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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
File 013
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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 013. 1989-05-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-05-05). Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1736

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 013, 1989-05-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 5, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 MONTROSE VOICE/MAY 5, 1989 Human Rights Campaign Fund making a difference From TOM SAUEKMAN National Vice-President, P-FLAG A letter from the field division ofthe Human Rights Campaign Fund came across my desk some time ago. It appealed to my interest and made good sense. But it called for me to do something I've never done before: pre-authorizing mail to Capitol Hill—so that they could send messages in my name to members of Congress when critical issues come up. Before I tell you what I did, let me explain its appeal. Washington, D.C, though only three hours from my front door in Philadelphi- a, is light-years from my experience. I rarely keep track of what's going on there—unless it's a banner headline in my local newspaper. Important issues about lesbian and gay concerns are frequently over and done with before I'm aware that they happened. These important actions, amendments and votes take place in small committees; occasionally they reach the full House or Senate for a vote. And, surprisingly, they often come up on short notice with little time for gay/ lesbian and AIDS lobbyists to reach all of us who care before these votes. It seems that the process doesn't make it easy for those of us who care to be heard other than through quick-response strategies such as the Campaign Fund For years I've been frustrated. What I find is I've been reactive rather than proactive on these issues where I do have strong opinions. So, I spend my time writing to complain about my representatives' vote or writing to oppose legislation that seems too far along for me to change. Then came the HRCF field division (formerly the Fairness Fund) letter. ■ The Human Rights Campaign Fund is the national political action committee for the gay and lesbian community. The Campaign Fund lobbies Congress on AIDS and fairness issues for lesbians and gay men Founded in 1980, they're now the 9th largest independent PAC in America. Because thery lobby and monitor Congress daily, they're able to move on an issue within hours. They currently have my permission to send ten 50-word messages in my name where timing and pressure is important. The messages will speak directly to and Letters to the Editor issue's critical points. They cost just 2.95 each. The Fund sends out quarterly reports on messages sent, their impact and legislative results. Or you can request and immediate copy of the message for just 50 cents each. Since they have my address, they know which voting district I'm in and send it to whomever they think it will have the most impact upon. I can cancel at anytime if I'm not satisfied. The whole process really makes good sense. In fact, as I re-read the material and thought about it further, it seemed a good idea to share at a Philadelphia Parents-FLAG Sunday meeting. (Why keep a good thing to myself?) I explained the program to the group. I invited others to give it a try by passing around the form the Fund sends in its information packet, I consider my first sales pitch a success: fourteen people signed up that day for a total of 87 Mailgrams. We're on our way. We've done something positive for our sons and daughters. Even some very closeted parents signed up; nothing identifies us as members of P-FLAG or any other organized group. From the quietness and safety of my home, I know that a sensible and thoughtful message will be sent on my behalf on issues that are important to me. And, as importantly, I know it will get there in time to make a difference. Every letter, Mailgram or phone call sent to Congress represents 1, 000 voters. And it not only reflects public opinion but also shows members of Congress that our side is organized in their districts. Jerry Falwell, lyndon LaRouche, and Phyllis Schafley generate lots of mail—often to deprive our children of their human rights and to pass AIDS hysteria measures that undercut and effective response to the crisis. Don't you think it's time that you stand up with us—and have your voice heard on Capitol Hill. Not once, but again and again. —Early gay history From MICKEY MCSHAW I am collecting stories, photos, tapes, posters, buttons, from Houston's gay history in order to create abook about Houston's growth as a gay power from 1975- 1985. Your help is greatly appreciated. For more information contact Mickey McShan at (303) 320-4041 or write to 3000 E. Colfax *368, Denver, Co. 80206. Texas House votes down hate crimes bill 79 to 64 By JERI CLAUSING FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE AUSTIN (UPI)—The Texas House Tuesday effectively killed a bill that would increase penal ties for "hate crimes" against religious, ethnic or other societal groups in a vote one black lawmaker said sends a message that racism is acceptable in Texas. the neighbOrhOOd,. Jerry VSnAmerongen "The dog wants out, Gracey." "I hate to say it, but I think the basic signal is that bigotry and racism are OK in Texas," said Rep. Larry Evans, D-Houston. "That's the signal that that vote sent today." The House voted 79-64 to table the proposal by Rep. Larry Wolens, D-Dallas, even after he tried to appease conservatives by dropping gays from the list of groups that could seek tighter penalties when victimized. The vote came the same day the House passed six of eight bills in House Speaker Gib Lewis's anti- crime package, carried by former Bexar County prosecutor Rep. Dan Morales, D-San Antonio. Wolens, who reminded members of recent harassment and vandalism crimes against Jewish synagogues in Dallas, tried to save his bill by cutting the sexual orientation provision after conservatives, who called it a gay rights measure, passed out letters to all House members saying the wording ofthe bill was too vague. '"Sexual orientation' is not defined in the bill and so would also mean any type of sexual preference such as incest, sex with animals (bestiality), sex with the dead (necrophilia), sex with children (pedophilia), sadism, etc." the letter approved by Rep. L.B. Kubiak, D-Rockwall, said. Opponents argued the legislation was not necessary because current laws cover harassment and other crimes. Wolens' proposal would have increased the crime by one degree if it was committed out of hate for a specific group of persons. "The bill addressed bigotry and the bill addressed racism and the bill addressed hate, where that hate is already acknowledged in a crime such as kidnapping, assault and murder," Wolens said. "And then action ofthe Legislature today says that the Legislature does not as a majority feel that there should be additional penalties if a jury is able to determine that murder or kidnapping or assault is done in the name of bigotry or racism. ... I think it's awfully disappointing." Opponents argued that the in creased criminal and civil penalties would only open up more people to lawsuits. "We've got enough laws to deal with these situations." said Speaker Pro Tern Rep. Hugo Berlanga, D-Corpus Christi. the only minority voting to table the bill. "I thought it was just going to open it up for more abuse and more lawsuits to be filed, and that was my biggest concern." Other opponents question.!. whether religious leaders would be held liable under the bill if they spoke against certain groups. But Wolens and Evans described that argument as a ridiculous smokescreen lawmakers used to justify their vote. "That was a bizarre argument that didn't have any basis at all in fact. That was just an inane, bizarre, crazy statement. There's no basis," said Wolens. "It has to be against current law before that would be a crime under this bill.'' Evans said he thought the religious argument "was an excuse to vote the bill down ... It's a convenient smokescreen" ULTS Additional Services Available Soon: —Painting —Lawn Maintenance —Carpet Cleaning —Sheetrock Work PEST CONTROL 223-4000 How they voted to kill hate crimes bill AUSTIN (UPI)-Here is the rollcall vote by which the Texas House of Representatives Tuesday voted 79-64 to kill a bill that would increase state penalties for "hate crimes": YES (7S)>: Alexander, Arnold, Barton, Beauchamp, Berlanga, Blackwood, Brimer, Campbell, Carter, Chisum, Clemons, Connelly. Counts, Craddick, Crawford, Culberson, Earley, Finnell. Fraser, Grusendorf, Haggerty, Hammond. Harris, C, Harrison, Heflin, Hightower, Hilbert, Hilderbran, Hill. K, Hill, P.. Hollowell, Holzheauser, Horn, Hunter, B. Hunter. T, Hury, Jackson, Johnson, J., Johnson. S.. Jones. Kubiak, Kuempel, Marchant, McWilliams, Mowery, Oakley, Ovard, Park, Parker. Patterson. Pennington, Repp. Kobinson, Rodriguez, Rudd, Saunders, Schlueter, Seidlits. Shea, Shelley, Shin., Smith. A.. Smith, I)„ Smith, R„ Smith. T„ Smithee, Swift, Tallns, Taylor. Telford, Thomas, Valigura, Vandervoort, Waterfield. Watkins, Wentworth, Willy, Wright, Yost. NO (64): Blaii; Cain, Cavazos, Colbert, Collazo, Conley,Cries, Cuellar, H.,Cuellar. R., Danburg. Delco, Denton, Dutton, Eckels, Edge, Edwards, Evans. Garcia, Gavin, Gib son, Glossbrenner, Goolsby, Granoff, Guerrero, Harris, J., Hill, A.. Hinojosa. Hudson, D., Hudson, S., Junell, Laney, Larry, Lewis, R., Linebarger, Lucio, Luna, A., Luna G., Madia, Martinez, McCol lough, McDonald, McKinney. Melton, Morales, Perez, Perry, Pierce. I'olumbo, Price, Rangel, Robnett. Russell, Schoolcraft, Soileau, Suits Thompson, G., Thompson, S., Turner, Uher, Vowell, Wallace, Warner, Willis, Wolens. ABSENT OR NOT VOTING (6): Lewis, G., Moreno, A., Moreno, P, Richardson. Williamson, Wilson.
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