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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
File 016
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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 016. 1989-05-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-05-05). Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1739

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 016, 1989-05-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1739.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 5, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript MAY 5. 1989 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 Master appointed to hear case against Judge Hampton By BOB LOWRY FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE AUSTIN (UPI)-The Texas Supreme Court Wednesday appointed a former appellate judge as special master to hear a complaint against a Dallas judge who admitted he was lenient on a murderer because the victims were "queers.." Robert R. Murray, a former judge on the4th State Court of Appeals in San Antonio, will hear the case against State District Judge Jack Hampton, who could be removed from office, Following a public hearing in a trial-like setting, Murray will forward his recommendations to the state Commission on Judicial Conduct. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for May 11 in I )allas on a complaint filed by the Dallas Gay Alliance and the Texas Human Rights Foundation. Hampton, who gay rights groups want ousted from office, would not comment on the appointment. Hampton came under fire last December when he told a newspaper he sentenced Richard Lee Bednarski to 30 years in prison in November rather than life because the two murder victims were "queers." Bednarski testified during that he and some friends went to a Dallas park to "pester homosexuals" in an incident that ended in the slaying of two men in what authorities called an execution-style slaying. Texas law permits parole after 20 years of a life sentence, compared with 10 years for a 30- year sentence. Robert Flowers, director ofthe Commission on Judicial Conduct, said the 11-member pan el, which requested appointment of a master, may accept or reject Murray's recommendation. Attorneys for the commission will act as prosecutors in the hearing before Murray, he said. Flowers said the commission could dismiss the complaint against Hampton, publicly censure him or ask a seven-judge panel tore- move him from office. If removed from office, he would lose his retirement benefits and be barred from seeking public office again. Glen Maxey, an Austin gay rights activist, said he was "pleased" that a master has been appointed. "I trust the Supreme Court has chosen someone who will be fair and impartial, and listen to all sides in gathering the evidence and background about what happened last year in this case," he said. "We have to have a full hearing on this and get it out in the open." William Wayboum, president of the Dallas Gay Alliance, said the group does not plan to become involved in the procedure. "This is the system's way of addressing the problem of Jack Hampton. I believe the commission, once it has all the evidence ... will agree with us. This man has said he cannot be fair; cannot be impartial." "If society does not deal with Judge Hampton ... down the line another judge can say, 'look at Judge Hampton. I don't like blacks and I can do it too.'" he said. The state Supreme Court is also considering a separate petition requesting that Hampton be removed from office. Texas judges can also be removed from office through impeachment in the Legislature. ACT UP, others, jeer or cheer Bush at state Capitol By MARK LANGFORD FOH THE MONTROSE VOICE AUSTIN (UPI)-President Bush was jeered and cheered at the state Capitol April 26 by a noisy crowd that ran the gamut from young radicals to young Republicans. Police squelched a minor skirmish that erupted when a conservative University of Texas student grabbed a football owned by one of the radicals and tossed it across a police barricade. The student was slightly injured by a blow to the head before several officers, including one on horseback, charged across the lines and broke up the fight. The wide range of emotions and issues were reflected in signs carried by supporters and opponents. The slogans ranged from "Ollie North is an Ameri can Hero" to "50.000 Dead of AIDS, Where Was George?" and "Bush Sells Crack." Robert Lowe, 27, of Austin, a coordinator for ACT UP—AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power—said Bush has failed to live up to his campaign promises or make any significant changes. "He has not used the time he's had in office to do more than bail himself out of the political mess that has more or less dogged him since his first day in office, and we certainly have no reason to expect that any significant initiative with respect to AIDS is going to be forthcoming," Lowe said. Another group, the Austin Peace and Justice Coalition, protested on several issues, including Bush's role in the Iran arms. Contra aid scandal, Central American policy and drugs. Jerry Rogers, 29, representing the radical environmental movement Earth First, complained that Bush failed to act quickly enough in helping Alaska combat the Exxon Valdez oil spill. "He really dragged his feet in getting the clean up started," Rogers said. "Bush didn't get the federal apparatus moving. Plus, I think Bush is aligned with big oil. Bush said he was an environmentalist during the campaign, but that was just hot air. In contrast to the 75 protesters, an equal number of Bush supporters were on the scene, and members of both groups occasionally taunted each other. Danny Taylor, 21, a UT student and member ofthe Young Republicans, said Bush's visit was "great." "This shows the system is working. He cares enough to come down here and address the House {of Representatives)," Taylor said. Taylor lamented the presence of the protesters, saying, "We see them every day on campus." Zyderm@ Collagen Treatments PETER H. PROCTOR, PhD, MD is now accepting appointments for evaluation and in-office correction of: WRINKLES FROWN LINES AGE LINES AND FACIAL SCARS FDA approved collagen injection (a natural protein) can restore the you.hful look of healthy, unlined skin and instantly delay the appearance of aging. V Proctor Clinic TWELVE OAKS MEDICAL TOWER 4126 SOUTHWEST FHWV. SUITE 1616 HOUSTON, TEXAS 77027 (713) 960-1616 __>t__. Being gay not automatic cause for divorce, says judge TORONTO (UPI)-An Alberta woman was denied a divorce because she didn't prove her husband's active homosexuality constituted mental cruelty toward her. "There is an element of willfulness in mental cruelty; being a homosexual is not equivalent to treating your spouse with cruelty," Justice Joanne Veit of Alberta Court of Queen's Bench ruled. "Cruelty implies callousness or indifference." Veit said there wasn't enough evidence to show "the grave conduct necessary" to get a divorce on grounds of marital breakdown or mental cruelty. Veit said the woman, identified only as Y.B., could reapply for divorce and provide more details about her claim of cruelty. The woman had testified that her husband "admitted to me and my eldest daughter that he is a practicing homo sexual." She said her husband "has treated me with mental cruelty of such a kind as to render continued cohabitation intolerable." The divorce wasn't contested by the husband, identified as J.B. Veit cited three other cases where divorces were granted to spouses of active homosexuals on the grounds of mental cruelty. In one case, the husband refused to have sex with his wife and said he didn't love her. In another case, a woman refused her husband's requests to end a lesbian relationship. In a third case, the wife refused to have sex with her husband for four years, moved back in with her previous lesbian lover and told her husband she was planning a sex-change operation. The federal Divorce Act says adultery or cruelty are the only grounds for immediate divorce, but couples can otherwise obtain a divorce if they've been separated for one year. Study debunks theory virus spread by insects BOSTON (UPI)—Scientists April 26 reported evidence debunking the theory a distant relative of the AIDS virus that causes leukemia could be spread by insects. The researchers said they produced evidence mosquitoes and ticks do not transmit HTLV-1, the human t-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, a virus related to the AIDS virus that causes leukemia. "This is reassuring," said Dr. Edward Murphy, an assistant professor of laboratory medicine at the University of California at San Francisco, who headed the research reported in a letter in The New England Journal of Medicine. Some researchers had speculated HTLV-1 may be spread by insects because it is found most commonly in the tropics and other areas where other insect-borne diseases are common. The researchers tested 90 Jamaican patients who had antibodies to HTLV-1 for antibodies to other viruses transmitted by ticks and mosquitoes and compared them to 110 subjects who did not have HTLV-1 antibodies. The researchers found no significant evidence that those infected with HTLV-1 were more likely to have been exposed to mosquitoes or ticks. "These results do not support the hypothesis that patients who are (infected with) HTLV-1 have had greater exposure to certain arborviruses (insect- transmitted viruses) than those who are seronegative," they wrote. "One may infer that seropositive patients have not had increased exposure to the specific mosquito and tick vectors of these arborviruses." HTLV-1 is believed to be transmitted primarily the same way as the AIDS virus—through sexual intercourse, blood transfusions and intravenous drug use.
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