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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
File 011
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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 011. 1989-05-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1734.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-05-05). Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1734

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 011, 1989-05-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1734.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 5, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 MONTROSE VOICE/MAY 5, 1989 Court ruling: Military cannot bar re-enlistment of gay man By PAMELA A. MacLEAN for the montrose voice SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)-A federal appeals court ruling that the Army cannot keep a soldier it knew to be homosexual for 14 years from re-enlisting was praised as a victory for gay rights, but criticized for sidestepping a larger constitutional issue. The 7-4 decision Wednesday by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overruled a landmark ruling by a three-judge panel of the same court that had struck down the Army's ban on homosexuals by declaring they deserved the same protection against discrimination as racial minorities. The Army was expected to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court. Homosexual groups seeking open admission to the military called the ruling a "small victory," but a dissenting judge said the court had avoided the larger question of whether the military has a constitutional right to bar homosexuals. The judges ruled Sgt. Perry Watkins was unfairly discharged because the Ar my ignored his openly stated homosexuality for 14 years before trying to block him from re-enlisting in 1981. Writing for the majority, Judge Harry Pregerson said the Army's disregard of Watkins' avowed homosexuality for 14 years "amounted almost to a policy of ignoring this servicemember's homosexuality." "This is a case where equity cries out and demands that the Army be stopped from refusing to re-enlist Watkins on the basis of his homosexuality," the decisioji said. The court said it was unnecessary to consider the broader questions of discrimination and denial of equal protection under the Constitution. Watkins, reached at his Tacoma, Wash., home late Wednesday, said he was ready to return to active duty as soon as all the appeals in the case are over. "Now we've got to wait and see what the Army will do before we make any final decisions," Watkins said, adding that while he was "real happy with the ruling, I wish they had addressed the (larger constitutional issue)." The four justices who dissented were largely concerned about the court's exercise of judicial review over the military decision-making process. "There is no doubt that the majority's intrusion into military affairs, unjustified by important federal interests, will have a disruptive effect on military discipline," wrote Judge Cynthia Holcomb Hall, who accused the majority of having a "steadfast desire" to avoid deciding the constitutional issues in the case. Stephen Bomse, attorney for the National Gay Rights Advocates, which argued in support of Watkins, said, "I'm pleased for Watkins, but this doesn't appear to do much to advance the resolution of very important legal questions. "It is disappointing the court did not take those (constitutional issues) head on" Bomse said. Watkins, 40, claimed he was denied equal protection when the Army tried to discharge him after 14 years of exemplary service purely because he is a homo- ft^^jm W5aw Hurt. RALPH, fl-.T MV "SIGNIFICANT UDDER" ^ sexual. Watkins had declared on his original 1967 draft form that he had "homosexual tendencies." Despite the disclosure he was inducted and remained in the Army, gaining the rank of sergeant. The ruling ordered reinstatement of a U.S. District Court decision Oct. 5,1982 that prevented Watkins' discharge. Watkins, who now works for the U.S. Forest Service in Seattle, said he believed that "if all the gay people in the Army came out of the closet, the Army would realize how silly their rule is. We're talking about thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of people." Judge William Norris, in a concurring opinion, said he would have gone further than simply protecting an already enlisted soldier. He found the Army regulations unconstitutionally discriminated against homosexuals. Norris wrote the earlier and broader appeal court ruling that was rejected in Wednesday's decision. "The Army's regulations violate the constitutional guarantee of equal protection of the laws because they discriminate against persons of homosexual orientation ... because the regulations are not necessary to promote a legitimate compelling government interest," Norris wrote. Leonard Graff, legal director of National Gay Rights, a public interest law firm, said a recent General Accounting Office audit showed, in the past 10 years, the military discharged an average of 1400 people a year on the basis of homosexuality. He called the annual discharge of homosexuals "yearly witch hunts" that cost taxpayers $20 million a year for investigations and retraining and recruiting replacement soldiers. Cats and dogs reign supreme at America's movie theaters By VERNON SCOTT UPI Hollywood Reporter FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE HOLLYWOOD—"Pet Sematary" and "K-9" were No. 1 and No. 2 at North America's movie theaters for the week ending last Sunday. Based on Stephen King's novel of the occult, the chilling "Pet Sematary" repeated its No. 1 standing in the box office rankings for a second consecutive week with a gross of $8.3 million and a two-week total of $24.4 million. The thriller, playing on 1585 screens, weaves a tale of horror in New England when a family is cursed by a sect that revives the dead. Runnerup for the week was newcomer "K-9," starring Jim Belushi as a cop whose lovable police dog partner has more personality than Rin-Tin-Tin and Lassie combined. In its debut week "K-9" dug up $7.4 million in 1677 theaters, proving that audiences like to laugh at bumbling cops, especially when they aren't as smart as their canine partners. No. 3 was "Major League," the baseball story of an improbable season for the Cleveland Indians, starring Tom Berenger, Charlie Sheen and Corbin Bernsen. "Major League" scored $4.1 million on 1615 screens for a four- week tally of $31.2 million. "Criminal Law," a curiously disjointed story of a psychopathic killer and a lawyer bent on bringing him to justice, was No. 4. The killer is played by Kevin Bacon in a minor role with England's Gary Oldman in the role of the American attorney. "Criminal Law" nabbed a disappointing $2.6 million in its opening frame at 1170 theaters. Rounding out the top five was "The Dream Team," a warm and wacky story of four mental cases on the loose in New York City, starring Michael Keaton, Christopher Lloyd, Peter Boyle and Stephen Furst. "Dream Team" posted $2.2 million for a four-week total of $19.1 million at 1365 theaters. Worth noting was the debut of "Scandal," the film version of England's 1960s sex scandal involving government officials and playgirl Christine Keeler. Opening in only 94 theaters, "Scandal" averaged an impressive $7,007 per screen, compared to "Pet Sematary's" $5,287 per- screen average. "Scandal" placed 13th in the weekly rankings with a gross of $658,660. It was a so-so week for the 23,000 North American theaters with an overall gross of $75 million, compared to $79 million in record-setting 1988. To date in 1989 the gross is $1,250 billion as against $1,245 billion last year. The top 10, the week's gross, total gross, weeks in release: 1. "Pet Sematary," $8.3 million. $24.4 million, 2 weeks. 2. "K-9," $7.4 million, 1 week. 3. "Major League," $4.1 million, $31.2 million, 4 weeks. 4. "CriminalLaw,"$2.6milHon, 1 week. 5. "The Dream Team," $2.3 million, $19.1 million, 4 weeks. 6. "Say Anything ...," $2.29 million, $12.1 million, 4 weeks. 7. "Rain Man," $1.7 million, $158.2 million, 20 weeks. 8. "Loverboy," $1.6 million, 1 week. 9. "Field of Dreams," $1.5 million, $2.3 million, 2 weeks. 10. "She's Out of Control," $1.3 million, $8.5 million, 3 weeks.
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