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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 001. 2000-04-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1860.

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(2000-04-28). Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1860

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 001, 2000-04-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1860.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date April 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript www.houstonvoice.com ISSUE 1018 The Boy Scouts of America says It has the right to pick the •moral leaders' for its troops, even If that means banning gay Scouts like James Dale, whose case reached the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Page S More than two-dozen gay Grammys were ~led out to gay artists Monday-including les· blan singer Meshell Ndgeocello-­during ceremonies that called Oritlon to the growing In~ of queer-tinged music. Page 15 There's nothing better than Sunday's Millennium March on Washington to celebrate the victo­ry won in Vermont, says MMOW executive director Dianne Hardy· Garcia. The Texas activist expects 300,000 people. Page 5 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. What do you call a woman who is an actress, stand· up comedienne, novelist. record· ing artist. femi· nist, gay and a single mom? We call her Sandra Bernhard and she's coming to Houston. Page 15 ------~ APRIL 28, 2000 'C.U. me!' Vermont legislature approves historic 'civil unions' bill and state's governor quickly signs it into law by LAURA BROWN A bill to recognize same-sex "civil unions" won final passage in the Vermont legislature Tuesday and received Gov Howard Dean's signature a day later, bringing with it the cre­ation of a new verb: "to C.t,;." "We're going to get C.U.'ed," said a beaming Stacy Jolie~ moments after the I louse gave its final approval to the meas· ure "I've already asked :-.:ina to C.U. me.'' Jolles was referring to her partner of nearly a decade, Nina Beck, who cradled the couple's 5-month-old son Seth as the two women hugged fnends and posed for pictures following the vote. The partm•rs were one of the three same­sex wuples wlio fled smt m July 1997 seek· mg the right to marry That smt led to the Vermont Supreme Court's December rulmg that called on the Legislature to find a way to l'Xtend all the rights and pnv1leges of m.uriage to same·sex couples. While the term "CU." doesn't roll off the tongue quite as easily as the word "mar· nage," jollcs' comments left little doubt as to what 5he meant. They and other gay and lesbian couples are already planning their visit to their respective town clerk's office after the bill goes into effect July 1. "I think we were actually quite disap­pomted in December that the Supreme Court didn't go for full marriage, but I think since then we have come to really respect the civil union thing and what 1t represents · what a huge step forward it is for all of us," said Stan Baker Dean's signature on the bill Wednesday-making Vermont the first state to offer gay couples almost all of the same benefits as married heterosexu.ils under state !aw-came less than two hours after 11 reached his desk. By the time of a 2 p.m. news conference, he already had signed it far out of view of television cameras, photographers and r<'porters. Dean signed the bi!, prhately because he did not want the ceremony to be a triumphal party by supporters of the la\\ Instead, he said, it was time for the state to begm healing. "This IS history This IS thnll.ng. This IS the dawn of J new era of support and pro­tC( hon for the fanulies of lesbian and gay couples and the1r cluldren," said Gary Buseck, executive director of Gay & L csbian Advocates & Defenders. During the Vermont House debate this week, a Republican representative made one !a~t attempt to kill the bill by propos­ing to delay the vote until after the Bobbi Whitacre (left) is hugged by partner Sandi Cote ofter the Vermont House gave final passage to the dvd unions bill on Tuesday. Gov. Howard Dean signed the measure into law a day later. November e!ecltons. But the effort failed, and on Tuesday, the Vermont House passed the Senate version of the bill by a margin of i9~8. three 'ates more than 1t earned on first passage ,_ Continued on Page 10 Organizing gay educators A veteran Houston teacher wants other gay and gay-friend ly educators to he lp start a local chapter of a national gay educators group to better conditions for gay employees, students by KAYDAYUS A f louston chapter of a national group is in the process of orgamzing to help stem harassment and violence against gay and lesbian students and educators m metro Houston schools. The new chapter of the New York-based Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) will help to bring togeth­er educators, parents and students to assure that "that each member of every school community is valued and respected, regard­less of sexual orientation.'' organizers said Kathleen Murray, a veteran teacher in the Houston Independent School Distnct, is spearheading the effort to bring a GLSEN chapter to Houston. While researching a book last year in the Internet, Murray was surprised by what she found about hate crimes, something that propelled her to take action. "It was a wakeup call for me," said Murray, a teacher for 11 years. "The exclu· sion of protecbon is an injustice against the LGBT community." Murray also discovered information about GLSEN. "[ checked it out and found there was no chapter in Houston and the closest one was in Dallas. I thought, 'There's something wrong with this picture.' There is a cntical need for GLSEN. So manv of our children are falling into the cracks,:. she said. Murray hopes the new chapter v.'ill be the impetus for change in metro school sys· tems, including HISD, which has a spotty histqry when it comes to gay and Ie~b1an issues. "We need counseling and intervention and the focus needs to be on the student. How much learning can go on if you don't feel safe where you are?" Murray said. A 10-year-old group, GLSEN began fight· ing anti-gay discrimination in Boston schools in 1990 and e\'Ol\'ed into a national > Continued on Page 12 2 APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE LOG ON FOR A MORE WELCOMING FINANCIAL WORLD. Welcome to gfn.com, the Gay Financial Network. With free daily news and information, plus the best in online trading, home mortgages, online banking, insurance and more from top-name financial partners, gfn.com is empowering the gay community toward realizing our American dream. free daily financial news and information banking • mortgages •insurance •investing HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 GDJjJU .=:.; ·t}JB JJ:;·iDf JdB 8 HIGHLY EFFECTIVE THERAPY CRJXIVAN II' coi .!Vflto dntretroliral agerits IS a poMrlJ J)roE -.e nhbtor tnat f gilts HN and IS dlTlOf'€ the prefen>d treatmems fOr HIV in kx1eraJ healthcare gudeines. CPJXIVAN LJ' help reduce t 1e chance d h!sses dfld death assooateC with 1-rv; CRlXIVAN can cllso ;iep lc:M.e" the dmOll'1t d J-fV r )O.T body (ailed w-al IOaCf ) and 'Cl.ISe )O.T CD4 T -eel CCUlt. as shov.n n s!'..des over a Ol'le-)ear perod. Some n--tonnt< "1JY riot experlenee these e"ects. CRJXJVAN oS not a are for HIV or AIDS. • DURABLE RESULTS •u• !mark study. over 90% of 31 ~1ents receMng a combmat1or- of CR.iXIVAN, All. and 3TC reduced their serum vrr-al load befO;V the Lrnrt of det'noo after 24 weel<S lmportd~ the '1mrted nUTT'ber of piltJent 5 who chose to stay with tfie study for longer pe"IC>ds of tirre rnainta ned these results through the one-year mark. In a c;eparate study. 30% of 261 patier'tS receMng dual therapy of CRJXJVAN and AI'. had serum Viral !oads below the timrt of detectJon at 48 weeks. :i another landmark study, 43% of 40 patients receMng COO'btnation therapy wrth CRJXNAN. All. and n: fiacJ p/aSTT'a viral loads below the 'm" of detect.Dn at 40 weeks. :i thJS study d aver l.000 patierTts. the group of patients re<:eM/li CPJXJVAN aJong With 31C and AZT acliieved a redJctlOn 1r deaths OJXf AIDS defi" ng 1 :iesscs aver those tolk1ng 31C ard AZT rone Overall the ri..mber of deatrr: w-..s nadequate to assess the ripact of CRD<.VAl\i on Sl.n1Val. Blood vraJ loads were measured by av-...>-ble tests and 1k wus may ... i... ""°Sent 1n other Clf1'ilT1 1'\!Ste'Tl"- • THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT CRIXIVAN CRlXIVAN car be t&ffl meal or on an e11W stomach. Some ;:mients tre.J!ed wrtr CRlXIVAN may de-v€fop k.d'ley stones. For some. t/115 can exJ to more severe Krliey probleMs, ndJcir€ kdiey tatre Dnnkng at least 6 glasses of water each day '11ay fielp ceduce tfie cr..:nce of fol'1TI ng a Kidney stone Other Sid<.- effects reported 1no<Jde rapid break.down of red blood eels and ve:r problerrls. As wrtr other protease nhbtors. change5 1n body lilt, increased l:Xeedng n some pateits Witt henophilia. ard 111Creased blood sugar fcvc>ls or diabetes rave beer reportC'd. AdditionaJly. severe muscle p;;;ri .:r1d weakness hJve occ..1rred n patients also t&mg cholesterol-..:iwerng PledlOnes ailed "statJr< There art' 5()(11:> CQfT'ln"on medications and AIDS related medications you should rot taKe with CRIXJVAN Disc.JSS all medications ~ are tak...ng or plan to take "wV!!h yoor doctor: For more oeta11ed mfo•mat.Jn about CRJXNAN. pea;e reud the m{ormat:m 11r. e Jtey fol.ow , tJ::s adl'ert'Ser'lml Gider.es b-the Use cl Aruetrowa1 Agerts ir t-tv. lri!cted Mk and .Ado!escents. Panel er Ch:.11 i+ .ictces tr i'eatMent cl HI/ Wecton. Dcpartmef'! cl Health ard 1-lman 'ier'JICeS (Ot ~ t5 Ma;- 5 1999 Remember to ask your doctor about CRIXIVAN. CRIXIVAN .capsules 3 4 APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE .~·1 CRIXIVAN' Patient Information about CRIXIVAN' IKRIK·slll-vanJ • ~ fur HI\' (Hwnan hnmunodeticiencl' \ims) Infection ""' -(iUEW'rufate) Generic name: inilin:111r (m-Dlll-i1uh-H'l'rl 'ulfate • CaosUeS 9024510 before ~ start tlk.P,JQ CRIXIVAN AaJ. read the leaflet e::!' t.oe )'Cli 111-:ase C")'lhlng 11as d1anged Remetrbel: Jeal!et ooes not IJke tne wit!1 )'OlJ" cb:tor You and )'OlJ" 1oc'or should disaJss CAOOVAN wnen )C start tll<ing yas medic:' and at ~ check;;;:; You •emain under a OOc'or s care ~ u:::ng CRXJ',;i.N and should not Change or stop treatnent Wit!'.:; l lirSI t:i.'klng wit!' yru aoctoc What IS CRIXNAN? CRIXNAN Is an oral capsule used tor the treatment or HIV (Human lmmun0del1ciency Virus). HIV is Ille virus ll1at causes AIDS (acquired immune defiaency syndrome). CRIXIVAN a Jype ol HIV dl1lg al a pro!C'.!;e PRC' tee-ase) inhilbr How does CR/XIVAN work? ... "has been IJeetl How should I take CR/XfVAN? 1llflllS ~ Take CRIXIVAN capsules every day as presCnbed by yoor dodor. Cailrue t3c1YJ »l 'fO.I <ll:U )QJ fD T ltC ~ artW1I ii CIWMI yo.I ctx:lu leis )QJ fD tN! rifiJ 'rtr. lte - ~ ~ iake JIQJ ,.. 'X<JVAll )QJ "el 'IOI Sl<Jp ;>;x;es or tll<ll 'II 'lolicl:: Int t ~ mxM>H 15 ~ aaNr'j '1f11JAN may be mi:ed ~ '""SiStn:eJ Take CRIXIVAH capsules every 8 hours around the clock, every day. t riav be Jo r iber to take CROOVAN ' vou bk8 at rie :me tune mry lay ll!ll' have luestlonS be;. wllen !D C XIVAN Ooctor or .., prov h you declOO wllat hedu wort<:; !or H you mlSS a dose by more than 2 hours, wait and Jhen lake the next dose at the regularly scheduled ume. Howe'e you 1T11SS a dose by Jess lhan 2 hours lake your do5e '.'lmedialely ~your next oosa at the regtAarly schedul nme Do not lake more or ress ~ your prescribed dose ot CROOVAN at arry one nrre Take CRIXJVAN with water. You can also lakO CROOVAN wtth ottier beverageS such as ~ or lllO:Jm !!"ii\. llJCe coffee or tea. Ideally, lake eacll dose of CRIXIVAN wlthotJI food but with water at leaSt one hour before or two hours after a meal. Or you a:.1 t.Jke CIWOVAN wtth a IT1d Examllles DI light meals include av 'OaSI wtth tell'/. ;Jice lr1Cl cottee twl1h ~or im..tn m111< and sugar ~ you want) ran llake3 wt!l or IX!:': llll and 50ga1 Clo not lakO ROOVAN al Jhe same IJlne as any inea!s that are high 111 calories, tal and pro!Clll (!or exar11>le - a bacoo and ew breakfast) Wilen tlken at Ille same time • ®JVAN JheSe foodS can i1ter'ere wtth CRIXIVAIJ bc"lg ltlsortled into your IJloollstrea!ll and may Jessen Its effect. 6 It is critical that yoo drink at least 11x s-oonce glasses of liquids (preferably water) throughout the day, every day. CRIXIVAN can cause kidney stones. Having e:iougll f\'.;!(ls in your body cncutd help reduce Ille cnances Ol l!lmllng a kOlev sttre Call your doctor or othel tieal'..h care prQYider ~ you devetlp ldci1ey paJ11S (middle to ~ stomac't or back pain) or blood 1n the unne Does ClllXTVAN cure HIV or AIDS? <RXIVAN IS iot 1 ~ la HV °'ADS. Petllle tak!ng CJllXJVAN may Slill ~ lnfectionS or other c:ordtlons assocJa!ed with >IV Because of 11\is, ~ ls very importanl lor you to remam under the care ol a doctor AJtt1our11 CRXIVAIJ IS not a an for HV or AIDS, CffmAN can help redl£e your dm:es ol getting llnesses, lllCIUllng deatn, asso:b!ed wttll ltV CROOVAN may rot llaVe V1eSe effect! in aD paten!S. Does GRIXNAN reduce the risk of passing HN lo others? llllXIVAIJ llaS 'lOI been Shown 'D redUCe Ille r'Gk ol passmg HV to otherS tllrough rex:raJ conJact or blood ccnlamination Who should not take GRIX/VAN? Do 10I tll<e CROOVAN H )QJ llaVe had a serious aJterg!c r98Ctlcn to CRIXJVAN or arry ol lls ~ What other medical problems or conditions should I discvss wtth my doctor? t to your doctor I • vou are pregn:; or ! you beCome pregna.'lt wt1lle you are tlklng alXJVAN We do nol yet k.iow '>OW CRIXJV.v-1 afeclS pegnant f«Jlllllll or l1lelr ~babies. o Yoo n ~ 'eedirlQ. You !hoUd SlllP leedng you n talung CRIXIVAN AlsD to your doctor you have • P!OOlerr.s ~ 'fWI mi especilJly d you have 11'*1 or 'llOdera!e liver Clsease ':81lSed by Cintlosis • Problems "' your icrre;;. • :Jiabeles ·~ • 'ti#! c:tXlieslelQJ a:xl you are tlL":il ~med!..: called-..-. Tel your doctor about Bl!'j medr-ies you tWng or (liar! '2ke, indudlng 'lOll-~too ~ can GRIX/VAN be taken with other medications? .. Drugs you Sl!ou!d not take with CRIXIVAN SELOANE• (lerfenadine ttSMANAi. • vrnsID" "1ldazolam HAl..CIOW (::'.lllllaml PRO:>W.Jl" E•got l'ledieallOrlS ~ ~ and Ca• •:1;mg CRIXIVAN Wlttl t.'!'l above 'lledicallOrlS Q;;.;:;J result ~ ' ~ proOJems (sue'! ~ he3r'!leat or excessrve Jn 1 you should not take CR!XIVAN w tl1 larr knowl' as r.:FAO!N" R:fAMATP RIFATER" 'll r.1.W' AIE." ' ~ • Jlrciti CR!XlVM l:illl n The 1 ng not a piete rlle eCIS "eJ)Olted With CROOVAN whC'.'. tlkrll r ;ie wt1ll o~ anb HIV drugs Oo not r !y on leatlet alone lor fomallon about effects twr OOctor can witll YIX' a more ;np1e1e ~ OISlde ~ Some patients treated with CROCIVAN developed kidney stones. In some of these pabents tnis led ta mOtll severe kidney problems, inctuc:Jmg kidney failure or innammatlOll of Jhe kidneys. Onnklng at least six 8-ounce glasses of liquid (preferably water) each day should help reduce Jhe chanCeS 01 fomung 1 lddney stone. cal ~ doctor or othc: heaJro care p!OYlder 1 you de"<cfop '" . -v:y pams (middle to lower tomach or rock pain) or blood 111 the ur111e Some paUents treated with CRJXJVAN have had rapid bleal<down of red brood cells (hemoly!IC anemia) wfllcl1111 some = was severe or resulted l!l death Some pa'Jent 'reated wttti r:w:Nl>N have had INer prOOlems niJdN1g liver ta111.1e and <tcatll Some pallent!; had ocner .-iesses or were bl<ll1g Oiiier Ougs. tt IS lllCe:::: I CRIXIVAN raused tnese Ne< JlOOlems 0 Dates and high blood sugar ~rglycemla) have occurred in pa!Jeflts tlk:IJ;j PfOlease inhibitors n some of Jhese patients, thiS Jed to ketoacidosls, a ser1ous •ondition caused by pOOr1y 00/llrotled blood SllQar Some patients had diabe1es before stziting protease lnhlbltofS otners clld '10t Some patients required Qislments Jo !heir "3betes 11100ica1Ion O!he!S r-100 new diabetes medicaUon h sane patiellts Wlttl llerTqJhi!ia n:reasoo bleeOnO l'a!; been reported Se.ere muscle p;jll1 and weakness have ocwred in patients laking protease lflhblas. irduc:Jll1ll CRIXIVM, ID;le1!ler wttri sorne ot Ill! CllOles!erof 1ower1ng mediOOeS C3fled 'statins. • Ca! YI>"' doCIDI r you develop se.eie lllJSde paJn or weakness. Cl-.anges Jn body fat 'lave been seen 111 some paUents taking protease lnhtMors Tllese Changes may ll1Clude Increased amount of fat 111 Jhe upper back and nec1< ("buHalo hUITIP1 breasJ. and around Jhe tn: Loss or ta! tram uie ieQ" and arms may also happen The (;3USe and tong lelm l1ealth effects Of tnese aincltions are not ITTiwn at UiS time ClirQJ StuOe3 Increases In bilirubin (one laboratay test ot ver Juneton) have been reported 111 approximately 10% ot pa!Jents. Usuany, tills fincing has not been assooated wtth !Iver PfttJlems Howc'm. 1111 rare occasioos. a persor1 may develop yelJow1ng ol trJe skJn BJ1d,lor eves Side e!lects oa:urrJng 111 2% or roore ot pallC!llS lnCblcC! abOOrnlnal pain. fatigue or weal<ness. 11.n pain, teefirlg IJMell. nausea. dl.mhea. vomiting. acid regixyltation Joss ol nwctite. dry rnoutll. OOck pain, headache. lrlltJble Sleepqj. dlzzineSS. tas1e Cl1angeS. rash, ~ respiratory Infection. av Sllln. arxJ sore l!Voat. 'iWolen ~ due to blod<ed unne llow occi..-red rarely • Mal1<el!ng U;lerieflce OJher ;;;oe eftecls reported since CROOVAN has been rnaike1ed lnWOO aDergJc reactJons; severe s1;11 reactiOnS ye!llwlng ol the $kin :id/or ews. hearl prcllJems R:ludl:ig heart attadl; lllldonWlal swelllng indlgestJoo, ittanvnatJon ol lhe kkileys, il!'.ammatlOll of llle im:reas joint pain ~ ltclling hes, Change l!1 color, h<W Joss i1grlMI' Jccro ' Wllll or wlthol.: ir.fecllon; crystals 11 ttie lrile ~ i;: lJ!al and IUIDless ol tne rrouth. Tel JW <b:tll" ~ alnJI tnese or any Olller .nad ~ a Jte arotoo pe:-,:sis or wrr;ens, r.ee1< medcal ll!'.ClllD1 How should I store GRIX/VAN capsules? • Keep CROOVAN ..:;;:utes 11 the botlle they ':arOO am I room tempefalln! 86'f) • Keep CMIVAN capsiJles ct'; by ieawig tile small desiC:ta11 'pdlcM" " me bot!!e Kee:> 111e bOtt1e ctoset1. nlls """1icll/IDn IQS pt..al/Jed lot yout patliallar- Do llOI use It lot lt!Y oa. t:fJtldltJon °' flv• #Ill "'Yflody fM. ~oep alWVAN 11111 llJI lfl«licinos out ttl a. mdJ ol cfJ/ltJrftl If you .,_,..,._tefy. -1 aut """° tllall IM prncrlbed dOU •I lh<S -·<IM ha - u1.,,, contact you1 _, flO/Sall <Dntrol nntor leafle1 ,,,_ •.,,..,... d ir1loml:lllOO ll»I f1V1!NI '""' llo'9-ir1J.es1JOOS or concerre ltlc>A - C!lllVAll 71 tW talk ro yas doctor CRIXIVAN. ---•OERCl<&CO '°" ;ol"l!IGl!IOIOCK&CO l>e. •996 •:m Al;..,........, - ""-- bdomiV>o>d.., - ....,..,.., .. .,...,,... c1 """°' & to re tjMERCK ' (indinavir sulfate) capsules HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 INSIDE NEWS Around the South ..•••......••....... 6 Judge permits adoption challenge in Flo ..•.. 6 Fired lesbian worker sues Baptist home ..... 6 Around the Notion •••••.•.....•.•...• .7 NGLTF tops newly out NOW official .••.... .7 Military not 'testing ground' for gays, official soys ..••......•......•..•.. .7 Health News •••.....••.....•••••.. .18 Tuberculosis outbreak among transgendered I 8 Survey: Depression top gay health concern . I 8 VOICES & ECHOES Editoriol: Gays may ruin 'traditional marriage' .8 Kubiak: Lifestyles of the vain, self--0bsarbed . 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Stand-up Girl Sondra Bernhard comes calling I 5 GlAMA-rous! The gay Grommys .••...••. I 5 On Stage: Melody on a lost path •..•.• . .. I 6 Out in Print: Memoirs of a hustler ...•.... 20 Bestsellers •••••••••••..•.••....... 20 Eating Out: Daring dishes stand out ....... 21 Community Calendar •.•.....••... . ... 22 Occasions ..••••.••.•.....••••..... 26 My Stars! .••.....•••.....••.• . .. . . 27 ClASSIFIEDS •••....••.•.......•.•..•••. 24 Issue 1018 l1fdii!.!\td1i voice All material In Houstoo Voice ts protected by federal copyright law and may not be repre>­ducad without the written consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orlentat100 or advertISers, photographers, writers and cartoonists pub-lished herein is neither Inferred or implied. The appearance of names or piclorlal representa· toon does not necessarily indicate the sexual Ortentation of that person or persons. Houston Voice accepts unsolicited ed1tonal material but cannot take responsibility for rts return. The editor reserves the r;ght to accept, reject or edit any submission. AU rights revert to authors upon pubhcation. Guidelines tor freelance contributors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 NEWS 5 Thousands expected to march on National Mall WASillL\;GTON (AP)-There's nothing better than a march on the National Mall to build on the victory that gays and lesbians just won in Vermont, Diane.Hardy-Garcia says. That's because every step forward gays and le~bians make-like the brand-new Vermont civil unions law-there is a step back, like the slaying of Pfc. Barry Winchell at Fort Campbell, Ky., after rumors sur­faced that he was gay, said Hardy-Garcia, executive director of Sunday's Millennium March on Washington and the Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. tunng Garth Brooks and Melissa Etheridge, rallying between the Washington Monument and the Capitol and broadcast­ing the events O\'er the Internet. Also scheduled to attend are the parents of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old gay Umvers1ty of Wyoming student who died in October 1998 after being beaten into a coma and tied to a fence, and \\~mchell's mother, "' Patricia Kutteles of Kansas City, :\lo. ~ Organizers are expecting 300,000 people at the fourth rally for gay, lesbian and bisex­ual right on the Mall in the last 21 years. They have been planning for years, hoping the rally will mobilize supporters into an important voting bloc this presidential elec­tion year. Critics praise the intentions of the e\·ent x but question how it has been organized. ~ William Dobbs, member of a committee of ~ acti\;sts formed to oppose the march, says , decisions about the event were made by ~ people in Washington who failed to gamer Texas activist and Millennium March organizer enough support on the local level and from Dianne Hardy-Garcia said despite criti<ism, minority groups. Sunday's event wil 'help celebrate gay "Celebrities draw attention but in the end victories' ike the civil unions bill in Vermont. But it is not without its critics. And the most vocal ones are other gay and lesbian rights groups who claim the event has little grassroots support. it's supposed to be a civil rights march," Dobbs said. "It shouldn't be just a feel-good event. But those past marches came about when there was a real community consen­sus to march on the capital and push the government changes." Men Together rescheduled a board meeting originally set for this weekend in Washington to show its opposition to the march. March supporters dismiss the criticism. "There have been disagreements. with every social justice mo\'ement and past marches," said Da\id Smith, spokesman for Human Rights Campaign. "The contro­\' ersy right now is not as important as the fact that we are all coming together to work for the common goal." "There's many things to celebrate and a lot of work to yet to do," Hardy-Garcia said. "One of the reasons we do marches on Washington is something that is important to the gay community-the real need to bring more people into this movement." To do that, they're staging a concert fea- New York City Counalwoman Christine Quinn, who:;e Manhattan district is home to a big portion of the city's gay and lesbian popu­lation, urged her constituents to stay away to concentrate on efforts closer to home instead. The National Association of Black and White Scouts' gay ban argued before high court WASHINGTON (AP)-- Walking with his lawyer and parents, James Dale ignored the anti-gay acth·ists who followed him across the Supreme Court's broad marble plaza. "Save yourself from this awful, horrible lifestyle~" yelled Philip Benham of D;illas, presi­dent of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue. "Mr Dale, Jesus will set you free'" D.iniel Martino of Wa~hington :;tood with a cross and a large sign declaring, "A homosexual Boy Scout leader is like asking a fox to guard the chickens." Dale has seen and heard such statements before and says they do not affect him. "The only per$on I am is me, and I've always been true to myself, and I think that's the most important thing," he said, addressing a mob of reporters and curious tounsts after the court heard arguments in his case against the Boy Scouts of America. Exp~lled as a scouting super­visor in 1990 when the Boy S,Couts learned he was gay, the Eagle Scout two years later launched a legal challenge to the !<Cout's claim that gay peo­ple do not ml'et the organiza-lion's standard of "morally straight." Without saying how they will ultimately volt', several justices voiced skeptiasm about how far the court could go to force open admissions upon private organi­zations. "In your \'Jew, a Catholic organization has to admit Jews" and "a Jewish organiza· !Ion has to admit Catholics," justice Stephen G. Breyer told Evan Wolfson, Dale's lawyer. Founded in 1910, the Scouts have an oath and law that long have required members to promise to be "clean" and "morally ~tra1ght." But no writ- ~ ten rule specifically addresses ~ homosexuality. ::; Wolfson said the Scouts are § not primarily an "anti·gay ~ organization" and therefore Dale's presence did not burden the group's message. New Jersey's highest court ruled that the Boy Scouts' ban on gay troop leaders violated a state prohibition on discrimina­tion in public accommodations. But the Scouts say the state law violates the organization's rights of fm. .· speech and free association under the Constitution's First Amendment. Former Eagle Scout Jcmes Dale (center) talks to the press at the Supreme Court in Washington Wednesday after Supreme Court justices joined i11 a spirited debate over whether loy Scouts can bcw gays from serving as troop leaders. Justice John Paul Stevens asked George Davidson, the Scouts' lawyer, whether gays could be excluded if they did not publicly declare their sexu­al orientation, but it was dis­covered against their wishes. Yes, said Davidson, arguing that the organization had a right "to choose the moral leaders for the children in the program." Dale, 29, li\·es in :\ew York Gty and is advertismg director for a magazine for people who are HIV-positive. 6 At Clia1e/ Ne tab ffiie in te!e/;ra6i11-5 vur ii11er1i6y ... • S.me companies merely say that they cme about certain communities but do very little to back it up. But when you choose Chase, you choose a company that has a history of supporting causes that are important to our customers and employees. What's more, we are equally committed to programs that recognize differences, like a nondiscrimination policy that protects everyone. At Chase, respect for the individual is a principle that influences many of our business decisions. We look forward to earning your business. A Proud Supporter of Houston's 2000 Lesbian and Gay Pride Celebration OCHASE ~, ' T•e JoY ,,,. ~ - Visit or call our Kirby branch or any of our 52 convenient branches In the Greater Houston area. Gerald Caliendo, Sales Manager, AVP (713) 525-2225 Chase-Kirby 3201 Kirby Drive Steve Santana Banking Service Officer (71 3) 525-2287 NEWS APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Around the South For more news coverage: www.houstonvoice.com Mississippi governor to sign newly-passed ban on gay adoptions JACKSON (AP}-Mississippi lawmakers voted April 19 to ban gay couples from adopting, becoming the second state this year to try to keep lesbians and gay men from becoming par­ents. The Senate passed the ban without debate and without opposition. The House had given • approval earlier, and Gov. Ronnie Musgrove has already said he will sign the bill. The pro­posal, which takes effect July 1, said "adoption by couples of the same gender is prohibited." The Tupelo, Miss.-based American Family Association had led a phone call lobbying effort over the past month to revive the bill, which looked dead when a committee chair said he was reluctant to bring the divisive bill up for debate. Democratic Sen. Hillman Frazier said his col­leagues were responding to political pressure. 'This is a very hot topic around the nation. They wanted to make a statement," he said, Two other states, Florida and Utah, also have bans on gay adoption. Utah's was adopted earlier this year. Judge permits ACLU challenge to Florida ban on gay adoptions KEY WEST, Fla.-A federal judge ruled April 24 that the ACLU's challenge to Florida's law banning gay adoption can proceed, rejecting the state's request to dismiss the law­suit. In court arguments to dismiss the case last month, the state contended that the plaintiffs had not actually applied to adopt, and therefore could not show that they were impacted by the adoption ban. The state also defended the adoption ban on "moral" grounds and claimed the gay fam­ilies in the case were not entitlt:d to legal protection. In today's decision, U.S. District Judge James Lawrence King did not address the state's morality claim, focusing only on which plaintiffs had formally submitted adoption applica­tions. Although the ACLU took the position that the adop­tion ban made the applications futile, the court said it want· Once Gov. Ronnie Musgrove ed the applications submitted nonetheless and allowed 30 signs a new law banning adop- days for this to happen. "The plaintiffs began filling out the tion by gay couples, Mississippi necessary paperwork this morning, and it will be submitted will join Florida and Utah with as soon as it is ready," said Michael Adams, Associate sinilar legal prohiiitions. Director of the ACLU's Lesbian and Gay Rights Project. Fired lesbian worker sues Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children LOUISVILLE, Ky 1AP)-Asocial worker fired by Kentucky Baptist_H?mes for Children after being outed as a lesbian sued her former employer on Apnl 17, cla1mmg her civil rights were violated. The state of Kentucky was also named as a defendant for providing more than half the agency's $21 million budget. Baptist I iomes firL>d Alicia Pedre1ra, a therapist and supervisor, on Ckt. 23, 1998, on the grounJs that her sexual orientation ran counter to the organization's values. Her dismiss<il came after agency employees s.1w a picture of Pedretra and her partner enterL>d in a photo contest at the Kentucky State Fair without her knowledge. Bill Smithwick, president and CEO of Kentucky Baptist Homes for Children, defended the organizatton's hiring policy. "We place a lot of emphasis on role models, and for us to have a staff person who is openly homosexual in some way could encourage ' [youngsters) to be sexually confused and to enter the homosexual lifestyle," he said. S.C. capital's police crack down on male prostitution at park COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP)-Police have conducted about a dozen undercover stings m Columbia's Granby Park, which some say has become a haven for male prostitution. Four men were arrested for allegedly soliciting sex in the park in Decemlx>r. It's unclear how many arrests have been made since then. "The park is there for the use of all citizens for recreational activities. It's for families," said Police Chief Charles Austin. ''It's not intended to be an outdoor motel, and we're not going to allow it to tum into one." Some area resi· dents say police are being too heavy-handed in dealing with the situation. Daniel Hutchins, who ltves nearby and often walks his dog in the park, said police harassed one of his friends. "They told a friend of mine to leave, and hew.isn't doing anything dirty," Hutchins said. Florida county adds protection for gays into local housing code TALLAHASSEE, Fla.-After more than three hours of debate, the I.eon County Commission voted 5-1 to add sexual orientation to the county's Fair I lousing Code's anti­d1scnmmation clause, the Tallahassee Democrat reported April 19. Th.it action makes it ille­gal for homeowners to refuse to sell or rent property to someone bt'C.iuse they nre gay. "This amendment is in rcahty nothing more than a technical amendment to bring thl• code in line with extSting community standards," SJid Commissioner Cliff Thaell, who intro­duced the .imendment last month "l're1ud1ct' is for outside the mainstream of thought in th.t5 community." The mostly pro-amendment crowd, many wearing white ribbons, applauded the vote Throughout the public hearing, s~eakers said the measure didn't con­done the tlomoscxuahty but put gays on the same footing as heterosexuals when it came to looking for a home -From staff and wire reports , HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 NEWS Around the Nation For more news coverage: www.houstonvoice.com NGLTF picks newly out NOW official as new executive director W\SlllNGTON-The National Gay & Lesbian Task Force named Elizabeth Toledo, a vice president of the National Organiz.1tion for Women, as its new rxecutiw director last week. Toledo, 38, a L1tina mothrr who c,1me out as .1 lesbian less than a year ago, will replace Kerry Lobel. who resigned April 7 after three years at NGLTF's helm, the Washmgton Blade reported April 21. Jerry Clark, co-chair of NGLTF's board, said Toledo's recent decision to come out was not dewed as a negative by the board. "We really think her example will be an inspiration for a lot of people who are not already out, and should be," Clark said . • Less than one year after NOW Vice President Elizabeth Toledo came out, she has been named executive director of the National Lesbian & Gay Task Force. Prosecutors drop hate charges over prep student's knife attack GREENFIELD, Mass. (AP)-A former prep school student has been sentenced to three years probation after admitting using a knife to cqt the word "HOMO" into the ~ack of another student. Matthew Rogers, 20, of Franklin, Tenn., was also given a suspended 2.5- year jail term and ordered to perform 144 hours of community service at his Ap~I 19 sen­tencing on two misdemeanor assault charges. Rogers' roommate, Jonathan Shapiro, 18, of Keene, N.ll, was also charged in the attack. Judge Bertha Josephson questioned prosecu­tors closely about their dl'Cision to drop hate crime charges as well as felony assault charges as part of the plea bargain. Prosecutor Renee Seese s..1id Rogers did not consider his 17- year-old victim to be a homosexual and described the assault as hazing. Police described the cuts as shallow, but deep enough to draw blood. Authori ties said the students had argued over the British rock band Queen and the characterization of its music as "gay." Rogers lost an appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy, because of the incident Rulings against domestic partner benefits in Pittsburgh, Virginia PITTSBURG!! (AP)-The University of Pittsburgh was within its legal rights to deny health benefits to same-sex partners of employees, a judge ruled Apnl 20. Judge Robert Gallo said that Pitt's policy is neutral because health benefits are offered to all employees regardless of sexual orientation, and Pitt also denies benefits to unmarried par'!1ers of het­erosexual employees. The city of Pittsburgh had been trymg to force ~e ~m~er~1ty,_ throug~ its Commission on Human Relations, to co'!'ply Wllh the city's ant1-d1scnm.ma~o~ o~d1- nance. The judge also ordered the commission to halt its investigation of d1scnmmatlon charges against the university. Deborah Henson, a former Pitt instructor who sued when the university denied benefits to her le;;bian partner, said she would appeal. Meanwhile, in Richmond, a unanimous Virginia Supreme Court struck down Arlington County's law that conferred health insurance benefits on the unma~ricd domestic partners of local government employees, the Washington Post reported Apnl 22. The court ruled 7- 0 that the Virginia General Assembly had never expressly granted such authority to local governmcnb. The county said it would not appl'al. Navy secretary says military is no 'testing ground' for gay rights ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP)-Secretary of the Navy Richard Danzig told an audienCl' at the lJ S. Naval Academy that the military should not be considered a testing ground for gay­rights issues. Responding to a quest10n about gays in military service, Danzig said April 17 that American society "hasn't reached a consensus" on gay rights. "In the end, the military itself shouldn't be a driver of that, but a follower of the consensus of society," he said. "It ts really much more an issue for society-at-large as it is for the military," he said "lbe mil­itary 1:m't csS<'ntially a testing ground" Meanwh1ll' m West I lollywood, Calif., the $1.2 m1lhon price tag for the city's proposed veterans memorial has ra1Sed eyebrows, the Les Angelt'S Times reported Apnl 21. Some tax· payers and oty council members are concl'mcd about rosts, while others question why tlus small, gay-fricndlv city would pay tribute to the mihtary <lt <ill. Michigan city repeals 40-year-old ban on serving gays in bars ROYAL OAK, Mich.-Just 10 days aftL'r city commissioners found out that this Michigan aty had banned bars from serving gay:-. more than 40 years ago, they unanimously repealed the Jaw, the I >et roil free Press reported Apnl 20. Red-faced officials said the ban hadn't been enforced for as long as anyone remembered But word of the ban still sent a flash of angst through a town whose gay merchants and customers h~lped fuel its rcnaissan~c.. ''f!1at Ian· guagc was more than four decades old, and at the hme it was wntten, the oty hfted 1t, word for word, from what then was ;;tatc Jaw," said City Attorney Chuck Scmchena. The statt• since had revised its code and rt'.rnovcd its rl'fcrence to gays, Semchena said April 19. -From staff 11nd wire reports If you are seriously ill, selling your life insurance is an option to consider. We have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. 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Call us today. f' IAUOUDAI.£ NEW~ TPRIDE INS'll'l'U'l'E 800-54-PRIDE www.benefitsamerica.com Benefits Amenco NA, Inc. 7 8 VOICES AND ECHOES APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE VOICe: Gays may ruin 'traditional marriage' 1· ifiJj fA{i] 1)1 EDITORIAL STAFF Associate Publisher Mike Fleming mlkeOhoustonvoice.com Editor Matthew A. Henn1e ed1torOhoustonvo1ce com Production Bethany Bartran - Stt11or GraphlC Designer Co ntributors R1c!l Arenschieldt. Kay Y Dayus. T•ayce Diskin. Ear D11tman. D l Groover, Robert B. Henderson, Kathreen lee, Gip Plaster. E la Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. K1:-1 Thompson. Terry Su.livar Advertising Sales Ken Burd Tom Robbins Office Administrator, Classifieds a. Di~ctory Marshall Rainwater Administra tion a. S" les Support Carolyn A. Roberts N•tion•I Advertising Representative R1vendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 A Publishers Ch" Crain Rick Ellsasser CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBiAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. SOO Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 fax· (713) 5~531 Contents copyright 1999 Offu houn; 9 am. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter letters should be fewer than 400 words We reserve the right to edit for content and ~ngth We will withhold names upon request. but you m:.st include your name and phone number for venf1tat1on. Please send ma I to Houston Voice, SOO Lovett Blvd . Suite 200. Houston, Texas 77006: fax (7 IJ) 529-9531 or e-mail to ed1torOhouston· """' com Opinions •"!'fessed thereif' do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. In all the fuss over our demand that gov­ernment recognize our freedom to marry, the retort that always leaves homosexual heads scratching is that we somehow pose a threat to Htraditional marriage." As a literal matter, of course, it's true. "Traditional marriage," by defini~n, has not included same-sex couples. But that's only an argument against change Before a landmark Supreme Court dec1S1on m 1969, "traditional marriage" in many parts of this country did not include mterraaal couples. Now that the Vermont legislature has chosen to follow the considered judgment of th.it state's Supreme Court, and not the cowardly example set by legislators in l lawail and Alaska, the voices alleging a homosexual threat to "traditional mar­riage" will only get louder. It's difficult to see how v-.inning recogni­tion of our relationships would discourage happy heterosexual couples from taking the marital plunge. So long as these opposite­sex couples are actually heterosexual, a ch­mate more welcome to gay relationships shouldn't undermine their will to be wed. But our fight for legal recognition-any sort of legal recognition-has, in fact, already undermined "traditional marriage" for heterosexuals, though the result may have been mostly unintentional. In every place it's come up around the planet, efforts to win full-fledged gay mar­nage nghts have fallen at least somewhat short of the mark. Conservative resistance has prevailed, and gay couples have won some variety of second-class recognition. In the English-speaking world, the faux mamages have been called "domcsttc part­nerships." In France, they're c.1lled l'acte civil de solidarite, or "l'ACS." And because most gay righb leaders and their fnends in government are socially pro­gressive, they've put up little resistance to the argument that gays seeking inclusion in lWE VERMONT lEGISL.AruRE HAVING OKAYED CNU. UNl<l'IS FOR SAME-SEX COUPLES, MR. IJ M2S. ,JEDEDIAH UNa:RWOOO WAIT PATIEN1'LY FOR IT 10 DES'TRO'f iH£R ~·YEAR MAAAJAGE. marriage rights shouldn't exclude anyone from these domestic partnerships. So in most places, heterosexual couples have also won access to the newly created insbtuhon of almost-but-not-quite-marriage. The effect on "traditional marriage" has been dramatic. In France, where PACS were first available last year, some 14,000 couples have signed up, half of them heterosexual. In a fascinating April 18 report by the Ncrv York Times, these straight couples talked about how happy they were to enter into PACS. rather than marriage, which they saw as "a burdensome institution, weighed down with religious connotation.~, and likely to end badly and at enormous expense." Some described their PACS as a "trial run" for marriage, but many said they had no desire to fully tie the knot. Jn France, as in many Roman Catholic countries, divorce can be difficult and expensive. Dissolving a PACS often involves merely giving notice Vermont passes 'civil unions,' Page 1 to the other party. Meanwhile, "PACS-ed" couple:; can file jointly for taxes, be eligible for each other's work place benefits, and automatically obtain joint ownership of new property they acquire. Back in the States, many heterosexual cou­ples are also choosing domestic partnership over marriage for many of the same reasons. In almost every jurisdiction where OP status is available, straight couples far outnumber gay couples on the sign-up sheet. This threat to "traditional marriage" as an attractive relationship option comes at the same ~1me that some states are purpose­fully making 1t harder to enter and exit that venerable institution. In Florida and Wiscon.,in, for example, heterosexual couples are encouraged by a marriage license discount to go through pre­marital counseling before they legally wed. In other states, including Mississippi, couples wishing to marry are offered the option of entering into a separate marriage scheme that does not permit "no fault" divorce. To exit such an arrangement, one partner must prove willful misconduct­abuse or infidelity-by the other. So far, it isn't working. Very few straight couples-fewer than 15 percent-ha\'e opted for the souped-up, ultra-traditional marriage. The counseling option is still too new, and <iccording to another Times report, the results are decidedly indecisive. These_ ineffectual attempts at bucking up tr.1d1honal marriage are losing the battle to a popular and easier alternative that 1s increas_i~gly available. There's your threat to trad1ttonal marriage . 1:J1at may Wl.'11 be a good thing, but It is ironic that the short-term resistance from some qua~trrs to recognition of gay mamage has contributed significantly to the wry hann that ou~ foes fear thr most-the piece­meal destruction of traditional marriage. HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT Lifestyles of the vain and self-absorbed by GREG D. KUBIAK You've heard it before. All that hand­wringing about the superficial body image and \'amty among gay men. But the effect of our obses­sion with outer appearances, and the industries that support those obsessions, should make room for the more troubl.ng reality of internal \·anity. We know quite well how the fitness and fashion industry is making a mint off of gay male sensibilities .md the desire to be on the cutting edge of physical fit­ness, beauty and style. Some statistics sugge:.t that plastic surgery among gay men is a luxury in higher proportion than in the general public. D.iwn Atkins, author of "Looking Queer: Body Image and Identity in Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay and Transgender Communities," has conducted studies about self-image, body weight and health in the gay male community. She found that the rate of eating disorders is higher among gay men than previously thought. But this is not the only exposure of 21st century vanity that affects our society. The internal vanity is also in our interest. The phone conversation was one-sided and seeming­ly endless. For nearly 15 minutes, Mark's friend prattled on about his gym routine, his untrustworthy new boyfriend, and how his job is just "so bad, bL'Cause my boss is, like, always wanting to see my work." Finally, the gym bunny took a breath and asked, "So, how are you?" Mark, an acquaintance who related this story to me, was by now exasperated. Still, he told his self-described "best" friend, "Not too well. My dad had a heart attack today. I'm flying home tonight" There was silence on the other end of the phone, fol­lowed by a soft and shallow, "Oh? Bummer." It's just one Hlustration. There's an increasing aware­ness among soaologists a.nd Main Street Americans about life and human relationships. There are growmg numbers of self-absorbed aliens taking on human fonn Now, l don't have an)' studies, figures or legislative remedies for the internal vanity and self-absorption that is cr('('ping through society. It's too pervasive. ~·m !1'ore inter­ested m naming the beast for now, than killing it. Worried that you, too, may be infected by this stealth invasion of St:'lf·absorbed aliens? Do your own inventory. If the average gym bunny worked half as hard on his personality as he did his pees, he might actually be an interesting person. Take tv.·o blank pieces of paper. On the first, write down three columns of names: people you currently regard as your "best" friend(s); those you regard as friends; and finally. the names of people with whom you have exten· sive contact, but may not think of as a friend. Now, review your conversations and interactions with each person in each column and ask yourself these ques· tions, (putting scores by the side of the names.) 1. Is this person someone I'd call if I had a problem or needed a serious favor? Score: add one point for "11c~ "; subtract 011.e point for "no, but they'd probably call me if they n£'('ded a fauor"; and zero points if you don't k11ow. 2. Do I initiate contact with that person, wait for them to call me, or don't think about it because it's pretty even? Score: add one point for "pretty ewn"; zero pomts for "I initiate"; and subtract one 110111.t for "wait for them." 3. Is this someone whom I legitimately enjoy spend· mg time with? And why' Score.': add one point for "yes"; extra 110ints for partic111arly good, q11a/1tatii>e "wliy's" After you've added up the points, and considered the qualitative "why" question in #3, take the second piece of paper With that, reorder the columns with best friends, friends, and acquaintances based on the range of numer· tc differences. U you sec spcafic shifts m names mo\'ed columns, 11 proba­bly mean' either (a) you're being sucked dry by pt.'Ople who give little b.1ck, or (b) you're sucking your "friend~" dry. The increase in sales of self-help books and psychologi· cal counseling appointments should give us all an idea that the "me" generation has taken some bad turns in the last few years. But it's not too late for us to do the internal work that we're so quick to do for our exterior selves. A good friend of mine summed it up best refcrnng to an attractive, well-built young man some time ago. "If he worked half as hard on his personality as he did hts pees," said my friend, "he might actually be an interest­ing person." We buv supplemenb to build muscle, increase sexual vinhtv and grow hair. We dispO!-l' of excess income on the la.test designer-labeled fashiorL", gym memberships .ind $40 haircuts. But moral support and fncndship don't come from a cat­alog or a weight room. Pretty soon, it'll get lonely if you are the only friend you have. The best ad\ire to an increasingly >elf-absorbed world 1s: If you want a friend, you've got to be a friend. Greg D Kubuik IS a Was/11ngto11-lxzsed .frrelance rolummst and can be readied tilil tlus publication or at GKubiak@aol.com. Revisit tho oorlu sto~ of Mo and Sydney's court.ship in this orchiw cpioodo while U10 cartoonist takes a hricf rest stop, 10 NEWS APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Civil unions recognized in Vermont Vermont Gov. Howard Dean (left) is congratulated by Rep. Bal Lippert, the only openly gay member of Vermont's legislature, in his office at the Statehouse after Dean announced at a press con­ference that he had signed the civil unions bill into law earfier in the day Wednesday. .- Continued from Page 1 "The possibihhes for our families and, indeed, the shape of our movement are forever changed," said Beatnce Dohm, legal director for the national Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund. "Vermont has sent a sign.ii to the entire nation that it IS no longer tolerable to deny lesbians and gay couples the respect other couples take for granted." GLAD served .is co-counsel in a lawsuit brought by three gay Vermont couples seekmg to marry their same-sex part­ners, while Lambda filed "fnend of the court" bnefs m the case The state Senate approved the avil unions bill Apnl 18, but made changes that required the measure to be approved again by the House-where many feared it could lose votes, making passage questionable. One representative who was absent for the first House ballot voted in favor of the measure, while two who origi­nally voted against the civil union bill changed and voted in favor of the measure's final passage. Both supported the concept of gay unions all along, but initially said the pro­posed legislation didn't go far enough. Rep Wilham Mackinnon had argued that gays should g receive the full instituhon of marriage, while Rep. James ~ ColVJn wanted civil unions to be open to unmarried hetcro­~ sexual couples as well. ::i The new civil union law 1s "a step, 1ust a step," :!; Mackinnon said, according to the Associated Press. "I prom-ise that I for one will remain ever-Vigilant to any d1scrim1- nation that may continue here in Vermont." Governor says 'time to heal' In an interview with Vermont Public Television pnor to the legislature's final vote, Dean said he understands that some Vermonters oppose the bill, but he feels it 1s necessary to lessen discrimination. "I have been governor for rune years; my kids were born m this state and I am not going to do anything that I think would harm thL~ state-ever," Dean said Opponents have argued that lawmakers weren't listening to vocal criticism from some citizens, but Dean said he dis­agreed. "I think legislators have listened to the public. There is a difference between listening to people and agreeing Mth them," he said The will .of the ma1ority can't trample on the rights of minorities, Dean said. "In Alabama, in 1964, Jf you had put the question of whether African Americans ought to be able to vote equally and hold property, the vote would have been 'no,"' he said. Recognition for gay unions is a civil rights issue, "but it is not the same civil rights issue as if you were African American and had no right to vote," Dean said later in the interview. "ObVJously, gay and lesbian people have the right to vote and to own property and so on," he explained "The reason it is a civil rights issue is this: People arc beat­en and m some cases killed because they are gay or lesbian m the same way other minority groups are beaten or killed because they arc members of minority groups." Dean also said he disagreed with those who said gays would "flock" to Vermont to register their unions. The state's secretary of the Agency of Commerce and Community Development has also said there was no reason to expect "any substantial negative or positive impact on Vermont businesses" as a result of c1v1l unions. Dean quietly signed the bill behind closed doors in an effort to help begin healing the rift the legislation has caused across the state. "In politics, bill signings are triumphal," he said "They rep­resent overcoming of one side over another. These celebra­tions, as the subject of the matter of the bill, will be private." Other states unlikely to recognize unions The House version of the bill originally wanted the law to go into effect two months later, but representatives agreed Tuesday with the Senate's earlier deadline, the only sub­stantive change between the two versions. Tax and insur­ance provisions will not go into effect until 2001. To register their partnership, gay couples who are over 18 and not closely related by blood will be able to get a "civil union" license from their town clerk, just as heterosexual couples receive marriage licenses. The unions could then be CLEARANCE! Williams Birnberg & Andersen, L.L.P. Mitchell Katine Attorney at Law How can I. ke-lp ~ou? (713) 981-9595 or mkatine®wba-law.com 2000 DEVILLES, ESCALADES, CATERAS, SEVILLES HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 NEWS 11 Peter Harrigan (left) and Stan Bake, one of three same·sex couples who sued after they were denied marriage &censes, watched the Vermont legislature debate a 'civil union' bill that won final passage on Tuesday. certified by a judge, justice of the peace or clergy member. Gay couples in Vermont will ultimately receive all of the same benefits as married heterosexuals, including automatic inheri· lance rights, hospital visitation, the right to make medical decisions for a partner, the right to be treated as an economic unit for state tax purposes, the ability to obtain joint policies of insurance and joint credit and parenting rights Couples who split up and end their "civil union" called a "dissolution" in the new law, will h~ve rights similar to those in div0orce, including methods for equitable property division, child custody and support. "The law applies to private parties as well, and discrimination against parties to a civil union is considered both marital status and sexual orientation· discrimination," according to GLAD. But the state action has no effect on feder· al programs like Social Security benefits. Moreover, the federal government and 30 states now have laws denying recognition to same-sex marriages, and Alabama's attorney general said this week that his state's gay marriage ban would ban recog­nition of "civil unions," too. Gay rights advocates have vowed to file legal challenges against other states' refusal to recognize Vermont unions, citing the U.S. Constitution's guarantee to "full faith and credit" of each state's laws. Tire Assocmtcd Press and the Rutland Herald contributed to tlus report. Premier Paging and Wireless' PHONE· ACTfVATION • VOICE MAIL CALLER ID • FIRST INCOMING MINUTE TRUE PER-SECOND BILLING I You called • W• anlwered ; Houston's Trusted Name in Communications Preml r AGING & WIRELESS 281-575-8500 12220 Murphy Road • ..,.,ww.ca/lpremier.com What does a •civil union' look like? Some of the key benefits that would be offered to gay and lesbian couples under the ci\·il union bill passed by the Vermont legislature this week: • Property P;utners would be entitled to 1oint title, transfer from one to the other on death, and property transfer tax benefil~. • Adoption Civil union partners would be enlt· tied to all the protections and benefits available when adopting a child. Same· sex couples already are allowed under Vermont law to adopt, but the laws would reflect that those couples would be treated as spouses. • lnsur;ince State employees in civil unions would be treated as spouses for insur· ancc or continuing care contracts. • Hnlth cue Medical decisions that someone can now make for a spouse also could be made by those in a civil union. Hospital visitation and notification would be treated similarly. • Lawsuits Someone in a civil union would be able to sue for the wrongful death of a partner, the emotional distress caused by partner 's death or injury, and the loss ol consortium caused by death or in1ury. • Probate Probate law and procedures related to spouses would flow to civil union partners. • Abuse Parties to a cn•il union would quali· fy for \"Jrious abuse programs as spouses. • Discrimination Laws prohibiting discrimination based on marital status would apply to civil union couples. • Compens;ition Provisions in victims' compensation and workers' compensation related to spouses also would apply to civil union partners. •Testimony Partners in a civil union could not be compelled to testify against one another, just as spouses cannot be forced to do. • Definitions State laws that confer benefits or rights to people based on their manta! or family status-~uch as family landowner rights to hunt and fish or definihons of family farmers-would be broadened to recognize cl\'il unions. -Source· Associated Press Building futures. The return on some im·estmcnts is impossible to measure. • /AXA ADVISORS Building Fulures George Hawkins 777 Post Oak Blvd, Suite 150 713-402-6425 george.hawkins@axa-advisors.co111 12 NEWS APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Gay educators group forming in Houston - Continued from Page 1 group m 1994. There are now 85 local chap­ters around the country and the organiza­tion supports students who start gay­straight alliances in their schools. The number of gay-straight alliances has "exploded" m recent years, especially since college student Matthew Shepherd was murdered in 1998, in part for being gay, Kevm Jennings, GLSE.\l's founder and exec­utive director, recently told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Now, there are an estimated 700 GSAs around the country. Murray's effort has the support of GI.SEN, which will send its southern field organizer, Brenda Barron, to Houston in early June to talk with local organizers. Based in Atlanta, Barron's territory includes Texas. Barron said she will help guide the local community in starting the chapter. "Ultimately, it takes the people in the community to get the chapter started," Barron said. "It takes a strong grassroots vmce and grassroots organizing and seek­ing action using democracy as it should be used-voices heard for change." Without the whole community, she cau­tioned, it won't be effective. Once a chapter is in place, change is brought about ''by spreading the word and educating the community for the need to change the language in school policy," a 21ST CENTURY BIOTECHNOLOGY You may be practically immune to HIV-1: Order our simple at-home test for $ 79 .00 fOday. process that isn't quick, Barron said. "The efforts produce a much more open environment to get policies in place and training m place," she said. But efforts to start a GLSEN chapter in Houston already have the backing of some HISD officials. "We need an organization to work with the system to make the system more responsive," said Harne! Arvey, assistant superintendent for student services at HISD. "I would personally like to see a policy that does address bias regarding sexual orientation for students and teach­ers. By not having one, we are not sensi­tive to gay and lesbian administration staff, teachers and students." While HISD has worked with PFLAG to hold training sessions for counselors, the school district's record on gay and lesbian issues is spotty. HISD received an "F" from GLSEN in a 1998 report grading the nation's 42 largest school districts on how well they protect gay and lesbian students and educators. The report graded the school districts in six areas, including whether school policies protected students and staff from discrimi­nation and harassment based on sexual ori­entation, if staff training includes gay and lesbian issues, if curriculum is inclusive and whether gay-straight alliances are allowed. Houston joined San Antonio and 40 percent of the school systems in reporting a "no" in all six areas; Dallas earned a Discover your DNA with our fast & affordable Personal Genetic (610) 497 - 3594 21 CBiotech.com "B," m part for its wntten policies pro­tecting gay and lesbian students and staff and for the district's staff training, according to the report. Arvey, a supporter of PFLAG and the Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals, said that although HISD has group counseling, teacher sensitivity train­ing and language that is intended to protect all students, protection for gay children is not included. "It is not specifically spelled out," Arvey said. But Arvey said she was "personally offended" by the 1998 GLSEN report. "We have some of the most sensitive poli­cies toward AIDS and HIV. They are exem­plary. But I was really shocked the district does not have a specific policy that's gender related," she said. Terry Abbott, HISD's press secretary, said the school district has policies in place to protect "all students," though the policies don't specifically mention gay and lesbian students. Abbott said he disagreed with findings of the 1998 GLSEN report. But he said he was unfamiliar with efforts to organize a GLSEN chapter in Houston and refused to comment. Murray wants the metro Houston chapter to be diverse, she said. "I want everyone to feel welcome," Murray said. "They don't have to be gay or lesbian to be a part of the organization. I want it to be diverse organization building a coali­tion across the entire learning spectrum." Brenda Barron, GLSEN's southern field organizer, will come to Houston in early June to help bolster efforts to start a chapter of the national group here. Organizers planned their first meeting this week and are set to staff a booth at Resurrection MCC on April 30 and May 7 to recruit volunteers. GLSEN Houston glsenhouston@cs.com THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Poof/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 . (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • tovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 We make lots of decisions together. But some choices I make for me. Thafs why I use PROPECIA. PROPECIA is the first and only FDA-approved pill proven to treat male pattern hair loss on the vertex (top of the head) and anterior mid-scalp area in men. THE NUMBERS rie 1.!a is, fer '!10Sl 't1ef1, PROPECIA work~ The results iii 2 ye~ ol te5IIf1g <pe!k fer lh<mselves. • • ~ OUI cl 6 men kepi the amot.111 of ha~ they had (vs. 28'11> With a sugar pill) • 2 w cl 1 men grew bacl: somt cl lhttr lo'1 ha• (vs. 1'lb Wl!h a sugar poll) Most men reported an oncrea5e 111 !he arnounl cl hao a decrease" hair loss. and rnprovement ., appeMance And the vasr majOllly ol men on PROPECIA wer~ rated as rnproyed by docL'"" (llO';b vs. 47'1b With a s:igar :). •Based on Yeltel slUdies at 2 ~of men rs to 41 Wiii! mild ro moder~ half km. There IS no1 Mltnce lhal PROPECIA worts for r«Pding hairlines at !he lemples- THE MOST COMMON SIDE EFFECTS Ctinical ~$hawed PRQPE(IA was verv wrll roler.ned. Only a verv small number cl men had '°"" semal side effect;, with each occumng on less lhan 2'111 of men They rdJded less de5ire lor sex, ddlirufty 11 acheWlg an et.a.on. and a droea 11 lhe amounr of semen. \\1ien the.,,.,, ..tio had lhese side effect> stopped Llking PROf>ECIA. lhe ~ dtect> """""'I OMERO< IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION YOU SHOULD KNOW PROPECIA is for mtft only. Women..lloareormaypaential!ybe pregnant must nol .ise PROPECIA because ol the rl5k that !he adNf ll8Jedienl may cai:;e a~ bid cl brth defect (See accompany1ll8 Pa1lonl l'oduc! -'=1alion for delails ) liewtsc lhey Wl\jd IYOod hand'.:: !he 1abJets r.flel1 they're OUll1'd or broken. PROPEc.A l.Jhle!s are coated and will prevMI rontaa ~!he «INt ingredint during normal handling WHEN YOU COULD SEE RESULJS Take PROPEOA daily and you COIJd see~ in as little as lhree <nontlls. tt you stop 1.1<:ng II. OOwevei. )00! results will gradually go~ a...er!M!lve 'TIO!l!hs. And ii a hasn 1-'ced in IM!lve mon!hs, • IS unlikely to be ol 'ienefit For more onformabon, call l -888-806-J72S or VISll our wd>sile at www.propecia.com{lnfo. PROPECIA IS av.ii!able by prescnpoon only so IH best !hons to do is ulk to your doctor. !(now the faCls. Ma!l)' mei do which IS prtlbably why M!' .IO.!XXl presmp!JOOS fer PROP£CIA are filled e.idl weel .. Plea •ead the 'lfXI page fer addioonal llformaoon aboli PROPEOA. ---y~d.U.~ID • -IMS--~-... ,. Propem· (f~terili Helping make hair loss history" 13 14 Propec1a ·, (Finasteride) Tablets Patient Information about PROPECIA' (Pro-pee-sha l Generc name: finasteride tfm-AS-llJr-eyed) PROPECIA'" lslonsellyMEN ONLY PIM•'Ud ntletbltor•youmrthkagPROP£0A Also readdle~ ~11.ld.twilhPROPECIAHC'hDntfyou , ... ,ourptttCJ10DQfl.JUSI: 1ae~hNcbangtd.Renwmbe lhisl9tfttldoes1JOtQktthtpllctolc&refutdistUSllOftlwtlh JOUf' doctor You and ¥QUI' doctor sbo4lkl discuu OROP£C!A wlltn you ltlrt :aling 'fOLI" mechC9t)On and It te d'ltc.ktrPS-Whal IS PROPEQA-tor' PRO PE CIA is ....S tor lhe PROPECIA tor --ldltok•PllOPECIA' ---·INUUt!IOftl • 1'aka one tablet by mouth 11ch day • You moy 13kt PROP£CIA- 0t without t00d • Hvauforvol Dtak1PROPECIA.do1111111k11 -•t1blet.lusltablhenextt1ble11susual PROPEClA wf1 narwort faster or better t you take I mottd\an onct t dly APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Wllo-HQI "hPROPECIA' • P~PECIA IS for the treatment of male pattern h11110S1111 MEN ONLY ind should not bt taken by women ot children. • Anyone a arg1c to any ot lhe sngredients A WllllJltl lbowl PROPECIA 1nd pr19n1ncy • Wome• who art Of MtY polenhally be pr1gn1~ Must not •H PROPEClA -Id not handle cnishod 0< brok'" tablets al PROPECIA ti 1 WOMll who ii pregnanl wrdl 1 Nit baby absotbl dtt Kllvt ingred1lflt in PROPECIA. tither by sw1llowing or through dte 1lun.11 uy ClllM tbnorruhhn oft..,_ bliby·1 su OfllM. H 1 woman who 11 pr11111nt comes ntto coeltact with tM at;trwe iagrtdtellt • PROPEClA. a doctor should be censutrotl PRO PE CIA tablelS 1t1 coated lfMI w1ll prtvenl contact widt ... ""'"iagradianl ...... _, ........... provi<lld..., .... tablats ... not-.... - WW 111diepessit>l11ule offl<IS of PROPECIA' Likealpme: produc!s.PROP£C!Amayt1U11sideeHt<U.ln lllldies.1>d11ff1ctskom PROPECIAwore uncommonanddidnotaffectmostme Aam& 1M1tnberofmen1~1dc11"..a "x side-effects These en r Id one or more of the following less desue f0t sex; utry 1 hltwlQ 1 lflC:bOn: and 1 dee ease n the am crlseman ra thesesfdteffetts ed leuthan~?frnen Jhes111detftenwent1W1Ylftft18 who stopped PROPE A. Tboy1lsolf1S1Pllf• who PROP!~ gene "'°""""' toboulthese or 111'1 • PRO PE CIA can affect a ~lood tut aHH PSA C'Prntate-Spe< tc Atttigeal tor lhe scrHe111g et pro a.ta uncer. H rou Imo 1PSAIntt1ooe.yH-d1111 YG11' •actor dw yoo 111 r>lbsg PROP!~ Stot1110anOantlloot Kee;i PROPE A ng1 1 c er and keep the tamer 1 rt m 1 dry p a e al room emptra 1 PIOPECIA lablets .,, co1ted and will prevent contact wtdl tbt 1ctr"' htgred11nt dan•1 eo11111I handling. ,rov1d1d tti.1 tb1 tablets ire aot b«lkla or cnshtd Do not t your PROPECIA ~bltts to anyone else h hH bH presc d nty for yo Kffp PROPECIA 1 d 1 ed .a ns out of the a of ldren TH S LEAf. ET PROVIDES A S~MMARY Of NFORMAllDN ABOL PROPECIA f AfTER READING THIS UAF ET YOU HAVI: ANY QUE~IONS OR ARE NC S,RE ABC ANYTHING ASK YOUR OOCllR 1-11111-0l-7315.Mondoytllrorrglifnday.tlllAM. T01:(1JPM tm 1'qrsterld trtHmart o! UERCK a CO ._. . .....,,,.,.at11£11Ck6CO ... ........ edrt.tdetMrklf.tohrtloPllJiltwrMa Propec1a· ~~ (F1nastende) Tablets comacHle>L ,.., .. __ 0 MERCK & CO., INC., Wh tetoouse Station N.. 08889 uSA ~'""*'"' «IMl7111KIJJ)-PRP-C0N d says gay fans <an relate to her they'U have the <hanc• to do orms ill Houston her first Texas • I SIX years. HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME Comedienne Sandra Bernhard is, surprisingly, a modest person who doesn't relish celebrity status. But her new found mellowness doesn't affect her on stage raunch. by EARL DITIMAN What do you call a worn.in who 1s an actress, stand-up comedienne, novelist, recording artist, feminist, gay and a single mom? Critics have labeled her "brilliant and one of a kind"; some members of the gay commuruty pro­claim her their patron samt, leg10ns of devoted fans simply call her "divine" But Sandra Bernhard, the woman and the per­former, IS much more than all that. Her obvious t.ilents aside, she's an mcred1bly inteP gent, funny, sv.eet-natured and swpnsmgly modest 1.idy who IS fearless in her quest to speak out on the world's inJUShces. But don't say that to her face, because she'll set you straight ma New York minute 'Tm Just a loud, big-mouthed broad with an atbtudc and you're making me sound like Mother Tl'rcsa," the multi-talent-ed performer said 1okingly from her home m the Big Apple. "Do you want to know what to call me' How about a woman who has been givrn some really great chanc to haw herself heard through ertertauung people' Because that~ all I n'all} am and I'm gomg to keep domg 1t until peorlc get tired f me and tell me to shut up " l1lcre s little cham- of that any time sooo As her upcorrung ~ womamhow m Houston wilhhow, her ro ha\Ul'th.ld theirfill yet "I haven t been to Texas m about six years, I m glJd that people hJ\en't forgotten me," she said with d laugh. "I really have lo s.iy that I love fexas and the South I thmk it IS kinda true about what they say about the hosp1tahty of the South. I've Jlways felt that people go out of their way to make you feel at home down there." Bernhard ts one performer who doesn't buy into the notion that Southerners are culturally-challenged hillb11lies. "In fact, I trunk people from the South are probably more aware and more into the arts than a lot of the culture vultures from L.A or New York," Bernhard s.ud "When people want to > Continued on Page 19 L More than two-dozen gay Grammys were doled out to gay artists Monday during ceremonies that called attention to the growing influence of queer-tinged music by :vtARK J. HUISMAN NEW YORK--:Jn his program letter to the 4th A!Ulual Gay and Lesbian American Music Awards, which were held here on Monday, GLAMA co-founder and executive direc­tor Michael Mitchell urged fans to "be brave and explore new territory" by purchasing some new music. By supporting the work of artists both familiar and new, and for rewarding work in more categories than ever, the 2000 GLAMAs were indeed brave, even if thev occasional­ly treaded m familiar award< show territory. ' The 'how overcame early snafus-including traffic grid­lock caused by President Ointon's motorcade, who was in town for a fund-raiser. missing awards and technical glitch­es- but was hampered with no-show nominees. Of 26 GLAMAs awarded, eight w t!Ulcrs skipped the ceremony. Absentees included Suzanne \\estenhoefer, lellSSa Ethendge, Lee Lessack and The Butchies. lt was particular­ly d!Sappointing that four of the eight GLAMAs m new cat­egories were not picked up Gretchen Lee of Cu1ve Magazine (Music Reporting/CntJcsm), Susan Morabito (DJ), Indigo Girls and John Reynolds (Producer of the Year) and Hentges and Jude O'Nym (Song of the Year). The most graceful, elegant moment:; undoubtedly belonged to the cla:.,1cal and choral winners, including aa.. 1cal Performance GLAMA winner Then...""1 Bogard ("Alleluia In A Form ofTcx"t"ata"; Mu.~ic nf Louise Tahru; CR!}. 'Tm from l..iramine, Wyoming," said the dearly choked-up Bogard, who teache5 at the Unim'Sity of Wyommg. "And if I can be out and you can be out, we should all be able to be out." ;..- Continued on Page 17 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE SOCIETY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS --- Bringing the Worlds Best to Houston presents David Campbell Cabaret Stamng in off-Broadway's premiere of Sondheim's Saturday Night, 26-year-old David Campbell is an exc1bng young talent With an ever-versatile tenor, this Australian heart-throb is captivating Hear such favorites as Bndge Over Troubled Water, I Got Rhythm, Old Devil Moon, and more Catch a rising star ... Friday, May Sth Seating on Jones Hall Stage 7:00 pm & 9:30 pm www.ticketmaster.com <t~ AESTA • FDL£Y'S ·KROGER 713-ll7-4SPA ~8.-n:M ........ "'" -· ~ Bank o f M ontreal AMERICAN Contlne n u l IGE'.'llERAL flt~,\NCli\I , GRO Ai rline~ On Stage Melody on a lost path by D.L. GROOVER If you think you can't teach an old dog new tricks, think again. Carlisle Floyd, American opera's grand old man, has created COLD SASSY TREE, unveiled earlier this month at Houston Grand Opera in a most lyrical production. Aside from the physical beauty of the sets and costumes, whose realism could rival any Belasco presenta· tion from the tum of last century, Floyd has decided to shun the melodic and embrace the ultra-modem. Bad dog. No longer does he charm us with melody as in "Susannah," his one opera ~ for which he will be remembered, nor - enmesh us with drama and sigmficance as © in "Of Mice and Men" or "Willie Stark." !;; Instead he bows to the contemporary ~ and creates a jagged, dissonant score to a ~ piece of fairly tame passion where the ~ most conflict seems to stem from whether ii the house gets indoor plumbing. Taking a slice of rural Americana from the corn·pone novel of Olive Ann Burns, Floyd has fashioned a bland opera It is filled with all the sappy virtues of "The Waltons" and even an unintentional whiff of "The Music Man," although without its gift for music or sanctimo· nious parody. There's not a tune to be heard all evening except for the e\•angelical Doxology ("Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow"). Tensions rise and dra· matic situations occur throughout the evening, but not once do the characters really sing For a few bars they get close to a sustained melodic line, but Floyd. m his curmudgeon mood, pulls back and withholds pleasure. It's no wonder people don't respond to contemporary operas; there's nothing in them to wrap your ears around. It's diffi· cult to think of any recent work you'd want to sit through again. Directed in unobtrusive style by Bruce Beresford, "Cold Sassy" moves cinemati· cally and is performed without a false note, even 1 f they are ill served by Floyd's music. Last seen m a m•eting performance in "Mefistofele," Patricia Racette brings her dramatic gifts and voice to the role of Love Simpson. She is the young woman who mames the much older general store owner ma "business arrangement" that sets the tongues of the small town of Cold Sassy Tree wagging in disapproval. As Rucker Lattimore, Dean Peterson rounds out his idiosyncratic, cantanker· ous character with gently evolving shades of tenderness and wraps hb lus· CJous bass baritone around Floyd's zigzag tunes with more love than this music deserves. As narrator and John-Boy stand-in, Will Tweedy, who wants to be a writer Composer Carlisle Floyd was in Houston earlier this month during rehearsals of his ' Cold Sassy Tree,' his latest and perhaps final opera. and falls in love with a girl from the wrong side of the tracks, John McVeigh's tenor fills the house with dramatic insight and brings his character an ingra· tiating goodness. Margaret Lloyd, as Lightfoot McClendon, the mill worker who longs for "learning," sings and acts gloriously, although_ all her arias are way too brief and musically sketchy to be truly affecting. Although this subplot of mismatched lovers could take the story to a higher realm, Floyd, writing as his own dr.ima· tist, loses interest in them and settles their conflict too easily. The situations in this small rural Georgia town get settled with low-key concern, even the dram.itic confessions of childhood rape or the problem of segregation. It's the fault of the music, because everything sounds the same. Hypocrisy is given the same tonal value as young love; playing checkers on the front porch sounds just like attempted murder. The story can't possibly move us because the music goes nowhere. Floyd is notorious for tinkering with his work, having edited "Jonathon Wade" for 25 years after its premiere, until he finally scuttled the original book and music almost entirely. Perhaps mspi· ration will strike with "Cold Sassy Tree," and instead of new tricks, he'll revert to the old one: melody as the path to drama. Cold Sassy Tree Houston Grand Opera Wort ham Theater Center Through May 6 713·227-ARTS wwwhoustongrandopera.org HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 - Continued from Page 15 As Kristina Boerger accepted her Contemporary Classical Composer CL.AMA ("Dream of· Snow Covered Bridges," Amasong, AMAJ/ Amasong), she was re;plendent in black tuxedo tails, starched white ·shirt and bright baby blue bow tie. And the evening's first genuine surprise occurred moments later when presenter Kate Chnton announced the Choral GLAMA, which tied and went to Boerger for her sec­ond award, and to Dallas-based Turtle Creek Chorale for "In This Heart of Mine" (The Best of Turtle Creek Chorale; TCC). Two GLAMAs helped point out how forcibly queer music is forcing the major labels to re-write industry rules. After rocking the crowd with her winning track, Joi Cardwell won the Dance Music GLAMA for "Last Chance for Love," from her album Deliverance (Nomad Records), which was produced by her own label. "This means so much to me because Deliverance is my first album on my very own label," Cardwell said. ''J'm free from the record companies." GAYBC Radio's Charlie Dyer won the first-ever GLAMA for Live Radio Broadcast. "The GLAMAs are about music, not about radio," Dyer said. 'Thanks for supporting us because we don't exist without you." Christian Andreason took the nod for OUT ON THE BAYOU For a list of GLAMA winners, visit www.houstonvoice.com Contemporary Spiritual Music, a new category. 17 "When the subject of spirituality came up, papers started rustling, conversations began and people got up to get drinks," Andreason said. "But everyone in this room, whether you write or sing music or listen to it, does so from a place of spiritual honesty." In a perfect sign of queer serendipity, GLAMA's two special honorees, jazz pianist Fred Hersch and singer/songwnter Meshell Ndgeocello, were each honored beyond those prizes. Hersch earned a standing ovation while accepting the Michael Callen Medal, awarded to an indi­vidual, group, organization or business committed to furthering gay music and whose spirit embodies that of the late activist and musician. GLAMA co-founders Michael Mitchell (left) and Tom McCormick added several new categories to the annual gay music awards, which-despite some minor glitches-showed the growing influence of queer music. Revealing their similar background­Callen was raised in Cincinnati, Hersch a half an hour away-Hersch recalled meet­ing and working with Callen on the land­mark album Legacy. Hersch also collected the Male Artist GLAMA, for "Fred Hersch Live at Jordan Hall: Let Yourself Go." Meshell Ndgeocello received the evening's second standing ovation while accepting GLAMA's Outmusic Award, pre­sented to a recording artist, group or musi­cian who has advanced gay music through their work as an out musician. "Jt's really hard to come here and see that I'm only one of a handful of people of color. I just wish we could all love each other. Just love each other," Ndgeocello said. "Thank you so much for this. It inspires me to keep working, to go back to my label and push the envelope a little bit more." In an interview after the awards ceremo­ny, Ndgeocello laughed at her statements about pushing her music label-it is, after all, owned by Madonna. "You can always push the envelope a lit- Propec1a® (f inasteride) Ask your doctor about this pill from Merck. For more information, call 1·888-MERCK· 74. www.propecia.com tie more," Ndgeocello said. "I think my next thing to do is to impregnate Madonna. Maybe I can get some, you know, some­thing real happening that way." But the three-time GLAMA winner also reiterated her belief that the gay communi­ty has racial barriers to break down. "The community is so racially diverse, so economically diverse, so artistically diverse. Jt's just really difficult. Because I deal with that in my every day life. I even remember going to coming out meetings in New York and there was racism then. There is racism in the gay community today. But we can fix that. We can all broaden our minds. We really can all love each other. We at least have to try," Ndgeocello said. 18 Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Our Reputation is built on OUR MEMBERS! AJ) ITTrrnesG \@)XCJ~ Voted #1 in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 Let us show you how 01:1r program will work for you! londay to Friday 5 am - 10 pm 'aturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm NEWS APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Health Briefs For more news coverage: www.houstonvoice.com Tuberculosis outbreak among transgendered leads to CDC warning ATLANTA (AP)-A tuberculosis outbreak among transgender people living in Baltimore and :-\ew York City may be spreading, the government said April 20. The COC confirmed 26 active cases and 37 dormant cases of tuberculosis, most of them connected to transgen­der people in the two cities. The COC uses the term "transgender" to encompasses cross­dressers, those who have undergone sex-change procedures and individuals who are plan­ning to undergo sex-change operations. All of the cases in Baltimore were men, except for four women who were either family members of the men or health care workers who treat­ed them. The government said 62 percent of the tuberculosis patients tested positive for HIV, making them especially susceptible to TB. "Frequent travel and social network links identified among the Baltimore and NYC cases have raised concern that this strain ... may be circulating in other cities among young, mobile transgender persons with HIV infection," the COC said in a report. The COC is checking for additional cases linked to the same strain in Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, New York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. European health agency issues warning on AIDS drug Viramune BRUSSEL.5-The European Medicines Evaluation Agency has issued a warning about use of the AIDS drug Viramune, following reports of potentially fatal side effects, Reuters news service reported April 19. The European Union's drug administration said in an April 12 statement that patients and doctors must take special care in the first eight weeks of using Viramune, also called nevirapine. The EMEA said that some users.of the drug had suffered severe skin and liver reactions and some had died It said patients with a history of skin and liver complaints should not use Viramune. South Africa recently halted trials of another AIDS drug being administered in combination with nevirapine following the deaths of five women in one trial. On-line survey finds depression to be gays' top health concern NEW YORK-Depression tops the list of health concerns for lesbian and gay men, according to a health survey released by Gayflealth.com. The survey ranked depression as the top health concern, even surpassing HIV, for both lesbians (35 percent of those surveyed) and gay men (32 percent of those surveyed). Compared with a similar study among hetero­sexuals, gay men and lesbians are twice as likely than their heterosexual counterparts to be concerned about depression. The rest of the top five for gay men include prostate and tes­ticular problems, HIV, sexually transmitted disease, and hepatitis; for lesbians, breast can­cer, cervical cancer, menstrual pain and estrogen replacement followed depression as major health concerns. GayHealth.com is a new web-site devoted exclusively to gay health issues, and operated by gay medical professionals. The survey was used to launch the site April 15. Health officials use lowrider car to bring AIDS message to Latinos SACRAMENTO (AP)-The Cahforma · Dcpartr:nent of f.lealth Services 1s sending a customized lownder car across the state as a "moving billboord" to teach Latino youths about s.ife sex and AIDS. A Modl-..;to car club added hand-painted AIDS prevention murals and slogans in Spanish and English to the sides of the 1953 Chevy Bel Air. The vehicle also features special hydraulics, chrome rims, a sound system and upholstery. Latinos account for nearly a third of new AIDS cases in California, state officials said. California Director of Health Diana Bonta said the lowrider will travel to cultural events and car shows for the next 18 months m ,1n attempt to A hand-painted lowrider car similar to this one is being used to help educate Latino youths in Cafifornia about safe sex and AIDS. reach out to Latino youths. It was unveiled April 17 m Los Angeles by Bonta, Latma talk show host Cristina Sarlegui of Univision, and Ricardo Gonzalez, publisher of Lowrrder Magazine. Its first official stop will be April 30 at Sacramento's Festival de la Familia. High-fiber diet does not reduce colon cancer risk, studies say ATlAl\1TA-A high-fiber diet does not prevent the polyps that can lead to colort'Ct,11 cancer, according to two large studies published in this week's New Engl.lnd Journal of Ml•dicme, G'\N reported Each year 1~0,000 Americans arc diagnosed with colorectal can­cer, and 56,000 die from the disease Previous rese.1rch st~ggcsted a high·fibl·r diet could reduce .1 person's nsk of colorectal canCl'r, but those studies did not directly me,1sure the anti-cancer effects of a high-fiber diet. "There may be many rt•asons toe.it .i diet that is low m fat and high m fiber, fruits, and vegetables or to supplement the diet with a food high in cereal fiber, but preventing colorectal adenomas, at least for the first three to four years is not one of them," said Dr. Tim Byers of the University of Colorado School of ~ledicm; Ill an accompanying editorial. The study authors did express concern that the thm.~year study may have not been long enough to sec a difference m polyp development. -From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 Stand-up GIRL >-- Continued from page 15 know something, they find out about it. Maybe the culture is not always as easily accessible in certain parts of the South, but when people want to know, they know." And for the multi-faceted artist, much of that support comes from the gay comm uni· ty-a fact not lost on Bernhard. "I think because of my specification and my openness, I'm the kind of performer that the gay community can relate to," she said. "My own sexuality aside, I just think that on the surface, I'm iust somebody that has that kmd of sensibility. I'm open and not ashamed of it and gay audiences appreciate that. They, probably more than anyone else, can dig what I'm saying and appreciate me going out on a limb during my show." In typic,11 Bernhard fashion, 'Tm Still Herc .. Damn lt1" will be packed with a number of new surprises. "It's kind of a hybrid of 'I'm Still Herc' and the stuff l'\'e been domg on the road since," she said "It's the bulk of the origi· nal show, but it's abo a lot of new stuff, things that I continue to add. Like me, the show's continually e\'olving. It's really a cross-section of cultural examination and my emotional/spiritual Journeys all intcr­WO\' en around music and singing." While admitting that giving birth to daughter Cicely Yasin in 1998 has mel­lowed her personally, motherhood has done little to tone down her raunchy yet heartfelt ranting and ravings about contem­porary life on stage. Bernhard refuses to artistically muzzle her views. "I've never had a single regret about any· thing I've said on or off the stage," she said. "Because more than anything, I think that it has done good things for me and good things for people who needed to hear it. I think that if you are forthright and coming from your heart, people who maybe inhib­ited, a little intimidated or afraid to express themselves get inspired by that. It gives them an opportunity to gain their footing." From her recurring role on the hit sitcom "Roseanne," as lesbian character Nancy from 1991 to 199b, to her recent cameo a~ a gay actress on "The Sopranos," Bernhard has repeatedly ignored common I lollywood wisdom that taking on gay rob c.:in damage a career. While gay fans applaud the work, Bernhard has never seen these actions as particularly noble. "While I was doing 'Roseanne,' I never thought that it w.:is so brave or so important," she said. "I just thought that it was a fun char­acter. But if it affected people in a good way, then that was fantastic. I just never looked at it like I was doing something heroic." Shll. Bernhard is considered by some to be a role model, but it's not a role in life she set out to secure. "I never purposefully thought to myself, 'Hey, I want to be a role model,'" she said. "I iust think I am one because I do what I love and I have a great time doing it. l know that I am affecting people, but I'm not setting out to. I'm not a lecturer. I'm not someone out there going, 'Listen to me, because I'm the truth-teller. I'm going to break ground!' I A fresh approach for restoring the skin you ore born with. Available NOW for men and women. SPECTACULAR RESULTS! • improve skin tone, clarity, elasticity • effectively treats fine lines, wrinkles, sun damage, acne scarring and hyperpigmentation ASK ABOUT OUR TRANSDERMAL HAIR REMOVAL PROCESS '4".rp~n_w --W- 3843 N. Braeswood 713-669-0466 TRANSDERMAL HAIR RESTORATION All natural transdermal skin and transdermal lace technology WE SERVICE AND REPAIR ALL 1YPES OF HAIR SYSTEMS, WHILE YOU WAIT. Fun SERVICE, $30 just march forward and do my work" Even with her celebrity status, Bernhard doesn't see herself as a star. "You'd be surprised how I live my life. I don't really live it like that. I'm kind of out on the streets, doing my thing-like going to the dry cleaners. I do things that are not typical of somebody who thinks they are a celebrity," she said. "I just think that things are going to happen because they are sup· posed to happen, not because I'm a star "That whole celebrity thing is really just a state of mind,'' Bernhard said. " And I 1ust think that it is a boring one I think It's kind of sad for somebody to have to get up every morning and realize that their whole hfc is about them bemg famous. I thlnk that it is deadenmg. I really do." Bernhard speaks from expenence, hav­ing spent a great deal of time with former pal Madonna while the Material Girl was scaling the ladder to superstardom. "I had a chance to see what that crap can do to you, so I don't think that she has that much of a fun life, at least not in my opin­ion," Bernhard s.1id "I wouldn't want to be followed around by paparazzi and ha\'e my every mo\'e morutored I think that would be hell on earth. Can you think of anyone who would find that rewarding?" But that could change if Bernhard's act· ing career continues on it's upward spiral. With "Dinner Rush," she's just added another entry onto her resume of perform­ances m films like "Track 29," "Lover Girl," "King Of Comedy" and "Hudson Hawk." The project that could put Bernhard's radiant visage in front of millions of Americans on a weekly basis is a top secret /J t/r,iJ ... television show, which reportedly could ha\'e her playing another lesbian character. "I just wrote a TV thing fer me to star in, and we are pitching it at different places," she said. "It's a comedy, but I don't want to JinX it by talking about it too much. All I will say is that it's a pretty eclectic piece that should definitely get people's attention." Until a deal is finalized, Bernhard will be keeping herself \'ery busy. She's working on another album, writing another book, audi­tionmg for more film roles and spending as much time as she can performing for chari· ties benefiting gay and AIDS-related causes. As for more 11\'e performances, don't expect a full-flcdgt.'CI tour anytime soon. "I think I'm too old to live that rock 'n' roll style, so 111 probably just keep to doing these weekend gigs,'' the 44-ycar-old said with a laugh. "I ha\'e a lot of responsibili­ties at home now, so I like to bt> there as much as I can. Doing these shows are like nicl' little weekend vacations for me. I ha\'e fun doing them and hopefully so do the people who come see me 'Tm a happy gal at this point in my hfc, and I'm doing the things that I want to do," she added. Sandra Bernhard Mays. 7 p.m. Aerial Theatre Tickets are S36 25-S76.25 713-629-3700 tke 1lutf6 yvu 're ih.7 /J if clw 1/uy:~e yvu Na h-6.J MUSCLE MECHANICS"" PKRSONA L. TRAINING STUDIO 713.523.5330 •Y AP'P'OINTMll: N T. CALL N O W . 617 'R1ch"'ond .Aven"e in Montrose +WESTBURY GARDENS CONDOS 2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath. 2-Story Townhouse with private patio and assigned covered parking. $38,000 2 Bedroom. 1 Bath, Spacious Upstairs Flat. very Good Condition $29 000 For more mformslion. please call after Tuesday, Apnl 2 5, 2000 All units ire In 1 chinning old·world •tmosphere with an over-sized pool on the complex 713. 729.9316 Call Lyn for an appointment (On-Sole Agent) Real Estate Call Marshall Rainwater at 713-529-8490 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU Out In Print BOOK NEWS Memoirs of a philosophizing hustler by JS. HALL Like many a young man before him, Rick Whitaker left his home m the Midwest for the bright lights of New York City. But unlike many of those hypotheti­cal young men, Whitaker's journey took darker and more twisted directions, as a series of mISfortunes led him to hustling. ASSUMING THE POSITIO:-.; chroni­cles his descent into this netherworld and eventual emergence to the path of recovery. In many respects, Whitaker dif­fered from the stereotypical hustler. A college dropout who had studied philos­ophy, he wrote book reviews and a novel, proofread manuscnpts and dab­bled m classical music. But then jobs started falling through, the novel kept getting rejected, and his boyfnend Tom broke up with him Wh:rt began as a one-time act of getting back at his ex soon escalated into a full-time 1ob; Whitaker's drug use increased. While some might .irguc that he was debasing himself, the author contends that "hustlmg, at least at the lime I began doing 1t full time, seemed more hke an effective way to earn money than a spiritual or moral dilemma." Indeed, he sees nothing wrong with scott kennedy 'Assuming the Position: A Memoir of Hustling' By Fl ck Whitaker Four Walls Eight W1ndO'M, hardcover, 192 pages. SIS paying money for good sex, any more than exchanging money for a sumptuous meal or to sec a favorite performer in concert. True, he could earn in a few hours what others would earn in a week, but hts expensive drug addiction-which dead­ened his emohons so he could continue hustling-ate all the profit and left him back at the beginning of an increasingly vicious cycle. To some, the idea of hustling holds a certain sleazy glamour; "Assuming the Position" pops this bubble with cool, semi­detached prose Whitaker insists he didn't set out to de-glamonze the "profession," but you can't help being simultaneously repelled yet morbidly fascinated by some of his Iess-than-sa\•ory encounters. Most involved older, far-from-attrac­tive men with unpleasant habits-like a coked-up doctor; a psychologist who ought to have seen a shrink himself; a suc­cessful lawyer with serious self-esteem issues; and a computer geek with a pen-bob smith SUNDAY, MAY 7 • 8PM / )> V> V> c:: 3 :.-,:,r '"O 0 "' Rick Whitaker chant for oversized dildos. But Whitaker makes an important point that every man somewhere, somehow has some erohc characteristic about him, and only by focusing on that element was he able to complete some of his transactions. The product of a broken home, Whitaker partially attributes hb hustling as a way of reaching out to his ;1bsent father, which makes more sense in the book than it might in thL~ review, and as a way of both feeling something intense and losing himself at the some time He quotes liberally from Freud, 1ietzsche, Thoreau, Leonard Woolf and Wittgenstein, using their words to illus­trate some of his particular, peculiar sit­uations. The chapters alternate with entries from his journals of the time, which reflect his often strung out, depressed state of mind. He freely admits that the spiral of his life "felt good-even the going downward, especially the going downward. It was relaxing and easy." But now that he's sober and no longer hustling, he still doesn't play what-if games. "It was an interesting expencnce," he wntes, "but not, in itself, nearly so inter­esting as hfc 1s for me now .... "Prostitution is inelegant, a11d I have always wa11ted to be an example of a cer­tam kind of rlegancc, .. [the kind] result­ing from the undistractcd observation of one's own vigorous thinking Thoughtlessness IS the cnme-or the sm­that comes before all others, and hustling requires it," Whitaker concludes. Those seeking a sexy account of hus­thng encounters are advised to look else­where But readers interested in an oddly compelling, ph1losophically-flavorcd exploration of a dark descent and ultimate escape would do well to pick up "Assuming the Pos1hon." APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE What yo!'r neighbors are reading . . . 1 Mr. Right is Out There by Kenneth George, $13.95 2 Get Happy: The Life of Judy Garland by Gerald Clarke, $29.95 3 National Nancys by rred Hunter, $22.95 4 Cat on the Scent by Rita Mae Brown, $6.99 5 Shy Girl by Elizabeth Stark, $22 6 Fabulous Hell by Craig Curtis, $12.95 7 The Operator: David Geffen Builds, Buys and Sells the New Hollywood by Tom King, $25.95 8 Rough Stuff by Simon Sheppard, $13.95 9 Fresh Flesh by Stella Duffy, $15 10 Married Women Who Love Women by Carron Strock, $12 95 Crossroads Market BOOKSTORE & CAFE 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 Built to Survive by Michael Mooney and Nelson Verge! 2 Original Story By by Arthur Laurents, $30 3 Get Happy: The Life of Judy Garland by Gerald Clarke, $29.95 4 Rooneys Shorts by William Rooney, $14.95 5 The Cruelty of Science by Sebastian Beaumont, $12.95 6 Gay Adult Video Star Directory by Balle Wayne, $18.95 7 All About' All About Eve' by Sam Staggs, $24.95 8 Boys Across the Street by Rick Sanford, $24 9 Something to Tell You by Gilbert Herdt and Bruce Koff, $22 95 10 Golden Men: Gay MJn's Guide to Midlife by Harold Kooden, $14 w;~' 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEWS For Auto, Home & Health £~~ng dish~~~~~b.?~! l•ffeey I Your Community Insurance Agency! The raves about CAFE BEIGNET, a block outside of the Galleria between 5.1ge and Yorktown, made ml' picture an upscale coffee shop with an emphasis on pastries. While the sea of cars parked in front doe-n't mesh with its sclf-aimparison to a Pan..,ian cafe, Cafe Bcignet is as close as we'll get m Houston. The slick cherry wood furniture and bold paintings ms1de present a stylish, yet unpl'l'­tentious interior. What's not visible 1s the upstairs bakery, where staff arrives at 3 a.m. to mix, knead and punch until the downstairs counter is fully stoch>d with everything from breads and muffins to pastries. The complimentary breads, served in chic wire baskets, help lure you to the bakery counter on your way out. The fresh multi­grained bread was wholesome, and the com bread moist enough to avoid crumbling when spread with pesto. I loved the idea of pesto as dipping sauce. With just a dollop on a small saucer, the olive oil drams to the edge of thl' dish, leaving the thick, spicy mixture of nub, cheese and basil in the ccn­trr, satisfying both those who prefer to dunk thcir breads in a lightly flavored oil and those who prefer to slather away. The rich Tomato Soup ($3.75) is simply sublime. Served in a sun-dried tomato bread bowl, the salmon-colored base is flecked with black pepper and topped \1rith a few strands of basil. The cream and pepper contribute as much flavor as do the tomatoes, and the· bread offsets the somewhat fiery bite. For iJ;.iosc who prefer less filling soup, the Duck Cafe Beignet 5381 Westheimer 713-626-9664 Food: ~ S':i S S':iS':i service: ~~~S~ Value: ~<t>~SJ Scene: 8' 8' SJ t) t Opt for bread, water at home ~ t, Worth the drive, so Ii~ a little with minuscule carrots and zucchini cubes. While simple, the Cafe Salad ($3.75) fea­tures ripe tomatoes and lettuces coated with a carefully balanced balsamic vinaigrette. The attention and quality given to each dish 1s impressive, but what really allows Cafe Beignet to stand out is the astonishing number of original, daring dishes. The sep­arate brunch, breakfast, lunch and dinner menus overlap only slightly-and all menus offer an array of pastas, crepes, appetizers and entrees. The Smoked Trout Ravioli ($9) exemplifies the Cafe' s practice of transforming familiar ingredients and dishes into something worth raving about. A mamy mixture of smoked fish and marscapone cheese fills each tender pasta disc. The deliciously gamey aftertaste of the fish kicks in beautifully against the ten­der texture of the pasta, but hardly overpowers the Marinara. The Almond Crusted Chilean Sea Bas.s ($17.95) is more typical of the entree list. The serv­ing of seared fish, large and thick as a copy of "War and Peace," remains flaky and savory throughout. Served on a bed of artichoke hearts and stewl'<i tomatoes, and topped with toasted almonds and asparagus, the entire dish retams the flavor of each of its parts. Although the "Continental Fusion" descrip­tor is e\ ident with dishes like 9lri.mp and Artichoke Martini ($8.75), Grilled Salmon Fillet and Black Pepper Fettucrini ($16.95), Wild Mushroom Risotto ($15.95) and Mediterranean Grilll'<i Chicken ($11.50), Cafe Beignet offers more than a ·wink to our local coast. The Gulf Bouillabaisse ($16.95; $9 for lunch portion) offers a treasure chest of shrimp, crawfish, scallops and Andouille sausage. The dark saffron broth delicately steams each :;eafood piece, and the sausages sizzle in the tangy tomato-in{u.5(.>d oils. The less successful Crawfish and 5.1ffron Gnocchi ($6.50) coats its seafood With a deli­cious lobster-tomato sauce, but the chewy tex­ture and bland flavor fall short of other, more exquisite dishes. Speaking of the Gulf's culinary gifts, be1gnets play a greater role than a mere b.ikery item. The Crawfish Beignets ($15) consist of sauteed bell peppers and cucum· bcr wmoulade. The Artichoke Beignet ($13), stuffed with olives, feta cheese and ht•rbs, gives a Mediterranean twist to this New Orll'ans staple. The sm·crs arc friendly and knowledgl'­able, and it's not unusual to see the proud and h<*p1t.ible owner pouring coffee and replen­ishing bread baskeb as he welcomes cus­tomers. The location defmitely draws the Gallena area shcppcrs and residents, but Montrose natives would do well to venture out to experience the superb dishes. ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Buslne.ss l:uurancr • l\orA:rr.s Comprnsallon Group llralth • LI/~ lnsurancr &· much morr 6575 l'U.oop Sout/r, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 Cefe6rating 25 Years in tfie Communit}j Saturaays at 7:30pm 1307-Jf 'Yafe • 713-880-2872 to sign up for a weekly email preview, send your address to editor@houstonvoice.com visit us on-fine today art www.houstonvoice.com 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) Services Start Sundays at 6:30pm April 30 Rev. Carl Tell, Guest Pastor "God Sees You As God Has Called You, Not As You See Yo11rself' • Speaal time for Prayer and Healing m tlus service • Come and receive a blessing "Circle of Chairs" A new recovery support group, is being held at 5pm in the Blue Room of the Educational Butlding. ChristJan support for every addiction. Everyone is welcome. .... Bible Study begins at 5:30pm and nursery is available. Mid-week •Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more info ••• 713-528-6756 or maranatha@e-v1.net Baly,Mind &Spirit NOT YOUR BASIC STORE! Unique Clubwear & Undergear *For Men & Women• Leather, Lubricants Adult Toys - Gifts r:------ -, 125% Off Sale1 I Mens Club Shirts I Ladles Dresses L.---- - ---' ~As 1207 Your New L.!J 'J "tui!h§I Alternative Store '"Don't Miss this Once a Year Sale" 713-944-6010 E-Mail: erasl207@bobnaiLcom l!l7 Sl'ENCl!K • AU.£'11 GENOA. S...O. 1"""1<.._ TX 77 E.l•C..lfFft:c• •J&1 Nrport/Cclloic. nco C;all 2 M1b 0ncn IO :nn . M>dn lu • M21I Ordon - 1M ~~~ Maranatha ~lf . ~f Fellowship lfetropolltan Community Church ·A~--'*'ll•~Ood. ' !Michael A. Bartfey M.o: P.A~ " Your Near-Town Psychiatr ist" General psychiatnc·.~valuabons • ApPropnate medication management • Cash tra'1$action receipt provided for insurance purposes • Medicare also accepted • Confidentiahty stnctty respected • Se hab!a Espallol 500 Lovett Suite # 275 Houston, Tx 77006 713. 521.3334 if your hair isn't BECOMING to you, you should BE COMING to me. DON Gill STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 MASSAGE IT'S A PLEASURE Roland iu1rnsm 713-942-2399 Ce11trall.11 Localed •7 Days/Evenings• ttsalMC Outcal/s Kr.Jcome Call Marshall Rainwater at 713-529-8490 community calendar saturday, a pril 29 Alter Hours KPFT 90.1 FM. 12 a .m. to 3 a.m. 713·526· 5738 Q·Patrol walks the str••ts 9,4s p.m. 713-528·SAF£. D19n1ty mass. 7:30 p .m. for gay Catholics. 713-880· 2872 St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary 8 a.m. 1805 W. Alabama. 713·528-6665. Houston Chain Gang 81cycle Club. 7'3·863·1860. Rainbow Foshong Club. 713·526·7070. Northwoods AIDS Coallt1on food Pantry Southwest C•nter 281 ·633-2S55 & Conroe 936•41 1614 10 a.m. to 2 pm. Houston lesbian and Gay drop 1n hours from noon to 4 p.m. 713·524 3818. Mo ntrose Writer's PrOJtct. 3 to 4 30 p rn. • Ray Hill and love• benefit performance 7 30 pm. 803 H•wthorne. 713·956· 1866. sunday, april 30 New Hope Chriman Center Worship Stl\11Ct 11 a.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713·524·3818. Houston Area Teen CoalJt1on of Homosexuals meeu. 713.942.1002 Rainbow Ride rs. A bicycle club for women. 713·869. 1686. St Stephen's Episcopal Church Holy Rote Eucharist I 7;45 a .m.; Holy Rite Eucharist II 8;55 a .m.; Education hour 10 a .m.; Choral Eucharist 11 a m. 113·528·6665. M"anatha FeJlowsh1p Metropolitan Church. 6:30 p.m. 113·S28·6756. Resurrection MCC. Services. 9 a m and 11 a.m. H•ndbell Choir reh .. rsal 1:30 p.m. 713·861·9149. Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9:00 am. Service 10:30 a .m. 713-528-3269. Community Gospel. Service at 11 a .m. & 7 p.m. Sunday School for children. 713·880·9235 or www community· gosp•l.org. Houston Mission Church. Service 10:30 a.m. 713-529· 822S. Covenant Baptist Church. Service 9.30 a.m. & educat jon hour 11 • m. 713·668-8830. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Services at 8:30 • m. & 10,50 a.m. Sund•y school 9 4S a .m. 713- 526-1017 Th• Women's Group. 10,4S a.m. 713·529-8S71. Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St . S•rvoce 10,30 • .m. 409·765-8330. First Congregational Church (Memorial). Service at 11 am. Christian Education. 1 L30 p.m. 713--468-9543 or fcc-houston.org. Un1taoan Fellowship of Hou\ton. Adult forum 10 a.m. Servic• 11 a .m. 713·686·5876. Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation: Adult discussion 9:45 a .m. Service 11 a.m. 281-277-8882. www.h1uc.org Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m.- Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713 692·2703. PFLAG Houston. 2 p.m. 7•3·867·9020. monday, may 1 Berong Support Network. 7 p.m. 713-526-1017 Frost Eye Chnic. Free eye exams for p"ople with HIV. 713·830-3000. HIV testing Free from AVES from 1 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. 713·626·2837. FrontRunn•rs. 6:30 p.m. 713·522-ll021 Kolb• Pro1ect Euchari1t 7-30 p.m. 713·861 · 1800. Northwoods AIDS Coaltt1on Food Pantry opef\. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936-441-1614. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center- 713-692·2703 STD hams & tr•atment. Free. AVES. 713-626·2837 gayOAR. Wellness community. 7 p .m. 713·526-1017 X211 • Houston lesbian and Gay Community d rop·tn hours from 6 to 9 p.m. Black lesbian & G.iy Coalition weekly m••t<ng 7 p.m 713·524·3818. tuesday, may 2 Gay Men HIV+ Psychotherapy. Montrose Counseling Center. 4,30 p.m. 713·529·0037. Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center 6 p.m. 713·529 0037 PROTECT. An HIV·negatove support group 7 p.m. 713. 526·1017. Women Survivors of Childhood Abuse. Montrose Couns•long Center 6:30 p.m. 713·529·0037 Bering Support Network. lunch Bunch Gang 11 a .m. 713-S26·1017 Gay Men's Process Group . 7 p.m. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713~ 526·8390. Men's Network. Discussion group for social. educ,\t10n· al development of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Northwoods AIDS Coa l1t1on Food Pantry open. 10 a .m. to 6 p.m. 281 633·255S. Lambda Skating Club skates at 8 p.m. Tradewinds. 713- 410-7215. Houston Lesbian a nd Gay Community Ce nter drop-in hours 6 to 9 p.m. l esbian Commg Out Group meets 7 p.m. lubians Island Young Women's Group meets 7 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713·528·3818. INNOVATIVE • ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO MEDIATION/CONFLICT RESOLUTION Results Oriented • Affordable • Short Term 20 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE working with couples, organizations and groups in conflict. Cf!enle/v f<Pl/ cewatitiit lJ, X 1wudedge & cetu111<;..: Maria E. Minicucci, Ph.D. Human Behavior Specialist • 713-592-5262 Oasis Esplanade A three level luxury apt, with rooftop garden & best view in New Orleans. 3 blocks to French Quartei All amenities. Available for short term accommodati~ns FOR RESERVATIONS: 800-575-9166 • 504-524-4248 1260 Esplan.ide Ave , New Orlea111, LA 70116 HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 Impotence support/d1scusslon group. 7 p.m. 713-523~ 04S1 lesbian Health ln1t1at1ve. Monthly meeting. 1 p.m, 713· 603-0023 wednesday, may 3 free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clinic. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 201S Thomas Street 713-793-4026. STD Exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 713-626-2837. 81Net Houston. 7:30 p.m. Social meeting. 713-467-4380 Women's Network. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 701 Richmond. 713-S29-0037 Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry open. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936-441 ·16t4 PtOJtlL Caesar. Workshops. AFH. 3203 Weslayan. 713· 623-6796. Out Skate Rollerskating Club. 8 to 10 p.m. 807S Cook Road. 281-933-S818. Rainbow Ranglers free C&W dance lessons. Brazos Rover Bottom. 7 p.m. 713-880-0670. Hospital Volunteer Training. Kolbe Project. 1 to 4 p.m. 713-861-1800. Bible Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m. St. Stephen's Eposcopal. 713-S26-666S. Sporotual Uplift service. 7 p.m. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713-861 -9149. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713-692-2703. HIV Testing. Free. AVES. 713-626-2837. Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center drop·in hours 6 t o 9 p.m. Free HIV testing by the Montrose Clinic 6 to 9 p.m. Houston Gay & lesbian Poht1cal Caucus monthly meeting. 7 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713. 524·3818. - Classoc Chasm Car Club. Monthly meeting. 713-797- 8615 thursday, may 4 G1y Men's Chorus of Houston Open rehearsal. 7 p.m. 713-S21 -7464 HIV+ Men Psychotherapy. Montrose Counseling Center. US p.m. 713-S29-0037. Rainbow Ranglers free C&W dance lessons. Brazos Rover Bottom. 7 p.m. 713-880-0670. STD Exams & treatment. Free. AVES 713-626-2837. Relapse Prevention. Montrose Counseling Center. 2 p.m. 713-529-0037 Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry open. 10 a.m to 6 p.m. 281-633-2SSS. Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center. 6 p.m 713-S29-0037 ROCK.SENSUAL. "Rain is solid." -Houston Press "waves of Rain is a sumptuous, auditory feast that will leave you satiated." -Urban Beat Waves Of Rain The New Album From Uquid-i Available at Wherehouse Music Souodwaves, Cactus. Sam Goody (Willowbrook & Village) www.lmulsio nR<'cord•-corn ! or morT inform•tion call 1U-111-H H OUT ON THE BAYOU Women's Therapy Group. Montrose Counseling Center. S:30 p.m. 713-S29-0037 FrontRunners. 6:30 p.m. 713-S22-8021. HIV Art Course Program. 1 to 4 p.m. Patrick Palmer 713 -S26-1118. Women's Clinic Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Open Mike N19ht Cafe Artist. 8 p.m. 713-S28-3704 Community Gospel. Service. 7:30 p.m. 713-880-923S or www.communitygospel.org Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Varoous Support Groups 7 p.m. 713·526-1017 HIV T•st1n9. Free. AVES. 713-626-2837. Gay, lesbian & Bisexual Alliance at the University of Hounon (GLOBAL) meets at 4 p.m. 713-743-7S39. Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center drop·tn hours 6 to 9 p.m. ·First Comes Lust" lesbian Sex Forum. 7 p.m. 713-S24-3818. EC Houston. Pro-Gay. Pro Christian. Bible Study 800· 310-6718. friday, may 5 Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (HAT.C.H.) meets. 713-942 7002. Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counsehng Center. 6 p.m. 713-S29-0037 STD Exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 713-626-2837. Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830-3000. Q-Patrol walks the stre•ts. 8:4S p.m. 713-S28-SAFE. Kolbe Project . Morning Prayer. 10 a.m. Park Plaza Hospital vosotatoon at 7 p.m. 713-861-1800. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennos Center. 713-692-2703. Pos1t1ve Art Workshop. 1 p.m. to .C p.m. Patrick Palmer. 713-626-1118. Lesbian and Gay Voices. KPFT 90.1 FM. 7 p.m. 713-526· S738. M1shpachat Ahz1m Shabbat Serw1ces. 8 p.m. 713 -748· 7079. Men's Coming Out Group. 7 p.m. 713-S24-3818. Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center drop-t'n hours 6 to 9 p.m. lesbian Movie night. 7 p.m .• 713. 524-3818. Healing Eucharist. Christ Church Cathedral. 7 p.m. 1117 Texas. 713-222-2S93. Community Awareness for Transgender Support (CATS) meets. 409-927-1705 or tgh~lpOyahoo.com . To list an event call Carolyn Roberts at 713-519-8'~. fax at 7'3·519-9531, or e-mail ed1torOhoustonvoice.com. Deadline Is Friday at S p.m. THE PLAZA AT RIVER OAKS ~ A , A ~ T M ! N T S 1920 W. Gray • 1945 W. Bell 713-528-5277 SEE THE CLASSIFIED SECTIOS RESURRECTION MCC Celebrates the Mlu.ENNIUM MARCH ON WASHINGTON 2DDD Worship Services are Sundays at 9am & 11am and Wednesdays at 7pm 713-861-9149 1919 Decatur St. • Houston, Texas 77007 www.mccr-hou.com Automotive Services ~ . Call Marshall Rainwater at 713-529-8490 •• \\ •• THI 11al PLACI Ire. •Alignment •Brakes • 1 307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 713-529-1414 American & Foreign TAFT STREET AUTO Aute Repair & Service 713-526-3723 1411 Taft Houst11.TX. 11011 Alignments Brakes 2314 Washington 713-880-4747 23 24 Classifieds Announcements The Chamber lbe general meeting 1s set for May 2nd at Sonoma, 141~ C:i11fom1a The social hour b<.-g1ns 1116pm nod ends :u 7pm then din­ner • Jcny Qumnes ll!ld Regma l>o!son ill'C the spotlighted cnter­tunmcnt • Vickie M.:O:inahan :md Rick Schroder are the featured spe:il;ers for "Out" In Corporate Amenc:i. They ,.,11 discuss how n rc:illy 1s in corporate Amenc:i to openly identify :is lesbian or gay. • Non-members are welcome Cash bar :ind set menu pnce • $22.00/members, $25 OCV non­members • RSVP to 713523 7576 • Actor Auditions Theatre !'cw West 111 Sonoma 1s lookmg for 2 men and 2 women (ages 2040) for upcoming pro­ducuon. • Auditions will be held S:uurday, Apnl 29, I -5pm. • By appomtment only, call 71 'U22 2204. An Uncommon Legacy The de:idlme of May I, 2000 for subm1ss1on of applic:u1ons for An Uncommon Legacy Foundauon, Inc scholarships draws near Application~ and complete m-strucuons are avail­able on the mtemet (www uncommonlegacy.org) M:u' apphcat1ons to 200 Hyde P:irk. Houston, TX 77006 • Bod\ Posithe Wellness Center 1s a non profit org;1mznt10n that seeks to empower those wnh HIV 1nfcct1on. through nutnt1on hiropr~ct c scrv ces yoga. nod pt.'CHounsehng If you = mter estcd m pa111cip:u.c.n or volun teenng "e Willi! to spc;U; "'ith you 1 \ 1 u our \\ellSlte at "'"'wbodypc .t1ve org or call 711 ~24 2174 Autos For Sale 19 Ford Fxped1t1on XLT • ISK miles. 1nl seat dual air, Wo"' 1 • $!5,999 • Lone Star N1ss:m 2SI 241 ~600 '90 M1tsub1Sh1 Galan! • Auto. sunroof, power W/L and more• • $4.299 • Lone Star Nissan 281 2418600 '89 Nissan Pathfinder • 75K miles, power W/L, mcc1 • $3,999 • Lone Sur Nissan, 281 241 8600. '92 Ford Explorer• Auto, po"er W/L, cruise. tilt and more' • $4,999 • Lone Star Nissan, 281 243 8600 '98 GMC Suburban SLT • Only 34K miles, leather, 3rd seJt, dual rur • $23,99'1 • Lone Star :-;lSSall, 281 243.8600. '98 Mazda 626 • Only IOK miles, CD, auto, super dean'• S 11,999 • Lone Star !'11ssan, 281 24'.l 8600. '99 Mercury Sable • Auto, power W/L. 2 to choose from. • S 12,299 • Lone Star Nissan, 281 .243.8600 '97 lnfm1t1 1-lO Stk #VT~07501. Bose, power W/L, leathcr sunroof• Sl5,999 • Lone S1:ir l'<.s::..in, 281 241 8600 '91 Mazda Protege • 4 door, cold A/C. super mce, super pnce • S2.999 • [..one Star Nissan, 281 243 8600 ·9~ Mercury Tracer • Auto, power WfL. and more' • $4,499 Lone Siar :-.01ssan, 2812418600 Employment Adm. Assistant Seekmg full urne energe1ic can· d1da1e with public candor will­mg to make presen1a11ons and fam1har wtth mtemet • Will assist in expansion of program· ming :ind workshops. • Kolbe Project, 713.861.1800. Carter & Cooley Busy Heights area deli needs counter help. • Apply 1n person at 375 West 19th Street or call Doug :u 7 n 864 3354. The 611 Club 1s mterviewmg for expenenced bartenders. •Apply m person on Tuesdays only - before .lpm at 611 Hyde Park. Cafe Bc1gnet, :in upscale Gallena n:stauranl 1s now hmng manager and profi:ss1onal w:ut slaff • Fax resume to 711 790.0846 or apply m pcl'St'n :u 5381 Wcsthe1mer & Yorktown N1ghtmgalc ADC offers free employment assistance ro HIV+ individuals • lncludmg JOb pre­paredness tram ng. resume development. Job search as 1 lance Fer more information wll 71'9 I 1~43 Person_a_l-.1-'r_a_i_n_e_r _ Pos.:1on Jv:ulable • Ceruticallon and experience preferred. • C ontacl John Aaron •.it 1 n ~21 ~HO fur 1ntcrv1cw/informat1on. OUTSIDE SALES Work with our cornmumty and g.-e back at the same umc Good base • Excellent benefits and generous tomm1ss1on • Mon Fn • Call Jan Rcberts wnh Community Commun1eat1ons .Set'll.ork at 281 ~8l 3770. See our full pai:e :id m this issue Cnsh1er •Late mgh1 Sh1f1S • S1a11 $6 50 per hour• Apply m person 1100 Fannm • M1dtowne Spa. STEVEN'S HOUSE HIV Intermediate care borne seeks mgh1 staff · Resident mtcr­action. housework. :mJ clencal • Understandinglsens1t1vtty of HIV/AIDS and expcncnce a plus •EOE• Send rcsurne to Executive Director • PO Box IJ 1301 Houston. Texas 77219-1303 EXHIBITIONIST WANTED Exc111ng new "ebsne venture • We provtde the •cchmcnl stuff • You be the st:ir1 711957.3500. Window~tedia Window Media, the publisher of Southern \'rltct (Atlanta), Hou sum Vma (Houston) lmpt1cl News (:-.cw Orleans) and ecl1pst magazme 1s expcncncmg unprecedenlcd growth wllh amb111ous plans for the future Talen1ed. hard-working, creative and dedicated ind1v1duals ore constantly rn demand as opponunt11es ansc "'thin our pubhcat1on areas: Sales. Admm1Mrauon, Circu· lat1on/Distnbullon, Editorial, Design/Producuon. If you are interested m a career palh w11h a growing organizauon, please submit your resume to: Window Media. Attn Human Resources Dep1 • I 095 Zonolite Road #I 00. Atlanta Ga . 30306. BASIC BROTHERS N"w acceptmg applications for management positions and fulV pan·t1me retail employmen1. Pnor retaiVsales expenence and computer knowledge a plus • Come JOJO our team and enjoy one of the best benefit package. around • Apply M ·F, I O-.im-4pm, 1212 Wes1hcuner • No phone calls please. Home Improvements Top Sml, Clay Gravel nnd etc. • Spread and compacted • We build ponds, roads, pads, etc • Free delivery• 281216878~ or 281546 10 0 BOOGIE& MARCELA Home Repair Service • 40 Years expenence • Call us for all your rep:ur needs• 713.8566188. Items For Sale Community Yard Sale You keep the $$$ Reserve a boo1h at the Communny Yard Sale (May 6th & 7th) at the llou.5ton Lesbian & Gay Communuy Center (803 Hawthorne) and sell your stuff • Make small donauon to the cen !er for your space, then keep all of your proceeds For more mformarion or to reserve your booth call 713524 J81g Licensed Massage Brazilian-Swedish Massage Relaxauon or Spon massage m BRAZILIAN STYLE • Shower factlny Male 1herap1s1 (RMT#Ol 1176) • 832.4416443 Hawaiian Massage 2 Hours - $90.00 special (Reg S 125.00) • 3 Hour< -S 125 00 spe­cial (Reg. $175.00) • 1im of L.A ( Rmt #23477). 713.508.7896. ALL AMERICAN Therapcuuc massage by Tim • Located m Montrose • Sports • • Swedish • Professional ser.1ng Montrose. lletghts and River Oaks • RMT# 21139 • 281. 520.7630. ARE YOU STRESSED? Expenencc the bcl.t m 1hcr~peu­t1c full body massage • Call now for an appomtment • Randal • RMT# MT0059JO • 713.861. 5458. Massage Therapy al its finest. • Swedish. Deep Tissue, Sports, Reflexology • Don't settle for less • In/Out, Ho1els, 7 Days • Jeff #016074 (Nationally Cer­ufied) 711524.5865 You Need Therapy! Massage therapy now available al Muscle Mechamcs personal trarnrng & wellness studio- sports massage, therapeultc massage, relaxauon therapy. Ca.II now for your appointment! Muscle Mechanics 711.523.5330. Moving Services American Movers Vmt us on the web • www. nrncncanmovcrs.org • 2412 A "Taft • Houston. Texas 77006 • ."low Statewide • TxDOT #00528-2015C • 713.522.1717 Pets The llomeless Pet Placement League IS n Houston area. non­profit annnal welfare organlZll­t1on HPPL provtdes f:.>r the rehab1!rL1110n of stray and aban­doned dogs and cats lhrough its umque fosler care program. All animals are spayed/neutered and have their first set of shots For more mf;irmat1on en.I 71 1 862 7 387 or \ 1ew website at WWW llPl'L.org The Spay Neuter Asststancc Pro­gram "11.111 provide FREE spay­mg/ neutenng, rabies vaccma­uons and city hccnscs for nn1- mals belonging to qualifymg low mcome dog nnd cat guard· 1ans. For qualificauons and trans-ponauon information please call 713.522 .2337 Professional Services DJ RICK SIX Mobile DJ • Parties, Clubs, etc. • Top 40 • Diva • Hou'e • Trance • 713 747.8384. BODY WAXING FOR MEN Personal groormng by Dale • Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist Private Loc:u1on m Montrose • Cnll for appomtment 713.529 5952. APRIL 28, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Real Estate For Rent Montrose/New Post Office Arca • 462' Yupon @ C.asilecoun • 4Plex, I Bedroom • Good Landlord/stable tenants $500.00 + •Alan, 711 521 !711. MO!'ITROSE Charm mg I II. 2-story, 1910 Carnage House • Complclcly renovated, Central NH, hard· woods, hlly pond. garden, picket fence. FREE DSL-mlemet/yard mamtenance. • See to love', owner 713524.6545 or 713.529.5200. Galleria Condo Huge 2/2, 1200 sq ft. Richmond/Sage area, molding • pnvate pauo, balcony off Master • S 1,050 (bills paid) • Call for more iRformation, Lmda Marshall Realtors 713.523.4600 HEIGHTS APARTME"ffS New & Unu,ual I Bedroom/I Bath • $595 - $895 per month • Individual flats • 1112 Lawrence @ 11th Street • Lauder Propen1cs. 713.862 3747 Westbury Gardens Two separa1c units: I upstairs & I downstairs, each "uh 2 bed­rooms, I lialh and assigned cov­ered parkmg. • $625 month • Call 713 729 9316. Gn:cnway Plaza Condo 2 blocks from Compaq Center • I/I, gated communny, W/D on s11e, covered p:ukmg. coun­yards • $450 mrn•h + clc.:tnc • 1400 nmmons I .nne 713.868 21H Westbury Square J/I Condo, 748 sq. ft •By pool, covered p:irkmg, ll(;Ccss gates, W/D on-slle, central nir new c.irpet, basic cable 1ndudcd. i:ay-fncndly. • SS25 month • Call 7117212011. 1 BEUROO:\.I Great locauons Montrose/River Oaks • Wiil included • Garage available • New construction • Gill for specials • 713.630.0006 RIVER OAKS Pla1.a at River Oaks • I bedroom • Wiil included • For details call 713 ~28. S277 Roommates Share house with SWM • Memorial Park area • Pnv
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