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Houston Voice, August 27, 2004
File 007
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Houston Voice, August 27, 2004 - File 007. 2004-08-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1919/show/1896.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-08-27). Houston Voice, August 27, 2004 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1919/show/1896

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, August 27, 2004 - File 007, 2004-08-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1919/show/1896.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, August 27, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date August 27, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 AUGUST 27, 2004 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I national news GOP rejects call for 'unity' plank Party endorses anti-gay- marriage amendment By CYD ZEIGLER JR. NEW YORK —As the Republicans gear up for their national convention next week, the party's platform committee unanimously adopted language this week officially endorsing the Federal Marriage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which would ban states from marrying gay couples. The committee also rejected a plea from moderate GOP groups to adopt a "unity plank" that would urge respect for those Republicans who do not agree with the party's opposition to abortion rights and gay rights. The 2004 Republican National Convention began with a quiet rumble Wednesday Aug. 25, at the Javtts Center in New York City with meetings of the RNC's platform committee. Gay issues from marriage to job discrimination to HTV were addressed for the better part of Wednesday with little dissention, as unanimity ruled the day "Compared to previous conventions, this was a lot less heated and emotional than previous occasions," said former presidential candidate Gary Bauer, now chair of the Campaign for Working FamUies. The hot-button issue of same-sex marriage was addressed by the Protecting Our Families Platform Subcommittee, chaired by Mississippi Gov Haley Barbour, who is also a former chair of the Republican National Committee. A paragraph entitied. "Protecting Marriage," was included in the platform. "One of the people who voted against the Defense of Marriage Act was Senator John Kerry," Barbour noted during the public discussion of the plank. DOMA, passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton in 1996, limited federal benefits associated with marriage to heterosexual couples and provided that states are not obligated to recognize same-sex marriages performed elsewhere. The original platform draft language proposed Aug. 24 said marriage defined as between a man and a woman has deep historical context, that that definition should be protected, and attempts to change it should be stifled by a constitutional amendment. Criticizing 'activist judges' "Attempts to redefine marriage in a single state or city could have serious consequences throughout the country, and anything less than a constitutional amendment, passed by the Congress and ratified by the states, is vulnerable to being overturned by activist judges," part of the proposed draft read. Cecilia Levatino, a delegate from Las Cruces, N.M., proposed the paragraph be amended to admonish "activist judges," and to withdraw the U.S. Supreme Court's jurisdiction over marriage so that other states would be protected from "the mis- On Wednesday, Aug. 25, at the Jacob Javits Center, Tony Peridns of the conservative Family Research Council unveiled a new book about gay marriage and the gay 'agenda.' chief in Massachusetts." Barbour quickly requested an amendment to me amendment that would change the "mischief in Massachusetts" language to "Massachusetts' attempt to redefine marriage." Levatino later said she used the term, "Because I'm mischievous and wanted to add a little punch. Nothing more sinister than that." The amended paragraph on marriage, and almost every section of the subcommittee's platform, was adopted unanimously Gay rights groups were quick to criticize the anti-gay language adopted by the GOP. "Vice President Cheney must explain how he can stand behind a platform that discriminates against families like his," said Cheryl Jacques, the Human Rights Campaign's executive director, in a statement. 'Unity plank' rejected After the vote, Jim Bopp, a delegate and lawyer from Terra Haute, Ind., called the group's attention to a news release issued last week by a coalition of moderate GOP groups, including the Log Cabin Republicans. The release, sent the morning of Aug. 25 before any subcommittees had convened, expressed disappointment that the first draft of the platform did not include the coalition's proposed "Party Unity Plank." Log Cabin Executive Director Patrick Guerriero, along with leaders of other moder ate GOP groups, sent a letter on Aug. 19 to platform committee OKhairs Sen. Bill Frist of Tennessee, Gov. William Owens of Colorado, and Congresswoman Melissa Hart of Pennsylvania, urging them to develop an inclusive platform. "We recognize and respect that Republicans of good faith may not agree with all the planks in the party's platform," the proposed plank reads. "This is particularly the case with regard to those planks dealing with abortion, family planning, and gay and lesbian issues." Guerriero also asked that the platform not take a position on the Federal Marriage Amendment and that language stating, "We affirm that homosexuality is incompatible with military service," be removed. At the subcommittee meeting, Bopp said the coalition's Aug. 25 statement, released before a vote was ever taken by a committee, showed a lack of commitment to unity "It frankly indicates bad faith from someone who is attempting to divide the party rather than bring it together," Bopp said. "Everybody knows ... that [the draft] becomes the foundation," Guerriero said. "Regardless of where you stand on these issues, if you're a gay or lesbian American or an ally, this platform is offensive. That press release was probably muted when you look at the types of amendments that were passed unanimously." The Strengthening Our Communities subcommittee had a bit of trouble adding anti-gay language to the GOP platform this week. When a delegate attempted to add a clause to the "Ensuring Equal Opportunities" paragraph that would exclude "sexual preference" from protection against discrimination, at least one subcommittee member voiced concern that "sexual preference" could include straight people. There was some talk of specifying that homosexuals should not be protected, but the issue was tabled indefinitely. The draft of the platform, at more than 90 pages, is more detailed and issue-specific than the 19-page platform adopted by the party in 1992. "It doesn't mean anything other than people have strong feelings about a lot of different issues," Bauer said. The main event begins Monday, Aug. 30, when the convention moves to Madison Square Garden. The Republicans have promised to showcase a more moderate, diverse face of the party when the convention gets underway. Guerriero said that very few people read the platform, but millions watch the convention speeches. "We have great friends who are going to be featured in prime time at the convention," Guerriero said. He said they include New York Gov. George Pataki, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani.
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