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Montrose Voice, No. 93, August 6, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 93, August 6, 1982 - File 001. 1982-08-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1859/show/1830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-08-06). Montrose Voice, No. 93, August 6, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1859/show/1830

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 93, August 6, 1982 - File 001, 1982-08-06, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1859/show/1830.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 93, August 6, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date August 6, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript This is Royce Williams, president of MSA Volleyball League, and he's smiling because the league is hosting a tournament this weekend. Story on page 17. MOITROSE 0 I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #93, Published Weekly Friday August 6 1982 Good Evening Montroae weather tonight: Fair and warm with a low of 72°. Saturday: Sunrise 6:44AM. Partly cloudy and hot with a slight chance o~ thundenhowera and a high of high of 98° Sunset 8:11PM. These are the organizers of the Gay Olympics in San Francisco and they're not smiling but they ARE happy, as the start of that event approaches. Story on page 18. This is Montrose entertainer Nancy Ford, and he's smiling too because she's featured this week in 'Montrose Live,' page 21. I l 2 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 I ~ Advance Tickets Available =• ,-, ,-, I I C C T U C I (it C 0 l_I ,-, I I C T ,-, /\I T C \I 0 C C :1 C _ C C C ·1 -' t_t t_t 1.!,1 L -' I I I L I I I t_ 1' I I t_t 1_1 _t I 1_1 I I, I 1_ I\ I I -' -' t_ 1_1 1_1 -' _1 I Two men shot in front of Midnite Sun By Johannes Stahl Two men were shot early Thursday morning, August 5, at 1:40 a.m., in front of the Midnite Sun, 534 Weetheimer, according to a police report. The victims were identified as Nathan Simpson Jr., 21, and Michael Green, 27. The gunman shot from the alley between the Chicken Coop, 535 Westheimer, and the building directly east of the bar. Both the Chicken Coop and the Midnite Sun are gay bars. Police officers were at the Stop 'n' Go at 503 Westheimer when they heard five shotgun blasts and approached the scene on foot. They were there shortly after the shooting. Simpson was shot three times in the chest and was taken to Ben Taub Hospital in critical condition. Green waa shot in the neck and leg and was taken to Ben Taub in serious condition. Green told police officers at the scene that he knew ofno reason someone would want to shoot him. A witness told police officers that she saw a white male in his early 20s, 5'6", and weighing between 115 and 125 pounds. The witness said that the man had shoulder-length hair and might be Hispanic. He was described as wearing a pink shirt and bluejeans and h aving a slim build. The witness described the vehicle the man drove as a small foreign stationwagon. The car was an older model with faded white paint. The report said the car had Texas plates. The number of the plate was listed as P28898. The gunman waa seen before the shooting, climbing over two fences that separate Lovett from the alleyway, carrying a shot­gun. After the shots were fired he was seen climbing back over the fences without the weapon. He got into his vehicle, made a U-tum and went back over the fences to get the shotgun. He then sped away with his headlights turned off. Police recovered a spent .12 gauge shotgun shell in the alleyway and an investigation is underway. Large buckshot, .00 gauge was used in th e sh ell. Police asked that anyone with information concerning the shooting contact Homicide Division at 222-3651or222-TIPS ifthe caller wishes to remain anonymous. Customers in the Chicken Coop heard the blasts inside the bar, according to em ployee Don Sorsby . Everyon e in the bar dropped to the floor after the first two shots were fired. AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Gay Lutheran group convenes in Houston By Johan nes Stahl Rev. John McNeill, author of The Church and the Homosexual, spoke to a national conference of gay Lutherans held in Hous­ton last weekend. He said the "Sin of Sodom is that of inhospitality" and is "a sin of the straight community, not the gay community." McNeil! said he feels that the gay reli­gious community needs to consider the "special gifts gay people can offer the church at large." Lutherans Concerned/North America (LC/NA), a predominantly lesbian and gay male group seeking reconciliation with the church, held their third biennial assembly of its eighteen chapters, July 29 through August 1. About 60 people partici­pated in the conference, according to Jim Brown, the group's media coordinator. Houston chapter member Daniel Harms was elected vice president of LC/NA at the gathering. The local chapter hosted the event from their meeting location, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh Dr. An election of officers, modification of the group's constitution and by-laws, and a statement of support for women's rights to the Lutheran Church were the business iBSues of the conference, said Brown. Other speakers, workshops and worship service• highlighted the '82 Assembly theme: "Extending the Light." New action army likes weak coffee If an enemy attack ever catches America napping, this may be why: a two-and-s­half year, $40,000 Pentagon study has concluded today's G.L's don't like coffee, reports the Boston Phoenix. Researchers say young recruits prefer their coffee 25 percent weaker than older veterans. In fact, younger soldiers would rather drink a lot of other things, including milk, orange juice, lemonade, iced tea, hot tea and hot chocolate. Montrose Mouth 'Nightlife is my life' Well, let's see what's going on with the nightlife this week. Sheila Ceaser has opened at Baja's; The Double R Saloon has a Sunday show this Sunday; the Barn has Its famous steak night Tuesday; Gerry Quinones is at Rascals; Bacchus is pulling a line crowd now for happy hour every day; The Deep is going strong with happy hour 7am·7pm daily; Grant Street Station has Automatic this Sunday, 2-6; Mary's will give happy hour prices to all in dresses this Sunday; and Kindred Spints has OJ Cherry Wolf on weekends making everybody boogie And that am't all. Numbers laser show might just be the best in the country: the Dixie Kings are Sunday 5--8 at Happy Trails with New Or1eans jazz; the Copa's DJ on Thursday is Wayne Barton: The Drum is now open afterhours on Thursdays; the new Officer's Club has a pool side dance late Sundays; and the Briar Patch has a free buffet Sunday, 4pm, end it's delicious Wait, there's more. E/J's has moved John Day & Co up to 6pm this Sunday; Tim's Coffeeshop now has a Sunday beer bust; and the Pink Elephant is now working on year number 47 , Did we miss anybody? ·-·- One the same day (Aug. 14} as the drag queens vs. the MSA sponsors softball game, thetenrris aague may challenge the volleyball league to play softball The bowling leagues have not tried to get in on the fun, but perhaps that 1s because those balls are just so hard to hit with a standard bat -·- A couple of notable events that happened this week, in year's past: the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima Aug. 6, 1945, and the equivalent of $7 million was stolen [l.ug. 8, 1963, in Britain's " Great Train Robbery." -·- And happy birthday this week to Lucille Ball (Friday, she's 71), Andy Warhol (Friday, he's 54), Alley Oop (Saturday. he's 49) . Esther Williams (Sunday, she's 59), Connie Francis (Sunday, she's 44), Herbert Hoover (Tuesday, he would have been 108) and Cecil B. DeMille (next Thursday, ha would have been 101) -·- The real Garden Party is this weekend. So brace yourself. "E. T loves Mari( and Clark." It was on the wall when Mark and Clark Erwin, the twins, celebrated their 27th birthday at Chases Wednesday, August 4 II you're confused as to which one you're talking to, Mark bartends at the Montrose Mining Company and sports a moustache; Clark bartends at Chases and has a beard. Clark was on duty at the party an said he had to work to pay for Iha party. Chases' own Eric provided dance music for the guests and the twins prepared most of the food, a lavish display of fruits, cheeses and snacks -·- 1/H Inc. reports that 10 groups are now officially committees of their corporation-meaning they can benefit from I/H's tax exempt status The groups are Interact/ Houston {technically a separate group from l/H Inc.), the Montrose Cloggers, the Montrose Symphonic Band, two new vocal groups under Andy Mills, the Gay Switchboard, Families and Friends of Gays, the Gay Archives of Texas and the Community Coffeehouse Others may be on the way -·- Sponsoring membe~ of the Greater M?ntrose Business Guild will host a reception for potential foun ding members of the group next Monday, 7:00 p.m., in the Bering Church educational building at 1440 Hawthorne. The group, once it gets going, is not to be a political or social group (we've got plenty of those) but a business group. It'll be an organization of businesses helping businesses succeed Sunday-Beer Bust, 4 till ... And Sunday-Happy hour prices to anyone wearing a dress (Heaven help us) Monday-Leather Night! Wear leather for happy hour prices Tuesday's Movie-'Three Faces of Eve,' starring Joanne Woodward 1 Year Ago Aug. 5, 1981: N eartown charged foot-dragging by city officials A representative ofNeartown Association, a Montrose civic group, appeared before Hous­ton City Council and alleged that city offi· cials were dragging their feet in prosecuting the Circus Club, 508 Westheimer, for "fla­grant" prostitution activities. City attorney Ed Cazares reacted angrily at the charge, implying that the Houston Police Dept. vice squad had not requested he prosecute the club. Aug. 5, 1981 Peden steps down from GPC Johnny Peden steped aside as a board member of the Gay Poli~cal Caucus "after several months of soul·searching." Aug. 6, 1981 Lesbian judge appointed The nation 'a first openly·lesbian judge, Mary Morgan, a prominent gay rights attorney, was appointed to the Municipal Court of San Francisco by Gov. Jerry Brown. Aug 7, 1981 Guar dian Angels started training Sayina Montrose would be one of the areas to be patrolled by the Guardian Angels, coordi­nator Joe Perri starting training volunteers Over 100 people turned out for the Houston chapter's first meeting three days earlier in eaRt Houston and Perri said patrols would be on the 1treet in Novemlx>r after members complete the three-month training course. Montrose Voice thenewap1perofMontroae 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentscopyright•1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm HenryMcC/urg pcJbl••Mf«/Jlor Jo~z~:,~•h' Bl11Je0uncan •nt•rt•lflment1'pcKl1MJ11<" Ed~;!inez AcelClark Qteph•U W1ll1amMarberry •dv9rf .. 1ngdit«.l<N Oa~!~~ck ~~~: G=~'.~t FtMJIK1mg Affmber G•y Pr ... Auoe111ion New• S.rv>C•• lntern•hon•I G•y New• Ageri.cy P•c•hc New• [i!4~~~£§~~~i~g~~l~~~g§ =~~~~~2~~,~~~s:; =~ :k1~~~~::~· :S29 :e=t• ~:~·:;~~;1;':;~~==-·~=~o;~~;~:i:11;) ~~~~S: Ad\lerl1S•t'lg d .. dlt,.. E•ch TUMdly, 15:00pm. tor INU8 r .... MCIHchFrlday911•n•ng ~~~tt:•~l::~rt~~·::e~v•tht•ng rate 1c:n.dulfl F1..,..A w•ll gc Police operation visits five gay bars in two-hour period By Johannes Stahl Five Montrose gay bars were subjects of a police operation Saturday, July 21, between 8:00 and 10:00 p.m. Uniformed officers entered the bars checking custo­mers for required identification and public intoxication violations. Two arrests for public intoxication were made, according to police officials. "There is no concerted effort against the dubs or citizenry," said Patrol Division Sgt A.I. Gilbert. "It was one of those rare occasions when the radio was dead and we were able to do what we're supposed to be doing all the time." "Saturday night we went to a couple of clubs on complaints from citizens. We also went into the Ward area. Five units were involved." He said that three non-gay bars were also a part of the operation. Gilbert eaid he was aware of only two gay bare involvOO in the operation: Mid­nite Sun, 534 Weetheimer, and Chicken Coop, 535 Westheimer. But witnesses said officers also entered Montrose Mining Company, 805 Pacific, the Barn, 710 Pacific, and Dirty Sally's, 220 Avondale. In response to the disparity in the number of bars involved, Gilbert said the officers "figure that ... what the hell. I'm here and might as well check across the street." "We listen to citizens bitch if we aren't visible and bar owners bitch when we do go in to theclubs," hesai~.Aliquorlicense owner has given "imphed consent" for operations of this nature, he added. Witnesses at the different bars said that the police offkers were not abusive in Ian· guage or action during the operation. Cus­tomers without proper identification were either escorted to the front door or were asked to leave the premises ateome of the bare. Sgt. Gilbert said no arrest were made for identification violations. AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Politicos add spice to chili cook off J;ly Billie Duncan On Sunday, August I, Eleanor Tinsley, George Gresnias, Lance Lalor, Judge A.D. Azios, Sgt. Layne Tand and Ninfa Man­dola all got together. Was it a political meeting? No. It was the third annual chili cook-off at the Bra· zoa River Bottom. And all the people men­tioned above were judges. The patio at the BRB was filled with drizzle, steam, people and the smell of chili coming from 10 different and distinct pots that were stirred and babied by teams from the Colt 45s, Sundance Cattle Com· pany, Double R Saloon, Copa, Chicken Coop, Montroae Mining Company, Exile, Drum, Loading Dock and the Brazos River Bottom softball team. It was also filled with the sounds of the very entertaining booth prepared by the Chicken Coop and emceed by the very Roxie Starr. Roxie had lined up several cabaret entertainers who sang and joked inbetween music provided by the Coop's deejay, Keith Shankle. Live entertainers included Lee LaForge, Kim, Dameon, Roxie (of course) and yours truly B.D. But some of the best entertain­ment was provided by the judges, espe­cially Lance Lalor who was the target of a great deal of Roxie's humor Lalor threw himself into the fun and even danced with a certain female entertainer/reporter (at his request). Roxie's arrows were accepted with good humor and Lalor even threw some of his own back, including, "The truth about Roxie is so damning that it's no use for anyone to make anything up." Some of the judges had officiated at the contest before and still had the nerve and perserverance to return. Eleanor Tinsley had done the cook-off year before last, but not last year, while Lalor had attended in an offi cial capacity all three yeara. Explained Lalor, "That's why I'm los· ing my hair and she's not." This was Ninfa's first year. She said, "Lee asked me. He's my friend. He works for the restaurant. He'd do anything for me, so I have to help him." Then she added, "Besides, I understand food." County Judge A.D. Azioa was glad that he was asked this year. "I hope they invite me again. I loved it. I love the atmosphere, the people, the hospitality." George Greanias attended because "it sounded like fun." But he was not univer­sally thrilled with the chili. "Some of it I liked better that others. It's an squired taste for me." Sgt. Layne Tand of the County Conata· ble's Office was enthusiastic about the entire affair. "I enjoyed the whole after­noon." The thing he liked best was "watching Lance Lalor dance." He added, "I wonder where Debra Danburg was." When the judges finished judging, the awards were presented-lovely trophies topped with meta.lie representations of the rear end of a donkey. Fir•t place went to the Chicken Coop (chef, John Pegram I, second went to the Exile (chef, Bernice) and third place went to the Double R Saloon (chef, Papa Bear). The showmanship award went to the Chicken Coop. After accepting the trophy, Roxie insisted, "I did not bribe Lance Lalor. I simply told him that I would tell everyone that he hung out at the Chicken Coop." The first place winner of the jalapano eating contest went to Adrian Luera, who accepted hie trophy, red wheezing and tearing after eating 29 peppers in 5 min­utes and said, "I'm cancelling my tricks for tomorrow." Second place went to Jay Elliston who ate 25. BRB owner V.J. Abney (Ab) explained that the contest started three years ago. "All over the state we heard about chili cook-offs. We thought we've never heard of chili cook-off in the gay community." So they had one. "It's been a great success." The cook-off ia now known as the Ben LeDoux Memorjal Chili Cook-Off. LeDoux, friend and worker at the BRB, was killed last year. Said O.R Smith (Smitty), BRB owner and former co-mate ofLeDoux's, "Itwashisprideandjoytodo il" 6 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 GPC announces membership drive By Johanne• Stahl One thousand new members is a goal set by the Houston Gay Political Caucus. The membership drive was announced at a regular GPC meeting Wednesday, August 4. Larry Bagneris Jr., president of GPC, said that total paid membership is currently 200. GPC previously sent invitations to orga­nization• and businesses in Houston and about 60 people attended the meeting. CauC\18 Vice President Terry Harrie spoke to the audience about screening of candidatee for office in the upcoming November elections. He said the Political Action Committee (PAC) has "compiled a list of Democratic and Republican candi­datee oppoeing one another." According to Harrie, 57 letters have been sent to Democrats and to the same number of Republicans. GPC expects to screen some­where between 35 and 40 candidates in the next few weeks, to ascertain the candi· dates' stance on gay and women'e rights. PAC has designed the questionnaire that will be presented to the candidates during the BCl'eening, Harris said. The questionnaire is to be "cuatomized for each race." The next item on the agenda was the election August 14 for changes in the city charter. Bagneria urged members to show support for the changes backed by Mayor Kathy Whitmire. "! won't go into detail but it will make Houston city government more effective." GPC Board member Ray Hill emphas­ized the importance of local civil aeTVice control aa opposed to current state control, one of the proposed changes in the charter. He said this will affect the fire department and police department as public service personnel, "il you can call them (police officers) public service people." In an appeal for gay community unity behind GPC, Bagneris introduced Lee Harrington and Steve Shiflett, both former GPC presidents. Relations between Bagneris and Shiflett had been strained in the past from internal discord in GPC. But Shiflett and Harrington encouraged those present to take part in the membership drive. The Republican Group Co-chairs, Scott Miller and Marion Coleman, spoke of their groups' success in the political machinery of the GOP. Miller announced that they have elected 13 delegates and 11 alter­nates to the Republican state convention. He stressed that the Gay Republican Group is "not separate from GPC." Coleman eaid, "We will never be suc­cessful if we don't care and love and be together. We must put aside personalities and remember why we're here and share it." Debra Danburg, state representative, called GPC "the most kick-a88 organiza­tion in Harris County. We (GPC) have the beat and moat thorough screening in the city." She revealed that due to redistrict­ing, her district is now 55 percent Republi­can and if gay Republicans "vote the party line instead of according to personal need, I won't be state representative." Bagneris hopes that the next GPC presi­dent will be a "paid executive." He cited the loae of jobs by former presidents due to GPC related activities and duties, as his reasoning. Membership posters with tear-off mem­bership coupons will be poeted in local gay establishments. The membership committee was chosen at the meeting. Representing the business community were Marion Coleman of !Gndred Spirits and Francisco Valle of Chapultepec Restaurant. Picked to repre­sent GPC membership were Rich Wilson and another member who did not wish to be identified. Representing the Board of GPC were Bagneria and Wendy Strain. Representing community organizations were Scott Miller of the Montrose Singers and Ed Coleman of the Executive and Pro­fessional Association of Houston. Former gay bar building burns second time By Johannes Stahl An abandoned building, formerly a gay bar called The Rack, caught fire at 7:30 p.m., July 31. The cause of the fire is "under investigation" by the arson divi­sion of the Houston Fire Departmenl The structure at 1516 Westheimer had previously burned shortly after The Rack closed in the fall of 1980. Structural damage in the last.est fire wae estimated at $600 and no one was injured, the Fire Deparptment official said. The fire was extinguished at 7:40 p.m. Gulf Coast Community Services group to hold election Open, Inc., a subdivision of Gulf Coast Community Services (GCCS), announced an election eet for Saturday, August 7, to select the Area VI representative to the Board of Directors of GCCS. Open, Inc. is a name chosen by the group for Area VI. Duties of the person elected to this posi­tion include management and allocation of funds from the GCCS for Area VI. Area VI includee Fourth Ward, Allen Parkway, Montrose, the Heights and some other neighborhoods. GCCS provides programs for the elderly and the underprivileged. A qualified voter in this election must be a resident of Area VI. 16 years of age or older, a citizen or resident alien and meet the l•poverty guidelines.'' These guidelines are based on family income ranging from no more than $4310 per year for an individual to $11,110 for a family of six. . Information concerning voting loca. tions may be obtained by calling 659-7527 or 526-8780. The politics of sunbathing The best way to determine who's moat likely to take it all off at the beach is to ask about their politics, says the Philadelphia Inquirer. A Gallup poll of 1000 residents of Den­mark revealed that the further to the left they are, the more likely they are to sun­bathe nude on a public beach. Baring the body, the Gallup analysis says, appears to be "a revolutionary political attitude." Halley's comet may be washout Pacific New• Service Halley's Comet, due back in our neck of the solar system in late 1985, may not pro­vide the celestial fireworks it has in the past. Astronomers are predicting the comet may be virtually invisible from most American cities and suburbs. The reason: "]ight pollution," too much man-made illumination that will rob the night sky of its glory, and dim the splendor of the tra­veling ball of fire. Skywatchers' societies are already mounting a campaign to dim the lights on key nights when the comet will be putting on its best show. Mr. and Mrs. Frankie Gusemano, who have operated Princes for 15 years in their heart of Montrose location, take pride in announcing their purchase of the restaurant. Expect to find the same good food. friendly service and great prices that you have always enjoyed in the past. Only the name has changed. FRANKIE'S • WESTHEIMER AT MONTROSE • 529-7896 AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Come and get lei'ed Friday the 13th Hawaiian Night Tropical drink specials Happy hour If you wear a Hawaiian shirt Door prizes Steak night 6pm Wednesday on the patio Saturday & Sunday $5 liquor bust 4-7pm Houston's wettest happy hour Come seethe MSA playoffs 220 Avondale 529-7525 Victory party after the games at the Galleon Dirty Sally's vs. Galleon Saturday, Aug. 7, ~~::.L-J.J7:30pm rlappy hour daily 2-8pm Thursday buffet 8pm I MONTROSE VOICE I A UGUST 6, 1982 FDA takes action against cocaine substitutes, not 'poppers' By Johannee Stahl Cocaine 1ub1titute1 are the aubject addnoaed in a letter drafted by the Food and Druir Adminiliration to manufactur­era of chemical1 u.oed in the product. Dan Cuellar, reporter for "Newscenter 11 ", KHOU-TV, had oaid in a broadcaat Monday, Auguat 2, that manufacturera of cbemical1 u1ed in "poppera" were included in the letter. Poppen are product. containing butyl nitrite oold a• room odorizera and often u.oed u an inhalant to enhance oeL Anthony Whitehead, director of FDA in Hou1ton, said, "'The agency has aent out lettera to cocaine 1ub1titute drugmanufac· turen. We did not oend, nor intend the letters for manufacturers of solvent mate­riala, including butyl nitrite, that are prone to abuse." Whitehead conaulted FDA headquartera in Wuhington, D.C., to confirm the agen­cy'• otance on butyl nitrite as a result of Cuellar'• report. But Cuellar'• follow-up report on Aguat 3 again emphasized "poppers." In addition to the letter in queation, there wu an FDA warning to u.aers of the danger• of cocaine aubetitutea. The agency oaid it bad received reports of three death1 attributed to the abuoe of the aul>­atitutea which are available in adult book· atoree and novelty ahope. The main componene of the fake drugs is a loca 1 anesthetic, auch aa Novocain. The manufacturers and suppliers for the aneathetic1 are being told to better control to whom they sell these drugs and to ascer­tain that they are being legitimately used. "The FDA inveetigation continues and if not resolved, the FDA will initiate action , such as court action to reeolve the situa· tion," the report steted Cecil Smith, inveatigator for Conoumer Product Safety Diviaion (CPSD), said that ''room odorizen," compoaed of butyle nitrite. are under the jurisdiction of hi1 agency. CPSD requirea a warning label to be placed on the producta containing nitrites under the "Hazardous Substances Warnin11 Act." Smith aaid the industrial chemicals, including butyl nitrite, are commonly found in school and commercial chemical labs for legitimate purpooes, malring con­trol unlikely. Crime prevention update from Neartown Neartown Aaaociation, a Montrose civic organization, i9 participating in "Opera­tion I.D.," a crime prevention technique involving ensraving identification on houoehold itema to discourage theft and to uoiat in recovery of stolen gooda. John Daniel, chairman of N~rtown_'• crime prevention committee, said he ~l have the engraving tool at upcoming Neartown meetings. It was previously reported, erronoualy, that the Houston Police Department would have the tool. Daniel said that lockamitho can arrange for deadbolt lock inatallations in the home to better oecure the premioes. Thia iA one ?f the atepe required for rednced rate• m homeowner'• insurance, he oaid. Neartown meets the fourth Tueeday Of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Bering Church, 1«0 Hawthorne We are seeking businesses to join with us In becoming founding members of an organization to be called THE GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD which shall immediately seek to become an affiliate of the National Association of Business Councils and the National Chamber of Commerce. Any Interested business or "d.b.a" may contact a sponsoring member for further information. A meeting will be hosted MONDAY AUG.9 7pm Bering Memorial United Methodist Chuch, 1440 Hawthorne, in the Education Building on the east side of the church (Friendship Classroom} to bring together those interested in becoming founding members. SPONSORS E/J'SCLUB 1213 Richmond-527-9071 FRAME OF REFERENCE 1533 W.thetmer-520-0710 MONTROSE VOICE 3317Montrose, th1rdtloor-529-8490 SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bellaire BIYd.-667-7•17 SPUO..U-LIKE 4ie W.thelmer-520--055<4 TRAVEL TECH 5719Kirby-522-8227 Playgirl Follies This Saturday, Aug. 7, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover, starring Laura Lee Love & Lana Kane with special guests Jackie O'Shanter & Brandy Lynn Happy Hour Saturday mid night-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-8pm Open 101m Mon-Sit, Noon Sund1y A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephan~ "Oldest & ~-} Friendliest 1 '1 , in Texas" .· . 1218 Leeland ~ · 659-0040 The Happy Trail Riders Country & Western Boogie Band FRIDAY & SAlURDAY 9-MIDNIGHT Bourbon Street comes alive with the ever popular Dixie Kinas SUNDAY &-8Pfv1 Houston's only Sunday Happy Hour SUNDAY 12-3PM 715 Fa irview 521-2792 THE Sunday Buffet 2-4pm Keoki Kona at the Top of the Hole Wednesday-Sunday 5-1 109 Tuam 528-9128 GERRY QUIN~J"J~j.i~.U:~':;ger/entertainer Dinner Monday-Tburaday 8:30-11:00, Friday a. Saturday 8:30-12:00 Sunday Brunch 11:30-3:00 Reaervatlona Requuted. Clooed for Lunch Custom designed jewelry to fit your own indi­vidual taste and lifestyle Gita's Jewelry Handcrafted Investments in Fine Jewelry Ev~ry spu:ially dtsignftl pie« includes Crtt profo­sional appniisal by an indtptnd~nt appraixr Visit 8c consult with our prize-winning European goldsmith with a fine arts degree in gold 8c silversmith. Call 680-11579 7728 Long Point Rd. Only 15 minutes £rom Montrose Houston's Friendliest Country & Western Bar Serving Breakfast 7:30-10:30am Mon.-Sat. SUliDAY: Buffet for MDA. KON-SAT: Open 7am. )(O?lDAY: Barn T-Shlrt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Welcome back S•ndre, Bill, Ron Sioux, the Pride of Teu1 Mu1teng B•nd, •nd the Montroae Coun­try Cloggera from the National Gey Rodeo AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 11316 Wnthelmer 531-9600 Open 10-9 M-F, 1o-6 Sat, and 12-5 Sun for browsing We wish to welcome Richard Kurtz to our staff as our Montrose representative. Watch for the change that's coming We carry the fine SEALY POSTUREPEDIC line Complimentary margaritas to our shoppers & browsers ----------------------· THIS WEEKEND 20% OFF all speclal orders Must present this COUPON I I I I ----------------------· Sunday. August 15. the Briar Patch softball team will attend bar 6 entertain 4-8 with happy hour prices 6 free buff et the Briar Patch 1194 W. H?kombe 665-9678 HAPPY HOUR 12-8 Everyday Customers Pool T ourney-9pm Monday Spaghetti-7pm Tuesday Pool Tournament-9pm Wednesday Buffct-4pm Sunday 10 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 Hepatitus vaccine now available By Johannet1 Stahl Distribution of "Heptavax-B," the only vaCl."ine currently licensed in the United States to protect against hepatiti&-B infec­tion . ia now underway, according the Merck Sharp & Dohme, the developer and manufacturer of the vaccine. The company made the announcement July 14,coinci<lingwithaclosedcircuitTV broadcast from New York to about 100 pri­vate TV atu<lioo, inclu<ling KUHT-TV in Houaton. The broadcaat waa a news brief­ing from a panel of experta in the fields of infectious disease, vaccine and public health. The City of Houlton Public Health Department will not be administering the vaccine because "the cost is prohibitive to get involved in vaccinating patients," explained Dean Maaon, administrator of the Immunization Program. "We support and believe in it but we can't afford the $90 to $120 for each vaccination aeries.'' The vaccine will be available to physi­cians in the Houston area and according to Merck Sharp & Dohme will coet $100 for a eeries of three injections. This figure doee not include any fees that may be charged by in<lividual phyaiciana. After the initial injection, the patient must return one month later and then again six months after the firat injection to finish theaeriee. Gay malea who are sexually active with multiple sex partners are included in the high riak group for contracting the disease. Dr. James Chin, chairman, Immuniza­bon Practicea Adviaory Committee, U.S. Public Health Service, alao liated the fi>l· lowing people as high risk for whom the vaccination ia most often recommended: health care presonnel inclu<ling anyone exposed to blood or body liquids in a clinic or lab aetting, patients and staffofinstitu­tiona for the mentally-han<licapped, mor· ticiana, embalmen, pro11titutes and users of illicit injectable drugs. Populations with high incidence of the di8eaee include Alaakan Eskimos, Indoch­ineae and Haitian refugees. Maurice Hilleman, Ph.D., aenior vice preaident and <lirector, Virus and Cell Biology Reeearch, Merck Sharp & Dohme Reaearch Laboratories, claimed that the vaccine is the "moat technically complex of vaccinee to date ... He said that it is derived from blood plasma taken from car­rien of the di.ease which i.ti then proceased through several purifying treatments to derive only the 11urface antigen used in the final product. Human plaama. containing hepatitua B surface antigen ia used to produce Heptaucu·B, a vaccine to prevent hepatitis B infection. A donor is shown here in a New York Blood Center specially licensed for collection. 11Several million doee. are produced each year," Hilleman said. The company expects to be able to meet demand for Heptavax·B but said there could be "spot shortages" during the initial months if demand runs high. Panel member Jules Dienstag, M.D .. auociate profeesor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, and member of the Gas· trointeetinal Unit. Massachsetts General Hoapitsl, said the vaccine has been exten­sively tested for effectiveness. In one study involving individuals with a high riak of contracting the hepatitia--B virus infection, Heptavax·B was shown to reduce the incidence of infection by 92 r----~;;;,~;;o~i~~;.;;-----, King size Queen Regular Regular SPECIAL $15.00 $10.00 $12.00 $8.00 $10.00 $6.00 <?>nc HOU• nmAllT[Q/l/DG." THE MOST Ill DRY CUAlllllG Coupon expires Aug. 29, 1982 percent. Among vaccinnees who received all three doses and developed protective antibodies, incidence of infection was cloae to JOO percent. The vaccine can be administered to patients who suffer from a gay-related immuno-eupre88ion disease{GRID) with a alighUy reduced rate of protection from the di1ease, according to Dienstag. "If response is 60 percent, it'• better than zero percent." Health He said that although considerable donations of plasma came from gay males, the manufacturer did not "actively seek out only male homosexuals." In real· tion to the posoiblilty that a GRID may be passed on to another individual through the vaccine, he said that plasma from someone "immuno--compromised would not be used." Plaama is uoed from gay and non-gay persons. The panel concurred that the only observed side-effect in the three year study on human subjects was an initial burning at the sight of the injection and less often a slight fevet'". Dienstag said that patients in the study group who were given a placebo in a controlled trial of the vaccine deve­loped the aame symptoms nearly as often. Saul Krugman, M.D., profe88or of pedi­atrics, New York University School of Me<licine, said that type-B hepatitis is a more serious desease than type-A. "It may be complicated by chronic active hepatitis (5-10 percent of caaes) that may progreas to cinhosis of the liver and occasionaly to hepatocellular carcinoma, a cancer affect­ing the liver. HilJeman said Heptavax-B will 11not interrupt a chronic case of hepatitis-B" or be effective on the other types of hepatitis. He claims that "research is far along with development of a hepatitis-A vaccine." A thrid type of hepatitio called non-A, non-B has been discovered in recent years. He hopes that genetic engineering may result in a vaccine produced without the need for human plasma and thereby reducing the cost. Hare today, gone tomorrow The tougher the economic times, the more bunny burgers show up on dinner tables. The Boa ton Globe reports that the Amer­ican Rabbit Breeder• Aaoociation regio­tered a 25 percent increase in membership in the past 12 montha. "People are raising a few rabbits in their back yards to put more meat on the table," saye Ed Peifer, the asociation's executive director. 0 0ur big problem involves the Easter Bunny," he adds. "It's like saying you'rf going to have dog for supper. It's like eat ing a pet." Do-it-yourself beefcake Among the how-to books ocheduled to hit the stande this summer, keep an eye peeled for "Take It Offi", described as a man's guide for disrobing in the home. The Chicago Tribune reports that ads for the book eay it includes a 0 etrip-flip," where, by flipping pages, you can watch two "gorgeous men" take it all off. COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED WITH GARMENTS (NO LIMIT) Good only at 1224 Westheimer location 906 Westheimer at Montrose 527-0188 L-----------------------J Applications are still being accepted for our exceptionally unique cooking classes beg1nn1ng August 13. 1982 "La Guisi~ Provincial~ is a six week course in the fine art of cooking 1n the French style. In each class you will learn how to prepare an entire menu. from appetizer to dessert. FOr furl:her tnformatton call: 520-7650 1717 Westheimerst. ~ Houston, Texas 77098 Sometimes you get more than you're itching for. Intimate moments can make for pleasant memories, but occasionally, something a lot less pleasant lingers as well­crabs, for example. Now there's RID,* a liquid treatment that kills crabs in 10 minutes and provides rapid relief of itching. RID contains a safe, mJdically proven natural ingredient at al­most twice the concentration of the leading non-prescription product. Each package also includes an in­struction brochure and fine-tooth comb for lice and nit removal. You can buy RID at your pharmacy without a prescription and begin treatment at once. But remember, 38% of the people with crabs have been found to have something worse like VD. So ii you think you may have been ~xposed to something more than crabs, see a doctor. RIDL Safe, effective treatment for crabe. Pfil)Mrm«,.DlviNOl'loiPUzcrlnc NewVork.NewVorkl0017 AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Another Woman's Alternative 523 Lovett, Houston Come in and strut your stuff on our new dance floor. We're open six days a week for your drinking and dancing pleasure (closed Monday) LET'S GET ACQUAINTED HAPPY HOUR 4-7 TUES-FRI WELL DRINKS 2 FOR 1 BEER 85¢ Live DJ 4 nights a week Every Wednesday evening entertainment by Maryanne Mahoney and Mata Hari (713) 523-3396 Quality Dental Care. The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Care, we've discovered on important fact, No matter how well we do our job, you're not going to oppreciote your beautiful teeth if you hove to go through a lot of discomfort to get them. So we use the latest comfort systems available. "Happy gos," premedication and 5-chonnel stereo headphones. And because your time is important, if you have to wait more than 30 minutes for your appointment-we'll buy you lunch. It's as simple osthot. Quality Dental Core. Complete dental services in comfort. Now that's something to smile about. Quality Dental Care Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway af Kirby 523-2328 . Bring in this ad and get yo..- teeth cleaned for $5. Offer expires September 30, 1982. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 Fair games in Tennessee By Marianne Ferran 1982 Stonewall Feature. Syndicate Worth seeing for ita own sake, the Knoxville World'• Fair offeni a unique opportunity for gay travellere: a trip that combines excep­tional li1htaeeing with a good tuu of gay nightlife in variou11 cities. The fair' a Eutern TenneB&ee location puts it within a day'• drive (but a long day) of Houston. You can break up the drive on the freeway with 1topovere at gay spot& along the way to make it more adventurous. Here are eome Bample trips: Between New Orlean.8 and Knoxville (8 hours) i1 Birmin1ham, where Bell Watling'1 (2327 Morria Ave.), long one of the moat beau­tiful diacoe in the South, has recently opened in a new location. On the way back, stop in Jackson, at the C.O.AD. Disco (2912 Old Canton Rd.), the lughlight of Misoiasipp1 If you take a more northerly route from the west, you can drive the length of Tennessee, with a chance to aample gay life in Memphis and Nuhville, as well as the sightseeing Weat Tenne&ee baa to offer. euch aa the Elvis Preeley Home in Memphis and Nashville's Grand Ole Opry and Country Music Hall of Fame. not to mention Music Row, where country music is made. EveD though the fair has been a".~~ging well over the 40,000 people per day originally projected, everyone arriving in Knoxville thie eummer bu been surprieed to find no traffic jam.a and little difficulty in getting hotel rooma. The manager of The Eleanor, Knoxville's gay guest house, reports that he has not yet turned anyone away. Linea at pavilliona are long, but notimpoe­• ible: ueually about a 30-45 minute wait. But at the China Pavillion, where ancient arti­facts, including piece• from the Great Wall are dioplayed, and at the Peru pavillion, where the exhibit of Inca gold baa been com­pared to the King Tut tttuuree, you may apend up to 90 minutee in line. Cultural exhibita are proving more popular than ditiplaye of technological wondere which more cloaely follow the announced energy theme of the fair. An admiseion of$9.95 per day get.a you into any and all pavillione, but does not include any food, of which much i• available in many ethnic varietiee and price rangee. Some pavillione provide special entertainment wluch requires a free ticket that muat be obtained in advance. The nightly finale ie a firework. display that lights up the eky each evening at 10:30. Even if you stay for the fireworks, there will be plenty of time to Jut Knoxville'• three l•Y ban, which are enjoying a noticable, though not overpowering, influx of out-of­townera. The moat popular, the Europa, may move soon, so ca]J first. Upstage 54, famous for drag ahowa, hu a mll:ed male/female clientele, with •ome non-gays. Wedneeday nighte find moatly women there. The newest place in town is the Badlands, a men's west­ern bar. The gay Metropolitan Community Church of Knoxville assures us that it is holding reg­ular Sunday services at 4:30 p.m., and wel­comes out-of-town visitors. Lesbians visiting Knoxville will be interested in the potlucks held by the East Tennessee Lesbian• Alliance, which also runs the Tennessee Les­bian Archivee. Call 992-8423 for both. Before leaving Knoxville you can: titillate yourself with a tour of the Blunt Mansion and James White's fort; attend the nearly continuou• Bluegrua Festivals you'll find listed in the daily paper; visit the Appalach­ian Museum of Music and Culture in Norris (16 miles); camp it up in the Great Smoky Mountain• National Park (40 miles); do the resorts in Gatlinburg or Piegeon Forge (38 miles); see the Atomic Energy Museum in 1. Upstage 54 1501 White Ave. 637-7774 2. Europa Club 216 Main Ave. SW 522-0032 (call; location may change.) Travel Oak Ridge(25 miles); or go boating and water 11riing in the lakes of the Tennessee Valley Authority. 6. Badlands 317 N. Gay St. 3. MCC Knoxville 3219 Kingston Pk. SW 521-6546 E. Tenn. Lesbian All. Potluck Dinner (call for location) 992-8423 ACCOMODATI ONS 7. Eleanor Guest House 1127 Eleanor St. 523-5831 4. Adult Boutique 3507 Magnolia NE S. Kingston Pk News SOOS Kingston Pk SW BED HOUSE SALE! SALE! SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER Kings, reg. $600.00, now s17900 Queens, reg. $400.00, now '149°0 Other Sizes Available AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Come One, Come All! \ ~ 1~ ( ( "-- 7am-7pm \ \ Happy Hour , l ( 7 Days a Week Grant at Jackson 52~234 WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..... . 14 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 Letters GPC salutes Diana Foundation By Larry Bacneri1, president, Gay Political Caucuo On the evening of June 22, the Diana Foundation, in cooperation with Numbers Disco, presented its Annual Extrava­ganza, with both live performers and videotapes, for the benefit of the GPC and the Montrose Clinic. To many in the gay community, Diana ii seen aa a private organization that comee out once a year, dressed in tuxedos, and entertain• at the Tower Theater for a $25.00 admiuion price. For those of ua in the gay political move­ment, we look at the 29-year history of Diana and begin to see her in a much dif­ferent light. Just think what itmeantot be gay in 1953 aa compared to gay lifestyle today. We see Diana as a part of our his­tory, aa a survival tool for gays who did not have the advantages we have today. We see a picture of the need for privacy, communication and family that this orga­nization offered not only to its members, but also to other gays, as a place in which they could be themselves. Today, Diana presents an evening_ of professional entertainment, for which many houre are sacrificed, to give the com· munity an evening's entertainment for which we can all be proud. Many of your membera and supporters spent hundreds of hours helping to sup­port the GPC endorsed candidates. In our victories this past November, we became much cl°""r. In its desire to help the GPC in our financial responsibilities. Diana, on the night of June 22nd, raised $2800 for theGPC. On behalf of the Board of Directors of the GPC and myself, I would like to thank all of those individual• involved for being a part of our movement for liberation. He doesn't agree withGPC secretary Montrose Clinic announces blood drive and fund By Gulf Coaat Regional Blood Center If you were in an automobile accident and needed blood, would you expect the other From S. Cuniberti guy to donate for you? If the MONTROSE VOICE, in the article Sure, you would. But, did it ever occur to "GPC Seeks to Censor Media Contacts" you that you are the "other guy" to some­( i88ue 91), "miBBed or misinterpreted" the one else? Could someone else depend on intentions of the GPC letter of "invitation you to donate for them? to participate in discuSBions," I am not Montrose Clinic staff membera are au prised. I attended the meeting at which aware of the dire need for blood donation•. the letter wu read and approved and I got They are showing their concern by host­the same impression aa did the reporter. ing a blood drive on Saturday, August 14, Now I am really confused since Tony to set up the Montrose Clinic Blood Fund, Vega'a letter (issue 92) seems to aubstan- a blood replacement credit system for the tiate the original article in spite of it.8elf. Montrose community. I think that someone else who might A mobile unit from the Gulf Coast have been confused by Mr. Vega's reply ia Regional Blood Center will draw donors Mr. Webater who defines "censor" as "an from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 to official who reads communications and 5:00 p.m. at the Montrose Clinic, 104 deletes material considered harmful to the Westheimer. interests of his organization." If the desire If you are in good health, you probably to prevent Mr. le bin's "inappropriate" let- can be a blood donor. You must be between ter is not a deaire for censorahip then I do 18 (17 with signed parental consent card) not know what is. and 65 yeara of age. You must weight at Mr. Vega's letter to the editor runs rife least 110 pounds a nd have no history of with Marxist rhetoric such as, "A coBec· hepatitis or yellow jaundice, internal tive leadership is better." Within the con- • cancer requiring surgery or coronary text of the letter he wishes to deny artery (heart) disease. individuals' opportunitiea to "be reaponai- Blood donated at thia drive will estab­ble for the reactions their words produce" lish a blood replacement credit system for by preventing their free speech. memberaofthe Montrose communitywho Additionally, if what is going on receive transfusions in Gult Coast area "behind the scenes" is legal, why can't it hoapitals. Thia will help alleviate all or be done in the open? part of the patient's replacement obliga- In the midst of this furor, I wonder why tion as well as aid financially by removing the approved GPC letter baa not been some of the blood coats from the hospital made available to the public so that each bill. individual may decide for himself the If you know someone who could benefit validity of GPC policy. from thia blood fund, you should contact the Montrose Clinic. All requests for asaistance will be handled on a case-by­case basie. IC you have a question about donor eligi­bility, call the Blood Center at 790-1200. To make an appointment to donate August 14, call the Montrose Clinic at 528-5531. Your donation will not only help cover the blood needa of your neighbors but will assure a safe and adequate supply of blood for Gulf Coaat area patient.. Those "other guys" will be grateful. Summer Sale s2.oo each Tank Tops, Cutoffs, Shorts, Selected Shirts BASIC BROTHERS 1220 Westhelmer 522-1626 Open 11-7 M-S Vlso/ MosterCard/Am&.per.s INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 523-2795 l A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" ALL YOU CAN EAT ... Only $3.75 (plus drink) Buttel served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY 4 to 10:30 pm * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE)* * Chief cook with 20 y ears experience-just came from China * '* Chicken Kew * Sha Cha Beef with Cashew Nuts * Chinese Style * Shrimp with Roast Squab Lobster Sauce * Oyster with * Chiu Chow Style Duck Ginger & Green Onion * Sharks Fin with *And Many, Many More FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA Shredded Chicken . . We will prepare for you a very special Chinese dinner * **** Mixed Drinks ... * Professional Bartender ... * Lovely Waitresses ... Lowest Prices on Alterations COATS shorten or lengthen sieves $10, lower collar $12.50, shorten coat $25. take in or let out sides $10. lapels narrowed $35 VESTS sides $4.50 TROUSERS waist $3.75, seat $3.00, crotch $4.50, bottom $4.75, with cuffs $4.75, recut $25.00 DRESSES shorten $7.50 and up, skirts $6.00 and up The Designer's Room 224 Westhelmer 522-7106 EXPRESS YOURSELF FR~~.~~·s JERRY"S INFLATlolt FlllHTER PRICES HatrcuVblowdry or haircut & Hf. $10 PermanentwavesS35 men or women 523-0438 SUNDAY MONDAY Worahlp I z lerTtcea Memberahlp 10.45am u ClaN 7•J0pm 7•1Spm. llle•r.Welle1 lleY.Howard Cla• 7- Wellala the AMMrTice AA-llpm 8 q Mamberahlp Cl ... 7•JOpm Worahlp llleY.WeU.' lerTica• 1014·sam u ClaM 7- 71JS-. AA-llpm 15 16 Mamberahlp Claa 7•JOpm Worahlp llleY.WaU.1 lerTtcae l~SamU a- 'Jpm 7•JSpm. AA-9pm ==~ " 1~samu 111 ............ 71JSpm. ClaN 7•:Mpoa ...... a .... llay, Walle' FnCallmttb c:taee ?Pm labotb MrTICff AA-... zq JO Worahlp lanicae l~SamU 7•1Spm. AA-llpm T Paul D. Fraternal!, D.D.S. Cosmetic & Restorative Dentistry in Montrose Located just off Montrose Blvd. at 6 CHELSEA PLACE Call 523-7432 For appointments Tuesday-Friday Insurance assignments welcomed Patricia Anne O'Kane Attorney at Law • Criminal matters • Estate planning • Corporations • General civil practice • Seven years experience 3323 Yoakum 526-7911 AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 ------------------------ c_,t1puDl'•JJI~ Mexican Restaurant Breakfast Special Huevos Rancheros $1 Monday-Friday, 9-11am 813 Richmond Avenue 522-2365 -----------------------~ Tennis 1hoe1 priced up to $12 • TONS OF BOOTS Converae, TexH Br11nd, Acme, Dingo 2024 Weathelmer, 524-6606 AUGUST AT MCCR TVEIDAY WEDNESDAY THUJlSDAY FRIDAY SATUJlDAY J 4 s 6 71 CIAMeednp WUIV- Choir 7130pm Worahlp llleb ...... 1 IUD- lerTice 7•J0pm Blbl•Stndlff S1J0pm 71JSpm AA-8pm 7:JOpm 10 ll u u 14 Cbolr eo ....... , -rd Worahlp Rehearsal Meeda1 lel'Ylca 7:JOpm FamUIH Lambllout 7:JOpm 7•1Spm AA-8pm A;rtsChla~ 7•JOpm 17 a 1q .zo u Choir lln'.l!ldar Staff Worahlp lllebaaraal Fradalmltb NMdnp lan1ca 7•J0pm wWpreadl 7•JOpm 7•1Spm AA-8- •t7t1Spm ~ ZS %6 Z7 Z8 Choir 1119 Docacur ...... lllebaaraal Pot1-k Houac-. Tnaa Naadq Worahlp lel'Ylcle ,,,.... ..b ......... m-r 77007 7•JOpm 7•1SPDI AA-llpm 713epm 7,,.... 31 16 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 Do you know where Advertising in 1982 in Montrose has changed from the days of 1979 and before. The switch is to the Voice because we don't play games with your advertisements by limiting the number of copies we put in circula­tion. We saturate Houston's gay com­munity every week-with news, entertainment, and the ads of commu­nity businesses that are getting ahead. Call your Voice advertising represent­ative (David Petluck, Gene Oliver or Lyt Harris) or advertising director Bill Marberry, at 529-8490. We'll show you a difference! If your advertisement is in the Mon­trose Voice, you can relax. Your message is appearing in over 7700 copies (guaranteed) being distributed through 110 Montrose clubs, restau­rants, shops and stores, and it is getting into the hands of an estimated 21,600 readers! On the other hand, if your ad is elsewhere ... well, you're reaching far fewer people-and paying more money to do it. The Voice brings results for its adver­tisers because we saturate the com­munity every week with more copies through more distribution points. In fact, the Voice now circulates about twice as many copies each week in Houston as does the other publica­tion. Surprised? You shouldn't be. After all, the Voice has better commu­nity news, sports and entertainment coverage, nationally syndicated wri­ters, great comics, a professional attitude-and thousands more copies distributed each week in Houston through dozens more distribution points. AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Competition tight in the MSA softball playoffs By Jerry DeSale Pre•ldent, MSA Softball Leape The MSA Softball League's 1982 Cham­pionship Playoff Series finally got well underway last weekend with the final qualifying round game being played and the first four championship game com­pleted. The previous weekend, the first of the qualifiers saw the Montrose Voice defeat the Barn 7-5 in a rain-shortened game. Last weekend, A&K Jewelry faced the Brazos River Bottom in the other qualify­ing game and A&K prevailed by the score of 12-8, sparked by Ken Johnson's 3 for 4 performance with 2 homeruns. In the first game of the official cham­pionship playoff series. the Montrose Voice faced Jim's Gym. By past perfor­mance and season records, the Gym should have been highly favored, but the Voice had other ideas. The Voice turned in an excellent defen­sive game and outhit the Gym on the day to earn a 10-2 victory. The Voice had no one star this day as the team spread the hits throughout their lineup to upset Jim's Gym, In the second series game on Saturday, the Montrose Mining Company over· whelmed A&K Jewelry 21-8. The game saw A&K open an early lead on Ken John· ston's 1st inning 2-run homerun. The game remained close until the 4th inning when Larry Bradley delivered a Z.run homerun for the Mining Company to give the Mine an 8-3lead. Then in thefifth inning, the Mining Company exploded for 11 runs while sending 17 batters to the plate. Sunday afternoon again brought rain to Levy Field and it appeared that the games might be washed out. Thanks to the efforts of several players from Dirty Sally's and the Montrose Voice and head umpire Carol Clark, the field was put in fair condi­tion and the games were able to be played. The first game of the night saw the Mon· trose Voice face Dirty Sally's. Many thought that this would be an easy game for Sally's, but the Voice continued to play excellent defense for most of the game and held Dirty Sally's to 'only 6 runs for the game. But 6 runs was all Sally's needed as the Voice could not manage to put a runner across the plate and the final score was Sally'• 6, Voice 0. • Sunday's second game saw the Mining Company, fresh from the romp over A&K on Saturday, ready to play the Galleon. The Mining Company thought that this could be their day to beat the Galleon since the field conditions and high humidity would tend to negate the power hitting advantage that the Galleon would nor· mally have. llut the Mining Company soon found out differently ao Don Kessler delivered a 3-run homerun in the bottom of the Jot inning to give the Galleon a 4-0 lead after the lot. The Galleon tallied 4 more runs in the 4th inning and, though the Mine tried to rally, it was too little too late as the Gal­leon won by the final score of 14-6. With the wine and loBBes over the past weekend, the schedule for this Saturday promises some interesting games. Saturday's first game will pit the 2 second place teams, Jim's Gym a nd the Montrose Mining Company. The second game Saturday will pit division riv.ale A&K Jewelry against the Montrose Voice. The loaers of these games will be elimi­nated from the playoff race while the winners will advance to face each other m the last game on Saturday (8:45 p.m.). The third game on Saturday (7:30 p.m.) will feature the teams that won their respective divieions, the Galleon and Dirty Sally's. The winner of this game will advance to the championship finals on Sunday and will be just one victory away from being Houston's representative at this year's Gay Softball World Series in San Francisco. Should any or all of the games on Satur­day be rained out, they will be reached uled for early on Sunday and will be played at either Levy Field or Westwood Field depending on field conditions. Game• will begin about 10:00 a.m. if necessary on Sunday. A sign will be posted at Levy Field should this reschedul­ing become necessary. This rescheduling will not affect the time schedule for the finals which will begin at 6000 p.m. at Levy Field. MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Saturday. Ju/y31 (playortquallfer) A&K Jewelry 12 Brazos River Bottm 8 Saturday, July31 (playoffs) Montrose Voice 10 Jim's Gym Montrose Mining 21 A&K Jewelry Sunday, August 1 31 (playoffs) Dirty Sally's 6 Montrose Voice Galleon 14 Montrose MininQ FINAL 1982 SEASON STANDINGS South D1v1s1on Galleon Jim's Gym A&KJewalry Montrose Voice Briar Patch 10 3 769 8 5 615 ~ ! ;: 3 10 231 NorthD1vi.s1on OlrtySally's 12 1 923 - ~:r~trose Mining : ~ :~ Mary's 5 8 385 Br1ZOs River Bottom 3 10 231 REMAINING PLAYOFF SCHEDULE (Allg1m.prob9l)lyatlavyF111d FromMontrOM.go outRichmond.pulKlrby.letlonEu1..o..) S•turd•y. Augu:.t7 Game 7 Jim's Gym V1 Montrose Mining Co., 5pm Game 8 A&K Jewelry vs Montrose Voice, 6:15pm Game 9: Dirty Sally's va_ Galleon. 7:30pm Game 10: wmnergoame7 vs wlnnergama8. 8:45pm lf1nyof1heAugust7g1masarera1nedout.theywlll berescheduledlorearlySunday1teitherLevyField or Westwood Field. depending on field conditlons beginning about 10:00 am_ II necessary A sign will be posted a1 Lavy Field The championship finals August Bat LavyFieldw1llnotbeaffected CHAMPIONSHIP FIN:~snday. August 8 Game 11: loser game 9 vs winner game 10. 6pm Game 12·winnargame9vs winnergame 11. 7:15pm Game13 lfnecessary.8:30pm MSA Women's Softball POST TOURNAMENT 1982 STANDINGS Ducks ~~!al Blend Renegades MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK"S GAMES HIOH GAMES Monday, A~:~~fUES Steve Stapleton 224 Steve Stepleton 576 Rich Ryan 219 Don Housen 588 Bob Craig 208 Bob Akins 553 STANDINGS DWl.slonA 1. Eurotan lnt'I ~:~~y'• 4 LowattLana Dlvl.s!on B 1. E/J'• Protein Sup-pllments 2. Five e .. y Pieces 3. Bushwackara 4.Lolslanes Dtv1.sionC 1.CitizenPain 2.Cock-Tailers 3. Trash Unlimited 4 Slow Hand Dfvi.sionD 1. Happy Trails 2.GalleonOne 3.lntaract 4 G•tor-Ald THIS WEEK'S GAMES (AH 99,,.... ., SINlum Bowwl, l:!OO Brearn.m) Monday, August 9 Aegut1r competition, 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursday, August 5 Resulttnextweek Sports Houston's West End Stars practice (above and below). HIGHQAl.IES Thursday, July29 Terry Wotber 234,201 Stave Matzke 228 Stave Mcconaughy Jlfry Newton 225 233.201 Jack Richardson 203 MlkeFoetar 202 STANDINGS {ThrooghJuly29) 1. JuatMarion&Lynn"s 7. Thursday Knights Troplctil Fruft 8 Hang 10 2 For a Few Daddies 9 Thursd1y Night More Tt1cks 3. Chases 10_ 4to 1 4 The Rockett" 11. Gutter-Sluts 5 Kindred Spirits' 12. Kindred Spirits' Acea High LHther&lace 8 Salt & Pepper II THIS WEEK'S GAMES {All~ ... Slad1Umlklwl,l200BrlN9IM11'1) Thursday, Augou.st 12 Regutarcompetltion,9pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Mond1y,Auguat9 K1ndrecl$plritl(!52'4!58uH•loSpeedw•y.M5--9756)1t 130pm.11ngle•ltmlnauon,$2•ntry,winn.rtllk••ll R•nch (M20·~ M•ln, ~730) M" pm. !MOie ahm•MbOn $2.,,try,wlnnut11halt($50gu9rant .. ) Tilffd•y,AUQurr10 L•mpott(2'417Tlmn81Yd.!52&-8921)Mlpm.single.iim._ Mhon.$2antry, wmMrt•k••ll WadnHd•y,Augvat11 Bn., P9tch (2294 w Holcombe. 965--9871) st Opm. a.1ng1e •hmin1t10n.$2entry,S50priz.• G 81 (1'411 R1ehmond. 52&-8803) •I lpm. •ll'lgle ... m.,.._ Uon. S2 entry. w•M« t•ke Mt end new pool cue MSA V olleyballers may do it again There are four major volleyball touma· ments in Texas in the summer. Three of the have been played so far this year. With their first place win in San Anto­nio on July 31, the West End Stars of MSA Volleyball have taken first place in all three tourneys played this season. Entered in the tournament were teams from Houston, San Antonio, Austin and Dallas. The enthusiasm for volleyball is growing throughout Texas. Said a spokesman for the West End Stars, "It was very exciting. We had a big crowd watching." The Stars played Pegasus from Dallas in the finals and struggled to victory, win­ning the first game 15-11, losing the =~:~t~;·!,5~~da~d~7t!:!!!!~~1ti a 15-10 win. In the B Division, the MSA's Diehards, also took first place. MSA Volleyball is now preparing for the final tournament in Tnas this season, which will be held in Houston August 14. The A Division matches will take place at Fonde Recreation Center and the B Divi· sion will play their matches at Gregory· Lincoln High. Thuraday.Avgwt12 B.un(710Paclflc.52&-t427Jstipm,double911m•Mbon.$2 tnlry.S2!5firslroundpn1:1.St!5MCOnclroundprtza JU1IM•rion1ndlynn'•(817F•1rview 528--9110}.t(lpm.$2 tntryfeeWlnn«takeall EIJ'1(1213RICtunond.52M1071)al10pm.doub+eehm•M­hon,$ 2.mry.w1nnerlaJleaU MSA Tennis LAST WEEK'S MATCHES Sunday, Augu.st 1 KitciV"Cotbert <>"et RobichuuxJEltiot 6-4. 6-1 John Ryan over Richard Cot • 6-3, 6-3 M1chMI Houston over Mika Green 6-4. 6-4 Charllft Brown O'l9f Jim Olsen tH. 6-2 John Ryan over David Robichaux 6--3. 7-6 (5-3) Don Kally overOavtd Garza 7~. (S-2). 6-4 TOP TEN STAND!N~~ 1. Rich Ryan 1. Mike Green 2. Fred Lopez 2. Donny Kelly 3. Jim Kitch 3. Rich Corder 4. Aon L•ndrum 4 D•vld G•rza. 5_ John Ay•n 5. Peter L" 8 D•vld Roblch .. ux 6. Robert Arrlagoa 1 Rlch.,d Cot... 7 Ch1rhe Brown 8. Lester Vela 8 Eddie Chavez 9JonCofbeft 9.JimOlsen 10 M•ch.., Houston 10. Larry Collins THIS WEEK·s MATCHES fCOurtlloca.tadMacG...,..Pw\Tll'IMC.-.TakaGull F,_ayM:IUth..UCalhoun JUMPffllM~pwOOlt.ft.) Sunday, August 8 Regul•r compel1tlon, 10:31'.Mm Gay Olympic Games deadline extended marathon,ph (.._on)JI), divin •• lmnia. andwr•tlin•(,.,on0<>ly~ TbeidMforthe1amMola.udinl980in SanFranci9<o.8y•rlythilly .. r,San FroinciKoAn.oandAthetiaHntoutfeel ..,.. M to bow m..,y poopLt W<><lld be lntuNl<!d in the l'•meo. E•p.._od \ri-taomefrom.,.,.,,2000potent.ial perticipantoln .... rtyllOrountriN. Onooftheproblomathatfon:i1na~ 1-ra .. u.h.,..1oon~rthe<:011nlt)'>n .,,...,.tocompeioinlh• r•--~•l ad.;.,,,onhowlo~•l'OlllldlhoTMtric­\ ioM""lravolthatar11imix-don1ay ~J::.=i;~~1~r; t.!":h':"d;.i~:!':e~pu=~~ OrpniNro (W/l IO ri#llt)of~G<l.y Olympia i~M•r•_Brown, ~iu.;•<>flM to=~~':,;lionin th•.1unoe_ll'f :;,'i,~.;,,,";:,~-~.=':f£:H'1:';!~",..,"":,,c:!~ theya,.."' .. llU""1~- t~E~~§. ~@~~~~ How....,.,theocopeoftho~Olympo< After tho ioumamont, tropb;..i .._ =.!:.=!:;E"~~1 ~~onelo..chmomberoftheorin-utotheOl'l'& nllonofthe.-.- Mark Brown, chairman of tho •porlo commiUH,oaidl'Kftltlythat hebopedtho otentionofthedoadline~onooura10 H,,...IOnathi.c..topart;cipe&e. The1...,.w:illrv.nfromAqU428 thl'OU&'b5epc.ember6Md,..jJlbehelda!l OYerS.nFTancieco,inchldin1KnarSla· dio.m.Thutadhun,b,thewayw:illt..vea opM3a!N<ti.onoetuidof0<the~bhod andm,,.ho......,pln_~.,llbe :;;du.bi.. for th• hoenn1-1mpe1l'fld, they BWMT plan bicycle non-race Rumage sale for MSATennis planned Womens post-season tournament overcomes rain soaked field On S..1ur-d•y, A-t 21, lhoMSA Ttnnia 1-uo&DdBWMT(Bl•ck&Dd'NhiteMeo T<>10IJ.er) wiU hold • nunmap .elo H • The eYOnti &notnaetly •n fund...Wngefl'or'I. ofllcial opo;>OU MSA Softball hu al-.ly don•.ted the ""ont,butltd-ooundoponyin• .. aJ'remalnd•oflhopoda~lhe1rvery and lt lnY<llVH ....,en] MSA •lhlriH, 9-ful Nie, •hid> took pl•oe at tho ByBlllla Du_.. ""Catlit1tt..,,.k1...,.,den,"oaid.Claire Vuilioy ollho MSA Women'• Soft""1J 1-ue.u M1uplal....to~l•-diD1' eleonn:alpoundb .. 1ofco.thlkroverlhe .n.e.l.d.o.o.t.h...t.lh.1 po1WMOOD 1<>1tm.o.mont MI .. uov.tlhenat7inlho"'ominl'on !:!:'!"J.';n~?~·!",;,,'!".:ttf::: play«l ond ·~t •u• ,.....,,....,..," ~tpiooi•uwonbyo""""-Du.cU tM.m,whileSpocilll Blendiook1oupriM _,,,..placo.Sped•IBlondwuln lhe<>0l· luinlhorenlar-.oon -r..lruico.pturedthir.landlhelop­= Ren"l'odH manapd IO ploce Thoompbamowuoriopo;>OU"'•,,..,ip andth.ejoyofpl1yi..,,,and..ui1-. invo)Tod who 1poh IO I.ho VOICE 5719Klrby/Suite 20 Houston,Texu77005 522-1227 SCUBA DIVERS! Labor Day Weekend in C<>zumel, 5ept.3-6 ONLYlheVoiceaatura!es Montrose each week with over one hundred distrlbutOonlocatlons 'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.--,iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil ---------A-u..G. .U ST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 II MONTROSE ~~~!ours Monday-Saturday I TRAVEL 522 _ TRIP Sunday, Aug. 8-Fabulous show ~~ ~:~i.is~rr, DOUBLE R The Search for Burgundy Woods, Peaches 11: Alexander Rira "Poppa Bear" ~~~~~rtr~~t:1,:· r~i~~~ir~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~ ~--SALOON September 17-19, $159 i~;~i~~~~~;l-1444 ~~ ~~~~~::~;~0;;0::~~!b~?~fi~~;:~;~· Watch for Grand Opening R Denver Weekend 3 days, 2 nights, Hotel & Round Trip Air ( Fare, Welcome Cocktail, Many other OPEN "- special attractions, Hosted by Charlie's Monday-Saturday "\ Bar of Denver llam-2am, Sunday lpm-2am $199 based on double occupancy Call for details, 2506 Ralph, 522-8747 ~@tdl~ LEE HOPMANN INDEPENDENT OPTICIAN Yo11r 1l,\t1n·~ 1rrf~,rwlr'111 t1•1•l.-1•ll/t' Personalized Custom jewelry b Rings Designed to Reflect Your Li/ estyle! Serving Mon~ Since 1974 Immediate Cash We Buy • Gold • Silver • Jewelry •Gems • Coins • Watches 1947 West Gray• Suite 101 • 7D/529· 3005 The ROUGH CUT I 520 Westheimer Suite K I JZ0-7050 *****•••••• KRAZYHOUR 7 days a wook, 9-10pm, 75' Well Drinks GRANT STREET Tuesda:.-~;:~,[K~~~t/LPnces Sun., 2-6, AUTOMATIC -Lml~-:--'.., 2377 Grant at Fairview St~r I ON 528-8342 A People Place NOW OPEN AT 7AM for Cocktails with Lulu ••••••••••• 20 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 .... ,...-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ L.1 .... ..._ • 522-8227 A CLUB FOR WOMEN AND THEIR FRIENDS SAN FRANICSCO 1249 Round Trip Air Call Rick for Details . Sunday, August 8, 6-Spm John Day & Company 8pm-till Cayte Myth Show starring Cayte Myth, Jackie O'Shanter, Lana Kane, Laura Lee Love Wednesday, August 11, 9-1 Happy Trail Riders Band Tuesday: Steak Night Thursday: Free C&W Leiisons by Dennis Rodriguez 7.9pm Pool Tournament lOpm Movies nightly on the patio Waterinr Hole OPEN 7AM-2AM 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 E11tnparkil'1Jonthecorner of Mt. Vsnon A Richmond NEVER A COVER CHARGE ~~~i~~Y- ~~Y~1E 1625 RICHMOND 522-1625 Live Entertainment weekday• 5 :30 - 8 :00 Happy Hour, Monday thru Friday 5 :00 • 7 :00 Cherry Wolfe, D.J. Appearing Thuredaya thru Sunday• Pool Tournament every Monday 8 :30 winner take• all 1 •t Monday of every month Free C&W Dance L•••ona 8:00 Lll•t Sunday of every month C&W Night, featuring the Mustang Band 7:00 • 11 :00 SECURITY I NO COVER (l.D. required) ~z;:.~oun~·~:.:-::=: 713/84'5·$758 Samantha Samuels Final 2 performances Friday & Saturday, August6 & 7 From Hollywood, we bring you .. . Sheila Ceasar Beginning August 4, Tuesday-Saturday Accompanied by Joe Thalken Happy Hour 4-8pm Our chef has d011e it again! Elegant dining and woml.erful prices. ............................ Marlena Shaw: From jazz to disco By Nick Fede A laser graphic repeatedly projected the name of Marlena Shaw on the top right wall of Numbers, 300 Westheimer. Then the etage curtains parted to showcase a giant red fan that slowly folded down to reveal the singer. She etepped out and greeted the crowd, garbed in a gold shimmer pantsuit with a matching jacket. Before singing "Love Dancing," the songstress sang and spoke an interlude that recounted a young girl's flight from adolescence at the age of 17 until her growth and maturity with the arrival of her early 308. "I did (wrote) all of the connecting things on this," she said later in an inter­view. During the song, two crowd member& leapt onto the stage and danced along with the singer . One of them tipped her some money to which she, with an incredulous look, said, uOne dollar!" She brought laughter from the crowd when she moved to the opposite end of the stage eaying, "I'm going down here to see if I can get some more money." When asked later about the impromptu tip, she 88id, "I was not offended by the tip. I was offended by the amount of the tip." She added, uEvery one knows I'm a whore but just how much i• to be deter­mined." After the two men exited off stage, two more quickly jumped up to boogie with the einger. She then asked both such pertinent questions aa, "Are you spoken for?" and "Have you had your ehote?" She then lriaeed one of them warmly and applauded all of the crowd dancer&. A jazzy crooning of ''Touch Me in the Morning" followed with the songstreBS fluttering her fingera expansively and wringing her hands, while some crowd memebers lifted their arms high toward her. During the instrumental center of the the tune, lasers shot beams of color throughout the club, adding an interest­ing dimension to the music. Strong, driv­ing vocala finiehed the number after which ehe ended her 20 minute show to long and profuee crowd applause. &ferring to her performance later, she eaid while lighting a cigarette, "With live musicians you can et.op and go, but when you're doing dieco, you have to go." When aeked about her soulful perform­ing style, she commented, "To me there's a certain monotony to the music (dieco) and the the only deviation is the meseage." In speaking about some show business penonalitiee and their worlring attitudes, she aaid, "There are times when I have Iota of patience for bullshit." A coneumate jazz performer who has been recording for 16 years, she has been recording disco mueic for the last three. "AB a jazz singer-which is basically what I am-I have a tendency to change things around." She continued, "I decided if I was going in to disco, I was going to do it my way." About. performing disco, she said, "It.'s no different t.han any other audience expe­rience." . One reason she said she enjoys perform­ing in discoa ie "mostdiecos are private, so you can do three or four shows in the area." She referred to the club and stage at Numbers by eayin11, "'The actual set-up waa perfect." When asked if her music could be described as "romantic disco," she said, 11 As a performer I'm doing only the one side of the two people in the song." She indicated that it might. be romantic reality "if you can see the two people romancing each other." At the start of the interview, she gave a clue to the fact that she posessee a warm and humoroua peraonality when ahe com­mented, uAsk me anything. I will lie." Somehow, there are atrongdoubte about that . AUGUST 6, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Live Nancy Ford: Funny person with big plans trabon is all pre-taped by an excellent band from the Dallu area and Dena pro­VJded the live vocals. She fits in eo well wi~ the pre-recorded music that you'd think she had a full Jive band behind her. By Billie Duncan Nancy Ford waa born "head first" is Salem, Ohio in 1954 and she has been going at life head first ever since. Her first memory of childhood was that of being propped up on a pillow while watching the Mickey Mouse Club. Her mother possibly sat her in front of the tube to keep h~r quiet. "I was a screamer, I'm told/' said Nancy. "My mother said I ~~'{J':i.~ to be held. As a matter of fact, Television was a big part of her child· hood. "I used to watch aikoms back to back." And she was doing "satire when I was three, four years old." A photo of young Nancy still exists in which she ie wearing a couple of 451 booked on her ea111 and posing for the camera. 0 1 was supposed to be a singer. Maybe I thought I was playing by ear." When she was lees than three years old, she took up tap dancing. Of course, she was the end of the line-the kid that went off last as the tiny tappers exited. "I got to bow and throw a kiBB." In junior high, she took up the French horn. She enjoyed it until one week when she did not practice. She went into her lesson and just faked it. And everything went so well that she stopped practicing altogether. Soon, her playing fell apart and she quit the French horn completely. By 1968 she had already been a singer imitator, a satirist, a tap dancer and a French horn player. What was left? "I took up the guitar to embellish my hippie image." The first eong she learned to play was "Where Have All the Flowers Gone." She maintains that she is still "striving for the avant garde." College did not impress her. She went ~o;~~~g.~~at a year and 111 really studied Like m~ny young women, she married and was m that Jegal state for the aum of three years. "They were six of the happiest months of my life." Explaining what went wrong, ehe said, 11People change." But when ehe reflected for a moment, she added, "Maybe I didn't change. Maybe I JU&t started being more honest with myself." Besides playing her guitar and singing at public gatherings, she became involved in community theater in Ohio. She has served in some capacity in thirteen pro­ductions since 1976. One of her favorite theatrical experien­ces was that of playing thirteen charac­ters in Edgar Lee Masters' Spoon Riuer ~~~~~t;·~~~a~rtr• ranged in age Another memorable experience was when she W88 the musical director for a prodution whose set was on a huge revolve. She was conducting away when the curtain• began to bulge. The set bad broken from its spindle and was on its way off the stage. Like the musicians on the Titanic, she and her group kept right on playing as frantic otage hands finally stopped the errant set. Actually, one of ther favorite parta about conducting the show was that she got to wear a tuxedo. "It was a small town. Women didn't dreu like men. As a matter of fact, men didn't dre88 like men." She moved to Houston a year ago this week. " I've at least begun to establiah a name for myself around Montrose. Which wao a goal." She has played at Kindred Spirits, Don's Le Patois, Cafe San Michel and at the Keyboard with Eileen Weiner. Other musical appearances included a performance for an ACLU event and one at the NOW kickoff for Women's Week at Herman Park in March. When asked ifhermuoiccould be termed women's music, she answered, "It's my mueic. I happen to be a woman. Does that make it woman'• music?" She added, ,.I really think it could be applied to men and women. Neither. Both." Nancy has written 12 oongs in 11 years and the fint one she wrote is often the Nancy Ford most requested by people who know her music ("Here with You"). Currently, she is appearing in Theater So~thwest'e premier production of Don't !'rmt That! She read about the auditions m the VOICE and went and tried out and was cast. The audiences have loved her In addition, she io in rehearsal for the next show of Houston/ Off Broadway ("Mangled Minds Go Kamping") which opens at E/ J 's on the 16th of this month. HOB i1 an improvisational collective that has been presenting shows and develop­in!'!' ~lent in Montrose for three years . . Ive never done improv before," said Nancy, "and I knew I oouJd do it." She added, ult'eagood.feelingtoknowyou'rea ::~ e~~:~~.i,?g that's really growing Ae far as her future plans she she said she i~ ~king it, "one step at 'a time. Right :;::d~~. •my goal to be a bia fieh in a little But not for long. "I went to a psychic who told me that within 10 years I'd be a national name." Nancy Ford is getting ready to be just that. "I want to polish. I need to be very tight. When I get there, I want to be ready." Dena aloo picked up her guitar and aang oeveral ballada without the benefit of the taped band. ~th.ougb Dena is tiny in stature, her voice 11 atron& and raspy and at times reoemblea that of Ann Murray. The music style ia primarily contemporary C&W with several romantic follt ballads thrown in for contrut. The packed house at E/ J'o was moet reaponsive to Dena'a warm and unique style, although obe is almoot an unknown entity to Montrose audiences. The excellent eound and light system that travels with the group compliments the unique concept. The "group," aa it is, ~nsiets only of a eound technician, a spo­tlight operator and Dena. Even though Dena'• Houston debut was only a mere aix week.a ago at the Brazos River Bottom, she bas been playing other clubs around Te:i:ao, both gay and non· gay, for six years. Her home base is Dal­las, where 1he is best know, and she a ppears regularly at The Wild Crowd Saloon there. Born into a family who traveled and sang gospel mu.sic, Dena sang with the family through her high ochool years and then ventured out professionally on her own in 1976. ''The gay clubs have been just great to me and really gave me my start," Dena commented, "but we aleo enjoy playing the atrlllght clubo, especially in the smaller citiee and towns." The group leavee Houston for Waco Abilene and Odeua. and then its back U: Big D for more performances on their home turf. If you miaaed The Dena Kaye Show at the BRB or at El J 'o, don't despair, because Manon Panzer of Just Marion & Lynn'• Club has recognized Dena's talent and has booked her in theclubat817Fair­view in mid-September. More Montrose club and cabaret owners should wake up and take note of Dena, because she'o a talent that'• too good to be kept a secret in Dallas, or Waco, or Odessa. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (fndly. Augustl. througl'ITl'iundl'yAugust12) • PIANO Gerry Qu1non• 9pm Tueedly through Saturdly •t Ructil•. 2702 Kirby. 524-8V2 Jlm C•ter & Jert Longino 8pm Fndly; Tom Williams & Jert Longino Spm S•turdlly: Greg O•vis 8pm Sundey & Monday, Tom W1lh1ms Bpm Tu.day: L .. Laforge - --------"- ~,:~~:t:.,.c;,~~;"~:~.!.~~r8pm Discover Dena Richard Aikin end Dena Rogers 10pm nightly :~~~~~"!:: ~~==y) et the Copa (piano bar), SamantM Samuels 9pm Fridlly & Saturday. Lion· share 9pm Sundey & Mondey & Sheila Ceasar 9pm By Lyt Harris Tuesd•y·Thursdsy at S.Ja·s. 402 Lovett, 527--9868 When The Dena Kaye Show rolled into ~':=~~ .. T~~~::'!:O~.F=·=~='. Houston thio week for their second and 52&-2993 third area appearances at the Brazos • ORGAN River Bottom and E/ J 's Club on Tuesday • l<eot<I Kone 5pm Fnday & Sellurdey. 3pm Sunday & and Wedneeday, repectively, even the cae- 5pm W.ctneedey & Thursday at the Hole. 109 Tuain, ual obeerver could detect more than juat S2&-90M the typical otereotype C&W groups thateo • COUNTRY 6 COUNTllY/AOCK often frequent the Montrose club acene. Thi New Happy Trail Riden Country·W•tem Sog- To say that The Dena Kaye Show is g .. bind 9:30pm Friday & Saturday •t Happy Traits slick, professional marketing package 715 Fa•rvttW, 521-2782 would be an understatement. From the Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9·30pm FrKtay & Saturdsy & ~~=~~':t ~~'f.~ J:.':," to ~~c~s':o"!: ~~.F::.,~~·:, ~r':o.":.'!,'~;,:,:;'>":oo~;:;: made a~e back~rop and top quality wall Flying Bhnd Band 9pm Tueeday-s.1urday at M1" posters, it was eVldent that this group had Charlott.-.. 911 Drew, 528-8840 cJa~. But, as we all know, class and talent Trinity River Bridge Band 9 30pm Friday & Saturday don t alw!-ya keep the same company. & 3pm Sunday & Muata~ Band 8.30pm Wedneed•y en'f11~~-:1e::·!~=tiw~=:;in~~~ :~~~:11Y at BrazOI River Bottom. 2400 Brazos, hi~%:::!.~~ ~~~~J~~?!~t;.WP.:.i ~:~: ::~~5~;~19pm Wodnooday at E/J1. 1213 :~tithepbe':~t with •inena" embroidered ;;:,, ~~'t.~~~~ Wednesday at the The Dena Kaye Show ie definitely not a Susan Christian 5:30pm Fnday; Reynolds & Rand "me too" product, but a talented package 530pfn Monday: Rawslyn Rott•n 5.30pm Toeaday with an unique point of difference. Orchee- =n~.':i~n::=~~~ at l(indr.d 22 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 • IHOWGROUH Dixie K1ng1 9pm Saturday & 8pm Sunday 1t Happy Traill. 715Fairview. 521-2792 Mita Hui 9:30pm FrKtay &Saturday at Lampoat. 2417 Tim• Btvd . 528-8921. & 8pm Wedo.day at Bac­chus. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 John Day & Co 8pm Sunday at E/J's. 1213 Rich­mond. 527-9071 • JAZZ The ADO Jazz Quartet Bpm Sund1y at Hatrar's, 428 W•tlie1mer.52fr2895 Robert Ceballos Group 9pm Sunday & wtth Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday, Wednesday & Thursday atlas8r1sas.614W Gray,528-9959 W1ndrose9:30pm nightly (except Sunday & Monday); 1nd Horace Cnaby9:30pm Sunday & Monday at Bird­watchers. 907 W•the1mer. 527-0595 • NU WAVE/PUNK The Litt & Random Culture 9 30pm Friday; the Upstarts & Doomsday Massacre 9:30pm Saturday MDC & the Fuck-Ups 9:30pm Monday; & the Bound­..., 9·30pm Thursday at Omni, 1540Westh91mer. 528- 4230 •COMEDY The Chinetti Syndrome 830 & 11pm Friday & Satur­dlly: Manuel L•bor 11 the Not the President of Meiuco e-30pm Sunday & Monday: The Best of Comedy Workshop. Volume II 8·30pmWednesday & Thursday 1t Comedy Worbhop. 2105 San Fehpe, 524J.7333 Stand· up com1e1 n+ghtty atComm1xAnnex. 2105San Felipe, 524-7333 Sean Morey. Adam LHl1e, Diana N1chols8 & 10:30pm Frid1y, 7:30. 10 & m1dn1ght Saturday. & 8:30pm Sui:t­dly. and Max Maven, Jett OeH.,t. Adam leslte 8:30pm Tuesday. Wednesday & Thursday at the Laff Stop. 1952-A W Gr1y. 524-2333 • IMPRESSIONISTS Donn• Cay. N1om1 Sims & Hot Chocolate Sunday 8\"en1ng at the Cop.1. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Little Bobby. Tracey. & guests Sunday evening at Exile. 1011 Bell, 659-0453 ~ P11yg1r! Foll1• ' 10·30pm Saturday at Ptnk Elephant 1218 Leetand. 859-0040 • MISCEUANEOUS T11ent shows Tu.day hen+ng 11 the Cop•. 2631 Richmond. 5~2259. Wednesd•y 9'temng •t M1dn+te Sun. 534 Westhe1mer, 526-7519: & Thursday evening at Twins 535W•thetrner.S20-0244 0 Duncan's Quick Notes Hot muaie and hotter food: Harrar's on Weatheimer had its grand opening this past week with featured entertainment by jazz group ADQ, which stands for the Aubrey Dunham Quartet. They played to a packed and very mixed audience who fully appreciated their rather atandanl jazzy otyle. The entertainment was good, but the food wu better. In fact, the food ia an entertaining experience all on its own. It io extremely hot. Very, very hot. Hot. No forlu are oerved with the apicey dishes, so the eater takes some of the spe­cial Ethiopian "bread" (more like thin, opongey pancakes) and picks up the food and eats it with the bread. Entertaining and really deliciou.a. Give and take of Chocolate Bayou Theater: It is better to get something for nothing or something for something than to get nothing for something. With this in mind, the Chocolate Bayou Theater is kicking off its new season by presenting a fun evening in return for soliciting season ticket.a. The fil'lt part of the evening will feature 1lidea, music, dance and other entertain· inr tidbits that will give lhe audience a picture of the hiotory of the theatre and of its futun! plane. Greater Tuna. segment with a chorus of eigh t. Pat and Leonard are not known for their musical abilities and Pat usured me that they will not aing. Another good reason for attend· ing. The aecond part of the program will be Peter Shaffer'• tour de force using reverse lighting, Black ComM.y. The,play starts out with a dark atage until a black-out occurs, at which point the lights come up on stage to reveal to the audience what is happening in the dark. Mon troeian Roger Gentry is the director of Black Corudy and Phillip Charleton of Montrose is the director of the musical revue. Sounds like a wonderful way to sell tickets. Summer kamp: Well, it had to happen There is a group of Montrosians headed for summer kamp. But in true Montrose style, they won't get there until the fall. Yes, the Mon trose Symphonic Band will be off the the Rocky River Ranch pretty soon for a "work weekend," according to conductor Andy Mills. After explaining that the facility will "do the cooking. And there'• bunkhouses, horaeback riding, swimming and tennis," Andy insisted that the reason they were going was for "rehearsals and work· Two members of Killing Joke flanking a fan backatage at Numbers 2. shops." Andy is also very excited about the upcoming Montrose Chorale that will begin practicing next month. "I'm looking forward to working with women.'' Summer youth musical: As part of the Mayor's Youth Program, the Kashmire Summer Drama Workshop will be present· ing West Side Story, directed by Julian Doner The cast membere are predominately bJack and had to audition for the summer program. Once accepted, they began to work in an appreticeship atmosphere designed to give them a grounding in pro­fessional theatre. Some of the young peo· pie in this year's production have worked in the program for several years. Last year'• production of Fame brought Montrosiana out in force. Since the basic conflict in West Side Story is the lack of understanding between races and most of the cast is black, the conflict has been changed to one between Puerto Ricans and Blacks, rather than whites. Kilting joke knocked them dead: Opening with a blaring cacopha ny that melted into a raucua melody, the nu wave band from England, Killing Joke, slammed their music with a vengence mto the ears of the audience last week at NTh~k':yboard player (Jaz) clutched his hair in a maniacal way between v~le while present ing occult signs to the Audience. His face waa painted with black otrea ka that may or may not have symbol· ized anything, and he waa highlighted in garish red light. r..!:,c::i;'d/ =~;.J;•.;:..i:e~ ~hl~ Andy Milla and tM Montrose Symplumic Band at tM Tower TMaUr in 1981. The sound 1ystem was the pits and vocals were garbled, but most of the crowd did not oeem to mind. By the end of the show, the stage guards were having a hard time keeping the stairs clear. Anouncements had been made that the concert would stop if the stairs were invaded, but by the end the crowd man· aged to take the bottom step. After the concert, the leader of the group was unavailable for comment, but the other members of the band were talkative between beers in the dressing room, put­ting down the rumors that they are satanic and speaking of protecting the environment. About music, the drummer (Big Paul) said "I'm talking about music like classi­cal 'that causes people to think-that reaches the soul. That makes them go out and say, 'Why!"' As an afterthought, he added, "! like disco because, although it is shit music, it does get people to 11et up and do some­thing." Alley actors put on drag: Two very tal­ented and versatile actors are currently performing 20 different roles in a small­town spoof called Greater Tuna. Jaston Williams and Joe Sears are not only the performers but the co-writers (along with director Ed Howard) of the show. They play all the people in Tuna, Texas, both male and female. The characters include Aunt Bertha Bumiller (who wants to get Romeo and Juliet out of the library because it deals with teenage sex), Reverand Spikes (whose bombastic style is only out­matched by its lack of sense), and Petey Fisk of the Tuna Humane Society who has love for all threatend animals, from gold­fish to people. Greater Tuna will play on the AJley's Arena Stage through August 29. Professor encounters homophobia International Gay New• As ency Professor Uiuie Crew asked his college etudent.s at the Stevens Point extension of the University of Wisconsin to write out their reactions to discovering that a close friend of theira was gay. The results were chilling for anyone who thinks gay libera· tion has penetrated to America's hear-tl~:~ e samples of the atudents' responses: "I am very unwilling to do this paper. I honselly feel that I can't do it. To even ponder my best friend being homo­sexual is something I can't do." "Frankly, I really don't know what~ say, but to be as honest as posaible, I d~n .~ think that I really want to see you agam. Other wrote: "After they revived me with smelling salts, I would calmly sit down with my daughter. I would then B8;Y 'You stupid litlle bitch. What the hell 1s wrong with you? Tell me where I went wrong.'" Some of the students gave responaea that would be more acceptable to gay peo­ple. For instance, one said, "If he was my best friend for a length of time I couldn't just cast our friendship aside." One considered her aon thus: "To realize that he waa gay is one thine, but to come and tell hie mother must have been very difficult and yet courageous. If my so.n prefers other males .that is_ purely his ::k~ ~:.,;,u~!i~ilit~1~:i~r~f; i!~!e:: honestly make a decision as to hie sexual preferencee." Profe88or Crew, who conducted the experiment, concludes: "By whatever method, we must effect a fundamental change in the narrow, inaccurate, and uni· magi.native ways in which most folks understand their own sexuality and the rich sexual diveraity of the world." 654-4040 "Growing with Houston" 24-hour rad io dispatched UNITED CAB COMPANY CJ::>efu x e, c:R e,norJatlon HOUSTON 77006 SPECIALIZING IN PAINTING GENERAL CARPENTRY PRIVACY FENCE AND DECK DESIGN COMPLETE LANDSCAPING SERVICE WRITTEN ESTIMATE WITH DRAWING 524-0038 JON BARTON AUGUST 6 , 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 23 FULLFILLMENT vs STRESS-PAIN-FEAR Hypnosis can change your life today. Rid yourself of nega­tive thoughts and habits. Private and Group Sessions. James D. Kristian, Ph.D. HYPNOTHERAPIST / PSYCHOTHERAPIST 14 years or_expcrienoe, co-founder or prcscnplion Hypnosis and acceleration Tht'rapy We know _ Physical and EmotionaJ Pain can be hdped. YOU CA.' OVERCOME Weigh1 • Smoking • Fears • Aru.iety • Guih • Oeprcuion • Drua AbtHC • Alcohol Abuse • An&er • Lonehntss • S1rus • Nervousneu • Pain• Problems YOU CA~IMPROVESt:lrConfidencc • Self Worth • Shyness •_ Memory • Concentra1ion • Rtlationships • Lo\e Emooons • Ma.kt Friends • Be A Sucoeu m Relationships • Sports • Busineu. We'll ~how you how! TUESDAYS-Group Success Series STARTS SEPT 7 CALL TODAY 977-2485 THURSDAYS-Group Love and Intimacy Series STARTS SEPT IO MEMBE:R HOUSTOS PROFESSIONAL H\'PSOTISTS ASSOCJATIO~ 24 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon· Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat AUG AUG 6 7 AUG AUG AUG AUG AUG 8 9 10 11 12 For9ddl11onal infOtTN1tion about ev91'1ts listed below. loot! for tl'Mlsponsonng Of';9nization und« ·Qfg.niuhof'll. 1n ll'MI MontrOM C~lied Selected Events through 7 Days llFRIDA Y: Interact' a Commu­nity Coffeehouse 7;30pm­midnight 3405 Mulberry llFRIDA Y: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannin 11.SATURDA Y-SUNDAY: MSA's Softball League playoff gamee, Levy Field ..' lfONDA Y: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmam •TUESDAY: Montrat<e Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show !Opm-midnight on KPFT Radio. FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks II.SATURDAY: Aetro Rainbow Alliance for the Deaf garage sale lOam~pm, 2034 Norlolk -.JN I WEEK: National gay leaderah1p conference in Dallas, Aug. 13-15, sponsored by Dallas Gay Alliance at Grenelefe Hotel IHN 1 WEEK: MSA Volleyball IDumament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center IHN 3 WEEKS: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fun· cisco begin Aug. 28, lasting ID Sept. 5 IHN 3 WEEKS: Gay Softball World Series begins in San Francisco Aug. 31, lasting ID Sept. 4 IHN 3 WEEKS: Integrity Inter· national Convention opens in New Orleans Sept. 2, lasting ID Sept. 5. IHN 4 WEEKS: Texas Gay Conference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 IHN 4 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 6 9JN ti WEEKS: Midwest Gay & Lesbian Convention in Chi­cago, Sept. 1 ().!I IHN 6 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Arts F ... tival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, lasting ID Sept. 30 IHN 9 WEEKS: Gay Academic Union 8th national conference Oct. S.10, Chicago IHN 9 WEEKS: Columbus Day,Oct.11 IHN IO WEEKS: Gay Atheist League of America national convention in Houston. Oct. 15-17, Americana Hotel, 3301 Southwest Fwy. IHN 10 WEEKS: Weatheimer Colony Art Feetival Oct. l&-17 IHN 12 WEEKS: Halloween weekend, Oct. 29-31 IHN 12 WEEKS: Elections, Nov.2 BUSINESS OWNERS (1) We list lret •cf'I wMk 111th,.d1rectory(eJbu11rieu•1eb1ishrnents ;;"~~r!:i~~:~~;~'::.:~~1rH:::n g•ybars&pnv•teclubs{lorlf'Mlbenef•tolout-ol· town v1s1t0f's) end (d) non--prol1t community orgenizehons •'"*-•- Montro.e voe. dl9trttMton points COMMERCIAL SPACE Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice Murphy's ManorByKurtErich•en What is rt 9ou see in~ weekly c.Offqe socials,~? DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES RICE TRANSFER STUDENT, 22, wants roommate situation or small cheap apartment near Rice or South Montrose. _Working, car, furniture. Friendly and active, broad interests. Independent but willing to give time to house. 529-0971 , Bob WANTED: Furnished apt. or condo in Montrose area until Oct. 1 Up to $800/month or $200/week Phone Louis 66&-3841 ext. 530 after 6 10 minutes to Montrose Large 211 upper duplex with terrace. $450 month plus deposit. 211 garage apartment $350 plus deposit Ten· nant pays gas & electric. References required. 926-3975 Support, join your community organizations EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED POLICE OFFICERS WANTED Women and men Good Nlsry snd benefotl! !~~ t;',;~~;1~2-~20~-~~01,~ci:~~~~ GAY BARS (AJHouston Tavern Guiod "'9mber u'IC"CMlon, pi.c.d1nth•sd1rectory1lt~irNQuwt :~~rlJi --:S23 LOYelt-:_5-i3·33i"i: I-;_ enter• See our ad elsewhere this issue :~.~'S;,~~~~1527-lll8e with restkl· See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice eABAAl\l-710P•c~9427 co;:;'n~ See our ad elsewhere this issue eeRAzos -RIVER SOTTOM-=2•ooBrazos- 52&-9192: country ~~:IAA PATCH-nii-w Holco~-= See our ad elsewhere this issue ~R1Chmonci:.:.S20=1&.e-d•ICO ~~ICKEN COOP-535 w .. in.;.m•r-52fl· :.;o:i~w1 R-;c~-=52r;225ldr1eO See our ad elsewhere this issue COVE-2912S ShePhel'd--524-0170 'Montrose Li~;. -each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment e THEOEEP 22t2Con 526-823' ="!':!T DRUtl-1732 w .. tM."N-~ See our ad elsewhere this issue e i..otRTY aALlr&-220 Avondel.-529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue Montrose Classified •DOUBLE Fl SALOON 5731 K•rby-521-1444 See our ad elsewhere this issue e ifi..-1213AIChmond-~ See our ad elsewhere this issue e>.EXILE-1011 Be0-&59-0453 c:ovn1ry Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 e GALLEON-2303 Aichmond-522·78UI ~.~:-~~O~~~ATIONAL (GBL) 141'1 : 2C:.."::'i STREET STATION 911 F...-v1ew- $ee our ad elsewhere this issue •HAPPY~rv1ew-~27s2 See our ad elsewhere this issue eHOLE HOUSE-109 Tu.m--522~178 See our ad elsewhere this issue iJR·a-«JIP~-­:~:,\ oM.:.R~~ & LYNN'S-117 Fairview ;~~~"~--3012 Milllm 52M1988 p;ilO The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice e iclNDFll D IPlllUTI 5245 Buflalo SpMctway· ~9758· predominantly lelb1an See our ad elsewhere this issue :.~~POST-2417T1me1BIV<l-52&-8921 le9- eLAZVJ--312Tuam--5~ - ~8~A~~-d~lf-1~ro: e AMAR'f'l~2wnthe1mer-S2s..:a851 , See our ad elsewhere this issue Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10Cpet"regrJ1•rvwordor1_5e_PEAALLC-AP1TAL WORD In &-point type. H shown her• (II Ullng 1-words1nlh••••zeor1lcentenngonalin.e comput•1tlOC1hne1u11ngmaic1mum7regu11r WOl'dl Cl( s All CAPITAL WORDS to • line l 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PEA ALL CAPITAL WORO in 8-pomt type. as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line. compute at $1.50 a lrne. using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WOADS to s /1ne.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Sile per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, a• 30C per rogulor word or 45C PER ahown here. (If ualng few ALL CAPITAL WORD In I-point word• In thl• •lze or If cen- :':.!dw~:~ :,~.0;;.t;~~~~t~~~: tertng on• line, compute at on • lino, compute ot s1.so •lino, $2.00 •line, ualng maximum uolng moxlmum 4 rogulor wordo or 3 regular word• or 2 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS too lino.) CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed. at the per line rate You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8or10 point). Simply compute each word individually. You may NOT mix type SIZES on the aame line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per claasified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain aheet of paper. Include your name, addresa and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. Sorry, but we cannot bill and cannot accept classifieds over the phone. IM -!hue') rnonz to it than that. I go it> see friends at a plac<Z that isn't a smok41, Bci~ides, you neve:r know who yoJre going to meet! noisy bar. Mi! ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations :~~.~;.suN-~~ wes1n;mef.:s26-1sls 9 MISS CH-A.RLOTTE'S--911 W Orew..:.52e"- 8840 country ~NTROSE MINtNG CO -805 P•c•tlC-529- •NUMBERI 2 -300 WHlheimer-526-6551 d11CO See our ad elsewhere this issue =FICE.FU CLUB =2101 Al~g See our ad elsewhere this issue :.~~t~~~~N~,~~~.i;n~~~ See our ad elsewhere this issue • RANCH--:-ee:z0· Main- -52&:"4730- -- :~~f~~ _!~~1-=i .5-24-e272With res- See our ad elsewhere this issue Support, join your community organizations e ROCKY'S- -341&w"Da11u-s28*22 lelbtan : ;INS:-:-s35W•tt1.,rflel"- .52():-02,.419.bian e VENTURf-N- -2923 Mi,;;:=sn--ooOi) - ORGANIZATIONS ~I ~~~.~~LA Chorut ~l'I of (MontrOH) Church ACLU-1:f3e: w-Griy-524-Mn5- ~e:•~A~~"~Ef,;I~~~~.e~3I•::~~f~ ~28clubn~tWed Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ~~o Ra1nbow ... tt.1nc.-~ BERING-~-Mtith~ Hawtt'loml-526-1017 United M9thochat wor-fibi~~~ Q=S:~:.~:~.::.,._~,.~,3~---~-.,.-.,, ~~~.~-~~TiMEN Together (BWMT)--529- ~~~~~~:c-~~~~A~;!.20;I~:; CHURCH OFCHRlsTIANfAITH-• 13 we.thei· ~~~.:o!'!!f.n':.~~~:~~~inf T~9Yenlng1.eholrprecllce Wedevenrng There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice C1TIZENS FOR HUMAN EQUALITY tCHE1- 609 F•nn•n •1J01-2J&.8M& t>oard meet1ng 2nd Tueedaya ____ -- - _ _ -~ ~iJmoi5~~";;~g:i~~2&-~; et Brezos Rrver iCOMMUNITY COffEEHOUSE-p;~I of l!Hlne:7.30pmFndey1a1~Mulberry CONG AYTZ CHAY1M--:rn.:.1Sa1 McCR.-1919 Oee•tur-552-13-i0,888-8997. Mf'Vice&soe••I 8pm2nd&-ithFr1day1 CONROE AREA Gey wOmen_:;;se:--~ CR1sis-H0Tl1NE-:-:22a-1·505 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment OIAL-.. G-ay-Att\i•11--s2•-222"2 proJ9CI oTG•v Athe•tlLeegueolAmerice DiANA FOuNOAT10N - -2700 M .. on-52•=5791 01GN1lv=irleeisa!CeihQi;C s~1-c;;;1;;" i~~u=~--s21H21t. 52&-7&4-oi meetings Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 FAMILY & FRIENDS of G9Yt-~ .... ee11 2prn 3td Sundays •I COmrnumty CotfeehOuH 3""405Mulberry FIRSTUNTTAA1AiilChurCti- -s210Fenn1n-~ 1571wo111hlpNrvic•11 tSemSun FM1960/GREENSPOINT FARAWAY FRIENDS MEET­ING SUNDAY, AUG. 8. ~r:~~ai?-~:FM19&0 ArH Fer-Awey ~2":1ti 1~;~~9~ertng E•penetlee jGASE}- The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice GAY ARCHiveS of r .... proteet o!Tnter.c:t ~:i~~TH~;~IM~ A~A~!;:'! Holltl,3301 Southwest Fwy, Houston GAYHISPAN1CCAUCUS 2722Newmen 112 521-0037~13rdThurldey1 GAY 1TAL1A.N"Q,.oop..:..526-.,.. g~~~7~~::11: PHYSICIANS ot Houllon-o'o GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPC)-POB eee&t, ~-r:11~_;_w'=S!v-4800 Main •217 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations GAY PR1-0EWEEK82 COmm11tee_:-7&t·i699 GAY sw1TCHeOAR0:.52i-3211 ~~~~~~!~1r~~~- HEPATirus -H0Tl1Ne=:/iinM o.-;,d iit 717- 2281. a pro,eet of GPC's Med1eel Commrttee HOMOPHILE INTERF°A.-ITH Alhenee-729 Menor-52H969 Support, join your community organizations Houston Ar .. GAY & LESBIAN ENGINEERS & ~~':'trsts-526-738fi mMts 7pm •th Wedn•· HOUSTON-COuuUNITY CLOWNs'.:862-831• ~APR0F-ESSic:iNALs-=..-:;nMts-•n Eest Room. Hohdey Inn Centr•I. '6'0 South ;;;~~~M=~2fdH~:-i~riu~-7i: ~~~~~~~I~1CLU-ikJO Ma-;y.i HOOSiOnTAVERN- GUILD-,,,.,...~ e;;n 01rtySelly'•.EJt1le. Mery·a. Midnol•Sun ~m'~;~tf~~75:"~~1d~t1 i~ bc>ard mee11ng 730pm 1st Thursdeyt (vened =:;ions): ectucetionelfOl'\lm730pm3rdThurs- :~,!.;r~~~~t~~t,!,!~:~~':i:.~~ 52&-0565 meeting 7 30pm 2nd TUMdeya ~:,?~~~~~~~~~tl/H ~nc Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice iKPFT"R.ci10. FM:go__. 19 Loven ilvd -528= oiOQO_ ·-wilde ·n Stein' gay r.cloo show 10pm· mldn1ghtThu111 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice MONTROSE c1v1CC1ub-(Neert0Wn)-rneet1 et Bering Church. 1-ioiO Hewthorne-522·1000 rneeMiJ730pmlourthTueldeya ~Nit=1Gt-wutnelmer-52j:. ~ :~u!10pm Fri 1-Spm Sun , &-10pm AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Dateline S.F. Occupational hazards By Randy Alfred If errant lawyers are disbarred, and wayward clergy are defrocked, how do doctors get thrown out of their profession? Axe they de­stethoscoped? What about bankers, or cowboys for that matter? Laurence Urdang, editor of the amusing magazine, Verbatim: The Language Quarterly, reported several years ago he had made a game out of just this subject. (The following entries, however. arem)' own.) What happens to doctors, for instance, may depend on their spe­cialty. Cardiologists would be disheartened, except in France, of course, where they would be discouraged. Neurologists would be unnerved. Got the idea? O.K., let's go. Bankers are divested, savings-and-loans executives disinterested, charge-card clerks discredited, tax preparers deducted, and real estate a gen ts dispossesed. Cowboys are deranged and camp counselors debunked. Musicians are disconcerted. There are a few exceptions: brass play­ers are disbanded, percussionists drummed out, and violinists unstrung. Bolero dancers, by the way, are unraveled. In other vocations, sorcerers are disenchanted, toastmasters dis­tributed, tasters disgusted, wine merchants deported, bicycle racers unspoken, phone-company workers disconnected, upholsterers unseated, affirmative-action officers disintegrated, secretaries described, mathematicians unequalled, and librarians taken out of circulation. U.C.-Santa Cruz professor Carter WiJeon adds these: gymnasts are unparalleled, Arctic explorers are defrosted, and ladies of the night unfrequented. Phone-company worker (still well connected) and linguist Rob Ber· nardo thinks a lot of faat·food workers should be disenfranchised. My fellow journalist Terrence O'F1aherty offers: Amtrak workers are derailed, and moneylenders are di.Abursed. Journalism? Of course: editors are deleted, writers lose their author­ization, and publishers are depre88ed. Depressed is exactly what this columnist will be if you don't mail in a lot of clever additions "' htis list. The address is Dateline S.F., 500 Hayes St., San Franci8CO, CA 94102 SPou&al Benefits: Larry Brink.in is suing his employer, Southern Pacific, and his union, the International Brotherhood of Railway, Airline, and Steamship Clerks, because they refused "' grant him three-days paid funeral leave when he waa mourning the death of his lover, Richard Reich. Attorney Matt Coles argues the decision violates San Francisco's gay rights ordinance, California law prohibiting discrimination baaed on marital status, and the right "' privacy guaranteed in the state oonstitutuion. Brinkin said no amount of explaining would move the company or the union. But, five yeara ago, just a few word.a of explanation changed the attitude of a clerk at the California State Au"'mobile Association (an affiJiate of the AAA). When Brin kin tried to enroll Reich for a reduced-price spouse mem· bership, the clerk at first said it w .. limited "' married couples. Brinlcin explained they would be married if state law did not forbid it, but they were in all other respects a married couple. The clerk said OK and signed them up. Cruise Control: A Florida State Univeraity psychology profeaaor conducted an experiment in which his students approached strangers of the opposite sex and asked, "Would you like "'go "' bed with.me tonight?" Six percent of the women accepted, compared to 69 percent of the men. I think this means most heter0&exual men would be just as promia· cuous as some homosexual men, if only they had the same chances. Gay men eetablish sexual contacts so easily only because both (or all of) the partners are men. Promiscuity is a male phenomenon, not a gay one. Groves Of Academe: The Sociologists' Gay Caucus Newsletter reports the American Sociological Association's task force on homo­sexualtiy haa learned 45 percent of sociology department chairs said hiring a known homosexual wouJd present serious problems, with fully 18 percent saying it just couldn't be done. For gay activists, the figures are 56 percent uproblems," 28 percent "can't be done." Even people who came out once hired would face difficulties (35 percent) or impossibility (13 percent) in securing a promotion. For gay activists, the figures rise "' 46 percent and 19 percent. These are sociologists. One-Liners: Suppoee Prince William of Wales, seemingly destined "' be King of England, grows up instead "' be an outrageous queen named Malvina? And will the day come when gay employers offer Lacoste-of-living adjustments? 26 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 "So, then ... Would that be 'u1 the people' or 'we the people?' " Gary Larson "H-re, yakity yak yak yak! . . . Com•, come, yakity yak yak yak!" ~1~~~~~UNSei.1NGC.,1er-900Love'tt =~~~~EAS-meeta 1t MCCA.1iii ~~~OSE SPORTS ASSOCIATION (MSA)- =:.~~.!~~~~r:. atri~~~~ ~on &Th_u_!!~nm_g• _ _ 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment ~=.r~lt~!rt~l~~~~~~~~~I dLl";l. 523-0413 ...... MUOn plrf April 17..July 18; t:~;~·:r~4:.Z ~·rf!~~rt~J"u~,!~~~o Mori1ro-a;-5pen,-woMEN-;S -soFieALL LHgue-728-9371 posl·H•son tourn1ment July3t -Aug 1. toc.11on1obe1nnounced Mon1rose~E.NN1s-=-~ ~SPOr1i'VOLi-EYe~ :i~~:n!~1~~~7;,L~=:=~ MONTAOSESYMPHON--ic- band::..::;;;;;; II 8.­lng Church. 1«0H1wthome- -527·9669 meet­lng730pmTu .. MusTANGS (.0C-;I c1Ub}-meet1 11 th.-B;;°n ~~r!i~1~~-L::-~u~ J!'::m1~1':."1or!::: honaltnMhngl30pm.July4 g~AAT10-N OOcUMENTATION Pro1ect Ot RECREATIONAL Land -F"Und -Co~m1itee~ prOfflCIOIMuatangClub ~~fU"tV Gtiy1L9-t>••n Support Gr~~su. ~~;_jJ;REA Gays--332-=3"73f meeting Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 fEiASGA-VC0NFERENCEIX~on­~ r=~ 3-5. Agnea A.mold Hall. UniYera11y TEXASGffiASKFQRCE:..529-7014.522-t85i TeiiSHUMAN RIGHTS~ MarylafKt ..... 521-9139 ~~;=~S-c/o M•ry'•. 1022 Weathei­UN1TARiAWUNIVERSAL1STGi; Ca~-c10 lit Untianan Church. 5210 Fannm-,520-9797 521-5842 meet•ng3tdSUn attemoona W~-1.AYAN FeL.LowsH1P~&e9Sl The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice WeSrHE1MER CoLoNY ARTS Auoc1iitlon· • ~WHthe•mer --521 -0 1331allleaMal0c116- PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ThaVooeadoeariotr mendlheolfermofof =1:: =~·· .-::~:.~:.,~:-H~!~:-·~~ ~:~~:i~r~•=· ~~~~ni'!::.'~:a~~ u•l.butwaaaMimanolagalorf1rianicalr.apc>n- 11blhtylolld't9rt11•rioorraaporid1nopart1M LoVERS FOR AT LEAST• VEAAs? A-tCMr ::-~~:~'.~~~:~~1~:0:~:.~ relatlONf<•P' belWMn O•Y mari Raquir• that ~~~ "Co~e~:L~dC'O~F1=~r~":.'N~ ANONYMOUS C.11 Tony C.rrolt ., 52M1051 WITCHCRAFT, TAROT, MEDITA­TION Instruction through classes, cassettes, correspondence. Moon­rise, POB 20007, Houston, TX 77225 (713) 666-4878. ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations MAN FRIDAY WANTED .. compon­lon 10 father Image. Return or con­tinue ac:hool. 654·3040. FOR AN ATMOPSHERE ol 1oe~d ~J}~~;~~.=~~~~=:,1;. .~ ~ BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 Support, join your_ __ community organizations Relax and enjoy the BodyWorks massage. Gift certificates. Call Biii, 526-2470 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS ::~x 0"1C! ·1&25 Rlchmond--522-1625 See our ad elsewhere this issue :~u!.:ounoN e.1n1-220S- F;;;;;;;--~. See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent Is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice :!i~~9~7~~~~ER Tn.tet- 3201 Lou1s1- ::~0TOWNE- &PA:.3100 F.nntn-522-Wa See our ad elsewhere thics Issue ti2Xi&CLUB--:::-230e o«MIUM-528-4235 m•I• RESTAURANTS elAJA'a-.t02 Lovett -- 527-9Ml!I See our ad elsewhere this issue = -ASSEA IE T00-1322 Wulheimer- 526- iCHAPlll TAPEC- 113 R~mond-522-2365 ~~CATUR CAFE-·708 W Al•bllme- 52&- fa:"HKIFa-MontrON •I w .. the+l'MI'-~ See our ed elsewhere this Issue eG~~-~~N~-302Tu•m~ There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice !!r~~?-~:2i~•ndw1ch~ See our ad elsewhere this issue ::.~t!.~,'~.~:~2~op l •n Cul i lne- •28 See our ad elsewhere this issue eHoNGTHCiNG-424W91t~ • HOUSE0FPIES--:_3,rnc1rby-5~ e 1Nr!RNAT-IONAL- Club Rti.~ W• IMtmer-523-2795 See our ad elsewhere this issue e JA0EoAAooN -22' wes1~ :=Efo~Slc~wti;1t;;;;;'- iW-ERS-- 1-3CilwM1,,;;;;=~ e 0MAR'S-- 80l-L0v.tt --52~ e AASCALI -2702 Kirby-524..e272 See our ad elsewhere this Issue. Montrose Live in the Voice is your guide each week to Montrose entertainment eSPUO-U-LIKE-415 Wtllttie.mer- 520-0554 elTAlll "ZZA- 2111 Norfolk- 523-0800 See our ad elsewhere this issue. eSTEAK 'N' EGG-4231 Montro.-521H135 ~~·SCO-ttM Sh~1525~ e WINE SELLER- ·1408 WMIM1mer- 52&-38711 SERVICES PSYCHOTHERAPIST-gay and les­bian counseling. Individuals. cou­ples and groups. ANN E. EISEN­STEIN, 6030 Hornwood, 432-1808 Attorney at Law General practice. John P Barnich, 523-5006. Evenings 528-5586 How to legatly reduce/avoid Income t8xHI The TH Plannlng Counctl. &54-71417. LESBIAN PROllLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nonolto Bruckner, Paychologla~ 523-2180. ~ Fln1ncl1I Group---330 F111V>9W--524 See our ad elsewhere this Issue ~F1lrv1ew--524-1 87 1 See our ad elsewhere this issue ;1~~r,:~-~~~~GE 1i1neu c;;;;=:3307 ~=~ICO'I hair u k>n -9oT R1Chmood­See our ad elsewhere th is Issue :~°}~n11tNAL1-0-0S~Cn.1 ... P.-c;:. See our ad elsewhere this issue :..~lfltCf/W'TNurce,._2f10l~ See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~~7;;l,' raplac•m• nl-710-A see our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 :f~~.1~20-~Yifi HOUSE 1CKtg1ng · lo& HOUITON TM.YIL - ConaUlt1nts-~82~ See our ad elsewhere this issue :!!i;.~!ro-~~79~• •uty S e hool - 327 =H D. UHITIAN, PtlO, hypnoff:>Q'9t an­See our 1d elsewhere this Issue .e.K..W..IK..·K ALL M•ll Bo.1.H 3317 Mont :a\~:Ds H•lr Dtia1gn eoe w.tttetn.f ~ H91r ~r.-3220 YOlkum-526- :n~ROSE HAIR 0.lgn-t317 Mont The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice :7':?NT~OI! TlllAYii --2508 R•lph--522: See our ad elsewhere this Issue :O~':'nt~ioor"~:~=aptlpw-3317 Mon· ~~k~t;~5a:_~:1~ O'KAN!, atto tM)'-3323 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~m·~1~~~~~~uis m.-;.- ti0 ..... ~~~O: loeilam•th:=-112o----eomn;on_.tlh ~h•1r tir"•- 1626Cti•rry· ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ~IDY ~INTIN0-54CI0-1hi1&J,. 81Yd -Mi= ~ our ad elsewhere this Issue Support, join your community organizations =V!L TICHtr•Y9laQWtcy-5i1"9K f ~-S22- $ee our ad elsewhere this Issue ~llHI INTl-llllOltl- 1727-­Wft; thto/m«-S20-1317 See our ad elsewhere this Issue Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston In the Montrose Voice SHOPS & STORES ~ARAdultNr#a- 1407Rlchmond ~~i~r GLITTERSgihl-'325 Monl rOH­::~~ RDALLEN FIOrill IMIW•tMil'Mt :~IC ISLE pet lhop--2011 SW Fwy-= •ASYLUM Adult Bookitcn-1201 R1ctuT!Onc1 :.r::.LL PARK Adult Book1tore-- 11130W -Ala· •BASIC BROTHERS UH d elot h1ng 1220 WMtn..m.r- 522-162tS eTttE 1~0 HOUU 2115 Norfolk 523-6271 See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice e BL.UE IRl5-3116S She;ph«d-S23-1127 THE BLUE IRIS FLORIST, 3618 S. SHEPHERD, 523- 1827 e 800M TOWN BLOOMS flow.rs 3210 S Sh99h«d-521H110 ~08~~~~1~":::!.-~ f lM e CAAGOHOUSE 1902P1rk ~­~ 6~~NE OANCEWEAA-4704 MontrOH-522· eCO MPANY B mlll 1ary wur-5369 W•theirner- 965--11753 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice is your guide to Montrose entertainment =NER"S Adult N~24()W .. tt'9;,;;a,._52j: ~~A~~ctotn1;;Q= ~BEA.T f;Kord1 21T7 Rtehmond 0 523- eORAMATllCAgihl-3224Yoekum ~57 e FACETS gihl- 1412 WHINllMr 523-1412 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ~~RA;'!~n!!~=1~ pt1nt & tram1ng u,:10AV"S Flor .. t 1331 w~ QITA'l-'-'91ry 580-3571 See our ad elsewhere this Issue e KIRBYNlwttlnd 3115Klrby 520-02"6 ::>~~~~LRY •rwt Lo•n me The number one source of community news in Montrose-the Voice ~'!;~YI L•ltMlrGoods-1112W~t e ONE MORE TIME ,... .. boutlq~1406 CaHt«~5551 ~I ONS rtower.-1~ Y ... at 15tti-ae. ~IYICOTTllHAJtON 1303W..t- 5ee our ad elsewhere this issue e PLANT HOUSE-112 W..tti.ifMf-Sle-7715 e o-1 LEATHER-..OS W..INon.f--527-IOU ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ~uaoc-i1CiS s-,;.,h.-d­~ CUT~llMf~ See our ad elsewhere this Issue :a~ WAREHOUSE-2024 .. wtiiit;;;°.,_ e SPORTS LOCKER clotrung 311 W•thei'­__... ...., e STUDZ Adult N9wl-1132 W. Aluam; e TEXASCARAVAN&.A.nna<MloF~ 2115 Dunll¥')'-520-7019 e TIMElESS TAFFETA c lo t h lng 1923 W•lhelm9r- 529-fm 8 TOTALITY STORE 11 21 W Gr1y ~___!~ Support, join your community organizations e TRES CHIC eyewMt 520 WHIM•"*-~ 0178 ------­• TREYMAN gif\1-407 w..tMun..----523-022!_ • UNION JACK clothing· ·1212 WMthelmer :5:2'!&!-™980i10 MER--- - -- ------ FLEA MARKET- 1733 W•t· Pulitzer prize winner Ben Sargent is exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ewtLDE & STEIN boot ator.-i02W .. 1h';: "*-~701 409)' AUGUST 6, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 Fortunes ByTycbo For Friday •vemng, August 6, through Frld•y •venmg . .August 13, 1Q82 ARIES-Pa68ing through your Bl/In thu wttlt: tlu Moon, from rrud-day Sun.day to Tuesday evening. You want what you want, and that's all there is to it. With a little bit of imagination, you may get the material things. If you can control your need for control, you may have yo·ur emotional needs filled, too. TAURUS-Pas.ting through your aign tfw week: th.i Moon from M:Ct Tueadayevening to about midnight, Thursday. Somebody'agotyou by the horns. Normally, you wouldn't inind that too much, but right now you have something important to prove. Show and tell what'• in your mind and heart. GEMINI-Entering your 1ign thia wttlt: tM Moon, about mid.night M:Ct Thuraday, Aug. 12. When an old love show• up out of nowhere, you'll know what to do and how to do il You're sure enough ofyounelfto know the deciaiona you make will be the right ones. CANCER-Jn your- sign all weelt: Venua.Someone older, who could ha.Ye a very powerful influence in your life, attracta you. There's a feeling of beginnings in the air. New things are within reach; reach out! LEO-Jn your 1ign thu weelt: Merc"ry (ka1>#1 Sunday morning) and tlu Sun (all weeh).Did you dream it, or did it really happen? Ia it real, or an illusion? This could be a confusing time, except that you're enjoying it too much. Let your imagination run riot. Create reality out of fantasy. VIRGO-Entering your sign th.la weelt: Mercury, Sunday rnornin,g.U you're a loner, forget it. Hit's solitude you're looking for, there won't be much to be found. This is a time for being with others; the needs, pleasures and responsibilities of friendship ia what this time ia about. LIBRA-In your aign all week: Saturn and Pluto.You and your lover have things to work out. and this is the time to do it. All parts of your relationship are open for examination. Lota of talking and listening will go a long way t.oward. making important deci&ione. SCORPIO-Jn your aign all Wttlt: Man and Jupiter.Don't be BO con· cemed about where you're going that you miu out on where you are. Take pleasure in &impJy doing what you're doing. The future ia a fine place to visit, but the present ia the place to be. SAGITTARIUS-In your aign all wee.It: Uranu.a and NrptUJU..Time t.o be a team player. You learn that in being part of a group; being able t.o work with others doesn't diminish your individuality. You're a star in the midst of other etant, shining your own special light. CAPRICORN-You've got oomethina' to explain to authority figur<e, and though you're pushed to do it. you're in no mood for compromise or denial. If you're firm, but not angry, you'll be heard. Try dignity, not denunciation. AQUARIUS-If you weren'teo •mart, you miaht be arrogant. In sex, it's nice to tell •omeone where to put it and when you want it done, but in other areae, being an example rather than a dictator works much better. PISCES-Jn your sign this week: the Moon, but only until mid-day Sunday. Sex of an intenae and excitini kind combined with playfuln..,. and a need for simple pleuure can 1harpen your sense of timing. The right t.ouch at the right moment does wonders. Seeine the humor in a eerious situation can add to the fun . •11112 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE Last Word It's pop quiz time By Henry McClurg Quick, what's the tallest building in Montrose? Well that depends on what the boundaries of Montrose are, of course. Neartown Association defines it as Allen Parkway on the north, Main Street on the east, Bissonnet on the south and S. Shepherd on the west. Now, what's the tallest building in Montrose? It's that new one going up on Allen Parkway. (It's some life insurance company I suppose, but I'm too lazy to drive over there to see. But I can see the building out the window here at the Voice and it's technically in Montrose-and it's the tallest-} Now, how many ·commercial radio stations have their. studios in Montrose? Those who said four are right (KILT-AM, KILT-FM, KLOL and KTRH). Plus there's KPFI', a non-commercial station. And they're all on Lovett. How many new car dealerships in Montrose? If you said one, you're correct, since Jimmy Green Chev­rolet sits on the Montrose side of Shepherd. How many banks in Montrose? Technically three (Liberty, Allied American and Stand­ard, on Allen Parkway). How many people Jive in Montrose? That I don't know, except I seem to remember having n;ad somewhere that it was between 40,000 and 60,000, which sounds reasonable. Now aren't you glad you learned all this today? 28 MONTROSE VOICE I AUGUST 6, 1982 Presenting FOUR FABULOUS DAYS OF AUGUST Male Strip of Linda Clifford Live ... in concert the Year Thursday, Aug. 19 Theme party 'Midnight at the Oasis' Saturday, Aug. 21 Wear your beach wear Special guest Rachel Wells, Miss Gay America 1978 Sunday, August 22 SPECIAL SUNDAY SHOW AUGUST 8: SADJI, DIRECT FROM LAS VEGAS
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