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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 009. 1989-05-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-05-05). Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1732

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 009, 1989-05-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1732.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 5, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 MONTROSE VOICE/MAY 5, 1989 <3ln Memory (§i ... —DOUGLAS DEAN McNEELY Douglas Dean McNeely finished his long struggle with AIDS on Thursday, April 27,1989. Doug had been a resident of Houston for approximately 15 years and is very appreciative of the love and support that he received here. At Doug's request we're getting "some nice people together to have some wine". Call Jana for details. 621-3959 or Rex, 528-0461. —MICHAEL E. PERONE Michael E. Perone. Sept. 19. 1947- April 23, 1989. After a long struggle with cancer, Mike passed in the early morning hours on Sunday April 23. He will be missed and remembered by many friends. A memorial service will be held soon at a location to be announced. For information please call Tony Dennen at 524-0203. —RICHARD RICK' NESTOR LEIVA Born July 19. 1953. died April 16, 1989. Rick was a resident of Houston in the late 70's and early 80's. He died at his home in Miami Beach with family. Corinthians 1, chapter 1, verses 9-20.—Marc and friends CanYaa Tell WIGHT From WRONG?... ...if so, you MAY QUALIFY TO SERVE ON THE HOUSE ETHICS COMM/TTEEL C-.OREI/ENAS SPEAKER OF THE H0USE.O Famed transsexual Christine Jorgensen dies of cancer at 62 SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (UPD-Chris- tine Jorgensen, a former G.I. who shocked the world in 1952 by acknowledging she had undergone sex-change surgery, died Wednesday after a 2-year struggle against cancer. She was 62. Jorgensen, who in 1986 developed bladder cancer that eventually spread throughout her body, died several days after she was admitted to San Clemente Hospital, said Jami Piearson, a spokeswoman for the facility. Jorgensen, born George Jorgensen in New York City, startled the nation and became the instant butt of comedians' jokes when she made public her then virtually unheard of sex-change operation. She originally complained about the publicity as an infringement on her privacy, but turned her notoriety into a career, appearing on stage and writing an autobiography that was turned into a movie. Jorgensen took hormones for the rest of her life to maintain her appearance, and worried in her 50s that the treatments could cause cancer. "She was absolutely emphatic about the public knowing that this (cancer) was not in any way related to the operation or to any hormone treatment," said her publicist Chris Costello. "It was more genetic, because both her parents died of cancer?' Costello said, adding that one of Jorgensen's parents also had been stricken with bladder can cer. Jorgensen, a one-time photographer, was 24 when she first heard about sex "reassignment" experimentation in Denmark. After two years of saving, Jorgensen, the child of first generation Danish immigrants, journeyed to Denmark to undergo the change. After a year of hormone treatments and three operations, Jorgensen returned to the United States in 1952. A family friend leaked her secret to reporters, setting off the furor. "I have no regrets now over the publicity, but in the beginning I hated it," she said in the late 1970s. Costello said Jorgensen, who never married and is survived by a sister and two nieces, was stoical about her illness and "upbeat" until her death. "She loved life, loved people and wasn't phony or pretentious," she said. Actress Dorothy Lamour, a long-time friend, described Jorgensen as "a wonderful understanding woman who absolutely loved everyone. She gave out so much love. She was a God-loving woman, one of the finest women I have met." Jorgensen was banned from television when she returned from Europe after the sex change. "I think they thought I was going to take my clothes off and run screaming through the studio," she once told an interviewer. She lived to see what once was regarded as a bizarre operation become much more common, but adverse reactions to Jorgensen's own sex change continued years after she returned to the United States. In 1953 police in Las Vegas, Nev., said they would charge her with masquerading if she appeared on stage at the Sahara Hotel in women's clothes. "Everybody was expected to be normal, but there is no normal," she once said. "There are places in the world where people are expected to eat their next door neighbor. "I don't know what my life would have been like" if her sex-change had never been disclosed, Jorgensen once said. "But I probably wouldn't have had all this. It's given me a lifestyle. It's been a lot of hard work. If I died tomorrow, I wouldn't think life owed me anything." She spent 10 years touring with a nightclub act, then expanded into stage roles, television talk show appearances and in the 1970s began lecturing at colleges. She said students asked personal questions, often inquiring whether she could have an orgasm. She told them she could. She published an autobiography in 1967 and helped produce a movie based on the book in 1969. She later sued United Artists for $5 million, charging that the 1970 movie "The Christine Jorgensen Story" was marketed as a "B- grade" film. She said that for the rest of her life she found that "some men still have a problem with me. I think they see me as a threat to their masculinity." She also worked with groups protesting discrimination against homosexuals. "This is not just a homosexual's problem," she said. "If a law can be created in Dade County (Florida) against homosexuals, then where will it stop?... You're opening up the floodgate to discrimination against everybody." Jorgensen characterized her personal life as normal. Though never married, she said she was engaged twice, to "charming men. I was deeply in love twice. But I was never in love with anybody I was engaged to. And I was never engaged to anybody I loved. Isn't that a perfectly normal syndrome? "There have been men in my life, but i never moved in with one, and 1 never let one move in with me. "Fundamentally, we are an entity unto ourselves from the moment of birth until the moment of death. Some people find this a depressing thought, a lonely philosophy. But it isn't lonely. It's a lone philosophy. I am an alone person. Not a lonely person." Costello said relatives planned a private memorial service for Jorgensen, who is expected to be cremated, A public service will probably be held later, Costello said, adding (hat a time hasyet to be planned for the services.
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