppmg a law sun contestmg her d1sm1ssal. her attorney said Friday. Auorney Robert R Wightman said he bas asked federal Judge Sydney Fitzwater to dismiss tbc lawsuit that lt Heidi De Jesus filed agamst the Air Force. No orders bad been signed in the case Friday aflcrnoon, a US. Dissncc Court clerk sa id Wightman said M ' De Jesus was forced to abandon her f 1gh1 because or money. 'There's no money," he said "I've hrer ally 10>1 my law practice over It Wightman accused F11zwa1er of fallmg T T T SPECIAL FEATURE to force the government to respond to the suil. \\htch challenges as unconstitutional all military regulations barring homoseX< uatity and homosexual conduct. The assistant U.S. auorney handling the case, Paula B11lmgsly, dec'.ned com­ment on the case Fr iday Ms. DcJesus 1s a logisllcs officer at Goodfellow Air f o rce Base m San Angelo. A military board has recommended she be d15charged for havmg a gay aff11r. That Sb~~1~s l.cW~tn~l~~fore Air Force Secretary President Clinton . who 1~it1ally prom· ised to lift the ban on gays m the milllary. ha. pushed for a plan that wtll allow homosexuals ro scne provided they do not engage in gay sex and they keep quiet abo ut the ir sexual preference Lesbian & Gay skydiving team literally breaks new ground from 13,000 feet B•· ~HAU S KU~'IAN <;n.<;o'1 rhe Nc:w Vmccn1ow1on Chances are, you are Siiting as you read th!S. If not , maybe you ar c at the bu' stop and standing, or you're in bed. In any case. some part of yo.ur body " being su•pended by a phy51cal obicct Basic enough ... but not enough for skyd1- v~en Candace Jones talks about the expcrtence of dropern& through 13,000 feet of open air, n IS that expenence of havmg ltterally nothing else to uching her body that she mentions f1n1 Jones 1s one of 12 iniual members of Houston's new lesbian a~d gay skydiv­mg team The croup behoves that ·~ IS the first a ll-gay group of us kmd and 11 1s rapidly drawrng attenuon ,They have been mvneJ by Gay Games. 94 lo do a Jump as parl of that athle!IC ce lehra11on and are bemg profiled by a documen­tary filmmaker who plans 10 follow their progress through the '94 games. By next summer, the team hopes to have grown to at least 21 members. Skydmng seems to be a latent desire that many people have and wall a long lime to act on. Jones says she had wanted to for years. but always told her: self. "it wa>n 't the rtght 11me or I can I afford ' Jeff Coffmann a nother tniual mem­ber of the group 'echoes Jones' sentunent that 11 was on h1S mmd for a long ume. It was somethm~ that I alwa)S wanted to do • he 111d, and then I saw Johns fl)er .'' John i' John Gri,ak, the mstigator of the group. Be has been domg th1' for eighteen years aod decided that there had to be other gay aod le,bian people out there who wanted to take the leap. Altho ugh he a dmit< that is a bit sur· p11sed by how rapidly the group has allracted members . Grisak says "my sports have always been exc1tmg. · For most reople skydiving conjures up images o World War II leaps from cantanke r ous pla nes with unpredicta· ble pa rachute• w.here even the land.ing site lacled con'1derable pred1ctab1lny Grisak reassuringly says that the sport has become so technically advanced, that it is ··unreco&nizable" from when he first started even eighteen years ago "Then, you had less control and it was less safe today, you have a lot of con· trot over "hat you are domg.'' Grtsak'> flyer admits t hat the fir't iump will be scary He wrnes that "most skydivers report that their ftrst JUmp was scary, while their second Jump "as terrifying From there on. as one become• more comfortable wnh the feel­ing of hem~ m the air. the fear gradually disappears.' Gelling started takes more than JUSI pulling on a parachute and getting showed out of a plane II 13.000 feet Diver> take an eight hour course. From there . they move through different lev· els of ability and risk. A first Jump involves bcmg held by two other expert· enced skydivers. Skydivers carry the equivalent of a passport, which records their progress and marh their level of experience. Having reached level three , new skydivers are ·•1e1 go" in the air by thetr more e"perienced fellow travelers. And, by levels six and seven, skydivers move into the realm of mid-air badfltps. Candace Jones has a hard ltme com· parinB the expertence 10 more earthly pursutts. "It really. reall) hit me," she said, "when I looked down and thought, whoa, there's Galveston.•• The tnp do"n takes from five 10 seven minutes. The group is currently seekmg new members For further 1nforma11on. e.111 John Grtsak durmg the day 11 (713) 488-5576. 2 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 NOVEMBER 4, 1993 • + Dance December 31, 1993 ) 7PM-2AM Westin Galleria Hotel 5060 West Alabama Benefiting the AIDS Equity League • and PWA Coalition Houston • Name ~------------------- Address------------------ City State Zip ___ _ Phone _____ ___ -,-------------~- How many tickets? :;c:oupi. Total Amount---- 0 Cash D Smoking table o Vegetarian Menu D Check o Non-Smoking table o Non-vegetarian Menu Make checks payable and mail to: PWA Coalition 1475 W. GraY- Suite 163 601(c)3 non-profit Houston, TX 77019 For more information call 522-5428 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 3 TT TDATELINE: NEW ORLEANS Tulane University Gay And Lesbian Alliance holds campus Coming-out Day By KEVIN MAllAFAY The Gay And Lesbian Alliance (GALA) of Tulane University sponsored a 1993 Com­ing- out Day ceremony on campus. The purpose of the Oct. 8th event was to acquaint the Tulane community with the li.ves and concerns of its gay. lesbian, and bisexual members, according to organiz· crs GALA has sponsored similar coming-oul events in recent yc~rs The event is scheduled for the Friday closest to National Coming Out Day, The event was held in "Pocket Park," an open concrete area on the Uptown campus, next to the University Center. Pocket Park is a favorite hangout for Tul­ane students, faculty and staff. The area features benches, a P.J.'s Coffee and Tea stand and a rai•cd wooden "stage" mak- TT TDATELINE: TEXAS ing it ideal for events like GALA'S The program began at 11:00 a.m. with a group of 30 which grew to more than 50 as the event ~rogressed. They listened to fd:aas~ers, eard music and exchanged Fluorescent sheets with names of histo­ric lesbian/gay/bi figures were posted around the area. Some names posted were: K.D. Lang; Tennessee Williams. who holds special interest as a one-time New Orlean­ian; and Alexander The Great. Also IJStcd were The Pct Shop Boys and Madonna. Paisley Da>idson, a student and board member of GALA, organized the event with help from others. Christopher Daigle, a Tulane faculty member introduced speakers and gave his own commentary on the value of coming out Two Williamson County . . comrmss1oners oppose same-sex benefits GEORGETOWN, Texas, Wednesday, Oct 20 (AP)-Two Williamson County com­missioners ">ay they would oppose giving property tax abatements to companies that extend health care benefits to samc­scx domc!ttlc partners of employees. Commissioner Jerry Mehcvcc of Taylor uid he would voce against a tax abarc­menc plan to any company that offered heahh benefits co same-sex parcners ''because those companies are destroying the families as we know them m America." TT TGAY HEALTH Commissioner Greg Boatright of Lib· eny Hill said extending benefits to same­scx partners 1s ''detrimental to the family and what Williamson County s:tands for. I don't agree with it, and I don't think it's right." Mehevec brought up the subject during this week's commissioners' meeting. Com­missioners Mike Hciligcnstcin and David Hays voiced oppo~ing vicwpointi. and County Judge John Doerfler did not com­ment Boatright and Mehcvcc said their remarks were prompted by a policy of Apple Computer, which has an option to buy a tract in western Williamson County Apple offers benefiti 10 same-sex partners of employees. It is expected 10 seek 1ax abatements from Williamson County Apple spokesperson Bill Keegan said, "We don't feel our personnel policy should affect what we want to do as a corporate citizen. We feel we're fair-minded and a progressive company. We've been success­ful because we can attract the best and the brightest and their well-being is as impor-tant to us as what they can contribute to the bonom line " Keegan said he did not know specifics of what the company wtll seek from Will~ amson County. He said extending benefits 10 same-sex partners is common an the htgh·lcch industry . Apple is planning to move 600 employ­ees to 1he Williamson Counry sne by the end of 1994, said Apple spolespcr<en Frank O'Mahony French researchers identify key to AIDS virus' penetration of blood cell By MARll.Y:-1 AUGUSf FOR HE ~W VOICE PARIS, Monday, Oct 25 (AP)-French researchers said Monday they d"cov· ered th.c gateway through which the AIDS virus penetrates and infects blood cclh, a discovery that could lead to development of a vaccine to lock the virus out. The Pa~teur Institute ream said ir has d1scoverec.J a "co-receptor" molecule, named CD26, used by all strains of the AIDS virus to gain entry, AIDS researchers have known for several years that the AIDS virus, called HIV, latches onto a receptor mole­cule called C04 on the s urface of some hlood cell:s. "But we didn't know how the virus got inside the cell to contaminate it " said Dr. Ara lluvanc"ian, who headed Pas­teur'. s ref,earch team "Now we know that both the CD4 and the CD26 are ncccs>ary for the virus to penetrate and infect the cell," Hovanes· ... 1an saic.J. The CD26 structure wa< 1dentif1ed several years ago, but Its function remained a mystery. "The pre<cncc and functioning of the CD26 molecule arc ind1spen.able for the infection and spread of the virus in the CD4 cells," said a statement from the Pasteur lns11tute. "In viral infections, the CD4 serves as the con1ac1 point for viral particles, while CD26 serves as the main door." T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA The group\ findings were to be pre­sented Tue,day at an AIDS conference outside Paris. AIDS researcher Rohcrt Gallo of the Nauonal Inst1tutc' of Health in Beth­esda, Md .. said the findings appeared to be a ''very exciting very Stimulating step" in AIDS research. Pasteur lnst1tu1c researchers »y the existence of a second receptor provides researchers wilh another avenue of research in developing a vaccme "The AIDS virus has always man­aged to have the key to open the CD4 rece ptor-Jock. We hope to be able to develop drugs capable of jamming rhe CD26 lock so that the AIDS key will no longer fit," Hovancssian said. Since even· s ram 1e .\IDS \•irus u<es CD26 to infect cells, "e're hopmg to develop a universal vaccme," he said. However. Hovaness1an s11d develop ing the vaccme could talc a long lime because research had been conducted only on a limited number of chtmpan zees, an endangered ~pcctes Scientists rn Pans expect 10 breed a laboratory mouse ,. h1ch would have both the CD4 and CD26 receptors Ji~e human beings. Jean-Paul Lev). head of France's National AIDS Research Center, said Monday the frndmes represented a major break1hrough because of implica~ tions for a vaccine that would worl against all AIDS virus strains. Camp Lejeune gay Marine sergeant accepts back-to-work orders CAMP 1.1 JEl NE, N.C, Wednesday, Oct. 20 (AP>-Marinc Sgt Ju•tin Elzie received orders Wednesday to return to the active duty JOb he lost temporarily after announcing he is gay Elzie said h" first day back at work "was really good. The command was really good. They were really good about it The •cellon that I'm going to is in the same building and people were just really good about 11. There were no nega­tive comments. I'm just ecstatic. " ... People were like, 'Great to have you back and lets get the Job done. That's what we Marines arc here for.'" Elzie received a supply administra­tion JOh "that fits his rank and train­ing," MaJ. Mark Hughes said. His previ­ous JOb as a supply clerk was filled by someone else while he was on standby re!">crve Elzie. 31. is the fir<t •crv1cc member to take advantage of a recent ruling by a federal Judge that banned discrimina· tion against gays in the military He announced hi:.. homosexuality Jan. 29, the same day President Clinton said he planned to lift the miluary's ban on gays. At that time, Clinton imple­mented an interim policy which placed troops who have declared their homo­sexuality on reserve s.1aru'ii In March, a panel of officers at Camp Lejeune recommended that Elzie be dlS­charged, and on Sept I he was removed from active duty and placed on reserve status. But a Sept. 30 ruling by U.S. District Judge Terry Hatter Jr. of Los Angeles banned any policy that discriminates against homosexuals in the military. And the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals left hi• ruling in place, despite a Defense Department request that it be overturned. Elzie said he did not know how long he will be allowed to continue working. The Defense Department could appeal T T T DATELINE: GA y AMERICA Hatter's rulrng to the Supreme Court. which could overturn 1t. Hatter's ruling came tn the case of Keith Meinhold, a gay sailor who filed a lawsuit challenging the constitutional­ity of the military's ban on homosexu­als. Meinhold. a sonar instructor at a naval air station near San Francisco. was discharged 1n August 1992 after announcing he was gay on national tel· cvision "Somebody l\kcd me today 1f I get kicked out again am I ever going to regret it. I said no. I'm glad about what I did and I'm really glad to be back to work," Elzie said Wednesday. Last July, President Clinton said he would institute a ''don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue" policy that would discour­age investigations of homosexuals and let them serve if they kept their sexual orientation secret , Congress has been working on its own policy, expected to be more restrictive than the president's proposal. Lanny Breuer, a Washrngton, D.C , attorney who represents Elzie. ~aid the issue will eventually be resohed in the Supreme Court. •·1 am confident that ult1matcl\ our view will prevail and the ban .. ·,11 be struck down as uncons.tnuuonal." Bre· ucr said. "Evcrybod) has a guarantee under the con~titution to equal protec· tion under the law:• Meanwhile. there was speculation that Judge Hatter's ruling could also affect the ca~e of Capt. Luther Turner. a C-130 pilot at Pope Air Force Base who was dismissed from the Air Force last week after being convicted of commit· ting sodomy with a gay civilian, "The Air Force prosecuted the Turner case in complete di>regard of the Hatter decision." said Mark Waplc, a Fayct­tevllle attorney who represents Turner. Waplc plans to cite the Hatter dcctSton when he appeals Turner's case 10 the federal courts. Oregon activist warns Florida voters to avoid gay rights fight By JACKIE llALLlf'AX 'r°:.~'t;r;;,~~'tn. Aa . Monday. Oct 25 (AP)-Con•t1tutional fights over an11 discrimination protcct1on for gay, already have wreaked havoc '" two state,, and Horida voters would do well 10 avoid the trauma, an Oregon activist >aid Monday. . 'It unlca>hc' something unholy,' said Peggy Norman of Portla~d~ who was invited to Horida by florid.ans United Again!>t D1scrimmat1on. , !'he group wants to defeat a campaign to change the Horida ConstllUllOn to outlaw local ordinances that extend 1nt1-d1scnminat1on protection to gay!'!. To get that proposal before voters 1.n Nov 1994, the Florida chapter of Ameri­can Family Association must collect more than 429,000 signatures by next Augu•t Elections officials have verified nearly 38,000 so far. Co lorado voters approved a similar measure last fall and Oregon voters defeated one. The "'uc may go before voters in at lca't 11 states next fall, but Florida is an important battleground, Ms. Norman .said. "You're a trend-setttng state in so many ways," she told reporters. Ms. Norman, who lead the effort to defeat Oregon's hallot mcuurc 9, said the campaign was successful because ll was based on a broad coalll on of groups. She plans to travel around Flor­ida for a month to help start S'lm1lar grassroots participation. But Florida voters would do them­selves a favor 11 they avoided the fight all together by not signing the petitions to put the 1"ue on the ballot. 'The one thing that the No-on-9 vot­ers and the Yes-on-9 voters agreed on was that they never wanted to face another measure like this hecausc they all agreed that II nearly ripped our ,late apart," Ms. Norman ~aid. The political debate " hkcly to esca­late out of control mto threats and v1o ... Jenee. she said, adding that she received numerous death threats and the police advised her group to put a 6-foot wire fence around its headquarters. ''It becomes such a volat1le i~suc that It's really a crucible of hate," she said. Carole Griffin, a Tallahassee lobbyist who serves as vice chair of the state's AFA political committee for Florida, conceded the battle would be tough one but noted that she had received death threats in past fights over abortion. "Any time )'OU have wackos on cuber side that do strange thrngs, we don't blame an enllrc orgamzatton for what a few wackos do.'• she saiJ Florida ·s AFA office has rccctvrd over 2500 hate call>, Mrs. Griffin said. 4 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 Turn your LIFE INSURANCE into CASH, NOW. Your NEEDS must be met . . . . NOW. Your DREAMS must be fulfilled . NOW. PWA's C•ll for FREE BROCHURE 800/487-1183 800(78"6" -7183 Iv. &IRE, ,,1 Iv. tl#IJER.!lil#IJ B f t-.J c, r f V f N < J f I\ R T I <, 1 I C D I R f C T () R A sb.ocl~ing picture of fascist Spain. Painted witl-i dan cers feel. THENEw Vo1cE 1$UE 879 October 29 November<. 1993 Published Fridays Estabkshed 1974 as the Houston Montrose Star, re-es.tabished 1980 as the Houston Montrose VOiice. ineorpOl'aUng 1991 the New Orleans Cresent C~ Star 408 Avondale Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax (713) 529-9531 Contitot'l copynghl 1993 Office Hours: 9am-5:30pm weekdays Henry McClur9fpublsher James Chcck/g-manager Shaun Keenan Gilsonlmpotter Leonard Earl JohnSonlcorrespondent Javier T emoz/°"' & ontonalnment ADVERTISING SAi.ES DEPARTMENT Corpus Chrish!Suzeuo Loci<• Galv.,.lon/JllflY s1euan ttous.tonlOon Oowd<lfl. Miko Pr.ice Ron ~ wn Rio Grande Valey/Alc&lt lUCJO. Layr.11 CQftay San AntonlOll.efty Taylor llooston (713) 52'l 8490 San Anton<> (210) 226- 1833 Elsewhere (800) 729 84')() POSTMASTER Send 9dafa• eon.c .J 408 AvoncMe lie slru9gf.·d fo qin.' his .irl lo tl1~ umlf In tJ,., MJ, h~ garc /,;s life f.,r ii. Conccii'C</ by LmdsJy &mp, d1or"oqr.iph,·d by C1rnsl<'p/1,•r Hw,·c, Cruel Ganlcn is the p.issi,m.il" story of p,.J,•nco C.ir~1.i l.N,·a s f;fc, .ind ,J.,,t/1, al 1/1c hands of Sp.iin 's f.isdsl rcgm1e. Houston TX 770C6-3099 ~,.,.lr'ILIS(Zlrcamet«USMAA') S17SP9"...­" 4S 50 ~6 m:irthl ot S91 pet yea,, """10NI A~WIQ R.,,,...,,,,lMN Mlthffl (lreYOl9 ~en. a.le~ POB 1261 P1eir11Jtild NJ(908)780.-a50 Display ~ ~ Spm CT Mormy 10 reserwe -lPK9 noon CT TU1141y to lumiltl *1 ~ lor Friday l\:rf'omwn. ....-. . 111 th1..• l ulku Tk .. k'f •t 'I. rtlwm (\.·nlcr. r.J. ..- t. .111 :.>..~ i;. ... .,,n(l>7 lo l'M '>•w.o,11.P ll ~uncL.y ~\.1lmc.-c .,OOP\t :'\:;w 1 1;,,, t.c:ltrts, c.11 J.Z1 ARTS. Abo •v•1l.bk •l I louston f...:~ Ccntt·r in \Y~,rth.un Center or TKlr...t:M.aslcf'. 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Asaodale tr1MCitr Aasociltad PNU Scene: Sea-inspired restaurant • Casually elegant • Comfortable Bring in your cast of thousands for dinner on Sunday from 5 - 10 p.m. r>LIJf WfllfR Wll 2181 Richmond • 526-7977 ;\ot applicable on liquor and tax Please base gratuity on pre-discounted amount L------------- THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 5 'f' 'f' 'f'YOURS TRULY IN A SWAMP Parenting: Barry Chersky & Michael Baiad, gay fa the rs with biological son By LEONARD EARL JOHNSON The New Voice/New Orleans The hills overlooking San Francisco Bay are alive with things that Cohn Powell, Sam Nunn and Jessy Helms might not like. Michael Baiad and Barry Chersky are two gay men living in Oakland, father­ing their biological son. They had Ari four and one half years ago as a couple through "alternative insemination." The mothers are a lesbian couple named Adria and Marilyn, Adria is Ari's bio­logical mother. The couples live within a mile of each other. All are active in rais­ing Ari. Michael and Barry are 30-something, handsome and in New Orleans for a health industry convention. They sit in the front window at Kaldi's Coffee House. looking out on Decatur Street where three black nine-year-olds adjust boule cap> on the bolloms of their shoes and dance for change. Six white teen· agers, with rings flashing in cars, lips and noses idly hold out their hands. "The last two and one-half years Ari's time has been split between our house and his mother's. That works fairly well, but is somewhat of a stress on him, and he is expressing that," says Chersky. It was Chersky 's semen that was used for fertiliza tion. LEJ: "Perhaps beca use his things are strung out in two locations?" Chersky: "Not so much that. We have two of everything. I think it 1s mo re about once he has been somewhere, grounded and seuled in, then it's time to separate from those particular people and re-enter the other situation." LEJ: "Do the five of you have any plans to move-in together?" Chersky: "No, we don't. I do not think that would be right for all of us. We try very much to respect the boundaries of each couple and be supportive." "As an example," Ba1ad says, "for us to be away from Oakland impacts on everybody's schedule. But they are sup­portive of our having this lime together, as are we of them. We take very good Barry Chtrsky, MicNu/ Baiatl cl A ri 'f' 'f' 'f' DATELINE: GAY AMERICA care of each other " Chersky: "It 1s not easy. we arc deal­ing with four strong adult per<onalities as well as a child, who has his own strong mind." ''There arc lots of pressures on lesbian and gay people not to be parents. The reality is there is no such thing as an ideal family. Straight, traditional, I don't care what it is, every family has its issues." "Certainly homophobia and the heterosexism 1n our culture says it 1s not right and the children will be damaged. I want to make it clear that we can be good parents and to tell young people when they come out to not feel they have to give up the JOYS of par­enthood They can do It It may be more complicated and there cer­tainly are particu­lar challenges we have to face as gay people." Baiad: "For me it's been the expe­rience of family that I haven't had since a child. I've b een estranged from my father a nd my mot her died when I was very young. Our family basically split up. "Moving to California I learned so much about the concept and value of an extended family. What constitutes fam­ily is the community that you have around you. It has been strengthened by Ari's birth. It is wonderful. "I think it is a much healthier model­thc idea of community and extended family-it is how people used to live. It is much healthier for everyone." LEJ: "Have you experienced any legal problems?" Chcrsky: "We didn't because we have a known biological mother and father There was no need to legally declare paternity," LEJ: "There were no do-gooders tr>­mg to take him away from you because you arc quccr. •. trying to <top your family precisely because II JS working well, and should not be allowed lest 1t tempt oth­ers into sin?" Baiad: "If there was anyone needing protection it was Marilyn and myself. m terms of legally maintaining our inter­est in the child should something hap· pen to one of the biological parcnu. Who would protect us? The law would go clearly in the direction of the biological parents and their relatives." Chcrsl::y: "We had one legal docu­ment, medical power of allorney and more. If something were to happen to Adria or me. it is written down that we specify Marilyn and Michael to be guardians of this child." Gay groups upset as fight erupts over Capital Hill's hiring of gays By ALAN FRAM FOR THE NEW VOICE WASHINGTON, Friday, Oct. 22 (AP}­Gay group' arc rebuking House Speaker Thomas Foley and Minority Whip Newt Gingr ich as an uproar builds on Capitol Hill over three Oklahoma congressmen who said they would not hire open homosexua ls. Foley condemned "employment bias" based on sexual orientation or anything else on Thursday. But he a lso to ld reporters that because lawmakers have a special need to hire whomever they want to sensuive staff jobs, rules forbid· ding such dJScrimination would be unenforceable and could create prob­lems. "Whether it's a re: r ~on who docs not hire someone becau._c of gender, o r relig· ion, or race or sexual orientation, I do not approve in any way such a decision," said Foley, D-Wash. "But how you require individual members of Congress to hire specific individuals, other than those they say they have confidence in and wish to employ, is a difficult prob­lem." For example, Foley said that though it would not be condoned e lsewhere, con-gressional libera ls could not be forced to hire conservatives. The s peaker's rema r ks put h im squarely in the middle of a delica1c issue fo r Congr ess: t he exempt ions it has awarded itself to civil rights legislation and many other laws. It also drew f ire from the Human Ri ght s Campaign f'und , which lo bbies fo r homosexuals in Washington. "If a member of Congress stated he wouldn't hire a black person or a Jew in his office, there would be proceedings under way today to censure them," said Gregory King, spokesperson for the group. In Thu r sday's Washington Times, Gingrich, R·Ga., defended the Okla­homa lawmakers, saying a member of Congress may consider employing a homosexual to be "agamst his religion." This prompted another gay group to c r iticize Gingr ich and the three Okla­homans: Republ ican Reps. E rnest Is t · ool:: and Jim ln hofc, and Democratic Rep. Bill Brewster. "In addition to the obvious repug­nance of proudly stating that you would discriminate against a fellow American 'f' 'f' 'f'DATELINE: GAY AMERICA based on an aspect of their life irrele­vant to JOb performance, your public sta tement feeds the hatred that causes gay bashing," the Nat ional Gay and Lesbian Task Force wrole lo the four lawmakers. Also joining in was Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., one of Congress' two acknowledged homosexua ls While agreeing wilh Foley lhal a rule forbidding discriminat ion could proba­bly not be enforced, he said in an inter­view Thursday that one should be imposed anyway because "you really can't not do it." Frank and IS other Democrats also wrote to Gingrich, saying his support for the lawmakers would "encourage behavior in members of the House which contrasts with our ideals of fair treatment." Taking issue was Istook. who <aid his decision was based not on prejudice but a desire to employ people of the same political ideology. "If Barney Frank and some other peo­ple don't like 1t, well, I'm not about to kneel to the false god of political correct­ness," he said. Under House rules. members cannot make job decisions based on a person's race, color, national origm. sex. disabil· 1ty or age. Sexual orientation is not men· tioned. People who believe they have been discriminated against may complain to the House's Fair Employment Practices Office. But in a survey conducted r ecenrly by the privaie Congreo::'.'ii1ona l Managcmenl Foundallon, mo:tt con­gressional aides responding said they believed filing such complaints could threaten their careers. The District of Columbia has enacted legislation forbidding discrimination against gay people, but It docs not apply to members of Congress, Federal civil rights la"s do not forbid discrimination based on l\exual orienta· t1on. although lcg1slat1on has been introduced that would add that cate­gory Foley has said he supports an effort to review whether such laws should be applied to Congress. !stool::, lnhofc and Brewster had said they would not hire homosexuals in interviews in the Oct. 3 Tulsa, Olla,, World. Spotlight shifts to judge as closing argwnents wrap up Colorado Amendment 2 trial By CARL HILLIARD FOR TIE~ VOICE DENVER, Friday. Oct. 22 (AP)-The spotlight shifted to a Denver judge Fri· day on the challenge of Colorado's anti­gay- rights amendment after attorneys summed up why Amendment 2 should be struck down or kept in the state Con­stitution. Denver Dist rict Judge Jeffrey Bayless said he would weigh the evidence pre­sented dur ing the eight·day trial that ended Friday and issue a ruling later o n- he wouldn 't say when. Obser vers say a ruling could take weeks or months. "The soo ner 1 will be able to rule, the happier I will be," he said. In closing arguments, Jean Dubofsl::y, the former state Supreme Court JUSt1ce representing the Amendment 2 chal­lengers. sa id Colorado h_omoscxua.ls "arc not he re asking protecuon from d1s­cnminat1on- only the right to seek such protection, ff necessary." Solicitor General Tim Tymkovich. reprcscntina the state and defending the amendment approved by Colorado vote" last November, argued Amend· mcnt 2 "is not a question of natural law or religion or moral judgment . " It 's a question of whether public pol­icy sho uld be extended to a private group. And people of Colorado made that decision on Nov. 2," Tymkovich said. Amendment 2,. which bar; govern­ments from passing laws that protect gays from discrim ina t ion. was blocked by Bayless from taking effect as sched­uled Jan. IS. Opponents persuaded him 11 was likely to be declared unconstitu­tiona l. The Colorado Supreme Cour t upheld Bayless' order blocking t he amendment's implementation, and the state is appealing to the U.S Supreme Court Six ind1v1duals and the cities of Boul­de r , Denver and Aspen-which have gay protection ordinances that would be struc k down by Amendment 2-pursucd their lawsuit challenging the amend· mcnt, and the non-Jury trial before Bay­less began <X:t. 12. The state, in defending Amendment 2. said homosexuals earn more than aver­age, have demonstrated their pol111cal clout many 11mcs, and do not deserve protected status or designation as a sus­pect class. The plaintiffs have alleged Amend­ment 2 denies gays equal access to the polillcal system, a v1olat1on of their con· stitutional rights. "Attaining suspect class status is not a goal of the plainuffs," Dubofsky '"id in her closing statement Friday "If Amendment 2 goes rnto effect, gays, lesbians and bisexuals in Colo­rado will be without political power," she said. Dubofsky argued Colorado voters were fed fa lse arguments by Colorado for Fa mily Val ues, the Colorado Springs·bascd organization headed by Will Perkins that wrote and cam­paigned for Amendment 2. The arguments employed by the state in defending Amendment 2 were JUSt as false, she sa1d-"sc1entific" dua that gays commit more sex offenses against children than heterosexuals; that gays were wealthier and better educated than the general population, and that they have more political clout than the heter­osexual communuy. 'It is clear Amendment 2 1s discrimi­natory on its face. It singles out homo­sexual orientation," she said. adding that if the words "African-American," or ''women" were substituted for ''homo· sexual, lesbian or bisexual" m Amend­ment 2, 11 would be clearly uncons111u­tiona1. In his closing argument, Tymkovich said Amendment 2 does not answer the question of who should be provided protections from discriminuion. "It leaves II to another day,'' "Many people do not believe this group ought to be part of the civil rights code," he said. "Colorado voters have said, 'We do not.' And to paraphrase Will Perkins. 'How you have sex should not be the basis of protected class status."' Before closing arguments. the plain· tiffs presented a rcbuual witness who said Amendment 2 singles out gays and "puts a sc.arlet 'A' on their forehead." Jerome Culp, a Duke Un1ver>1ty la" professor. also said Amendment 2 bucks the national trend. "There is a trend across the country to provide protection against sexual dis· cruninauon," Culp said. 6 THE NEW VOICE' OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 TT THOUSTON LIVE 'Earl, Ollie, Austin & Ralph': the best production ever from The Group By JAVIER TA~fEZ lbc ~cw VoJCc/Houscon ''I need someone to grow old with!'' That familiar lament for love is spoken by Austin, the sanguine and romantic half of a relatively young gay couple 10 a deloghtful but bittersweet romantic comedy. "Earl, Ollie, Austin & Ralph" is being presented by The Group (Theatre Work­shop) at Kuumba House Repertory The­ater. and this os far and away the best production ever from the group. Austm (David M. Dukes) and his lover. Ralph (Andrew Dawson) have arrived for a getaway weekend on the small. coastal South Carolona town that was A11>ton's boyhood borne, Their relationship is a study in con­trasts; Auston works for the New York City Parks & Recreation Department as a groundskeeper of sorts; he is simple and unrefined but also sincere and kind­hearted Ralph i> a gay rights activist who works for the Gay and Lesbian Society; he os intelligent and worldly, also uncompromising and obnoxious. Because the gay hotel where Austin had planned for them to stay was destroyed by beach erosion the week before their arrival, the couple have to seek accommodations at a nearby estab­lishment called the Blue Angel. The proprietors there, Earl (Dan Aa­hove) and Ollie (Stephen Burton) seem like nothing more than benign curmudgeons-amusing to Austm. irri­tating to Ralph. Earl offers the young men two rooms for the price of one, but Austin declines thereby stoking Earl's suspicion that Auston and Ralph are "that way." To help conform hlS suspicions, Earl gives them a room. wh1ch is connected to an air vent remarkably suited to carrying conversattons to other parts of the hotel. The question of Austin and Ralphs sexuahty os settled for their hosts by Rogers (Grant Kilpatrick). a spry. charming. old geezer. who bluntly lays the question on the lone. In easily recognizable fashion, Austin and Ralph attempt to come to grips with a relationship they both know is deterio­rating. Earl, Olhe and Rogers stand by (usually within ear shot) and become so enraptured with the unfolding drama (I guess life on a small southern town is boring) that they eventually place bets on whether or not the couple will remain together. The play of course isn't really about whether Austin and Ralph will live hap­pily- ever-after. Rather it's a strong and blatant juxtaposition of two relation­ships and two generations Earl and Ollie, together for almost 50 years, over­looking insignificant differences and building instead on the common ground: values, outlook, goals, expecta­tions, even dispositions . For them life together was not burdened (or bestowed) woth the pulse of the gay rights move­ment and dutiful activism; their life was Earl, ow~. AKSIUI 4 Ralph T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA built quietly and wothout fanfare. Austin and Ralph established their relationship on the shaky and worn premise that opposites attract (which may be true in some cases but which also invariably fades) . Austin was impressed by Ralph's activism, commit­ment and sophistication. Ralph was taken by Austin's earthiness and uncomplicated appeal . Unfortunately, with few similar experiences and even fewer shared goals, their life together becomes a series of unplea<ant and awk­ward situations with genuine communi­cation almost completely negligible. To be sure the play does have ots flaws. The characters are shameless stereo­types. at times exaggerated to the point of incredulity. Earl and Ollie snipe at each other incessantly, but playwright Glenn Rawls apparently figures that's bow older couples interact. Rogers is really nothing more than a dirty. old man, albeit, an exceptionally comic one. He spends the areater part of his time hoping and trying to get a peak at Austin's unsung trio Austin is frighteningly ignorant-it's hard to imagine any adult homo­sexual, especially one from New York, who would not he aware of the meaning behind the pink triangle. Ralph is just a jerk, but in the extreme. With the charac­ters hardly any­thing more than cardboard cutouts, the plot should ""- ..r- then be what makes this play work. Not so. The story is predictable, even slightly con­trived. Its more poignant moments seem like uninspired revelation and a large part of its comic appeal lies on the antics of Rogers. Yet taken as a whole, this stands as one of the most enjoyable plays I've ever seen. It speaks to the lighter, less demandirtg, critical purview. The very things I found to be literary missteps, were the things I enjoyed the most. The characters are as familiar as an old pair of shoes; they react exactly as I expected them 10 and wanted them to in every situation. And it doesn't really matter that the plot is thin on origiroal­ity because this show is a generatioroal comparison. It's intended as a surface glance; there is no substance and no subtext. It is theater as sheer entertain­ment, and in that respect it delivers spectacularly well. The acting is great from everyone in the cast. Dan Aahove and Stephen Bur­ton give similar characterizations to Earl and Ollie, but so what; there's a per­fectly acceptable truism which main­ta ons that couples who have been together a long time begin to share per­sonality traits Both Flahive and Bur· ton capture the tried and tired features that mark the early years of retirement. Andrew Dawson is convincing enough as the cynical and cheating Ralph that by the end of the play I genuinely dis­liked him-Dawson not just his charac· ter. David M. Dukes as Austin unfalter­ingly displays a longing for deeper and a more personally meaningful vision on life than poh11cal slogans. Grant Kil­patrick is howlongly funny as the wiz­ened cracker·jack Rogers. Director Joe Watts has done his best work here. Rather than interfere with the obvious characterizations, he worked with the surface sketches d~awn, recognizing that in this case, to give them substance was unnecessary. "Earl, Ollie, Auston & Ralph" is as sweet and charming as they come. Take a friend and enjoy. 'Sesame Street Live' rumor of two gays in cast bombards show TUPELO Moss, Saturday Oct 23 (AP)-With a performance of Sesame Soreet Love planned for Nov. 12-14. Tup­elo coliseum officials say they've been bombarded with concerned parent• wanting to know 1f two of the fic11onal characters are gay Off1c11ls say rumors that Sesame Street's Bert and Ernie characters are suppo>edly portraying a homosexual couple have circulated across the coun­try and managed lo filter onto the stale. "There IS no truth whatsoever 10 the rumors that Bert and Ernie are mar­ried," <aid a spokesperson woth Jim Hen­son Productions. the company started T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA by Jim Henson who created the muppet characters more than 20 years ago. Tupelo Coliseum Manager Mike Mar­ion said his office has been receiving calls for several weeks from people look­ing for verification of che rumor Marion said callers have even gone so far as to ask 1f the cwo chanclcrs would have a wedding ceremony during the 90 minute musical. "We are doing five shows and I prom· ise there won '1 be a wedding ceremony in any of them.'' Marion said. Marion said at least one caller said 1hey didn't want lo come 10 the show if the rumors were uncrue. Pennsylvania Nightwatch patrol crwses the Wilkes-Barre gay underground By DA 'W:-1 SHLR\tArrlS FOR TtE t£oN VOICE WILKES·BARRE, Pa, Sunday, Oct. 24 (AP)-Condoms. Pepper mace. Home­made nightstick. First aid kit. Gemini is packed up and ready to pedal. He flicks hos otoll-smoldering Newport into the street and swongs a long leg over his customlzed mountain bike. It's 10:00 p.m. and the Nightwatch patrol has officially begun. Typically JOmed by a half-dozen other Nightwatch members. Gemini os a youthful harbin&er of Truth, Justice and the Homosexual Way. His patrol resembles a gay ver.ion of ''The Lost Boys'"-a largely secret organization whose members refuse to publicly reveal their odentitoes. Instead. they use "handles"-Gemino, Little Caesar. K.T, Rex, Ford, and Chevy. In reality, Gem om is a 26-year-old cook from Wilkes-Barre who dons a dark hooded oweatshirt three nights a week to safeguard area streets frequented by homosexuals-and, he says. gay bash· ers. The goal of the seven-month-old Nightwatch is 10 deter violence against homosexuals via a foot, bike and car patrol presence. The group's acronym is l.R.C.T, which stands for Identify, Report, Comfort and Testify of neces­sary. Together. under dark of night, Night­watch cruises the gay underground. Here, Nesbitt Park is Fag Forest. The asphalt outside the downtown McDon­alds is The Pumpkin Patch. The park­ing lot cornered by South Washington and Northampton streets is dubbed The Triangle one stop on the gay cruising circuit. It's here, they <ay, attacks on gay men occur. '"We want to see JU5tlce brought to peo­ple who hurt us, and if someone's hurt, we11 care for chem.'' explains Gemini, a tall, lank blonde woth a choir boy face. Most of the assaulls, ~ays Gcmm1, arc verbal-people yelling "fag" or "queer" outside passing car windows. Gemini estimates 2S times a month a gay man or woman is harassed. Physical TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA assaults, he admits, are few The last one he recalls took place on Nesbitt Park this summer, when two men picked a fight wuh a gay man. "We're not vigilantes," Gemim insists. "We're having a good tome and we're doing a good thing at the same ume." Critics in the gay community say the group os making fools of themselves. They've told Gemini . he's promoting crime, not combating 11. By publicizing assaults. they say, this area will get an unwanted reputation. "But for the most part, people give us a lot of support," Gemini 1nsis1s. "A lot of people say thank you." The six current members of Noght­watch range on age from 21 to SJ. They include a waitress. nurse's aid and com­puter operator. It's a loose organ1zat1on, sustained through word of mouth over th.e Citi­zen's Band radlO and conversauons tn local gay bars . One member-Blue Eyes-is a straight woman~ drawn to the group after catching their CB chat­ter Like most, she offers no name and no comment Chevy is 24, a lithe, blond Wilkes Col­lege student. He uses the CB to meet peo­ple, gay people. When approached, he bolls. Although Gemini os public abo ut his homosexuality, the other members of Nightwatch keep their sexual orienta­tion a secret from most friends and fam lly. They're afraid of rejection and vio· Jenee, they say. Nightwatch os a take-off from a group that operated on Philadelphia between 1990-92. Supported by gay businesses. members escorted men and women from gay bars . in center city. The group even· tually disbanded because of lack of financial s upport, according to Rita Odessa, of the Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Task Force, Gemini joined that group when be loved on Philadelphia. Seven months ago, he heard about the local Night· watch and joined up. The goal is to report more crimes against $•YS and 10 act as a deterrent to more violence Gemini considers the men and women who report such crimes "heroes." Yale University extends full health benefits to gay partners NEW HA VEN C••nn Saturday Oc1 23 (AP}-Yale Unoversuy is exiending full health benefits to the partners of gay and lesbian faculty members, administrators and managers. Yale jom1 ot 1er leading universities uch as Stanford. Harvard, Massachu· setts Iosti1u1e o.f Technology and the Unt­versity of Chicago that recently have cxrended coverage to homosexual pan­ners. Yale ·s decision, announced Thursday. followed two yeao of discussion and reports. The move had a strong faculty rec .. ommenda1ion, said Ann Ameling. an asso .. ciate provost who helped to draft the bene· fits plan Yale had previously extended a number of privilege5 to gay and lesbian partners. including identification cards and puses to the campus gym and libraries. BASIC BROTHERS 1232 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON, TX OPEN MON-SAT 10-9 SUN 12-6 (713) 522-1626 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 7 HALLOWEEN Costumes Masks Make-Up Wigs Foundations Shoes And More lfyou'dliketojoinforceswiththousands TO CARRY THE WORLff~ LARGE~T ;l:~~~:::~:~~:~s:::::I RAINBOW FLRG IN NEW YORH cny·~ ~TONEWALL 25 ~:t:~:~::.:et::tuan~~~rtcutforyou. MRRCH, MAHE A LEFT ONTO FIFTH AVENUE. Justfillouttheattachedcou.ponand BUT FIR'T CUT ncnocc I TUI' OIRE"T'"N send a S50-or-more donation for ) , ) ) 1-J! ) [., .lJ . early registration. You'll be entitled to raise the rainbow-commissioned by The Stadtlanders Foundation-along the Fifth Avenue parade route on June 26th. It's a chance to show your support of Lesbian and Gay Pride and to help AIDS charities at the same time. That's because every cent that's sent goes directly into The Stadtlande~ Foundation for distribution to AIDS organizations nationwide. So cut across the block at right. And don't drag your feet. Because the first 10,000 to register will receive a commemorative strip of our one-of-a-kind flag following its one and only flight. For more information, phone 1800-NYC· 1994. Please check appropnate boxes / .;,; 0 I wll hoJp atry U... rainbow flag •t U... Stonew .. ZS M.lrcl> on \__,/' μ,. 26111, 199-4. 11 NewYO!t. Gty. Endo5ed "my S50-<Jr...-Id> deducbble contnbution. 0 Sony, I'm .->Ible to attend Endo>ed" my tax deductible contribUtion. 0 rm ont....ied but I <lO<'d more onformation. M4ko chocks pi)'lblt too Tho St.ldtla.-. FoundatJC>n "'14•1 to: Tho St.ldtlond<r\ Foundat>on. 600 Pem Ceote< Boul<>ill'd, P>ttsburgll, PA 15235·5810 ~---- r.iY" St.mo - 14> ( ) ~...,...=. .-. ~'<•=··=---d,..-,.,,,'9'.=-=-=-=--.=.. .- -~--....- - RAl~E THE RAINBOW SHON YOUR COLORS • SHOW YOU CAR; M JUNE26,1994·NEWYORKCITY THE STADTLANDERS FOUNDATION 67R 8 THE NEW VOICE OCTOBER 29- NOVEMBER 4, 1993 TT T GAY AMERICA Gay and lesbian writers gather to discuss their craft at annual event By ID! MERRETT "I believe sex and porn arc basically good for society," said Scott O'Hara, a former porn star and editor of •·s1cam" magazine who spoke at the fourth annual OutWrite conference for lesbian and gay writers Oct. 8th through the 10th in Boston. "The world would be a better place if porn were widely available, even to child· ren, so they wouldn't have to invent their own erotica.'' The positive aspects of gay porn was one of several provocative issues that were discussed at this year's OutWrite conference, held for the second year in a row at the Bos­ton Park Plaza Hotel. More than 1500 literate and fans attended what might have been sub­titled "the conference that almost wasn't." Founded in I 990 as a national meeting for readers, writ­ers, agents, editors, book-sellers and other lesbian and gay literary pro­fessionals, the conference lost its original sponsor when Out/Look magazine folded last year. But the event was saved by the Bromfield Street Educational Foun­dation, the Boston-based parent cor­poration of the Gay Community News, a newspaper which sus­pended publication last year due to lack of funds. Special issues of a revived Gay Community News were distributed at the conference, and the newspaper is expected to resume regular publication in Jan. 1994. The three-day conference featured keynote addresses by poet Chrystos, poet and novelist Jewelle Gomez, lesbian comic Kate Clinton. and sci­ence fiction writer Samuel R. Del­any. Playwrite Tony Kushner was also scheduled as a keynote speaker but withdrew, informing the audience by fax that he had been forced 10 stay ID !'cw York 10 attend 10 the opening of the second part of his Pulitzer Prrze wmning play "Angels ,n America." Editor and author John Peterson filled in for Kush­ner. On a somber note, memorials were offered during the proceedings for the novelist Melvin Dixon and the poet Audre Larde, both of whom died w1thm the past year. But the bulk of this year's confer­ence was taken up with writing workshops, readings and panel< on such diverse topics as •·censorship," ··writing About Boy Love, ''AIDS and Pornography," and "Dirty Laundry: How do we write about our scandals?" The "Dirty Laundry" panel, which featured several writers who T T T HOUSTON LIVE have recently reported on scandals in the gay and lesbian community, became boisterous when Liz Galst, a lesbian who writes for The Boston Phoenix, an alternative weekly in Massachusetts, said she was afraid of the "political repercussions." Although members of the audi­ence shouted for Galst to give spe­cific details of the scandal, she declined. Instead, Galst asked the audience, "What do we do when our leaders engage in practices that are unethical?" Tim Kingston, a journalist who said he helped uncover what he called "mismanagement, arbitrary firings and sexual harassment" at The Shanti Project, a San Fran­cisco- based AIDS organization, feels that the gay and lesbian press should act as a "watchdog" for the community. Kingston said that although gay and lesbian organizations often pre­fer to resolve internal programs "in house and quietly, being a journalist I frown on that. If there is no cover­agc ... thc situation can get so bad that the mainstream press can get hold of (the story) and do a lousy job that ends up hurtinf more than it helps." In the case o the Shanti Pro­ject, Kingston said that the gay press coverage resulted in the prob­lems being corrected. Masha Gessen, a freelance jour­nalist and former magazine editor, said she recently investigated a "lesbian cult" for a gay and lesbian magazine, and was concerned that non gay media would exploit the story for its sensational aspects. But Village Voice columnist Donna Minkowitz said that she was "perfectly comfortable with expos- 1Dg the people who do harm to other gay people," as when she reported on a sex <candal at an AIDS Center resulted in the firing of the director, who, according to Minkowitz, was anti-choice, a sexual harasser and a Republican to boor. Minkowitz compared the Journal · ist's situation to that of the Milwau· kec "cops who gave a 14 year old Laotian boy back to serial killer Jef • frey Dahmer. If you are a gay and lesbian reporter and you come on a suuation (like that}, what do you do?" But , Minkowitz also wondered whether she would be as aggressive if the subject of an investigation was one of her heroes. and recalled a case m which <he withheld a "juicy fact" about a lesbian politician for a time for fear it would damage the poluician 's career. Ann Northrop, an activist and tel­evision journalist, said, "It is my knee jerk reaction that the highest value of honesty. but I am also aware that no one really does that. The mainstream press has their own agendas ... they covered ur, the fact of Ronald Reagan's senility.' Several panelists worried that controversial information in gay media can be turned against the gay movement. Doug Sadow nick, a gay writer and activist, said he has had con­flicts about publishing controver­sial stories that will bring about crit­icism of the gay community. Nevertheless, Sandownick said, he recent ly wrote about unsafe prac­tices in the Los Angles gay sex scene for a non-gay magazine, and was "viciously torn apart as someone who had exposed the dirty secrets of the gay and lesbian movement." But, Sandownick said, "The dirty little secret of the gay movement is what kind of sex we have, what kind of perversions we have. How do we deal with the shame that comes ur. when we have to discuss this? Isn t the public discussion better than the ways m which the outside commu­nity uses this dirty secret against us?" According to Pat Califia, a les­bian author and leather activist who spoke at a panel titled "Positive Depictions in the Mass Media," "the price of visibility is always gonna be disapproval. Homophobic straight people are always going to find an excuse to say it's our fault that they're kicking the s-out of us.'' Asserting that "sexual outlaws act as lightening rods," absorbing criticism from the straight commu­mty, Califia <cored the lesbian and gay community for "not comforta· bly defending our sexuality in all its delightful variety. We're afraid of the cops and the state because they have the power to crush our commu­nity. We're still doing the same poli­tics of appeasement we've been do1Dg for the past twenty years." Several conference participants complained that both gay and mainstream press tend to neglect such "<exual outlaws" to the detri· ment of the gay community. Luke Sissyfag, a Washington activist. said he had his name legally changed to reflect his sclf­imagc but had difficulty gcumg gay newspapers to print it when he was mtcrvicwcd as one of the organizers for the recent March on Washing­ton John Preston, whose book "My Life as a Pornographer and Other Indecent Acts" will be published this November, and who moderated a panel on "Censorship," said that as a pornographer, "censorship has been a major recurring theme in my life. I've had public television spe­cials do profiles on me, I have been profiled on the front pages of all the major newspapers, and they never talk about erotica." Barbara T. Kerr, a member of the Feminist Anti-Censorship Task Force, said her organization is working against anti-porn feminist Andrea Dworkin and Catherine McKinnon, who have teamed up with right wing censors to battle porn. "We shouldn't set up feminists as censors of gays," Kerr said. But gays and lesbians arc guilty of self-censorship as well, according to Dan Tsang, who edited a 1981 book titled 'The Age Taboo" detail­ing the pros and cons of age of con­sent laws. "I 'vc written about cen­sorship by (gay and lesbian) library workers not buying S&M books, not buying books on man boy love, and targeting librarians who are buying these books," said Tsang, who urged gays and lesbians to unify on such issues instead of "caving into the right wing and stigmatizing them." Groups that advocate controver sial positions, such as sexual rela tionships between men and boys, have been "silenced within the gay movement," according to Bill Andri­ette, _an editor at The Guide maga­ZIDe ID Boston as well as editor of the Boston-based NAM BLA (National Man Boy Love Associa­tion) Bulletin. Andriette said that the publishers of the NAMBLA Bulletin operate under the belief that they are pro­tected by a "long-standing tradition in the West" of freedom of expres­sion. But when Andriette displayed a nude photo of what he said was an underage boy. he warned the audi­ence that •·in the state of Massachu­setts, showing you this picture qual­ifies me for a mandatory 10-year sentence under the kiddie porn law that was passed in the early eight 1es." He added that the same book was in the Harvard Library Andriette said that the gay com­munity had failed to recognize that the suppression of "child and ado­lescent sexuality" was a form of cen­sorship. He said that the attack on government funding for gay and lesbian artists was "relatively triv­ial" compared 10 "people's homes getting raided and writers getting put in prison for the ideas that they express ... around a perceived danger to children and adolescents," (Editor's note· Jim Merrett is a New York-based freelance writer) Two intense one acts continue West-Mon's interest with the outer fringe By JAVIER TA\IEZ The New V01cctHouuoo The Wesc-Mon Repercory Theater has shaken up the Houston theacer scene, of that there 1s no doubc, and I saluce chem for the oumandmg theater they have brought rnto the hearc of Montrose. Unfortunucly the artistic power.­that- be ac the West-Mon have shown a strong prcd1lcc1ion for theater that showcases dcmzcns of the outer fringe . The two one-act plays currently run­nrng, • Apartment 3-D" and "Swccc Eros," arc boch prime examples of this morbid genre. "Apartment 3-D" "Apartment 3·0" is a deeply disturbing look at the games people play-in this case a male prostitute and his trick for an hour. The beginning 1s misleading: the boy (Adrian Cardell Porcer) is scared and uocertam; the man (Paul Prince) is soothing and unJcrs1andmg. It appear> as thOUJ<h a tender moment is abouc to be realized, the man and the boy both fmd1ng smccre affecuon tn the mid<e of an urban meal market. But that's not rcghl. Fantasies arcn'c any fun and certainly not worth the money unless you get "bat you paid for. So the man decides he wants to try agam, but with a different scenario this ltmc The boy, willing 10 tokra1c only so much for a quick and easy buck, figures the man ts too ,.c1rd. An easy exit is not possible The man pulls ouc a gun and a cerrifying game of reality and make-believe takes place. The man 1> vola11le yet clearly possesses a quiet. studied. even nerdy. demeanor. The man's game is cruel and ugly, and the tortured sole his facade masks is an example of wretched desperation. The boy 1s street-smart, full of bra- Apartm~nt JD vado but frightened and wary. He's played many games with many tricks and knows how to walk a 11gh1rope. The game becomes so cauc, wich both man and boy searching for an escape, thac its eventual conclusion is a relief Yet the sad, psychopuhic, puhctic nature of the man manages to engender some sympachy but only rcluc­tancly so Paul Pr a nee as the man h ex.eel lent . Hn~ ostens1· bly even-natured pcrsonali1y 1s a di>&UISC for the dangerously off. center mind that lurks in:)idc him lie calls to mind every mass killer described by a nei&hbor as ''quiet. !ihy, never bolhcred anyone." Adrian Cardell Porter also docs a tine JOb. Alchough at times , his char ~ actcr1zat1on appeared to slip he by and large had no trouble moving from street tough" to httlc hoy." Porttr is young and he has heller things ahead of him. "Apartment 3-D" is a good production and jolting theater. but like all the other West-Mon productions. this one won·1 make you smile. "Sweet Eros" Terrence McNally " one of the best American playwrights today "Swecc Eros" is one of h1> worst plays. A young man (Derek Cecil) has kid· napped a girl (Whitney Porter). lie keeps her gagged and bound co a chair Through some harshly ht scene>. he explains exactly how every1hing is sup­posed to work oul. Evencually the girl will come to feel compa»ion for her cap· tor. He will build up trust in her, and slowly he will release her from her con· finement. Well 1f you have some son of Roman/ Sabine fantasy. or if you JUsl lhmk bondage is kind of hip (and 1 know you're out there) then th" play might work for you. Ocherwise in a odious commentary on Che nature of rclat1on ~ ships and the evil, d1Sgus11ng per· versions that manifest thcmselve~ rn the deranged. Though Derck Ccctl docs well as 1hc sick young man and Whitney Porter shows uncommon bravery, part1cul1rly for Houston. m appearing disrobed, their brave efforts arc pointless m this type of tripe. This 1sn~ theater; u·s more akin 10 a sleazy episode of "llarJ Copy " Some companies and brokers are promising you "lhc most money for your life insurance policy," but they SIMS.""""..... are breaking their promises. lney promise to only represent your interests ... lhcy promise to get you lhe most for your policy ... they promise that everything is confi­dc n ti a I... they promise you will wilh a company like American life Resources there would be no fee. The extra money it costs to have a middleman shop your policy to investors would go directly to you. And copies of your private and con· fidential medical records would not be floating around lhe country like a chain letter. We don't need to find someone to purchase your policy. We don't have to wait to get you your funds after you have been approved. We not have to pay their fee. They promise you will get your money quickly. They promise and they promise and lhey promise! There is nothing sweeter than a promise kept. have over 50 mil· lion dollars of our own money that is solely dedicat· ed to purchasing life insurance policies. You receive the most money possible with no hassles, There is nothing more bitter than a promise broken. And who will these brokers sell your policy to? Not the com-no excuses and no delays. pany that will pay you the most, but someone who will pay the broker the most. Think about that! And who are these "funding sources" that they arc sending your personal and confidential medical records to? Someone you can check out? Som<:one you can trust? Someone you would want owning yo11r lif P insurance policy? Call us for more information. You don't need middlemen and neither do we. We keep our promises so you can keep yours' 1-800-633-0407 Amencan l\ file ~sources· A V1a11cal SetlleMenl Company Anrl who really pays tht· brok!'r's I<'<'' You! II you worked directly "'-'"'••"---q-IJI' ·---.. p .. .-tQISCl:llclrlcal ~111fle" RI WtUwe~lf!Cftf'W.l.JbttCDl'ltOIOllW n...,fllt.,.Ch- {)«/" 1~/el(rU II (/I( Ot'tj eQ«J(~tl Tell«~ to /lk't i!u.d a Little, 81't LolfP Md /Ve, e/11( Ila~ a cf eat t1t Tk TaJ!e,, We've Waited Long Enough NOW, It's Time •' We Have a Seat At The Council Table VOTE NOVEMBER 2ND. TO ELECT RAY HILL Council Member Position 2 At-Large Paid Poliliclll Ad. R•y llill Campuign !lay Hill Trcasun:r Printing and Layout Service• Donated THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 • NOVEMBER 4, 1993 9 "Accountability in government. That's what I'm about. And I mean Business." ~ THE MOST CONTROVERSIAL FILM OF THE YEAR! FARE.WELL MY CON CUBINE 10 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4. 1993 T TT DATELINE: GAY AMERICA 'The Boys in the Band' turns 25; theater season turns out gay themes By \IJCHAEL Kt:CHWARA FOR TIE ><eN VOICE NEW YORK, Wednesday. Oct. 20 (AP}­Before 1here was "Angels m America" or "Jeffrey" or "The Demny of Me" or 'The Normal Hean" or "Torch Song Trilogy," 1here was "The Boys m 1be Band." Mart Crowley's landmark gay drama turned 2S this year during a 1hea1er sea­son in New York 1ha1 saw a flourishing of plays wi1h homosexual 1hemes. None would have been possible wi1h­ou1 Crowley's laceraling and uncloseted por1ra11 of gay men. They were unapolo­ge1ically ponrayed as real people, nol stereotypes, cartoons or sinners who had 10 be punished for wha1 1hey did. "The 1hing I always baled aboul homosexual plays was 1ba1 1be homo­scxuahty was always the big surprise in 1he 1bird acl ," Crowley 1old The New York Times righl after ''The Boys in lhe Band" opened in April 1968. ··wen. life is nol like 1hat. Nol all faggo1s bump 1hemselves off al the end of the play_" Yet despue its groundbreaking status. Crowley'> play found itself at odds w11h the burgeoning gay righls revolution over the last two decades '"The Boys in lhe Band' bas been 1hrough so many periods," the S8-year­old playwrighl said 1he 01ber day dur­ing an interview in a Manhattan restau­rant. '"It was startling when it came out. Then 11 got old hat Then 11 got polill­cally mcorrecl. Now 11 's back to being taken in us period." 11·~ hard now to imagme the shock the play produced al off-Broadway's Thea­ter Four where its original production ran for exactly IOOO performances. The plol centers on a birthday celebra­uon and a v11.. u party game the host and his guests play. There's a live pres­enl for the birthday boy-a 42nd Street hustler dressed as a cowboy Self-depre­cation- and a 101 of references 10 "All About Eve"-fill the air. ll's 1ha1 self-haired, par1icularly by the leadmg cha racier. that upsets some gays today. " I can undersund how very bright people who are interested in 1he gay movement want to foster posit ive images only," says Crowley, with just a trace of a Southern accent that reveals his Mississippi roo1s. ''They get hys1eri­cal about any nega11ve role ponrayal. I lhink il's ra1her unfair 10 the play. "Critics would always hammer on that one character. Michael. who was self-hating. All of 1he characlers have a streak of self-hatred. bul lhat"s whal we were going through at chat time. We were trymg 10 get out of that. Bui there are other characters in the play who refute Michael's cynicism and pessi­mism" "The Boys m the Band" made Crow­ley more than JUSI a promising new playwright and a lot of money. which he admus be d1dn'1 handle too wisely. But ii didn'I prepare him for the letdown !hat was to follow. In 1970, his second play, "Remote Asylum," was eagerly awaited. There was an all-star casi: William Shatner, Nancy Kelly and Arthur O'Connell, and a big-name director: Jose Quintero. After a scathmg no11ce m The New York Times, the play died in Los Angeles at the end of its seven-week engagement. Today, Crowley refers 10 1he experience as "a giant humiliation." "I went mto a total decline and didn't do anything except drink and run around t"1e w• rid on the 'Boys m 1he T T TRIO GRANDE VALLEY SOAP Band' money," says Crowley In 1973, he returned to off-Broadway with "A Breeze from 1he Gulf." h got respec1ful no11ces, bul nobody came. "It wasn't what people expec1ed or wanred and closed in six weeks," Crowley says. He wrote another play that even loday he won'I talk about. "I've never lel 11 go," he explains. "I've rewrinen 11 and rewritten it and rewritten it." Broke, Crowley moved 10 Los Angeles 10 get a job. He found ii doing a series of original movie scripls- "All of which I gol paid for handsomely," he says-but none of chem was produced. He also found work through his good friends Robert Wagner and Natalie Wood. He produced Wagner's 1elevision series ''Hart to Hart" for four years. Crowley still works m 1elevision. mostly writing scripts for miniseries. These days, his sighls and energy are focused on a new play, his first in nine years. It's called ''For Reasons Thal Remain Unclear" and will have its world pre­miere next mon1h al lhe Olney Tbealer in Olney, Md., a Washington suburb. It opens Nov. 12 for a three-week run. The play stars Ken Ruta and Philip Angl1m as a Catholic pries! and a screenwriter who meet unexpectedly in a Rome hotel. More lhan thal, Crowley is unwilling to reveal. The playwrighl sees his soiourn in Olney as a homecoming. The theater was once run by Catholic Universily where Crowley maiored in drama. He recalls workmg at the theater as a stu­dent. "It was like a Mickey and Judy barn scene-typically summer s1ock," he says. "For Reasons That Remain Unclear" found its way 10 Olney wi1h the help of aclor Laurence Luckinbill, an old friend who was m the origmal cast of "The Boys in lhe Band." Luckinbill, who worked at Olney earlier this year, was to have played 1he screenwriter bul couldn't gel out of a previous engage­ment. Now Crowley is experiencing the exhilaration of rewri1ing, making changes in his script at 1he reques1 of his direclor, Jack Going. 'Tm a fast wri1er-af1er all, I work in 1elevision," he says. ''The Boys in the Band" was wrinen quickly. h was put down on paper dur­ing a bleak period m Crowley's life. He had come to California 10 be a film wri1er but couldn'I get anythmg pro­duced. So he was house sining for aclress Diana Lynn and her husband when he wrore the play "It was in my head," Crowley recalls. "Like all 1he thmgs I do, rhey seem to s1ar1 germinating and have a long period of gestation and rhen suddenly. I wrole the play m five weeks." Crowley says he has never been templed 10 revise "The Boys in the Band." "It is what it is and shall always be," he says resolu1ely. Richard Barr. one of its original pro­ducers. always wanted Crowley 10 wrile a sequel, focusing on the same charac­lers 1wo decades later . "Na1urally 1he 1i1le should have been 'And lhe Band Played On,' " Crowley says. "When Randy Shills came out wilh his book about AIDS, it dampened my enlhusiasm to write a sequel. "But I did come up wilh anolher 111lc-'Tbe Men from the Boys.' Nolh­ing's on paper yel, but it's m my bead, 1hough. It's cooking." Here's a Valley Halloween tale filled with festive hints for the weekend By \UCL\ LLGO The New VoJCe!Rio Grande Valley .. her hearl beat wildly as she ran from the madman. She had JUSI seen htm v.c1ously mu11la1e her besl friend, and she knew 1ha1 any second she would be his next victim. As she rounded the cor· ner of 1he dark srreet an arm reached ou1 and grabbed her from behmd a tree .. She cried 10 scream but a hand clamped down over her mouth, and a voice rold her 10 be ver) quite It was Isaac from 10th Avenue who was on his way home from the circu11 . They huddled 1here behind the tree as the madman ran by them w11hout even noticing them She hugged Isaac and !hanked him for rescuing her. "I'm nol here to rescue you, .. he said. "I JUSI wanted 10 lei you know thal tonight, Friday, Ocl 29th and tomorrow we havm1 the Isl Annual Pumpkin Fern­val . All 1he fun srarts al S o'clock with all kinds of boo1hs, including food boo1hs, a kl>Smg boo1h a fohmg booth. a dunking boorh and a 1a1I house. We are also having a cake walk, a pumpkin carving con1esi and Valley Voice is hav· mg a Buy A Tirle Booth comple1e wi1h sash and crowns. And 1ha1\ not all," he cried "We are also havmg a show and of course a Costume Contest as well with lols of prizes to be given away And all lhe proceeds are gomg to Valley Ram AIDS Services. • She got so excited she decided to jump out of the tree and run home to work on her costume However, lhe minute she hil the ground she real- 12ed she had for­go11e n all aboul the madman. As she turned to run he slashed 11 her with his ax, miss­ing her only by mches. She ran and ran will have Muscles Terry on thr road to Nrw Or/rans 1111 she got 10 rhe 1n Ac11on perform-corner of Ware Road and Daffodil. And there before her was P.B.D.'s. She ran m, exhausted, but screamed the minute she went through the door as she came face to face with a seven-foot hairy mon>ter (No silly, not Chuck!). Bur 11 was one of Chuck's crea-ing live." And if you think you're frighlened now, wail un1il Sunday night when we will be hav­mg our annual Halloween Contest We are gavmg away lots of cash prizes too," he exclaimed. Just then Ibey beard sounds of quickly approaching footstep>. Isaac ran and left her standing defenseleS>. She ~·as sure 1t was the maniac coming back to finish her off, so she quickly climbed up the tree 10 hide And who should be saumg lbere shaking in his soiled pan1s, but Terry of Just Tery's. "Oh Terry," she cried. "Thank goodness you'~• come co rescue me!" f'Rescue you? Are you ua1v'> I'm JUSI here wamng for a 1rick . After all, this is Trick or Treat asn't u? But whale you 're up here lel me tell you what we have planned for this weekend at J T ·s. On Sunday we are uon~. She quickly scanned rhe bar and thought for a mmute she mighl have accidentally entered Frankensteins Castle There were bats and skeletons and all sorlS of ghoulish monster• eve­rywhere. Jusl 1hen. Don appeared behind the bar ''Oh Don, help me. help me!" she said, "Before 1ha1 monster there strikes me dead!" "Well honey, you JU<! Sii down and have a drmk: on the hou'e so I can tell you all abou1 what we have planned for 1h1s weekend She shivered as she drank the tall "Bloody Mary ·• "Firsl of all on Saturday we're having 1wo last calls since we ge1 10 change lhe time back that night. In 01her words you'll have a whole exira hour to par1y, if you re s1ill alive. And 1hen on Hallow­een night we are having a costume con· 1es1 wi1h a SIOO bar lab gomg 10 the win­ner, and a SSO and S2S bar tab for lhe 2nd and 3rd place winners So honey, you just come ou1 and treat your trick 1ha1 night. Oh, and incidentally, did you know that Alicia from The New Voice chose lhio place as 1he besl and mosl ongmally decorated for Halloween•" Just then. the door swung open and the crazed maniac ran in screaming after her. She threw lhe drmk m h1> face, which blinded him temporarily because Don had put 100 much Tabasco m it She ran around him and quickly flew out lhe door. She iumped on Laurie's Surf Tram bus which was conveniently parked in front of lhe bar and was driven 10 Har­lingen where she got off at La Pla211a. Thinking she was safely away from 1he killer she walked a couple blocks over to Zippers where Max and Robert were busy decora11ng for Halloween. "Girl, you're so whue you'd thmk you had just seen a ghost," Max said. He shivered as he saw her blood-splat­tered clo1hes. "You look almost as scary as the wuch pinata we had here last Sat­urday night filled wilh condoms and tampons. Oh, incidenlally, did you know Iha! Ibis Saturday nighl we will be having a big Halloween Bash com· ple1e wilh Arna• reur show and cos· tume contest wi1h cash prizesr· Just as she was about to an5wer, she heard 1he sound of a chain saw start up right behind her . She screamed and Jumped out of rhe way of 1he killer thal had 1aken Lauriets next bus 10 Harlingen. She Prtu ran out scrcammg and waved down an old friend of hers that she saw driving by She iumped m10 the car and rhey borh drove 10 Brownsville where she was sure the killer wouldn'I fmd her Her friend dropped her off m fron1 of Crowning lady laura Club 440 where she ran m 10 call rhe police. But ii was Brownsville, so. of course the police were taking their sweet time to get there. As she sat waiting, Rafa and Michael came in. Rafa, seeing 1he condition she was m, bough1 her one of his famous Long Island Ice Teas to calm her down. Michael said, "Girlfriend did you know 1ha1 I his Friday, Miss Texas a1 Large U.S.A., Kelexis Davenport will be performmg here? And she will also be performing on Sunday nighl durmg our Halloween contest." Then Rafa said,"We are giving away lo1s of cash prizes for the most origmal, scariest, bes1 drag and best Tanya Lee look alike cos1umes." She then turned JUSI m 11me to see rhe maniac behind her gelling ready to swing a machete at her. By this time, our heroine was really pissed off She had enough of this 1di· otic, blood suck· mg, crazed bozo . She iumped up and did a spmnmg back kick direc1ly 10 his nuts, and rhen pulled oul her sem1·automat1c Uz21 from her bra (she had large 111s) and blew him 10 smnhcreens. Our congraiula· 11ons 10 Lady I.aura who took over 1he 111le of M1» Gay Pride of 1he Rio Grande Valley 1993-94 . She will now be lhe new represen1111ve for Valley Voice Gay/Lesbian Alliance. Valley Voice will meet this Tuesday at 8:00 p.m at 2313 E. Crocke11 1n llarhngen. For more mformallon call (210) 428-6800. HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN POLITICAL CAUCUS ENDORSEMENTS City Controller George Greanias City Council At-Large Candidates At-Large, 1 At-Large, 2 At-Large, 3 At-Large, 4 Gary Van Ooteghem Ray Hill Rob Bridges Brian Bradley District Candidates District B Roslyn Smith District C Robert Wol in District D Gene Harrington District F Dennis Dougherty District H Liz Lara District I Ben Reyes Paid for by HGLPC Political Act ion Committee, Patrick McKee, Treasurer CAN AID (ESSIAC FORMULA) COMPOSITION A (HERBAL FORMULA) ZEDORIA TABLETS (KS FOR~A) BITTER MELON (H:RBAL POWDER) T-CELL & B-CELL (FORMU.AS) COLLOIDAL SILVER (NATURAL ANTIBIOTIC) N-ACETLY-L-CYSTEINE (AN ANTIOXIDANT) Advertise Your Restaurant Here Call For Details (713) 529-8490 FOR MORE N'<HMTION ON CUI "'1TffT10NAI. Sl.FPl.J'J.ENTS. CAU_ MCHAEl. K.. Wl.SON TalAY THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 11 NEW ORJ,EANS HOME ALONE?? Come er::perienc. the magk: ot • New Or!Mna CREOLE Christmaa compM«a w tth fMtfYe Olnnera, 9onfk9 mdventure on the U l:aa. River, Carriaga RkMI thru the French Ouuter and much more! 4 Day tour. $349.00 pw ponon Obi occ. $299.00 pw penon Quad occ. New Years -SugarBowl THREE DAY WEEKEND.- ~ Complete Package! Tour wrth AIYM CrulH, otnMrS Ind ' FrH Drink Coupon• plua \ ,·. Accommodation•. ,i $359.00 per pereon Obi occ. Accommodat1on1 Only! From $150.00 par mght. MARDI GRAS ~... FEB.11·16, 1994 Boole .llllll( •"h only 201'. do Choft accommod11tk>n1 stJlt anlLlble DON'T DELAY! UPCOMING EVENTS: 1994 APRIL 8 -9-10 fr.nch Ouat1er FMUvat APRIL 21 MAY 1 H«rtage Jazz Festival. BOOK EARL YI ONE CALL NO FEE lff r.cndy (@uart.cr i!lts.eruatiDn ~truict 940 Royal Street • SI.Its 263 - OrteMs, LA 70116 (504) 523-1246 FAY. (504) 527-6327 ~ 1307 FAIRVIEW ••• (3 bloc:l<I Well ol Monlrole) ••• (713) 529-1414 .. ,,., ...... llC. • Alignment ~ •Brakes ._, Celebrate the I SOth anmveNlr) of Charle. Dicken,' A Chn.mnas Carol and the 20th anniversary of the Southwe.t'> happ1e>t holiday fe.tival. Dttcmber 4 & 5, 1993 Historic Calve.ton Island For nf1•r11\iltK~n.contact Galn·~r in Hbt ll'K--al Fourlt.fatK1n 2016 Strand • GdivNon. T<xa> 77550 (409) 7~5 7834 AmericanAirtines· rN < >-7K'wl AMrP. .f >-.11m1 m n.t '\1Tand c:£onbon CIDfjarf during Dic kens on The Strand .. London Wharf at the Texas Scapon Mu.eum dunn~ Dickens on The Strand. Dttember 4 & 5, 1993 Historic Calve.ton Island Check the back of your 0-. Fa>t Pay pump receipt for free adm1<.<1on to the London Wharf * Rob Bridges "Our Time Openly Gay candidate for Has City Counc/I At Largt1 Pos/Uon 3 Come!" Community Involvement Quality Leadership • Haullon Gay ' l.etbilln l'olllcal C.UCUa, tanner Preoidonl f'ro. T11111 • Mcno.~iyc.m.. ad .non c:cmmlnoe choir • l..MbirlGay Demoaalo ol Te­atatlwide co-chair • SIDllt Soup Food "-*Y ......_, Agenda for the "90's • Municf»I notHlisaimination Oldi- • Al»quat• fundl>g for HN-AIDS educ.tion • Priottiz•'""'*''s~mu.sat Houston Cly Hflalh Dflpl. • Pf9VWldon of Hat• Crm•s 2507 MontroM Blvd.. Hou.Ion. Texu noo& 7131520-6039 ,.., ,. .,_.._,..,.,~.,..__...._11.r- 12 THE NEW VOICE' OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 TTTGAY HEALTH Viatical industry unifies its national association with merger vote The Nallvnal Vu.t1cal Association (NVA) reported Tuesday that the com­bmed membership of the NV A and The National Association of Viatical Settle­ment Organizations voted to merge in a joint meeting held in Dallas on Oct. 22nd. The merger of the two industry associ­allons combmes virtually all of the par­ticipants in the rapidly growing viatical industry. Viatical companies offer terminally ill people the opportunity to sell their life insurance benefits for cash. Some insur­ance companies offer similar programs called "accelerated benefits." Currently, the majority of persons selling insurance benefits are people with AIDS, but the NVA said a much wider range of Americans a re poten­tially able to take advantage of viatical ser vices. NVA president, Brian Pa rdo said, "Virtually any pe rson with life insurance that happens to be terminally ill can benefit from the viatical process." Currently, abo ut 40 companies T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA nationwide provide an estimated $200 million in benefits annually to ter­minally ill people throughout the United States. Some states have recently enacted laws regulating the viatical process. The association said its members will abide by the highest standards of busi­ness conduct. Pardo said the industry will take responsibil ity for its members. "The NVA will not hesitate to take action against members violating ethi­cal standards," he said. "These actions can result in sanctions raogmg from let-ters of reprimand to fines and/or sus­pension or expulsion." To date only one company has been expelled from the NVA "We have expe­rienced very few problems in this mdus­try ," Pardo said. NVA officials estimate several thou­sand people viaticate their policies this year, but they said that number will become much lar ger as more people real­ize they can qua lify for the benefits. The NVA said benefits vary widely depend­ing on individual circumstances. Demonstrators protest anti-gay activist Lon Mabon appearance in Seattle By ELISABETH DUNHAM FOR THE tEW VOICE SEATTLE Monday, Oct. 25 (AP)­Chanting "Two, four, six, eight, Nazi hate won't make us s.traight.'" more than 400 protesters picketed an appearance by Lon Mabon. the founder of a group that led an unsuccessful Oregon initia­tive drive to curb gay rights Mabon, leader of the Oregon Citizens Alliance, addressed a sparsely attended event at the Aurora Church of the Naza­rene m north Seattle. The event was sponsored by the Citizens Alliance of Washmgton, which 1s organizmg a sim­ilar muiative drive in Washington. Demonstrators. marching in drizzly weather, filled the sidewalk outside the church. They chanted, beat drums and waved placards with such messages as "No Hate 1n Washington State," "Bigots are Boring," and "Queers for Equality." Police in not gear monuorcd the dem­onstration and blocked off one lane of traffic as participants spilled off the crowded sidewalk mto the street. Many passing drivers honked in support of the protesters. No arrests were made, The protest was organized by several groups supporting homosexual rights, including Queer Nation. Hands Off Washington and the Women's Action Coaluion. "We want equal r1ghts," said Dyer Downing, 30, of Seattle, one of the dem­onstrators. "We are not asking for spe­cial rights that anyone else doesn't have." Janme Vaughn Nagel of Brier. Wash., carried her 4-year-old son during the protest. 'Tm a mother, a child-care provider, a Christian and a supporter of civil rights. This (anti-gay) movement really fright­ens me." she said. Inside the church, Mabon urged his listeners to recognize that society faces T T T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA a war over moral beliefs. ''Their side recognizes it : our side is beginning to recognize it; you need to recognize it," he said. "There is a war going on that has dire ramifications for society, for the family. for everything we have grown up knowing." He urged his audience of about JOO to take up the fight. "Would you be willing to stand three or four in the wind and rain to make your point? They will," he said, referrmg to the gathering outside. "The homosexual community and their allies on the voting left have launched a campllgn that is not going to stop until it g11ns everything that they want and that is full minority sta­tus in the law so that society is forced to accept their behavior." Mabon said. Mabon was the author of Oregon's Measure 9, a proposed state constitu­tional amendment that would have pro­hibited that state's government from San Diego City Council race includes cri• es SAN DIEGO Wednesday, Oct. 20 (AP)-With only days left before the Nov. 2 runoff election. the campaign for one city council scat here has involved allegations of gay baiting and dirty tricks The police even have been called m. The first signs of the anger m the Dis­trict 3 nee came over the fax machine in Evonne Schulze's campaign office. Every 1$ to 20 minutes, the machine would spit out a message in bold type: "Homophobc." '"'Gay Baiter." "Hate Monger." "Loser." "Carpet Bagger " ''Trespasser." "Invader.'" Schulze also began receiving phone call> in the middle of the night. The caller would say nothmg, then hang up. For Schulze, a long11me supporter of gay rights, the calls and faxes were distress­ing. For opponent Christine Kehoe. who's trying to become the first openly gay candidate elected to the city council. it posed senrn1ve problems. Kehoe has tried to avoid being labeled as a gay can­didate, hoping to broaden her appeal. But a campaign mailer that Schulze mailed to voters last week, shortly before the barrage of phone calls and faxes started. sparked o utrage in the gay community. Schulze's mailer did not specifically identify Kehoe as a lesbian, but in a list of her past JObs, u said that she had been ednor of the San Diego Gayzette gay and lesbian communny newspaper. And a companson of the two candidates said that Schulze had raised two sons, while no family statistics were listed for Kehoe. Schulze's mallin& said it was in response to Kehoe's "attack" that Schu­lze was a carpet bagger who had moved into the district earlier this year to run for office. She defended the mformation she had included on Kehoe, saying "everything came from her own resume." Nevertheless, Ruth Bernstein, Kehoc's campaign coordinator, said the mailer prompted gay activists to want to protest 11 publicly Some saw 11 as a TT T GALVESTON SOAP subtle attempt to gain votes from con­servatives by reveal ing Kehoe's homo­sexuality. But Bernstein said the Kehoe cam­paign didn't want to get involved and even tried to discourage the protests. "If they felt they personally wanted to call Evonne, then do it, but It was not going to come from the campaign," she said. Schulze. for her part, had the phone company trace the anonymous faxes . On Friday night, two San Diego police officers went to the home of Keith !Um­sey. whom Kehoe's staff recognized as a gay activist, and told him to stop send­ing the faxes. Ramsey acknowledged that he sent the faxes, but he said he did not do 11 as part of Kehoe's campaign and added that Schulze overreacted by gettmg the police involved. "It's inappropriate for someone seek:­mg public office to try to squelch free political speech," said Ramsey. "They threatened me with arrest .• They promoting homosexuality The measure was defeated by Oregon voters last year. His speech was preceded by a video that discussed the power the gay rights movement has generated in the last sev­eral years. The video also discussed what 11 called "myths" about homosexu­ality: People are born homosexual; homosexuals cannot change to become heterosexuals. Speaker Patrick Murray ident ified himself as an employee of the Internal Revenue Service and said he was angry that federal funds were used for diver­sity training at the agency that placed homosexuals in the same category as minorities. "The Internal Revenue Service has taken the position and is teaching that homosexuality is an inborn, innate characteristic," Murray said. "This is cause for concern. This has nothing to do with the administration of the tax laws of the United States ... of gay baiting threatened to disconnect my telephone. They threatened to confiscate any fax machines at the residence." Still, Schulze said the controversy over her mailer and the fax incident illustra ted a double standard at work in Kchoc's race. "Chris can say she's gay in order to raise funds, but I say she's cay. then I'm a homophobe," said Schulze. Schulze contended that about 90 per ­cent of Kehoe 's funding comes from the gav community, altho ugh Bernstein placed tbe figure at closer to 65 percent. Kehoe denied that she's done any­thing to hide her sexual preference and accused of Schulze of "desperation" in trying to find an issue. Kehoe noted that virtually every newspaper artic le men­tions that she is gay. She also said that although she found Schulze's mailer "a weak piece," she was not part icularly offended by it. She said that mailer's failu re to give her a family history was "a moderate dig," which she accepted as part of the political fray A surprising invitation: it leads to aliens, zombies and warted witches By JERRY STIJART Tbc Sew Vo1te/Galvcston A couple of weeks ago. I received an invna· uon from two or my friends for a Hallow­een party they were g1V1ng. This wasn't JUSt any old party invitation picked up 11 Walmart or K-Mart or such. This invuauon was scrolled and marked with blood­red ink and had a very strange look­ing "D" on the let­terhead It said, ''To the chosen, a gath­ermg for all to feast and cavort, from aliens to zombies and witches with warts! All Hallows Eve again draws near. our hst is com­prised of straights and queers! Come Black Vdv.r drink the wolf shane and dance to enchanted runes, as wolves howl in the di<tan<e 10 the light or the moon' Release your fears and scream in bliss, as you sam· pie 1he ecstasy of a Vampire'> kiss! The Jack- 0-Lantern glow• to show you the way, so stay on the path and don't dare stray'" And It was signed "Dracula. Well, due to cir­cumstances beyond my control, I was unable to attend th!S great party Although I'm quite sure the rest of the 1ucsts who received 1his enticing invita- ~ tion had a good time . Reggi and John. next year I 'll be there for sure. As for wh.; t wu happen in at the clubs thlS past weekend. the Friday . night line­up for the show at the Kon Tiki featured the Island Diva, M1Sty Valdez, Crystal Tremaine and Poopsic Kline. The Saturday evening show at the K T. had Black Velvet And. Garza Produc11ons was proud to present Melissa Crawford from San Antonio. There was ano1hcr )pc· cial guest 1n the show Saturday night: Allen and his puppets. Madam. one of the more familiar pup­peis, was fabulous. The crowd at 1hc Kon Tiki loved her In fact, they liked her <o much, she will be a guest performer in the super show this weekend You can also 'cc Poison Alexander and Lawanda Jackson in the Saturday night show. Be sure to check out their ad for detail> Club Evolution Is also having •ome shows th•• coming weekend along wnh some costume conte1u. Star Ramsey 1s having her birthday party on Nov. 7th at Evolution. Happy birthday Ms. !Umsey. Pappa Vig1 cit Cinnamon Lafittes 1s also having their annual "'Rocky Horrible Show" this Saturday and Sunday night. Show t 1mes are at 10 :00 p.m and 12:00 a.m. Its a great show if you haven't ~een it before, you should. Hope to see ya' out and have a happy and safe Halloween. VOTE Sylvia AYRES City Council At Large Position 3 - PRESENT - • Executive Board Member; People Against Violent Crime. G.C.C. • Board Member; Coalition for Barrier Free Living • Executive Director, South Central Democrats • Founding Member; Texas Rainbow Coalition • Houston Resident since 1948 • Active in the community for 30 years - PREVIOUS - • Board Member; Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus • Board Member; Persons With AIDS Coalition • Precinct Judge; Precinct 39 • National Delegate; 1984 & 1988 "STOP THE VIOLENCE" "The m•in issue f•cmg you is crime, youth crime. What about victims of violent Cf/me? I will, with your vote, help solve the problems, I h•ve the wisdom, knowledge. honesty, compassion. and experience." To Volunteer • CALL 433-2924 P'ohhcal 9d pm1d foe by Sylvia Ayre1 C•mp111n. PO Boa 66271, H~•1D. TX 77266 Luhe Perez. 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For information, phone Gerald Schaub, LVN (409) 772-3991 14 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBE:R 4 1993 TT THOUSTON SOAP Soaper Tad returns unharmed ... kidnapped indeed; some Halloween ideas B) TAD SEl.S(A'I; was prcny incredible as usu:; I also heard Hello H usion' that there. v.>Sn't a can of Aqua Net Super I know that you ~ave been reading t~c Hold left in Montrose Hold those presses!' v1c1ous rumors of my "friends" at The New Mark Johnson was kind enough to call in Voice who took over fo,- me n my some mformauon just now and he reports absence that Wigs, which \\as held this year at the Tadwma indeed old Gage Sun Nursery on Montrose Boulc- 1 thought they mtght have called in the vard had about 450 guests in ancndancc FBI to help search for the Trucker and I, The hosts really worked hard on this one b Th d 'd d k · k f too. They even hauled in lumber to make a ut no •r, JUst cci e to ma c a JO e 0 dance floor so the crowd could dance to the the whole 1 ing music of DJ, Tiger. Around $6.500 was The truth of tbc matter was that the nctled for the Colt 45's and a check will be fruckcr and I had taken a little Sunday presented following the final accounting drive to the ship channel to look at some of balance the really hot and hunky crew on a Greek tanker that had come into port. Woof woof, But thlS coming weekend has a lot in Baby! They invited us on board 10 check store for all you Ghouls tn Montrose. out the bunk area and one of the twelve It beiins this Thursday at Club Hcdo­happencd 10 have a few botllcs of Ouzo nism with a party called "The Na11vcs Arc stashed in his locker so we bad a fc"' shots Restless" Get on down to 240 I San Jacinto fhen a few shots more-and well, I guess and n)oy the sights and sounds of the sca­n '""' umc 10 take a nap, you know things son wnh 1hc guys and gals of Club Hcdo­sort of went black My friend Cuervo has nism done 1hc same thing on occasion The Red Room tS holding a Grand Rc- Anyway, when I came to I bad been tied opening Party This Friday night. The club to the bunk and -~----.-- 1s under new man· blindfolded and the agcmcnt and IS Trucker wasn't 10 located at 1419 earshot It seemed Richmond Evcry-likc a few days bad body knows this pa s s c d , du r i n g locale because it is which I was fed right across the Black Olives and street from the old Baklava (not a Richmond Square great combination) Apartment>. Good Suddenly I sensed luck to the new that the ship had management of the stopped. But no one Red Room seemed to be com- Friday Oct. 29, mg 10 release me. the weekend begins Then what did I at Pacific Street hear, but, Trucker w11h a Dungeon Mom doing her Rtd Room crazits Party Jay and staff famous Tarzan .tm invite you to come 1at1on up on deck. She had tracked us and plan to be decadent and sensual. A down because we hadn't shown up with clothes check will be provided for the her shredded "heat (we told her thal Sun- entire weekend in order for you to plan day that ,.. were going to the store for her your b12 arrival and appear as you wish 10 cereal). be sccnf Doors open at 7 pm with no covcr- Ycp, she was irregular and m a 1csty charge that IS, until 8:00 p.m. mood Trucker Mom single-handedly This Saturday night Heaven will be hos­took out those Greek geeks one by one. Of ting Fem 2 Fem, singing their mega hit course, that took a while and my Master- "SWITCH" along with "Obsession " card reached it's limit bccau~ she chose ··woman to Woman" and many more. rca11y expensive restaurants and clubs 10 They will have 15 cent well drinks availa­takc them to. blc from 9:00 until 11:000 pm and follow- Wcll. thank gawd there were only twelve ing the show will be a CyberPunk Costume or the Trucker and 1 might never had got- Cc:>ntcst with 1udglng at 11 ·30 The prizcit 1cn released After a few bonlcs of her will be $300 for best costume, $100 for most favorite brandy, V.S.O.P of course, she had outrageous, $100 for the ultimate cyber-them all t1cd up and punk and $200 for she released the bc<t couple or Trucker and myself. group. Follow the I soon d1Scovered SearchLights to 810 that we were m Ath- Pacific for a really ens and were soon great Saturday to be home night It was quite a wp, A rmstron~ cruuing the Medi- Enterprises is tcrrancan wub a again havin,iz their bunch of hot men 800 Pacific Hallow-on that ship I hear 'l ccn Block Parly the video of what r:I this Saturday and transpired during r,: Sunday nights with those nineteen days //~~~ over SI0.000 in cash 1s prcnr. d:lrn good. I J. prizes, tickets and I haven t seen 11 yet, trophies and out-bccausc the Trucker Lawanda Jackson ;, back door JUdgmg of cos-bas shipped 11 off to rumcs at 10:15 pm Falcon Studios already It's supposed 10 be each night. Follow a Christmas surprise. But that's another the Search! ghrs Heaven, Jr's and The story So ca' off "missmg persons" and Mme each have a theme to offer you the chalk up another great adventure to most fun this Halloween. Jr'~ returns to Trucker Mom. And on with Soap last years successful theme with Twilight The Halloween cclcbranon' arc under· Zone ... the sequel Heaven will be Cybcr­way already thlS season with two of the Punk Or you can spend Halloween at the b1gg1cs happcnmg last weekend That's Gates of Hell at 1he Mme. r ~t Fantasy Ball and Wigs On Fire. I have a report from Fantasy Ball that they had a grcal party with over 500 people s1gncd-m. Two grandmother-type Las Vegas Show G :Is greeted people at the door (Ken aka Blind Blue Haired Old Lady and D.D ). A great time was had by all even though Car olyn couldn't keep her tits m bcr dress. George Ann m her wheel chair and Baby Jane coscume were complete with the Canary served under glass. Fabulous cos tumcs were everywhere As of press umc, that big hair-ball m the sky hadn't rc~rted the outcome of their event, so I will report on that next "eek But I hear from a little birdy that the par I Fantary Ball barttndtrs TT TDATELINE: GAY AMERICA Sa t urda y O c t 30th at P a c 1f 1c Street . u se your imagination and enjoy the Fantasy Party of leather and costumes Doors open at 9 and every· one is invued to go by and be amazed, astonished and awesome . This should /USI be a ~rc-l~ e;e~n t~~nb;fe ~1~ Sunday . Gentry ha' a Mort Monday nighr bow/us busy weekend with a Saturday "Parade of Costumes at Mid- ecn night with "A Night in Metropolis." As night with over $250 in cash prizes. Cate- you would think rhcrc will be a Leather gorics arc best costume. most original. Costume Contest wuh cash rrizcs for Best most outrageous and best couple or group. in Black Leather . There wll also be prizes Those hot and hunky men of the Lone Star for Best Theme and Most Outrageous Cos­Rcvue will be dancmg for your enjoyment tumc. I'm not sure whether all costumes too between 10 and 2 have to be leather or not but you can find And what would Halloween be without out by calling and asking 1hc friendly bar­thc Annual Pumpkin Carving Contest tender on duty at 521-2792 Sec you Hal­with Jerry Jones at Mary's narurallyl? lowccn mght guys! The contest s1arts at 10:00 a.m. with judg- Wow, what a busy weekend And how ing at noon. Mary's will also have a cos· will I ever decide which costume contests iumc contest both Saturday and Sunday and parties to go to? Have fun but be safe nights at midnight Prizes for best cos- and use a designated driver or a cab. tume will be awarded Remember if you have wigs or masks with The Club.Houston invites you to come by your costume, it would probably be safer 2205 Fannm. even if you arc m your cos· JUSt to take a ca?. since the wig or mask tumc and have a Witches Brew on them may block you v1s1on on the road. Better Brew will be •crved beginning Sa1urday at safe that sorry• midnight. (I guess Damion is making his In The Future In Montrose: really bad coffee agam .. JU>t kidding) At New at Gentry be•inning Nov. 6th is a Sat- Club Houston-you're always welcome • and 1hcy never close. Drop by in your urday liquor and longneck Bust from 5 pm birthday suit and give the boy> a Big sur - to 10:00 p.m. Optional Buy-In is only $5.00 prise! for 75 cent well drinks and $1.00 for domc>- Thcn 00 Sunday tic longnccks Regular ~Mp~ !~~~~/.de~! rhc Imperial Court JO pm, followed by presents the Count the men of the Lone :J:onCC~~/M!n ~~1J Star Revue Scarecrow Revue T~~r::aftcC~ Hous· beginnin\ al 9 pm ton Tribe will host a ~?s~rphavc hf~ick~: run, " Fircdancer< Treat Rarnc Bags Freedom 7. Shoot and an 11 pm cos· For The Slar!i.." tume contest with Nov 12-14. Blut· prizes for best drag, off w i 11 be at worst drag, most Mary's. naturally original costume ~,n l.Ooda'trh~~; w/~ and best couple or fi'~~~C;~c !ir1 Tb~ strutting for you Gray Party hosts-WOOF! from 5 pm to 9 :00 p.m. Sunday 1001 be a bar run Sal ur day which will include Mary's Gentry. E/J's, Ven­turc- N and the BRB Sunday, Oct. 31, Pacific Street pull< out all 1hc stops for the Witches, Bitches and Warlocks Halloween Party Doors open at 7 pm prov1dmg Houston with a most incredible spectal effects party. Plan now to enjoy Caged Heal Men. Bchmd Ban along wHh low regular drrnL prices at what is sure to be one of the most talked about parties of the season. Halloween at Rich's plans to be a Big Monster Movie Weekend' Friday "House of Porn" features the crone talents of Ty Russell showin~ you what's under htS Trench Coat Jom the hosts at Rich's after Outrage for " Saturday Night at the Mov­ies ' wirh free popcorn, giant loops and monsters that will make the night com­plete. Then Sunday, the "Cinema of Ter, ror" Party will bring out the Beast in you! Costume Contest and surprises will fmish the Halloween Weekend . All this at the Monster of Night Clubs-Rich's Halloween evening it's back to the Red Room where their new management wall be hosting a "Halloween Party In A Jun­gle" wnh costume contest beginning 11 6:00 pm EIJ s is gctung m on thlS Hal ­lowcckcnd tno wnh 1 great Costume Contes! w11h cash prizes Conrest judging will bcgm 11 II pm so be there a little early to let the Judges sec you in your finest . Our friends at the Ripcord will be active this Hallow for cocktail parties and a show at the Vcn­turc- N. Saturday night will be the Mr Firedancer contest and show at the Ven~ turc-N. Cost for 1he run "$35.00 1f received before Oc1. 31 and $45.00 thereafter . Con­tact John Szewczyk at 521-6772 or Barney Corley at 523-2905 for more information. For those of you who weren't aware. a raging storm has blown into our midst Home for the holiday 5cason. from La Cage in Las Vega>, the very talented Lawanda Jackson is back in Houston to ttkc this cuy by storm A• a world traveled performer, Mr Jackson has had the oppor­tunity to perform for audiences in all part of the globe including Tokyo, Japan and the Bahamas. On the local scene Mr Jack­son has won twelve pageants and partici· pated in may of the local shows in your favorite club<. If you haven't ' had the chance to sec Lawanda in action or would like to enJOY him on <ta¥• once again, be sure to catch him on h1~ latest tour "A Taste of La Cage" al clubs throughout the state. Well Houston, it's good tu be back . You think these foreign ports· of-call arc such glamorous places, but those people have a really rough life and a poor standard of Jiv­ing compared 10 ourselves Israel was truly frightening w11h armed rersonnel on JUSt about every corner. stanbul was dirty beyond belief. The water in Venice smells st rongly of sulfur and waste Athens Is full of insane drivers v.ilo don't know what stripes In the road arc for. And Rome has awful Pizza . We arc truly fortunate. even with all the cra1incss that goes on in our country. After nineteen days , I was clicking my ruby slippers right along with Dorothy- saying '>'fhere's no place like home " Have a safe Halloween and bye for now, Y'all ! Idaho officials to ask Colorado what anti-gay battle will cost BOISE Idaho, Friday , Ocr 22 (AP/­Idaho 's top legal officials will be looking 10 the state of Colorado for leads on how much u wall cost if state voters approve an anu-gay in111at1vc and 11's challenged in court. Senate Democrats this week asked Attorney General Larry EchoHawk for aa Idea of wba1 the legal battle will coSI tax­payers. The Idaho Ciuzens Alliance is circulat­Ul& petdlODS for an anti-gay initiative. If p s get n 000 Signatures by • July, the qucsnon will go before vo1crs in the November. 199~ , general clccnon •If this anu human rights initiative passes nc:u November, It IS inevitable that one or more groups will challenge us con­s111u11ona' ty ," said Bob Wallace, chairper­son or a group opposing the initiauvc, Don't Sign On 'The s1a1c of Idaho would by law be obli­gated to defend 11. We have asked for an estimate of chose legal cosu which would c ne out of taxpayers pockets, of course ' Wallace said "We have mamtamcd all along th.i thb initiative 1s unnecessary and wasteful. he said . EchoHa\\k was out ol 1own Friday, but his chief deputy, Jack McMahon, satd .. 11a1 the legal banlc will cost depends on 1hc legal proceedings. The legal challenge could be filed dircc1ly with 1hc Idaho Supreme Court, or it could start at cbc district court level wnh appeals to the ~tate 's h1i?hest coun . ''We've had four or five different scenar 10s that could come out of cases like this,'' McMahon said "There's a different pncc tag on every one of those depending on how It works out " Colorado is going throuih a court ba11le over an anu-gay law McMahon said he has asked Colorado offlctals for informa­tion on the cost. It should be available next week , McMa­han said. TTT IN MEMORY OF MICHAEL CHARLES BARNES Michael Cl'arles Barnes. 37, a com computer operator for South Central Bell. died October 14 of COrPpl1cat10ns from AIDS Mr Barnes died at homo Michael was born n Springfield. Illinois, and hved m New Orleans the past 36 years. He graduated from SI Augustine High School and attended the University of New Orleans and Loyola University Mr Barnes was a member of St. Maria Gor­etti Catholic Church. Pioneers of America and St Jude Catholic Gospel Choir. Survivors melude his parents. Charles and Ruth Barnes A morning mass was said Monday at St Jude Catholic Church Burial was 1n St Louis Number 3 Cemetery CHARLES (CHUCK) JOSEPH CUILLA, JR. Born October 7. 1956 Dled October 13, 1993 Charles (Chuck) Joseph Cuilla, Jr., age 37, passed away October 13. 1993 at Ben Taub Hospttal m Houston. Texas from complications ans1ng from AIDS Chuck was born at Baptist Memonal Hospital 1n Memphis. Tennessee on October 7, 1956. He was preceded m death by a sister. Charlotte Ci­ulla Chuck ,. survived by both parents. five other brother and sisters. many friends too nu~ merous to name and his hfe mate Wayne Woodmg of seventeen years Memonal s""'1ces wdl be held 1n the Chapel Ul'Mvers1ty of Saini Thomas on October 31, 1993 at 2.00 m the afternoon In lieu of flowers. the far!llly has requested donations be made to an organization of your choice m Chock's name Rest 10 peace baby, until I join you Love you forever, Your honey, Wayne Wooding LOIS C. WARREN • Lois C We rren. 41 a1 employee of the Lou- 1s1ana Office of P"b!·- Health. HIV/AIDS Serv· ices, died October 15 of cancer at Chanty Hospital, New Or1oans Mrs Warren was a data enlly speclallst She was a lifelong resident of New Orleans Survivors lncll;:lo her husband. William War· rer. her parents. Helen Clements and Arthur Cements, Sr two sons. Enc and Reginald McCfanon, a daughter Tonya McClarion, ttvee brothers, Arthur Clements. Jr William Clements. Jr and Freddie Barrow: and a sister, Irma Jackson A funeral was held Wednesday. with dis· rmssai lhursday at Antioch Bapbst Church Bur· ial was in Providence Memorial Parl< Rhodes Funeral Home was In charge of arrangements METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION Rev. Elder Jotvi Gitt Pastor Rev. Cari lyn Mobley. Asst. Pastor 1919 Decatw, 861-9149 OFF WASHINGTON & SI VER Tues., N ov. 2, 6:DDpm EM POW ERMENT FOR LIVING (HIV I AIDS Support Gr o up) Guest Sp eak e r : Biii Scott Worahlp Servlcea: Sunday, 8 :30am, 10:45am &. 8 :00pm Wedneaday: 7 :00pm Independent Byzantine Catholic Church An 1adcpendcnl Apo!llOl.c Community Oratory of the Nativity of Jesus 713-880-4915 Divine Liturgy: Sunday, 11:00 a.m. Eve of Holy Days, 7:30 p.m. (c.xcept Sat. ii: Sun.) Holy Days, 7:00 a.m. (except Suoday) Healing Service/Liturgy: Wedne<day, 7:30 p.m. sr;no..i o ......... a-.caq, ~ 5-1 A Hcalinc, UICI Sacruncau ava1t.blc by appoi:atmelll:. COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHURCH SOL E. 18th at Columbia • Houston. Texas GARAGE BAKE ~LE Sat., Nov. 6th 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM Scrvi~c1: Sun • ltOO A.M. • PRAISE .t WORSHIP Sun • 7:00 PM • EVENING SERVICE Thurs • "30 PM • MIDWEEK SERVICE Pastor - Chris Chiles (713) 880-9235 "A Church Built On Love" c.,!~~1:: ~-,, Frlenct. U meet for M .. s.1.-,. .. 7'30 .... 1307 YALE, SUITE B (713) 880-2872 Todol bicn vc:inidOll BAS. 981-82r7 SLIN'DAY 10~ g~JM4P~ "Count it all Joy" Oct. 17, 24, 31 Nov. 7 Holiday Inn West Loop 3131 W. Loop South (Opposite Transco Tower) PO. Box 667032 • Hou<tOn 772«>. 7032 528-6756 THE NEW VOICE I OCTOBER 29 NOVEMBER 4 1993 15 Kingdom Community Church COME EXPLORE HIS KINGDOM Sunday Worship Service 11 am 614 E. 19th 862-7533 Houston 7 48-6251 HOUSTON MISSION CHURCH 1505 Neuda 1t Commonwealth OCT. 31 GUEST SPEAKER: REV. MARTY WRIGHT Pastor: Rev. Robert Carter Caring Cremations "Serving the needs of the community with Dignity and Pride" DEER PARK FUNERAL DIRECTORS, INC. 336 E. San Augu:.'. in~ Deer Puk.. Tcus 77.'!30 O.nny W. Duncao f uncnl D1rcdor (713) 476-4693 ALL BILLS PAID! MONTROSE AREA 1419 Hyde Park $100 OFF MOVE-IN With This Ad 1 Bedroom $395 Cable Available Close To Bus Line (713) 524-9660 Bil PAMILY MOrnJAIY Private C.resnation $J9SCompl-a.~ a..-,.6i r...-, •• cl •.·H.,•1•1t•1 lllUl l • Prt·ArrutM St n1tH Stntu• • ,,..,. .d IH lf..., • AU l 11uruet PtUCIH H ... rtd 622-9030 2603 Southmait • HOUltOI\ • n004 ASK THE PASTOR Q· As 1 Clmstian \\hot 1s ~1\ rel lion lup o poor fl"O­plc the homclc:: •.he su.:k Wh:lt & G " int me t: do A. Jesus tells us thal the poor" nl\\ 'she \\. tu (M:l!the\\ 26 11) J.:stL• wa> nc=ll\ retemng hack «> the Mo­s: nc la\\ hi the Old h-stamenl the book of Dcut.rononl\ "c arc told !hat !here '"II nlwa,-s be poor j)t.'<>ple m the lnnd V. c were conunandcd b) God to be op..~iMnded toward onr broth­er:! and sisters and to\\ard lhe poor and need' 111 our bru! (0..~11 I~ 11) The Mos:nc la\\ prD\lded for the poor \\ltl: spe- Rc.:v Janel Parker c1tic gml.l!lmcs I The nght of f.lcanmg, 1 \Vhen ii crop \\J' li.ancsu•" . d the O\\llt:r t:ould not r.:-1zc the • nd ~ ~mpktch ,Jean 11 Olll n)I,,.'\ had 10 len\C some tor the poor to ~1ther for t!1ansd\Cs ) 2 F \Cf\ '7th \'CZJ[ th.: l<md \\,IS to he nnplm\cd and um1S1..~ so that the poor ix--oplc 1.:ouh .• get lood nnd the \\ti~ ununals grate 1 11 .1 poor person lose~ their proi~rt\ and 1s or.able to hm ll b..ick m the 50th \ca1, th..: \t.:ar of Jub1kt: the prop1. ~.. ,, \\~ 1't: rctumcd to the poor fX.."TSOll b' the one \\ho had hou~ht 11 trom them t Pte p..-cplc \\ere to ~1dp th~: poor :md gt\C them cxx. dotlung, t.-ssc11t1ab \\tthout chargmg mtcrc t and \\1lhout mn~mg 1 proC:.. S Pun10ns of the t1tl1c \\CIC to 1"' shared \\IU1 tl1c poor not sine'.' frr tl1e I e\lles pneslhood) (, TI1c poor were to tll! 111\llL"ll to the Ji!:J.sts and cdcbralJons. llic Apostk Paul m ~-pcakm8 to the"' urch m tl1e pronnce ofGalatm. tells tl1e p.:oplc lhnt ofnll the lhmgs tlmt tl1c Apostles James, Pc­tc- r :md John told 111111. rc:n1cml>..-nnt: the poor""' c·ss.:nt.101 Pnul tclls us m Galauans 2. 10 that he was c:a~cr to do tlus \L'"fV Uung Janlt."S, the brother of lt.-sus \\T'l to us obout a \c.."T'\ pract1cnl 181th James \\<lllled to~ our lrutl1 m acllet' He tells us \Cl'\ cle;irl' "Donl tell me what \OU hd1C\\! SHOW ME1 • In James 2 14 \\C read ... ,, h;at -:;:ood '' it, m~ hroth­en and \i\ler\, 1f a pcnon claim' lo haH failh but ha\ no JL·c<l\'! Can \Ul"h fallh \:l\C them"! Suppo\C a brolher or )i\tcr i\ \\ ithout clothe\ :.rnd lbil~ fooJ If om.· of~ ou \ii~\ 10 1hcm, Co, I \\i\h ~ou \\Cll; 1..ccp \\arm and \\Cll fed,' hut d'""' nothing ahout their ph~)iCllll need), \\hat j!Oot.I i\ 11? In the i&me "a~. faith h~ ihclf, if it 1\ not uccompa· nicd b\ action is dead." A \a\ JX>\\c..·1ful parable- Uiat .lt.-sus ga\c to us ts found m Matthc\\ 25 .l l-i6 It pcrtams to the cnteno lor )Udgmc'fll, detcnnmmg a person's re\\ard of e1lh~~ heaven or hell Ille ha sis for tl1c Jndgmc'flt \\Os\\ hethcr love \\as sho"n to God's p..'Ople Je­: ms \\lll S.1\, "Come, \OU \\}to arc blc:;.scJ b\ God, take ~our mhcntance. the domm1on pre~ pared for \OU suu.:c the creation of the world For I \\ils hungn and vou gil\e me something to cat, J \\3s thir'.';l~ and )Oll gave me sometl11ng to dnnk, I \\ns a stranl?:cr :md \OU lll\'1ted me 111, I 1H..-c<lcJ clothes dnd \OU clothed me, I was s1d. and }OU looked after me. I w~s m pnson and vou cmnc to nsll me" And m31l\ of us \\ill ask. •tord. "11en dut \\C Sf..."C" \OU '"tl' an' of thc-sc nc'\.'<l<"" Aud k-sus \\Ill an."' er, " I Tfl.L YOl THE TRUTH \\>HAT­EVFR YOU DID l'OR ONE OF Ti f f: LFAST OF THESF BROTlfrRS A'ill SI S­TFRS OF M INF. YOU OID IT FOR ~IE . " The Sam• •re~ re ""' 1 • '-'• • our rdatmnslup to the poor It 1s up to us 1d 1kc nc. IF YOL WOULD LIKF TO \ SK THE PASTOR A QL 1 S ! JO'\, Pl EASF WRITE REV JANET PARKER, \l.\RAl':ATllA. FEL­l. O\.\.'SHIP MC'C, P 0 BOX 667032, HOUSTON, TX 77266-7032 16 TH~ NEW VOICE I oc~ JBER 2' - NOVEMBER 4, 1993 T T T CORPUS CHRISTI SOAP Halloween plans offer diverse choices in Corpus Christi this weekend By SU:EJTE LOCKE The New Voice Corpus Chnst1 Hallowecntc on the Texas Riviera• Get ready, get set let your imaginations run Wi.d and wicked this hallowed eve­ning. ~faJor cash prizes for coc;1umes arc being given away at Desert Hearts, Choices and U.B.U .• you'd better get your date books ready! Ready? Your hot calendar of events for this weekend starts wnh Choices Friday (Oct. 29th) Dyan Michaels-Ms. Texas America with special guests Sunday (Oct. 3 lst) you are mvucd to a ghoulish Halloween Night Show hosted by our wicked mother Tanya Roberts. Ms. Tanya Roberts (Ms. Entcrtamcr of the Year) all the heart felt congratulauons thlS pee ~ convey this title for you was long over due-to thts most beautiful, charming and definitely the most enter ta1ning impresario on the Coastal Bend. All of my admiration to you. Now, back to the fcstiviues• Also with Tanya Robyrts two other excellent per· formers, Ms. Oprah DeMarro and Rae· mg Raciene will be guest entertainers along With many choice guests. Show lime IS at 10:30 p.m. Choice's Halloween costume contest will have three catego· ries and three great prizes It begins at 1.00 am Desert Hearts will be havrng a Halloween party all "eekcnd1 Sat· urday night three $100 prizes will be given to the best couple, most orig1· nal and the scan· est costume' Then the party conttn ucs Sunday mght and the hottest country and western dance mixes this side of San Antonio! fantasuc dt1nk specials all night long! At U B U. dt1nk and dance all night Saturday (Oct. 30th) with D.J. Cue's power mix Sunday. best drag, best cou­ple and scarie~t co~tumes win you cash prizes plus munchies and witch's brew! Babalou's always has the finest spir­us .. . they're your very own! Buy you own spirits and party! Babalou's is always ready to set you up for the evening. The honest Tcjano mix on the coast can be heard at 213 S. Staples! Corpus Christi has some of Amct1ca 's most beautiful and talented shows here arc a few tidbits of the rnside . Mmmm Ms. Kofi and her ''touch of cream" arc enough to mate you scream As always. Ms Kofi took Corpus by storm. personally the next hurt1canc should be named in her honor Stormy and Unpredictable can't wait til you come agam! Ms. Naomi Warwick, or should we say Ms. "Best Talcnt"-two years 1n a row1" Go. girl! Desert Hearts held hostage! Once again, the troll nappers have contacted Zondra with a vengeance! Pictures of the poor defenseless baby Butch in a shark's mouth and letters telling of ummag1nable horrors. Live shark bait' with DJ Scotty G Drurt Hrarts' All Frmalr Extravaganza TT T DATELINE: GAY AMERICA And the thr,.at of a Big Game" hunt on the agenda. " Who could be so cruel' cries Mother Zondra! An included 'ran· som note'' of sorts. ordering Zondra to be a twin to the troll for Halloween. Oh, the injustice! All there is to do is wait and meet their demands and pray they'll have a heart by the Christmas holidays! Please send Butch home and end her torment! Try­ing to keep up her spirits, Zondra held a hot, hot, hot all female extravaganza with a surprise blast from the past• Sonny and Cher (Zondra and Tag), Lydia, Terri (the producer) and Donna entertained the masses in the Desert' With standing room only. these ladies know how to do it' Let's do it again' Hey ... you asked for her , you got her (don't you wish 1t was that casy7). Delilah comes back Nov. Sth' If you miss it. you'll be the only one' But don't worry. there will be lots of pictures taken! Ohh! Rocky Horror Picture Show will be shown at Desert Hearts with audience participation Sunday night , Oct. 31st. Bring your rice and toast! Are you ready for the latest at U.B.U.7 Last week's U B .U. sexy underwear winner was Matt Come on. -~how me yours, maybe I'll show you mine. Are you too sexy for your underwear? They'll do u again Wednesday. Pau· lcna Leigh graced the floor on Friday night to a packed house along with Ms. San Antonio U.S.A. Aaron Davis and 'cry special guests Lmda Love. Brill· ney Wells, Sade Robyrts. Jasmme SX and Tiffany Clark Speaking of great entertainment Ms Untverse-at-large '92, Donna Day tore 1t up once more in the sparkling ctty after too long an abstinence l mean absence' U.B l' .. welcomes top-notch cntertarn~ ment every Fr
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