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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
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Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 001. 1989-05-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1724.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989-05-05). Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1724

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989 - File 001, 1989-05-05, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1753/show/1724.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 445, May 5, 1989
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 5, 1989
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE 0 (onmmnill! lJuhliel!in~ (ompmtl! 0 FRIDAY, May 5. 1989 0 ISSUE 445 - -- - Bo 0 Thousands march demanding end to legal discrimination /\n t>fitimatt·d 15,000 to JO,()()() gay men and lesh1uns marchrd on the state Capitol last Sunduy, t·ulling for the repeal of tht• st.alt• sodumy luw and prolt."C·tion from dis<·nmt· nution It wns thl' largest gay right"' rally in st.uh' hiHtory and the largeHl dt·moni-tru tion in AuMtm f!!inrt> thr I 960i:; peaC'e mov< .. mt•nt I A.·cl by n drum corps, protefiters from uno88 tht• stale mnrl'ht•d about ~ mih·s from tht• Colorado H.iver to the Capitol, t•hnnting, ··what do you want'!'' "Gay rightR now:• I.oc:al Hou"'ton organizer Ray Hill esti­matt.. od HouHtoo's participation at about i<()(XI people. "The march lasted 55 min· utet'. llouston·H conungent consisW of20 minult·s of that march:' Hill said. "We were C.'C>rtainly the biggest group there, followt'<i by DallusandSanAntonio:' About30anti­homo" exual at·tivists stood on the edg(' of th<' statt-hou1-1e grounds with placards that reud "I lomosexunlity is a sin,"· and •·Gay is not OK~' GttY nt'livisb; Htreamed around thc•m, some· taunting, ''Shame on you. Hhurnu on _you:• to Lh(> smaller group, but then• wc.·n· no incidt>nts In fal'l. somt• gay men and lesbian~ post-d for pictures in front of the smaller grnup. Capital polite estimated the crowd at 15,000 to :l0,000 pt'Ople while march organ· izers said the crowd was about 30,000. "They say this place belongs to all the people.., and today it s your day, State Rep. Lena Guerrt·ru. n-Austin, told the crowd .. We rnuf't m·ver surrender. We must nev· er rttn•ut. Victory or death;• state ~en Cruig Washington, D·Houston. said to wild chet•rs. "If we can't Jive together on thi!:I planc·t us one pt•ople, we don't have the right tu live on this planet.' "When we fight for our gay rights today or Hispant<' rij.thts yestt'rday or black righb; the day before und Indian rights the day bt•fon• that. we're all fighting for the same• rights. You can"t be for one and against the utht·r~· he said Organizers hoped to deliver to Gov. Bill Ck men ts 15.000 signatures calling for pas· sage of a slate of gay rights legislation, in· eluding the repeal of the Texas sodomy Jaw, ·tion 21 06 ortheTexas Pena~ Code. Paramedics treated three people for mi­nor injuries during the march. but none re­quired hospitalization. ~aid Vance· Kirkhuff. with the city Emergency .Medica1 Services Department. Buck in Houston Thursday. Hill said •J could not be more plt-ased. The Caucus hopt's to rt'ap the benefit of the march par· tic1pation." Hill is president of the Houston Gay and Lesbian 11olitical Caucus. He said about 75 Houstonians ... worked the halls of thE' Capitol" \.ionday att.t>mpting to visit every Harris Count)· delegate. He said they received cordial treatment from most. ex· <·ept Brad Wright. Randy Pennington and Buster Brown, all of whom were "'particu larly rude." 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 5, 1989 The Texas House of Representatives. in all its collected wisdom {which probably could fill any one of several receptacles made in­famous by cliches} . voted down the so-called "hate crimes" bill. It has been demonstrated in Texas and across the United States that many violent cnmes are essentially motivated by hate directed by a specific minority. be they blacks, Jews, gays or lesbians. Ttiis bill, like similar measures in Congress and in other states, did not create a new category of crimes. One esteemed legislator, Glenn Repp, a Republican from Duncanville {but we mustn't hold either of those circumstances against him}. was moved to ask, "Would preaching against the Church of Satan be considered a hate crime?" A familiarity with the First Amendment would have avoided the question (would such knowledge be an unreasonable prerequisite for holding a legislative post.} "Hate cnmes" bills do not create new crimes: they provide stiffer penalties for those who act violently against someone because they are a member of a minority Certainly any crime motivated by such hatred deserves attention since, in the past, crimes against blacks, Jews, homosexuals and other like groups have tended to receive lesser punishments. if convicted . Such measures, there­fore, appear to right a wrong. In the case of the Texas bill, its author. Steven Wolens {Democrat from Dallas}, had assumed it would pass when homosexuals were specifically REMOVED from its coverage. He was disappointed. Those Texas throwbacks, the Conservative Caucus, already op­posed the bill-perhaps their dislike for homosexuals 1s only a matter of degree from their regard for blacks and Jews. The leader of this caucus, L.B. Kubiak , a Democrat from Rockdale, contended there already were laws "to deal with the sit­uation'.' We're waiting for his legal citations. Kubiak went on to say that such a bill would lead to a lot of lawsuits. Now we must expect legislators to have a modicum of knowledge of criminal law {Lord knows. many of them seem to have need of it}. Such a bill only adds a burden to a prosecutor to establish a motive and a jury to decide the issue. The bottom line, of course, is that even had the bill passed the exclusion of sexual orientation to qualify as a hate crime is a insur­mountable flaw from our point of view. To all those God-fearing legislators the thought that a criminal would be given a stiffer pen­alty 1f he attacked someone because they were gay apparently comes across as so abhorrent that they would weight in on the side of the criminal bigot. The liberal tradition of the our highest court has long estab­lished that in a democracy the majority has an added responsibility to protect those less fortunate through circumstances of birth or cond1t1on or color Until homosexuals en1oy the full privileges of American citizenship (a right of equality, not special privilege} we fully qualify as a minority in need of protection. Give us our full and equal rights and we'll willingly take our chances in the crime-ridden streets of th is great nation. But in the face of such appalling ignorance as found in ''the land of little men"-the Texas House of Representatives-our greater task is obviously educating our " leaders'.' And here we would do well to remember that the black civil rights movement found that the best school for educating was int he streets and before the very doors of power. Until the politicians and the news media take us seriously (and Channel 13 showing drag queens and leathermen shows their bias and our diversity} legal progress will continue to elude us. Let our leadership learn from the past so as to gain our rightful future. I~ r--::i-SHEER INSANITY & ~ DAOUIRI FACTORY WESTHEIMER LOBO proudly presents Al Parker Saturday, May 6, 4-6pm Our customers and friends are invited to meet the premier gay activist in the adult entertain ment field. Also, "Carnival in Rio:· the most awaited gay video, is now availa ble at LOBO, along with "Full Serv ice" and other new releases. Only at LOBO, your full service gay specialty store. 1424-C Westheimer (at Windsor) 522-5156 Video Sales & Rentals • SWimwear • T-Shirts • Magazines • Cards • Books • Leather • Accessories • Necessities March on Austin photos for the Montrose Voice are by Phihppe Paravicin1, Ron Mathis and Ken Conner Mike's Automotive Repair 1411 Taft 522-2190 523-7832 • suspension• AC• Tune Up• Electrical • Clutches• Mot ors Rebuilt • Transmissions Rebuilt• Brakes • Air conditioning Check $6 + freon • Brake Job <most carsl $49.95 Factory Trained Technicians European, Japanese and oomestic service CHECK OUR MONTHLY SPECIALS NOW HIRING Journalists The Montrose Voice is now accepting applications for full-time and freelance journalists. Daily newspaper experience preferred. Advertising Re.presentaiives Requires sales experience, out-going personality and automobile. Please submit resumes to 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. MAY 5. 1989 MONTROSE VOICE 5 Co-discoverer of virus to address Houston conference Dr Luc Montag!er, head of the V!ral Oncology Unit at Inst!tut Pasteur in Paris and co-discoverer of the AIDS virus, will part!cipat.e as keynot.e speaker in the "First Annual Hous­ton Conference on AIDS in America" set for May 11-12, 1989 at the Hyatt &igency hot.el in Downtown Hous­ton. Dr Montag!er will address the conference Thursday, May 11 at 9:00 a.m. and part!cipat.e in a round table that same day at 3:30 p.m. The conference, which ls accredit­ed through the Universicy of Texas Health Science Cent.er at Houston for the American Medical Association, will address not only the obvious medical concerns, but address the humane, social and economic det.es­tation the epidemic represents for Texans and sociecy in general. The core of the FHCAA &!lat.es the epi­demic to the work place and its asso­ciated impact on the overall econo­my In addition, the relation of AIDS and the future of leglslative efforts designed to help in the solution of this tragic problem in Texas, will be addressed. -Bering Care Center Beg1tlnlng May 12, the Bering Care Cent.er will open its doors every Fri­day evening from 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. for a weekly "get-together" for HIV positive persons and their guests. Desserts and refreshments will be served and an 8:00 p.m. mOvie will be shown. Thell.rstnight'smevie ls "The Women:• the very campy 1939 classic starring Joan Crawford, Paulette Goddard, Norma Shearer and Rosa.lind Russell. If you haven't seen it you don't know what your missing. "!.Amour, !.Amour, Tm.\jours r.Amout.' The Friday opening ls just one of the new activities in the works as the Bering Care Cent.er strives to serve the communicy as a cent.er of positive support for HIV positive persons. AB Director Paula Hebert ex-old, the center iS open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday thru Friday. Lunch iS served at noon. It's free, it's fun, and it's a positive way for a 'PWA/PW.APIJ to spend the day. For more information contact Paula Hebert at 520-7070. - AFHboard John Paul Ba.rnich has been re­elected chairman of the AIDS Foundation Houston's (AFH) board of trustees. Elected vice-plalnS, ':After ta1k1ng with many 'PWJIB, we discovered a deftnlt.e need for an eve­ning gathering place, as well as a comfortable day­time care center A place to get together with old friends and maybe even make some new ones. And Montrose Beighbor­hood chairmen were Bill Napoli and Donald Skipwith; treasurer iS Michael ca.rney and sec­retary iS Sue Lovell. Board of trustees include: I vents Loren Allen, Richard Bolyard, Solomon since the idea ftts so well with the overall purpose of the center, we thought 'why not use our faclllties?: we have plenty of room and big screen tv, so let's show a movie and have some fun'.' Long-time volunteer Bob Austin adds, "I think we've created a very positive, fun atmosphere and we're looking forward to openlng the doors and having some fun on Friday nights as well'.' Paula, Bob and all the volunteers at the Bering Care Center invite all HIV positive persons and their guests to attend and to also stop by during the week for a Visit. Located at 1440 Har- Brownstein, George Chilson, MigUSl DaCunba., Bruce Felgar, Michael Fultz, Joseph Gathe, Jr, M.D, Edward lnderwiBh, Jack Jackson, Mitchell Katine, Joan Thomason Kent, Richard Ul­opold, Bernice Moncrief, Eleanor Munger, Windell Cooper Porter, Arturo Rios, M.D., Janice Thomas, Joseph Tumlinson, Genevieve Vaughn, Robert Watson, Steven Welch and Ben Wheatley. -Montrose Library The United Stat.es-China Peoples Friendship Association on Mon­day, May 8, presents a program on the study tour to take place this fall along the ancient Silk Road. The program begins at 6:30 p.m. The Montrose Voice n •US~ )N ~EXAS JE .<4 FRIDAY. MAV ;,., 1989 Published weekly FLAGSH PUF <t:omnmnily l.Jnbliohing <t:ompnny 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynght 1968 Offoce hours 9am-6pm Henry McClurg Pub shw ed•UN Skip Felkner°'''",,,.,,~ Richard Weekes Jeff Bray. Allen Thomson CMlt""""'f•r1t.,S SUBSCRIPTIONS (7'31 529-8490 ----- AOVER ... ISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529--8490 Jerry MulhOlland advert1sirtg dlfec"OI David Chapmafl account eiKUl•ve .. arry Lent ..:coun •urci.Jf1.,. POSl MASTfA SenCI aomess correc:: s 408 Avon-dale '"'°"'son. TX "006-"J028 SuNcnprlOlt ,..,_ US by V :-. ,,_ OT ...S Ua;t s1 25 per.eek !'3250 pere rnon;l'll or~ P9I' y .. rJ N•t•Oflltf~naJng'•1'f•Mnt•t,.,. Rivenoe< Markl!'l.-.g P 0 Boll 268 P m' .. NJ 07061 ~201) 7~-4348 •t:.m., a.l, .. t.v..e..n isi"{I O.MlllM 5Pm W.on.day tor Frl(lay NOflC. fO lltlvm ...... Advertl5U'lg ratti IChedu.e E>gtrt-A waeftectrweApnl 11 1986 Rupo#l••""lly We 00 not assume f1Nrw;ia1 r-.pon1 bd ty tor c .. ims by advertisen bu! readefl are aked lo ao-.•• the nt-w~per of any auapcion of fr.outenl QI' cleclrptive 80v9rt,.11;g .,..d .USPICJQM w bl mV9Stt;ated N"""' s•rvice United Press ntemetlONll Unique multi service center open to public on W. Gray Ulmd children play thl·ir version of soft. ball at thf• <Tnft•fs diamond By RICHARD V. WEEKES '!'ht· Montrost• Voice Montrose' latest activity hub is doing a booming business and this is just the be­ginning for the Metropolitan Multi-Serv· ice Center at 1475 W Gray. The facility, run by the city's Health and Human Services Department, is unique to Houthwestern United States, according to its Administrator, Bill Wanless, in that its primary aim is pro­viding recreational and educational Ht.>rvic:t> to th<' disabled. Secondarily, it is available to the public for a variety of functions. "Since we opened in the fall, we've he<•n swamped;' said Wanle8s. ''Last month we had Home 360 disabled people of nil ag<•s and more than 3000 others taking advantage of the facilities. We had one wedding with nearly 800 peo­pl< ·:· The Multi-Service Center occupies eight acres of land between Waugh Drive and Dunlavy Street. It contains an ul tra·modern (it.s ventilator pipes are Bill Wanh>ss is administrator of th(' untt•r exposed-in orange) 34,000-square foot building, two tennis courts, a softball diamond, playground, jogging track. picnic area, parking for 270 cars and space for an Olympic-size swimminy pool, to be built later. A vast auditorium, which can bedivid­l'd into two rooms with the push of a but· ton, holds a full-sized basketball court, a stage for live shows and a movie screen. It is the home court of the Lone Star Volleyball League which plays there evt•ry Thur8day night. Surrounding the auditorium are lock­er rooms, a cafe and commercial kitchen available for parties (and caterers). meeting and conference rooms (seating up to 400 persons), a fully-equipped exer· cise room, and 14 office spaces, 10 of them now occupied by agencies con­cerned with the disabled. They rent for .70 a square foot. The Metropohtan Multi-Service Center is 34.000 sq. ft large, and rontams a basketball court. meeting rooms. a dining hall u·ith rommerc1al kitchen and offices All the fac1htiei; are avrulable to the public-civic clubs, day care enterprises, athletic teams, aerobic groups, individu­als and private groups wanting to dance and party, at low rentals. A tennis court rents for S:J an hour, the same as the ex er· cise room, the volleyball court for $8 an hour, the softball field at $4 an hour. There are speC"ial discounts for the hand­icapped and senior citizens. There is no charge for lockers or showers-bring your own towel. (The Center has a de­tailed list of rental costs). The $5.9 million center is one of six such facilities in Houston operated by the Health and Human Services Dept. It is staffed by four professionals and is open from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., six and one half days a week. The Center brings to Montrose oppor­tunities for civic enterpri..c;:es the area has never had before. Once lights are erected over the softball field and the swimming pool is installed, it will be a magnet for every Montrot"ian, young and old. Says Wanless, 37, a social worker who came to Houston seven years ago from Wisconsin, "Ifs only just begun. There's no telling how far we can go in serving the community:· The Cenrer's relephone number is 529- 4711. 6 MONTROSE VOICE MAY 5, 1989 Women softballers to hold bowling tourney The Houston Women's Soft.baJ.J. I.aague 1s hold!ng a bowl1.ng tourna­ment May 13 at Stadium Bowl. The format will be Scotch Doubles, regis­tration will befrom 7:00p.m. till 7:30 p.m. and bowling will begin at 8:00 p.m. A charge of $5.00 per person will pay for 3 games. There will be cash strike pots, a raffle for a bowl1.ng ball, trophies and triV!a questions for free drinks. For more information ca.II B.J. at 495-1159. -Lone Star Volleyball The I.one Star Volleyball Association met for !ts semi-annual business meeting April 20. A noted change in the leagus format was to expand the levels of competition. The newly in­corporated assoc!ation will field two d!v!s!ons, meting on two separate evenings for the Summer leagus, which will start soon and run unt!l the end of August. A recreation leagus will meet on Monday evenings from 7 to 10:00 p.m. The "rec" d!v!s!on 1S open to both experienced players and beginners. A ''power" d!v!s!on will met on Thurs­day evenings at he same times for more accom­pl! shed competitors. Teams will be formed independent­ly and are invited to enter Montrose Neighbor­hood Sports - Patty's Pool Par­lor Get out those tips andsha.ftB and let's get it on. The G.H.P.B.L. summer season 1s now under way so a.II of you sD-<la.lled sharks better have your "stick" together. There tilts d!v!s!on as a team Genie Lutz, current leagus Presi­dent, commenting on the new format sa.1d, "This should give anyone inter­ested in volleyba.11 a place to play~ Even though both d!v!s!ons will be play!ng under USVBA rules, the powerba.11 competitor and the begin­ner now have a choice as to the level of play they want'.' Interested individuals may show up for the "open play" sessions cur­renUy meeting on Thursdays from 7- 10 p.m. at the Metropol!tan Multi­serv! ce Center on West Gray or ca.II 882-5195 for more information. will be 15 weeks of good old lilsh!oned fun and friendly competi­tion to carry us through the drudger­y of the summer. I know you gtzys from the Briar Patch are eager to de­fend your championship but I hope you are prepared to put something else on the shelf where the cup "used to be", As 1s the custom, there will not be any standings information to report for the ftrst three weeks of play. I'll try to keep everyone informed as to what's going on unt!l then. For the newcomers to the leagus I'd l!ke to say welcome. Anytime any of you have questions or concerns about the leagus please feel free to contact me or any of the other trustees. We ask that the veteran teams show lenien­cy with the newcomers and help them with the rules. Remember, we were a.II new at one time and some­one had to help us. It will soon be time for our leagus picnic. A tentative date of June 17th has been selected but we have not de­cided on a location. !Ast year was the ftrst t1m we had the picnic and I th!nkwea.lleI<)oyedourselves.Itwas nice spend!ng the day with friends in an environment outside of a bar and doing something other than play!ng pool. For those of you who missed it last year, try to mak:e!ttlltsyear(Ju­d, ycooks a mean hot dog). Wewillned volunteers to help organize, cook, etc. If you're interested, please any one of the Board members. The 611 and the C&N ca.fa are donating a keg of beer each for tilts year's picnic. Thanks a lot gizys, we rea.lly appreci­ate it. AmF AR announces grants to help get experimental treatments By PEG BYRON FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE NEW YORK (UPI)-A $1.4 million effort to speed up development of promising experimental AIDS treat­ments through non-traditional re­search organizations around the country was announced April 27 in New York. The American Foundation for AIDS Research hopes to create the opportunity for everyone with AIDS in the United States to partake of some kind of experimental treat­ment, officials said. "It's not going to happen over­night. Within one year the potential is for ten times more patients to be involved in community-based trials, about 50,000 instead of 5,000. That will be virtually all of them;' said Dr. Mathilde Krim, AmFAR's founding ccrchair. "There will be some people left out still, probably the poor in rural are­as, but the outreach will be much larger. There will be room for every- All Bills Paid New Owner MoniJored Intruder Alarms On-Site Management Efficiency, I, 2, 3 Bedroom Floor Plans ~ (jKEENWAY PLACE 3333 Cummins 623-2034 body in some kind of clinical trial;' Krim said. AmFAR plans to distribute the funds to 16 groups it described as community-based clinical trial cen­ters, an alternative to studies done at major universities and large ur­ban hospitals. Located in 13 cities around the United States, the programs are at­tempts to cut through bureaucratic red tape and make experimental treatments available to a broader range of people-especially women and intravenous drug users, who are primarily black and Hispanic and have not been well-represented in most past clinical trials. People with AIDS and physicians in the communities are to be in­volved in choosing substances and designs for clinical trials, which al­so apply traditional standards for reviewing procedures a nd collecting data. The approach was pioneered by AIDS organizations in New York 'Now Open' 11 26 W. Alabama ' ~ Jc:a-rrit Place Ant iques, Consignments & More 528-6981 Where we buy, sell and trade Larry White Owner and San Francisco, where efforts al­ready have yielded success with s treatment for pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which is responsible for most AIDS-related deaths. On May 1, the drug, aerosol pentamidine, was to be the subject of a hearing for marketing approval by the federal Food and Drug Adminis­tration, which granted it a limited approval on the basis of data gath­ered by the Community Research In­itiative in New York and the County Community Consortium in San Francisco. The community groups so far have been commended for the quali­ty of data gathered, and cancer re­searcher Dr. Burton Lee, now Presi­dent Bush's personal physician has recommended the approach be ap­plied to other diseases, such as can­cer research. The National Institutes of Health has adopted the approach for $6 mil­lion in AIDS research contracts it plans to award in September. FAXUNE AVAJLABLE $2.00 per page outgoing* *bas""' Wlth/O ltl(t rX)(lf1r•onro1 u ) $100 per page Incoming Have your fax sent here, we'll coll you when ft amves. Pilntex Plus 161 7 W . Alabama 524-4 365 "Your Full Service Printer and Copy Center" @ :·~· . I) Fax Line 524-7587 "Community physicians and peo­ple with AIDS began pushing the concept a while ago. Everybody es­sentially is for it;' said Dr. Lawrence Deyton, chief of the community clin­ical research section of the AIDS program at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH. The AmFAR grants ranged from $30,000 to $100,000 for the groups, located in Atl anta; A ustin, Tex.; Boston; Dallas; Houston; Los Ange­les; New Haven, Conn.; New York; Portland, Ore.; Redwood City, Calif.; San Francisco; Santa Fe, N.M.; Springfield, Va.; and Westwood, N.J. Krim said major medical centers have not had the capacity to carry out tests on people with the treat­ment leads yielded by stepped-up ef­forts among pharmaceutical compa­nies, which have recognized a poten­tially vast market as worldwide esti­mates of people infected with the AIDS virus have s urpassed 5 mil­lion. c:SJtJ&dies .hvm.-m·1d1· "'''"'rt\ ... ntralnx HOUSTON'S BEST GOURMET SANdwicltu H0"'1tMAdl '>Olp\ '>AIA<h C..AplCCi"-O Ol\\IRI\ ''""'"" ~ ~14 446'1 , •. """, , .. , ,,,. ( ~. b04 W1\1l111MIR ~r.P.;~, -----------· COUPON CApucciNo iNrRoducroRy offER Bly I, (,11 1 I 1u1 -1 p.··- part-y p..i- .Jay- w1tt -. .,..,o,1-p -Exp1-rei M-ay 1-1 . 11;·_., MONTROSE C·L·I·N·I·C A private, non-profit organization ISTD's (Sexually Transmitted Diseases)! Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Hours: Monday - Friday, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM Saturday and Sunday, 1 :OO PM - 4:30 PM lfnv (AIDS) Antibody Testing! Free and anonymous testing Hours: Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 1 :00 PM - 4:30 PM Wednesday Evening 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM ~~~;"i~ Pantzer's W~n-en's Programs! Includes breast exams and gynecological exam Hours: Monday - Friday, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM Saturday and Sunday, 1 :OO PM - 4:30 PM Including Immune System Evaluation, T4(T8 testing, Pentamldine Mist Therapy, Hot Line, Speaker's Bureau, doctor's referrals, and agency referrals. Call for Information. 28-5531 1200 Richmond Avenue (Three blocks west of Montrose Boulevard) Male/Female MCNlsa - AmEx Se Habla Espanol THIS ADVERTISEMENT MADE POSSIBLE BY A GRANT FROM WILLIAM MARBERRY MAY 5, 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 NO VISITORS can sometimes be dev­astating, especial!~ to a hospitalized person with AIDS. Be that person a PWA can talk to and share with b~ becoming a hospital team volun­teer with AIDS Faun- . dation Houston. We'll provide the training to help ~ou help us. 1 Helping someone with AIDS can make ~ou both feel better. lsn 't it time for )JOU to help? Call 621-6796. --- --------- -- ------ AIDS FOUNDATION HOUSTON, INC. This pub••c service ann-0\incement ptCIY•ded lh ough a gift from w~uaam M.uberry 8 MONTROSE VOICE MAY 5. 1989 c3Jn ~ilcmor~ ®f -DOUGLAS DEAN McNEELY Douglas Dean McNeely finished his long struggle with AIDS on Thurs­day, April 27, 1989. Doug had been a resident of Houston for approxi­mately 15 years and is very appreci­ative of the love and support that he received here. At Doug's request we're getting "some nice people to­gether to have some wine" Call Jana for details, 621-3959 or Rex, 528-0461 -MICHAEL E. PERONE Michael E Perone, Sept. 19. 1947- April 23, 1989. After a long struggle with cancer. Mike passed in the early morning hours on Sunday April 23. He will be missed and remembered by many friends. A memorial service will be held soon at a location to be announced. For information please call Tony Dennen at 524-0203. -RICHARD 'RICK' NESTOR LEIVA Born July 19. 1953, died April 16, 1989. Rick was a resident of Hous­ton in the late ?O's and early 80's. He died at his home in M1am1 Beach with family. Corinthians 1 chapter 1 verses 9-20.-Marc and friends ..• IFSO, YOU MAY QUALi l=Y TO SERVE ON THE HOUSE ETl./ICS COMM/11££!. .. Famed transsexual Christine Jorgensen dies of cancer at 62 SAX CLEMEXTE, Calif. (lJPI)-Chri& tine Jorgensen, a former GI who •h• k~ the word m 1952 by acknowl· edgmg he h d undergone sex-change surgery died Wednesday after a z-year struggle agamst cancer. She was 62. Jorgensen, who tn 19~ developed bladder cancer that eventually spread throughout her body, died several days after tihe was admitted to San Clemente Hospital, said Jami Piearison, a spokeswoman for the facility. Jorgen~en, born George Jorgensen in New York City, startled the nation and became the instant butt of comedians' ~okei; when she made public her then vir­tually unheard of sex-change operation. She originally complained about the publicity as an infringement on her pri­vacy. but turned her notoriety into a ca­reer, appeanng on stage and writing an autobiography that was turned into a movie. J orgenaen took hormones for the re~t of her life to marntain her appearance, and worried in her 50i:; that the treat­ments could cause cancer. "She was absolutely emphatic about the public knowing that this (cancer) was not in any way related to the opera· tion or to any hormone treatment:• said her publicist Chris Costello. "It was. more genetic, becauise both her parents died of cance.;• Costello said, adding that one of Jorgensen "s parent.s also had been stricken with bladder can· cer.- Jorgensen, a one-time photographe~ was 24 when she first heard about sex .. reassignment' experimentation in Denmark. After two years f saving, ,Jorgensen, the child of first generation Dam.sh immigrants, journeyed to Den­mark to undergo the change. After a year of hormone treatmen~ and three operations, Jorgensen re­turned to the United States in 1952. A family friend leaked her secret to report­ers, setting off the furor. 'I have no regrets now over the public­ity, but in the beginning I hated it;• she said in the late 1970s. Costello said Jorgensen, who never marned and 1s survived by a sister and two nieces, was stoical about her illnt'ss and ''upbeat" until her death. "She loved life, loved people and wasn't phony or pretentious:' she said. Actre~s Dorothy Lamour, a long-time friend, de.scribed Jorgensen as .. a won­derful understanding woman who abso­lutely loved everyone. She gave out so much love. She was a God-loving worn· an. one of the finest women I have met:' Jorgen!:'t'n was banned from televi· sion wht·n she returned from Europe af­ter the sex change."] think they thought I was going to take my clothe• off and run screaming through the studio;· she once told an intt'rviewer. Sht' lived to see what oncf> was regard· ed as a bizarre operation become much more common, but adverse reaction!'; to Jorgensen s own sex change continurd years after she retumC'd to thf• Unit(•d States. In 1953 μoli1.: in I.as Vegas, ~ev., smd they would char11e her with masquerad­ing if she appeared on stage at the Sa­hara Hotel in woml•n's clothes. uEverybody was expected to be nor­mal, but there is no normal:' she once said. "There are places in the world where p(.>ople are expected to eat their next door neighbor. "I don't knowwhatmy life would have \x,en like" if her sex-change had never been disclosed, Jorgensen once said. 'But I probably wouldn't have had all this. It's given me a lifestyle. It's been a lot of hard work. If I died tomorrow, I wouldn't think life owed me anything~' She spent 10 years touring with a nightclub a<'l. then expanded into ~tage roles. te)(.>vision talk show appearancl's and in the 1970s brgan lecturing at col· 1eges, She t-aid students asked personal questionH, often inquiring whether she could havt• an orgasm. Sh~ told them she could. She published an autob10graphy in !!167 und helped produce a movie bast•d on the book in 1969. She later sued l7nit· ed Artists for $5 million. char11in11 that the 1970 movie "The Chriollne Jorgensl·n Story" was markett'd a1-; a .. H­l( rade" lilm. Sh!' said that for the n·st ofhpr life she found that some ml•n t<till have a prob­Jpm with me. I think they see me as a thn·at to tht>ir masculinity She ulsn workt·d with groups protest­ing discn~inntwn against homosexu· als. "This 1s not jut-it a homosexual's proh­ll'm:• tshe said. ·•Jf alaw can be<.·rt>ate<l in Dade County (Florida) agamst homo· sexuals, then whnewill it stop'! .. You're opening up the floodgate to discrimina hon against everybody." Jorgem;en C'haracterizcd her personal life as normal. Though never married, she 1:mid she was engaged twice, to "charming men. I was deeply in love twice. But I was never in love with any· body I was t>ngaged to. And I was never en11a11ed to anybody I loved. lsn·t thatu perfectly normal syndrome'? 'There have bet·n m(•n in my life, hut I never mov(>(I in with one, and I never let one move in with me. "Fundamentally, we are an entity un· to ourselven from the moment of birth until the moment of death. Some people find this a dc·pressing thought, a lonely philosophy. HutiL isn't lonely. It's a lone philosophy. I am an alone person. Not a lonely pen1on:' Costello said relativt·s planned a pri· vah• mt.·morial servi«e for Jorgenstn, who iM l'xpt•C'lt·d to be cremated. A pubht• 1H•rvi<.·e will probably be held latn. Costello said, addml( that a time has y•t to he planned for the s<·rvict's. MAY 5, 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 AIDS risk low but not zero from blood transfusions By HOB STEIN VPI 8cit·nce Writer F()fl H1E t.IONTAOSf \IO:CE BOSTON-The risk of being infected with tht.> AIDS virus from a blood transfusion has b<•tn reduced dramatically but is still "not ze­ro;• researchers rrported Wednesday. Bal'ied on a f.itudy involving more than 4000 ht>urt i;urgt.>ry patients in Houston and Balli more between April 1985 and Dec. 1988, thl' n•gearthers t>stimated about three out of eve­ry 100,000 p('Ople who receive one unit of do­nal<' Ci blood can he expected to be infected with the AIDS virus. "The risk is low but it is not zero;· said Ur. Kenrad Nelison. head of the study and an rpidt.•miology professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore Dr. Noah Cohen. an epidemiologist at Tt·x· 'BETTER LAWns & GARDEns Total lawn maintenance Commercial-Residential • L•ndsctlpe • Trclsh Removal • Ch1mne4 Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Beepers! smn[[ siu, compact ~n NewNEC5000 Di9ita!-~tor P119er -Hali& 12 numbm in mcnory One 6utton contro( Wik al'ftl COVU09t Buy Yours To~ On!y $199 Financing avaifab(e No credit nwfttf (713) 621-2822 4252 Rit:funoruf rw.103 P119e MEI, inc (TM) Your Communications Store MC. Visa, Discover, checks as A&M's College of Veterinary Medicine, parlicipated in the study while he was on the staff at Johns Hopkins. Tht> &tudy, publishrd in The New England Journal of Mffiicine, underscoreis the need for thoi;e at risk for being infected with the AIDS viru1:1-primarily homosexual and bisexual men and intravenous drug useri;-to avoid donating blood, he said. "This reinforces the importance of not only antibody screening but also donor deferral;' Nelson said The results also support recommendations that J>E'Ople should try to stockpile their own blood ahead of time when they know they will need a transfusion to end their risk of being infected with the virus. "It's a good idea when it can be done:· Nel son .-aid in an interview from his Baltimore offi<:e Dr. G<·ruld Sandler, of the American Red Croos, .. aid the findings reassure the public that the blood supply is relatively safe. '·ThoHe of us who are responsible for the blood supply have been making energetic ef· forts to do whatever possible to attract the healthiest (donors) and introduce the most sensitive tests we can to reduce those risks even further;' Sandler said. Nelson and his colleagues tested 4163 pa· lients who underwent heart surgery between April 198!).Dec. 1988 before and after they re­c- eived blood transfusions from donated blood. Only one patient was found to be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus or HIV, which causes acquired immune deficien· cy syndrome. But bw;ed on that infection. the researchers estimated the risk of being infect ed with the virus was .0003 percent. Althouii;h blood Ct.•nterzs ttst donors for the virus. a small percentage of infectRd donon~ slip through because they have not yet devel oped the antibodies to the virus that the scret-nin(l te~t.-; dt·tect The re~earchers also tested 2i49 heart sur­gery patienU. for HTLV·l, a vlrus in the same family as the AIDS virus that causes a rare form of blood cancer known as adult T-cell leukemia The researcherzs found that at the time the study was conducted. the risk for being infect~ ed with HTLV-1 was 10 times higher than that for the AIDS virus. But the American Red Cross hBh begun screening for HTLV-1 since the study was done. ·For HTL\'· l we think the risk will drop ('(lfi!-iiderably hecau~e now the blood banks are routinely ~creening for that virus,• !\elson said. Man found guilty in shooting of girl friend SAN ANTONIO (UPI)-A state dis­trict court jury late Wednesday sen­tenced a 26-year-old San Antonio man to 20 years in prison for the slaying of his AIDS-infected girl friend . The jury deliberated over 4 hours Tuesday before finding David Boyde Melton guilty in the Jan. 1988 slaying of Donna C. Smith, 31, of San Antonio. The jury resumed deliberations Wednesday before re­turning with the sentence. Melton had testified he killed Smith in self·defense, saying she had threatened to kill him and that he believed she was reaching inside her purse for a gun when he shot her with a gun he bought with money he got by selling an engagement ring he bought her. No gun was found in­side the purse. Shortly before the shooting, Mel­ton testified he learned that his girl friend's disease had been passed on to their infant daughter, Sarah, who died two days after Smith from an AIDS-related illness. Melton tested negative for the presence of the vi­rus for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Defense attorney Raymond Angelini said during closing argu­ments Tuesday Melton acted out of fear for his life, telling the jury Mel­ton had a sister who killed herself and her husband. Angelini added that Smith had scratched Melton during a scuffle the day of the shooting and that Melton feared he might contract AIDS. But A'sistant Bexar County Dis­trict Attorney Wende Rush told the jury a scratch was not provocation enough to kill somebody. "He wants you to believe that be­cause she was a prostitute and she had AIDS, he had a right to kill her;· Rush said. Film: Yet another 'Robinson Crusoe' By STEVE WARREN FOR THE. MONTROSE. VOICE. Would you like to spend 80 minutes on an island with Aidan Quinn? Aside from the appropriateness of having tt distributed by "Island" Pic­tures, there was no earthly reason to make another film of "Robinson Crusoe:' There must have been a silent version in the 1920s that said all thatev· er will be said about this story. Caleb Deschanel's version, simply called "Crusoe;• is set in 1808. Crusoe (Aidan Quinn) is a slave trader sailing from Virginia to Guinea in search of fresh meat. He's not a nice man. He kicks the Come Join Us for Sunday Continen tal Breakfast 8- IOam JIOOF.A.NNIN (11J)511-ZJ79 --y-1/'1 price ,...ms ·-·" n.-y-1/'1 price -k .... (J()f.' '10NHi 11(Mltlf~.-S ONLT) WAT :H FQf. VK0t111'K. CHANC.U A WE rlA(f fOMfft ship's dog, Scamp, and even a white member of the crew urinates in his shaving water; but when storm and fire wreck the ship he makes an uncharacteristic attempt to save the lives of others. Once Crusoe reaches an island where he and Scamp may be the only living creatures, he becomes even more sym­pathetic, with his haunted, Montgomer­y Clift eyes and his James Dean.Actors' Studio technique. The island is made of rocks that may be real but photograph phony. Crusoe furnishes a cave with what he's able to salvage from the ship, builds a boat that never makes it off the PARADISE NEWS &VIDEO 14029 Eastex Fwy 44~0710 OPEN 24HRS 25¢ Token Arcade Pnvate Viewing Rooms $6-1 Video $10-2 Videos Vtdeo Rentals & Sales Full Line of Novelties Magazines & Paperbacks B•"'""'s~1~~ c:~~· c~~k ..§2~/l~ Rd v Accepted ·mr ~ Everyone Welcome ~=1: Singles & Couples launchmg pad, and prays for his dog, who dies anyway. Half-crazed "';th loneliness, Crusoe rescues a black man from a ritual in which natives of anoth­er tribe slit the throats of his people. Though he see• the man (Hepburn Gra· ham) as a slave, he also represents po­tential companionship for Crusoe, who becomes the first perbon to say "Thank God, it's Friday!" Just kidding. Actually Crusoe calls the man "Lucky;' but he disappears dur· ing the night. The white man has a few encounters, mostly adversarial, with a man (Ade Sapara) of the warrior tribe; but when the black learns to parrot an English folk song, it turns Crusoe into an abolitionist. REIN-CAR-NATION "' -~~ Complete Automotive Services and Full Detailing 1901 Toft (713) 522-3041 10 MONTROSE VOICE 'MAY 5. 1989 Court ruling: Military cannot bar re-enlistment of gay man By PAMELA A MacLEAN fOA THE MONTROSE VU.CE SAN FRANCISCO (UP!)-A federal ap­peals court ruling that the Anny cannot keep a soldier it knew to be homosexual for 14 years from re-en1isting was prw•ed as a victory for gay rights, but criticized for sidestepping a larger con· stitutional issue. The 7-4 decision Wednesday by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overruled a landmark ruling by a three-judge pan­el of the same court that had struck down the Army's ban on homosexuals by declaring they deserved the swne pro­tection against dito>Crimination as racial minorities. The Anny was expected to appeal the decision to the Supreme Court. Hom~ sexual groups seeking open admission to the military called the ruling a "small victory;• but a dissenting judge said the court had avoided the larger question of whether the military has a constitution· al right to bar homosexuals. The 1udge• ruled Sgt. Perry Watkins was unfairly discharged because the Ar-my ignored his openly stated homosexu­ality for 14 years before trying to block him from re-enlisting in 1981. Writing for the majority, Judge Harry Pregerson said the Army's disregard of Watkins' avowed homosexuality for 14 years "amounted almost toa policy of ig­noring this servicemember's homosexu­ality:• "This is a case where equity cries out and demands that the Army be stopped from refusing to re-enlist Watkins on the basis of his homosexuality;' tbedecisiop said. The court said it was unnecessary to consider the broader questions of dis­crimination and denial of equal protec­tion under the Constitution. Watkins, reached at his Tacoma, Wash., home late Wednesday, said he was ready to return to active duty as soon as all the appeals in the case are over. "Now we've got to wait and see what the Army will do before we make any fi­nal decisions;• Watkins said, adding that while he was "real happy with the ruling, I wish they had addressed the (larger constitutional issue):' The four justices who dissented were largely concerned about thecourt'sexer­cise of judicial review over the military decision-making process. "There is no doubt that the majority's intrusion into military affairs, unjusti­fied by important federal interests, will have a disruptive effect on military dis­cipline; · wrote Judge Cynthia Holcomb Hall, who accused the majority of hav­ing a "steadfast desire" to avoid decid­ing the constitutional issues in the case. Stephen Bomse, attorney for the Na tional Gay Rights Advocates, which ar­gued in support of Watkins, said, 'Tm pleased for Watkins, but this doesn't ap­pear to do much to advance the resolu­tion of very important legal questions. "It is disappointing the court did not take those (constitutional issues) head on;' Bomse said. Watkins, 40, claimed he was denied equal protection when the Army tried to discharge him after 14 years of exempla­ry service purely because he is a homo-sexual. Watkins had declared on his original 1967 draft form that he had "homosexu­al tendencies:' Despite the disclosure he was inducted and remained in the Army, gammg the rank of sergeant. The ruling ordered reinstatement of a U.S. District Court decision Oct. 5, 1982 that prevented Watkins' discharge. Watkins, who now works for the U.S. Forest Service in Seattle, said he be­lieved that "if all the gay people in the Army came out of the closet, the Army would realize how silly their rule is. We're talking about thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of people:· Judge William Norris, in a concurring opinion, said he would have gone further than simply protecting an already en­listed soldie< He found the Army regula­tions unconstitutionally discriminated against homosexuals. Norris wrote the earlier and broader appeal court ruling that was rejected in Wednesday's decision. "The Army's regulations violate the constitutional guarantee of equal pro­tection of the laws because they dis­criminate against persons of homo· sexual orientation ... because the reg­ulations are not necessary to promote a legitimate compelling government interest;• Norris wrote. Leonard Graff, legal director of Na­tional Gay Rights, a public interest law firm , said a recent General Ac­counting Office audit showed, in the past JO years, the military discharged an average of 1400 people a year on the basis of homosexuality. He called the annual discharge of homosexuals "yearly witch hunts" that cost taxpayers $20 million a year for investigations and retraining and recruiting replacement soldiers. Cats and dogs reign supreme at America's movie theaters By VERNON SCOTT UPI Hollywood Reporter FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE HOLLYWOOD-" Pet Sematary" and ''K-9" were No. 1 and No. 2 at North America's movie theaters for the week ending last Sunday. Bued on Stephen King's novel of the occult. the chilling "Pet Sematary" repeated its No. 1 standing m the box office rankings for a ~econd consecu­tive week with a gro~s of$B.3 mil­lion and a two-week total of$24.4 million. The thriller, playing on 1585 screens, weaves a tale of horror in !\ew England when a family is cursed by o sect that revives the dead. Runnerup for the week W8b newcomer .. K-9;• starring Jim Belushi as a cop whose lovable police dog partner has more per· S(lnality than Rin-Tin-Tin end Lassie combined. In its debut week •· K- ~r · dug up $7.4 million m 1677 theaters. proving that audiences like to laugh al bumbling cops, etip('Cia.t-­ly when they aren't as smart as their canine partners No. 3 was "Major League;· the baseball story of an improbable season for the Cleveland Indians, starring Tom Berenger, Charlie Sheen and Corbm Bernsen. "Major League" scored $4.1 million on 1615 screens for a four­week tally of $31.2 million. "Criminal Law," a curiously disjointed story of a psychopath­ic killer and a lawyer bent on bringing him to justice, was No. 4. The killer is played by Kevin Bacon in a minor role with Eng· land's Gary Oldman in the role of the American attornE>y •·Criminal Law" nabbed a dis-­appointing $2.6 million in its 01wning frame at 11 iO theaten. Rounding out the top five wa11 "The Dream Team~· a warm and wacky story of four mental caseti on the looMt' in New York City, starring Michael Keaton, Chris· topher Lloyd , Peter Hoyle and Stephen Furst. ··Dream Team·• posted $2.2 mil hon for a four-week total of 19. l million at 1365 theaters. Worth noting was the debut of "Scanda1:· the film ven1on of England's 1960s sex scandal in­volving government officials and playgirl Christine Keeler. Open­ing in only 94 theaters, "Scan· dal" averaged an impressive $7,007 per screen, compared to "Pet Sematary's" $5,287 per­screen average. "Scandal" placed 13th in the weekly rankings with a gross of $658,660. It was a so-so week for the Zl,000 North American theaters with an overall gr088 of $75 mil­lion, compared to $79 million in record-setting I 9AA. To datt> in 1989 the gr08& is$1 . ~billion as agaim•t $1.245 billion last year. The top 10, the week's gross, to­tal gross, weeks in release-: 1. "Pet Sematary:• $8.a million, $24.4 million, 2 weeks 2. "K-9;' $7.4 million. I we.k . 3. "Major League:• $-t I mil hon, · :H .2 million, 4 wet-ks. 4. '"Criminal Law:' $2.6 million, I week . 5. '·The Uream Team:• $2.a mil· lion , $19.l million , 4 weeks. 6. •Say Anything .;· 2.2!1 mil· lion , $12.1million, 4 wttks. 7. "Rain Man;' $1.7 mtllion, $158.2 million, 20 weeks. 8. "Loverboy;• $1.6 million, week. l~ J l i J r I 0 s ,, 9. "l''ield of Dreams;' $1.5 mil­lion, $2.3 million, 2 weeks. IO. "She's Out of Control;' $1.3 million, $8.5 million, 3 weeks. MAY 5. 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 WE'RE HERE ... ... and we can do a LOT for qou. -Screen Printinq (T .. Shirts, Caps, Stickers, etc.) -Aduertisinq Art & Loqo Concept Oesiqn -Flqer, Postet & Brochure Oesiqn -Oriqinal Airbursh Art -Siqn Paintinq -Commercial Printer Liaison ... and much, much more. Speci.al di.scounts auai.lable for the ffiontrose area busi.ness, bars & communi.h,i qroups. \..'_ -~~ P roductions 709 Studewood Houston, Texas 77007 861 .. 9303 12 MONTROSE VOICE MAY 5, 1989 Human Rights Campaign Fund making a difference From TOM SAUER.MAN N&IJOnal V!ce-Preetdent, P-FLAG A letter from the field division of the Hu­m. en Rights campa1gn Fund cama across m,y desk some time ago. It appealed to m,y Interest and made good sense. But it called for me to do something I've never done before' pre-authorizing mall to Cap­itol Hill-BO that they oould send mes­sages In m,y name to membere of Con­gress when cr!t!cal Issues come up. Be­fore I tell you what I did, let me explain Its appeal Wa.ehlngton, D.C., though onzy three hours from m,y front door lnPhll8delph1- a, le l!ght-yea.re from m,y experience. I rarely keep track of what's going on there-unless It's a banner headline In m,y loe&l newspaper. Important lseues 800ut lesb!an and gay concerns are fre­quently over and done with before I'm aware that they happened These impel' tant act!ons, amendments and votes take place In small committees; occaa!onal!y they reach the full House or Senate for a vote. And, surpr1e!ngly, they often come up on short not!oe with little t!me for g~ I lesb!an and AIDS lobby!ets to reach all of us who care before thees votes. It seems that the process doesn't make it easy for those of us who care to be heard other than through quick-response strategies such 88 the Campaign Fund. For yea.re I've been frustrated. What I find le I've been ree.ct!ve rather than pro­act! ve on these Issues where I do have strong opln!ons. So, I spendm,y !esue's crtt!cal points. They cost just 2.95 each. The Fund sende out quarterly re­ports on messages sent, their impact and leg!elatlve result.a. Or you can request and lmmed1ate copy of the message for just 50 oente ea.ch. Sinoe they have m,y ad­dress, they know which voting dlst.rlct t!me writing to complain about my representatives' vote or writing to oppose legtelat!on that seems too far along for me to change. Then cama the HRCF fteld di­vision (formerly the Fairness Fund) letter. Letters to the Editor I'm in and send It to whomever they think It w1ll have the most impact upon. I can cancel at a.nytlme if I'm not satisfied. The whole precess really makes good sense. In fact, 88 I re-read the material and thought 800ut It fUrther, It seemed a good Idea to share at a The Hum.en Rights cam-paign Fund le the national pollt!cal ac­tion committee for the g~ and lesb!an community. The Campaign Fund lobbies Congress on AIDS and fa.!rness Issues for lesb!sns and g~ men Founded. In 1980, they're now the 9th largest Independent PAC In Amel'1C8. Beca.use they lobby and monitor Congress d811y, they're able to move on &n issue within hours. They currently have m,y perm!eslon to send ten SO-word messages In m,y name where t1m!ng and pressure le important. The messages w1ll speak d1rectly to and Philadelphia Parents-FLAG ~ meeting. (Why keep a good thing to m,ysell?) I expl81ned the program to the group. I Invited othere to give It a try by passing around the form the Fund sends in lte information packet, I cone!der m,y ftret sales pitch a success' fourteen people signed up that ~ for a. total of 67 Mallgrams. We're on our way. We've done some­thing poeitlve for our sons and da.ugh­tere. Even some very closeted parent.a signed up; nothing ldent!ftsa us 88 mem­bere of P. FLAG or a.rzy other orga.nJzed group. From the quietness and safety of m,y home, I know that a sensible and thoughtl'Ul message w1ll be eent on m,y be­half on Issues that are important to me. And, 88 importantly, I know It w1ll get there in t!me to make a d!lference. Every letter, Mallgram or phone call sent to Congress repressnte 1, 000 vot­ere. And It not only reflects public opin­ion but also shows membere of Congress that our side le orga.n!Zed in their dls­trlcts. JeITY Falwell, I,yndon Lalkruche, and Phyllle Schatley generate lots of mall-often to deprive our children of their hum.en rights andto pass AIDS hys· ter!a mea.suree that undercut and elfec­t! ve response to the crtsle. Don't you think It's t!methatyoustsnd up with us--and have your vo!oe heard on Capitol Hill. Not once, but again and again. -Early gay history From MICKEY MOlHAN I am collecting storiee, photos, tapes, posters, buttons, from Houston's g~ his­tory in order to create e. book about Hous­ton's growth 88 a g~ power from 1975- 1965. Your help le greatly appreciated. For more !nformat!on contact Mickey McShan at (303) 3204041 or write to 3000 E. Colfax "266, Denver, Co. 60206. Texas House votes down hate crimes bill 79 to 64 lly JERI CLAUSl!'G JOR THE M )NTAQSE VC CE AUSTI1' tUPO-The Texas House Tuesday effectively killed a hill that wCJ ld increas ~n: tie:-; for 'hate crimes" against re­ligi. ou~. ethnic or other societal groups in a vote one black law· maker said send11 a message that r. ·i ·m i acceptable in Texas. "The dog wants out, Gracey.• I hate to say it, but I think the basic i;ignal 1s that bigotrv and racism are OK m Texas:' said Rep. Larry Evans, D-Houston '?hat's th~ signal that that votl' .sent today. The Hou.se votE>d 7H-64 to table the proposal by Rt•p. Larry Wolens, 0-Dallas, even after he tried to appea.se conRervatives by dropping gays from the Ii.st of groups that could M>t•k tighter penalties when victimized. The vote came the same day thl' House passed six of eight bills in House Speaker Gib L..ewis'R anti· crime package, carried by former Bexar County prosecutor Rep. Dan Morales. D·San Antonio. Wolens, who reminded mem· bens of recent harassment and vandalism crimes agamst Jew· ish synagogues in Dallas. tried to save his bill by cutting the sexual orientation provi8ion after con· servatives, who called it a gay rightis measure, pasi.ed out lettRrs to all House membt"rs saying the wording of the bill was too vague. "'Sexual orientation' is not de­fined in the bill and so would also mean any type of foiexual prcft·r· ence Emch as incest, aex with nni· mals (bestiality), 1;ex with the dead (necrophilia), sex with c·hild ren 1 pedophilia), sadism, etc-:• tht• letter approved by Rep. L B . Kubiak, D·Rockwall. said Opponents argued the legisla· tion was not necessary because current laws cover hara1H;ment and other crimes. Wolens' propos al would have increased the crime by one degree if it was committRd out of hate for a specific group of persons. .. The bill addressed bigotry and lht> bi11 addrefi~ed racitim and tht" bill addres1':1ed hate. where that hate is already acknow I edged in a crime such as kidnapping, as­sault and murder;· Wolens said. ''And then action of the Legisla ture today says that the Legisla· ture does not as a majority fe(') that there should be additional penaltiei.. if a jury is able to deter· mine that murder or kidnapping or assault is done in the name of bigotry or racism .... I think il's awfully disappointing.'' Opponents argued that the in· cn:·Ji. t•d criminal and civil penal· ties would only opt•n up morf' peo­ple to lawsuit:;. "We'v(.' w:ut {•nough laws to dt•al with theioie ~ituationl:{.:• saio Spc·aker Pro Tt·m Rep. Hugo Berlanga, U.CorpuH Christi. the only minority voting to table the bill. "l thought it was just going to op('n it up for more abuse and mort lawsuits to ht.• tiled, and that waR my biggest concern." Other opponl'nts quetilioned whethl'r rclij.,rious leaders would be held liable under !he bill if they Hpoke against certain groups. But Wolens end Evans de­ani hl"<l that argument as a ridicu· lous smokescreen lawmaker!i used to justify their vote. "That was a bizarre nrgumt"nt that didn't have any basis at all in fac-t. That wabjustan inane, b1· zarre, C'razy statement. There's no baMis;' said Wolens. "It hm; to be against current law before that would be a crime under this bill:' Evans said he thought the re­ligious argument "was an cxcu~e to vote the bill down·-· It's n con· venient smoktscn·c·n ·• RE5ULT5 How they voted to kill hate crimes bill ACSTl!\ (CPI Ht e i1 tht• ro le volt• by which the Texas JloU!oil' of Rt"prest·ntatives Tuesday votf'Ci 79-64 to kill a bill that would incrt'ase state penalties for ""hate crimes": Smitht-e. Swift, Ta11as, Taylor. Tt>lford, Thc:r ma:t, Vu1igura. Vandervoort, Watt•rfield, Watkms, Wt•ntworth, Willy, Wright. Yost. 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Goolsby, Granoff, Guerrero, Barris, J., Hill, A., Hino1osa, Hud son, D., Hud1o1on, S., Junell, Laney, Larry, Lewis, R., Linebarger, Luc.:10, Luna, A., Luna G, Madia, Martinez, McCollough, McDonald, McKinney, Mt>lton, Morales, Pe· rez, Perry, Pierce, Polumbo, Price, Hang(•I, Robnett, Russell, Schoolcraft, Soileau. Stilt'tt, Thompimn. G., Thomp1mn, S., Turner. Uher. Vowell, Wallace, Warner, Willis, Wolt>ns. AllSE1'T OR 1'0T VOTJ1'G <6J: Lewi., G., Moreno, A., Moreno, P, Ril-hard!ton. Williamson. W1h1on MAY 5, 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Looking for a Library in Montrose? ..- ~~~. --~,, ·.·.~ · . '· • c -- .... ",o. __ ·'k Ji A ~,, Montrose Branch We're a Library! Library is Houston Public Library's newest branch. We have books and non--print items for children and adults available for free checkout with a Houston Public Library card, and regularly scheduled storytimes for children as well as adult programs. 4100 Montrose Blvd. (almost at Richmond Ave.) Houston 77006 I 520--5487 Mondays and Thursdays: Noon to 9 PM Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays: 10 AM to 6 PM 14 MONTROSE VOICE/ MAY 5, 1989 We Cover the Ylorld of Monlrose! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 ~--, '--~'·----: "----/~ I MAY 5, 1989 MONTROSE VOICE 15 Master appointed to hear case against Judge Hampton By BOB LOWRY fOfl THE. M()NTROSE VOICE AUSTIN CUPO-The Texas Supreme Court Wedne~day appointed a former appellate judgf' as spt·<:ial mast.er to hear a complaint against a Dallas judge who admitted he was lenient on a murderer becam;e the victims were "queers.:' Robert R. Murray, a former judge on the 4th State Court of Appeals in San Antonio, will hear the cai;e against State District Judge Jack Hampton, who could be removed from office. J<'ollowing a public hearing in a trial-like 8etting, Murray will forward his recommen dations to the st.ale Commission on Judicial Conduct A preliminary hearing is scheduled for May 11 in Dallas on a complaint filed by the Dallas (;ay Allinncl' and the Texas Human Rights Foundation Hampton, who gay nghts groups want ousted from office, would not comment on the appointment. Hampton came under fire last December when he told a newspaper he sentenced Rich­ard Lee Bednarski to 30 years in prison in No­vember rather than life because the two mur­der victims were "queers~· Bednarski testified during that he and some friends went to a Dallas park to "pester homosexuals" in an incident that ended in the slaying of two men in what authorities calk-d an execution-style slaying. Texas law permit.s parole after 20 years of a life sentence, compared with 10yearsfora30- year sentence, Rob<· rt Flowers, director of the Commission on Judicial Conduct, said the I I-member pan· el, which requested appointment of a mw;ter, may accept or reject. Murray's recommenda­tion. Attorneys for the commisi;ion will act as prosecutors in the hearing before Murray, he said. Flowers said the commission could dismiss the complaint against Hampton, publicly censure him or ask a seven-judge panel to re­move him from office. If removed from office, he would lose his retirement benefits and be barred from seeking public office again. Glen Maxey, an Austin gay righl..l:i activist, Bald he was "pleased" that a master hru; been appomted. "I trust the Supreme Court has chosen somrone who will be fair and impartial, and list.en to all sides in gathering the evidence and backKTOund about what happened last year in this case:' he said. "We have to have a full hearing on this and get it out in the open;• William Wayboum, president of the Dallas Gay Alliance, said the group does not plan to become involved in the procedure. "This is the system's way of addressing the problem of Jack Hampton. I believe the com· mission, once it has all the evidence ... will agree with us. This man has said he cannot be fai~ cannot be impartial:' 'If society d1>t's O(ltdeal with Judge Hamp­ton down the line another judge can say, 'look at Judge Hampton. I don't like blacks and I can do it too."' he said. The state Supreme Court is also consider­ing a separate petition requesting that Hamp­ton be remo\ed from office. Texas judge; can also be removed from office through impeach, ment in the Legislature. ACT UP, others, jeer or cheer Bush at state Capitol By MARK LANGFORD FOA THl MONl ROSE VOICE AUSTIN (Ul'l)-President Bush was jeered and cheered at the state Capitol April 26 by a noisy crowd that ran the gamut from young radicals to young Re­publicans. Police squelched a minor skirmish that erupted when a conservative Uni­versity of Texas student grabbed a foot­ball owned by one of the radicals and tos&ed it across a police barricade. The student was slightly injured by a blow to the head before several officers, includ­ing one on horseback, charged across the lines and broke up the fight. The wide range of emotions and issues r;--= J I Zyderm® I Collagen I [ Treatments ] PETER H. PROCTOR. PhD. MD is now accepting appointments for evaluation and in-ollice correction of WRINKLES FROWN LINES AGE LINES AND FACIAL SCARS FDA approved collagen injection (a natural protein) can restore the youthful look of healthy, unlined skin and instantly delay the appearance of aging ] ~ I f.~~~!~~'"~!!~!~ I 4126 SOUTHWEST FRWY. SUITE 1616 :J HOUSTON, TEXAS 77027 (713) 960-1616 II====-"====~"===='"'===' were reflected in signs carried by sup­porters and opponents. The slogans ranged from "Ollie North is an Ameri­can Hero" to "50,000 Dead of AIDS, Where Was George'!" and "Bush Sells Crack:' Robert Lowe, 27. of Austin, a coordina­tor for ACT UP-AlDS Coalition to Un­leash Power-said Bush has failed to live up to his campaign promises or make any significant changes. "He has not used the time he's had in office to do more than bail himself out of the political mess that has more or less dogged him since his first day in office, and we certainly have no reason to ex­pert that any significant initiative with respect to AIDS is going to be forthcom­ing;• Lowe said. Another group, the Austin Peace and Justice Coalition, proletited on several is&ues, including Bush's role in the Iran arms, Contra aid scandal, Central American policy and drugs. Jerry Rogers, 29, representingtherad­ical environmentaJ movement Earth First, complained that Bush failed to act quickly enough in helping Alaska com­bat the Exxon Valdez oil spill. "He really dragged his feet in getting the clean up started;' Rogers said. "Bush didn't get the federal apparatus moving. Plus. I think Bush is aligned with big oil. Bush said he was an environmentalist during the campaign, but that was just hot air. In contrast to the 75 protesters. an equal number of Bush supporteni were on the scene, and members of both groups occasionally taunted each other. Danny Taylo~ 21, a UT student and member of the Young Republicans, said Bush's visit was "great:• "This shows the system is working. He cares enough to come down here and address the House (of Representatives);' Taylor said. Taylor lamented the presence of the protesters, saying, "We see them every day on campus:· Being gay not automatic cause for divorce, says judge TORONTO (UPIJ-An Alberta woman was denied a divorce because she didn't prove her husband's active homosexu­ality constituted mental cruelty toward her. "There iti an element of willfulness in mental cru(•lty; being a homosexual is not equivalent to treating your spouse with cruelty;• Justice Joanne Veit of Alberta Court of Queen's Bench ruled. ''Cru(•lty implies callousne::;s orindiffer­enct•:' Veit said there wasn't enough evi dt•n<·e to show "the grave conduct nect.•s sary" to gt•ta divorce on grounds of mar­ital breakdown or mental cruelty. Veit said the woman, identified only as Y.B., could reapply for divorce and provide more details about her claim of cruelty. The woman had testified that her hus~ band "admitted to me and my eldest daughter that he is a practicing homo­sexual:' She said her husband "has treated me with mental cruelty of such a kind as to render continued cohabitation intolera· blc:· The divorce wasn't contested by the hu•band. identified as J.B. Veit cited three other cases where di­vorc£' 8 were granted to spouses of active homosexual& on the ground8 of mental cruelty. In one case, the husband refused to have sex with hl.S wife and said he didn't love her. In another case, a woman refused her husband's requests to end a lesbian re­lationship. ln a third case, the wife refused to have sex with her husband for four years, moved back in with her previous lesbian lover and told her husband she was planning a sex-change operation. The fl-deral Divorce Act says adultery or cruelty are the only grounds for im­mediate divorce, but couples can other­wise obtain a divorce if they've been sep­arated for one year. Study debunks theory virus spread by insects BOSTON (UPl)-Sc1entists April 26 re­ported evidence debunking the theory a distant relative of the AlDS virus that causes leukemia could be spread by in­sects. The researchers said they produced C'Vidence mosquitoes and ticks Jo not transmit HTLV-1, the human t-cell lymphotrophic virus type I, a virus re­lated to the AlllS virus that causes leu­kemia "This is reatisuring;• &aid Dr. Edward Murphy, an as&istant professor of labo­ratory medicine at the University of California at San Francisco, who head­C'd the research reported in a letter in The New England Journal of Medicine. Some researchers had speculated HTLV-1 may be spread by insects be­cause it is found mo&t commonly in the tropics and other areas where other in· sect·borne diseases are common. The rcsearchC'rs tested 90 Jamaican patients who had antibodies to HTLV-1 for antibodies to other viruses transmit­ted by ticks and mosquitoes and com· pared them to I IO subjects who did not have HTLV-1 antibodies. The researchers found no significant evidence that those infected with HTLV-1 were more likely to have been exposed to mosquitoes or ticks. "The8e results do not support the hy­pothesis that patients who are (infected with) HTLV 1 have had greater expo­sure to certain arborviruses (insect· transmitted viruses) than those who are seronegabve;· they wrote. "One may infer that seropositive pa­tients have not had increased exposure to the specific mosquito and tick vecton; of these arborviruses." HTLV-1 is believed to be transmitted primarily the same way as the AIDS vi· rus-through sexual intercourse, blood transfusions and intravenous drug use. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 5. 1989 Texas' Best All Male Cinema Midnight Matinee Special Sundaythru Thursday Midnight till Closing Admission $4 presents Friday & Saturday llam-3am Monday-Thursday llam-lam Sunday lpm-lam fRfNCtt U~RTfR 527-0782 HOUSTON Turn this way, as the Friday Fox hosts ••• Af~S=p A httle local gossip Bal!JGG4~ Day-by-day breakdown of events <:/he dj.~ dj.M, Bill THE MONTROSE VOICE MAY 5, 1989 Bal!J GG4 ck!> a-'~ Pho- 11-- ~ ~ ~~~'t~~:s toll-free numbers for verbal ad- Our advertisers will tempt you Your horoscope from the Voice People who want to meet you Our Friday Fox this week is 36 and a professional therapist MAY 5, 1989 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 but his main hobby is yard work. He's 5'9" and 155 lbs. "This is certainly going to sur· prise my lover when he opens the paper,• he says. Bill's favor­ite bar is the Montrose Mining Co. and his sign is Aquarius. Photos by Henry McClurg MOfi.!__iOSe Soap: People and places Gary and Lady Barn make quite an mter f'Stmg picture together, don't you thinkt Mr. & !tis. T&RA t·andulatetJ DaL·id and Lu C')' at a recent fundraiser in Ft. Worth Remember Daizd, you 're Kenny and Lucy IS Dolly Sunday Splash continues at Heaven this week with free well drinks 7:00 to 9:00 pm and free Coors Light draft all night with the best looking bartenders in town sporting summer tans and attire. Journalists The Montrose Voice is now accepting applications for full-time and freelance journalists. Daily newspaper experience preferred. Please submit resume to 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006. Photographer Gary Schumacher u·ith some of hi1i u·ork that is on display at Parku•ay Athletic Club lulu of QT's must have just seen hls ex­husband when this plwto u·as snapped Rob and Brad serve Mother's customers on a sunny Sunday afternoon During the show last Sunday at Scandals a food fight broke out. It seems the audience was throwing tortillas at Maya. Ole: Randolph (Exit), so many men, so little time. We're Sure the Chain Drive (Austin) was glad to see you EXIT. Robert (Bacchus), ;ust another tequila sun· riset Larry Garrett, candidate for Mr. TGRA 1990, presents a live show Sunday at the BRB, bene­fiting the Bering Care Center, starting at 6:00 p.m. Tad (Mary's), they don't call it - .. ~ Welrome to Houston Jerry Don, the blonde-halred hunky new manager at Lobo. Stop by, browse through the store and say "Hl" Nash, the Ga/leon 'i; male strip finalist u·lnner Low.'i and /Jat·ld try to act ltkf• butch cvu·· boyb at Mary's a Mind Eraser because the name is cute. Try to remember that next time. If you missed J.R:s anniversa­ry last week, join the crew of the Mining Company as they cele­brate their 11th anniversary with free well drinks and draft beer from 8-10 p.m. and an ap­pearance by video superstar Al Parker. It all happens this Satur­day. Don't miss it. Fanny (Mary's), the Chain Drive called and wants you to do your windmill impersonation again real soon. Did you ever fig­ure out who those beers went to'? Prinfrx Pius's Jim Cran 1s abt·e and u·(•/J. His photo mlstakenly aPpeared 1n ourobll· uane."I tu·o u·t·eks ago HOUSTONUI CHECK OUT THE PERSONALS ON MAN-TO-MAN AND JOIN THE lOO'S OF GUYS WHO HAVE CONNECTED TO LEAVE YOUR FREE PERSONALS JUST DIAL [713) 778-6688. 976-0690 THE BEST PERSONAL OF THE WEEK RECEIVES A FREE PIN NUMBER. SIMPLY INDULGE YOURSELF WITH A FULL LOAD OF SATISFACTION ... 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Your good deeds are greatly appre­ciated, but you're mostly in­volved in helping one you love attain a goal that pleases both of you Another's ambition can also spur your own to greater heights. qt:M1h1 Promises, promises. Someone keeps edging forward, then sneaking back. Flirting can be lots of fun, but beyond acer­tain point it becomes down­right stupid. When the game's no longer fun, quit play­ing, and let Miss Co­quette know why. eMet:R When unknown and unbelievable. .BBR/1 You and your partner should be letting each other know ex­actly what you want, need, and desire. This is true in all areas of your life, but particularly in regard to sex. No matter how short or how long you've been together, say and do what you really, really want to. see;Rp1e; Nothing's going to stop you nowi Nothing at all, except -­perhaps -- your own difficulty in comprehending the growth of your abilities. This is the time to eliminate all self-doubt and begin to move forward in leaps and bounds. Sl1q.1"nl1R!)'J(S You and any woman or women you work with should get to­gether away from the job and get to know each other better. Valuable in-things at work get to be too much, and when you've done all you can to to allevi­ate the problems, getaway for * formation comes from that source. If a meeting isn't possi­ble, at least set up lines of commu­nication, you'll be glad you made the move. ellPR.1- ee;M a new and fresh perspective. Anything from a long walk to an ocean cruise will do, but you'll need a change of scene. Clear your head before you climb a wall. Pt:(!; Oh, how you love a mystery! And the one you currently love keeps getting deeper and deeper and more interesting all the time. Enjoy it. but stay organized; don't let this fasci­nation with sweet suspense overwhelm another equally important part of your life. V1Rqe; There are certain uncertainties that can be absolutely thrilling. Usually, your taste for the neat and tidy would make you climb walls in response to this topsy­turvy time. Oddly enough, you'll find the change exciting as you enjoy a bout with the Life is smooth, al­most boring for you, as things sim-ply chug along. Don't allow a little tiff at home to get blown out of proportion, simply through it's contrast. Any ar­gument is short-lived, and you'll love the making out after making up. /12'/,(IJR!)'J(S You and yours are oh, so close now. Warmth and tenderness ar springtime gifts to you. And, for those Aquarians who have not yet settled into long-term love. this 1s a prime time to de­velop a friendship into a full-tilt love affair PMecs Do good things come to those who wait? P1sceans certainly hope so, with their lives feeling like a waiting game. While playing this particular varia­tion, you should be making some long range plans. Be here now, as they say, but know where you're going. ~~lit _ . TGR~ 1419R1chmond 528-8903 -.,/· ... ._, PRESENTS Miss Gay Houston at Large Pageant Saturday, May 13th, 9pm sharp $3 COVER MC Jill Jordan, Miss Gay Texas at Large '88-'89 Applications now being accepted at Scandals NEW BAR HOURS 11 am-2am Mon-Sat 12 Noon-2am Sunday GREAT READING AT GREAT PRICES! Get any three books $ 14 in this ad for just _ Values to $251 :::.:;.. " :"t-'•""- -- ROCKING THE CRADLE: Lesbian mothers, by Gillian E Hanscombe and Jackie Forsier, $7.00. Here ts the first book to thoroughly look at the c;oc:ial and personal implications of lesbian motherhood, the implication!; of alternative imemination, and the feelings of children growing up with lesbian mothers THE LAVENDER COUCH, by Mamy Hall, $8.00. Therapy can help us overcome many of hfc's hurdles_ Yet how many of us really know how to choose a therapist, or how to get the mo~t out of therapy? Here, a lesbian therapist provides valuable guidelines for anyone already in, or contemplating, therapy. THE WANDERGROUND, by Sally Gearhart, $7 .00. These absorbing, imaginative stories tell of a future women's culture, created in harmony with the natural world. The women depicted combine the control of mind and matter with a sensuous adherence to their uwn reahtiec; and history_ "Sally Gearhan's is a wonderful, luxurious world," writes Joanna Ru s, and the San Francisco Chronicle calls her hook "a masterful Utopian fo:t1on m­gcrrnmsly conceived and anfully executed • THE TWO OF US, by Larry J. Uhrig, S1 00. Any two peuplc 1 rymg o build a fuliilhng rclauomhtp today face ma1or hurdles. A Jes· bian nr gay couple faces even more H1.:re, a Metropolitan Community Church pastor draws on his counseling experience to provtdt.• a practical handbook about how to make a lesbian or ~ay relationship work. THt LAW or RtTURN THE LAW Of RETURN, by Alice Bloch, $9.00. Ahcr a summer vacation in Israel, a young American woman settles there. Sbe ex­plores Orthodoxy as well as ber own feehngs about relationships and sexuality, and even- ~~!~nc~~~:e ~~;~ifssa fi~~hw~~:r ~~~~~~ to read everything sbe writes," said Grace Paley m reviewing The Law of Return IRIS, by Janine Veto, $7.00. When Iris and Dec meet in Hawaii, all they want is to live together in this island paradise. But circum· stances force Iris tu flee to the Creek islands; when !>he and Dec arc reunited, they find that their love must face a formidable foe if it i~ to Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Voice LONG TIME PASSING, by Marcy Adelman, ed., $R.OO. In their own words, women talk about age-related concerns: the fear of losmg a lover; the experience of being a lesbian in the 1940s and 50s; the issues of loneliness and community. "A hopeful, heartening book," writes Louise Rafkin in On Our Backs LECENDE, by jeanninc Allard, $6.00. Jean­nine Allard has brought to life a legend that still circulates m France: the story of Phil­ippa, who at the age of sixteen posed as a boy c;o that she could go to sea; and Aurelie, the woman she later came to love. But they had no modd for how two women could love and live together; this c;tory describes the difficult path they chose LIFETIME GUARANTEE, by Alice Bloch, $7.00. In this rcrson.tl 1ournal of a woman faced with the impcndmg death ~her sister from cancer. Ahcc Bloch explores the themes of survival, suppcrt and affmna1ion of life "T le tremendous power, l:>cauty and elo­quence LJfeume Guarantee comes (rom Ahi;e Bloch's c :ruragc to look to see, to think, to wrte, says Susanna Sturgis .n Off Our Backs. DANCER DA WKJ"5 AND THE CAUFOR­NlA KID, by Wi.llyce Kim, S6 00. Poer Willyce Kim'o; first novel won w1d.: praio;.e as a delightful story of lesbian adventure, 101,re, and lust. "'Her words dance through the pages.ff writes Lee Lynch in The Women's Review of Books. 'Kim'~ writing makes dear the difference between merely describing les­bian relationships and delighting in them," say!> the Fem1nist Bookstore News -----TO ORDER ----, Enc1osed 1s $14. Pie it" .end the three books I've hi;tcd below 1Ind1v1dual books are available at pnces .shown Add .SJ.00 postage when urdenng fUSt ont book, tf you order more than one we'll pay postage.} To ray by Mastercard, please send account no., exr. date, and s~ature Send me thei;e books: addres') city o;tatc ___ z1r. __ ---- ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept P-5, 40 Plympton St Boston, MA 021I8 I I I I I We do our best to make this list as accurate as possible but there may be some errors. Call the bar or restaurant to confirm an event. Most Alw•ys *Bacchus. Happy Hour 4-Bpm •Past Time: Happy hour 12-Bpm. • Chutes: Cruise Night happy hour to 10 pm, Male strip •EIJ's: Beer bust, 4-10pm, Ham­burger night.$2.00. 6pm til ? Michael Mead on Sax. 7-9pm •J.R. ·s· Pacific Coast Dancers non­stop 6pm until 2am *Montrose Mining Co Special Forces (male dancers} l0pm-2am •The Barn: Lunch served (Mon- Saturday Sat) 1lam-3pm •Parkway Athletic Club: Open •Scandafs: Open 11am. Mon-Sat. 1oam-6pm 12 Noon, Sunday •Rock ·N" Horse Live band 9pm- *J.R.'s Monday thru Friday, hors 1am d'oeuvres 5:30 until 7:30 *Scandars Dance to the music of *Club Body Center $5 for 30 mm- D.J. Ram Rocha ute tannmg session. $30 fora v1s1ts *The Barn: Cowboys in Action. 9-2 •Montrose M1nmg Co. Gold Rush •Cousins Cousins & Company, Happy hour 4pm-7pm, 3-1 happy 10:30pm hour till 10pm, beer bust 4pm- •EIJ"s: Performers· Alley. llpm 10pm •EIJ"s.· Dart tournament, cash •Momma"sMoney· 75r: Wei/Drinks. prizes. 12 Noon Monday-Thursday. 9pm-M1dnight *Bacchus· Houston·s Org Party •Momma·s Money Happy Hour. Night $2.00 margantas Monday-Saturday, 7am-8pm •J.R ·s Pacific Coast Dancers •Momma 's Money· $1 Well & 10:30pm Domestic Beer Monday- *a T's 8am-10am. Sl Well. Saturday, 7am-11am Domestic Beer & Schnapps. 4pm- * Exit. Schnapps $1 25 9pm. $1 Well Onriks, 9pm-2am, DJ •Club Romeo Happy hour 5-9pm & Dancmg •Venture-N Beer bust 4-lOpm * Venrur&-N Happy t>our Noon­Bpm *Mary's· Pounng doubles & 75t draft •JR. s 3·rn· 1 Happy Hour openmg-10pm •Chutes Frozen margaritas $1 25 6pm-2am. happy hour to 10pm •Charlie's Restaurant Dmner and m1dn1te specials *Brazos River Bottom Happy Hour Mon .. Sat, 7am- 9pm. Sun Noon- 9pm *The Barn: Happy hour 11am-9pm •Rock N" Horse. Open Tues-Sat (4pm-2am). Sun (4pm-2dm). Closed Mondays •E J s Beer bust, 4·1Ci •ErJ's First Happy Hour (9-lOam) Last Happy Hour (1-2am) $1 well. 75< schnapps * Bnar Patch Happy #Jour 1111 Bpm * E.x1t Keg Party 4-midnight •Exit. HappyHour71lfT! Bpm(Mon­Sat1 *Marys Happy hour 7am-noon. 5- Spm (ex wee ends) •Charlie s Restaurant Open 24 hours *Galleon. Happy Hour ·111 8pm Da1ty •Chutes. S 1 frozen margantas noon-6pm. happy hour 12-10pm *Chutes. Beer bust 4-Midnight •Spanish Flower Restaurant. Open 24 hrs. (ex Tues.) * Mary·s. Spec1at Happy Hour 9am- 11am Monday- Fnday.$1.00Well drinks and Beer FrlcUiy •Exit Keg Party 4-10pm *Parkway Athletic Club Open 7am-10pm •Lazy J: Show Night 10pm •EIJ's $1 Well Drinks 4-7pm •Montrose Mmmg Co.· 1 tth Anni· versary celebration. complimen­tary well drmks and draft beer 8-10pm. 25¢ draft beer m a mug 10pm-2am. AL PARKER auto­graph party & photo shoot. 10:30pm •Club Romeo $1 75 Coronas. $1 schnapps •Mother's 75' well dnnks 4-9pm • Exit Keg party, $300. 2pm-10pm • OT. ·s. Male Stnp Revue with •EIJ's. Dinner, 4pm, $3.00 •EIJ's. Beer bust. Noon-10pm •Momma·s Money.· Happy Hour Noon-4pm, $1 Well with 50¢ Schnapps 4-7pm •Mother's Male dancers 10pm & M1dn1te •Exit. Happy hour all day. all night *Parkway Athletic Club. Open Noon-6pm •O. T. ·s.- The Glffs CJ/ OT's present Splash Day Show with Danielle de Carlos and special guest Patti. OT's Miss Sex Kitten •EIJ's Volleyball. 2pm; Michael Mead on Sax. 7-9pm •EIJ's· $1 Well Dnnks 6-9pm *Club Romeo: Hangover Blues, beer $1 .25. Bloody Marys 52 •Mother's. 75¢ well 4-9pm •Galleon Steak Night. 6pm. Show 10:30 with Lindsey Love •Chutes: Beer bust 1-M1dnight •Heaven Freewell7-9. freedraftall night. $1.25 Corona all night, cover •Brazos River Bottom· Steak Night. 4.50. 6pm. Annual Old Timers Conference •Venture-N Booze/Beer Bust 4- 10pm •Scandal's. Mama Jo's Country Western T-Dance. 5-10pm. Pool Tournament. 1pm. reg1strat1on. Noon *Mary's Beer Bust 3-6pm • Montrose Mining Co. Beer bust 1 pm-10pm, 50¢ draft m a mug 10pm-2am, 50¢ hot dogs 4pm- 10pm • Rock ·N· Horse Bloody Marys $1, Live band 6pm-10pm. free hot dogs •Bacchus The Gay Dating Game Bpm Jack, Mr. G Q himself Monday *The Barn Cowboys in Action. 8-2 *Scandal's Dance to the music of D.J. Ram Rocha •Cousins Cousms & Company, 1030pm • Cousins. Drawing. 6·45pm, wm tflple your shoe size m cash *Montrose Mmmg Co Gold Rush Happy Hour 4-7pm {$1.10 well & beer), 3 m 1 Happy Hour 4- lOpm, $2 beer bust 4-10pm •Club Romeo. TGIF Party 5-9pm •Mother's Happy hour 7am-l0pm •Mary·s After-hours •Lazy J: Sh~w Night 10pm •Heaven: 50¢ well, cover •K.J ·s SS Liquor Bust 7-10pm • Brazoa River Bottom: Happy Hour, lam t1I 9pm. Brazos River Band. 930pm * 0 T s: Sam~ lOam $1 well, domes­tic beer & schnapps; 2pm-8pm. Happy hour; 9pm-2am, DJ & DJSCo dancmg. Male S1r1p Revue with Nestor & Jack. Mr GO • Brazos River Bottom Happy hour • Parkway Athletic Club: Open Ill 9pm, Brazos River Band. 9pm. 10am-10pm Annual Old Timers Conference * Galleon Best Crowd m Town •Chutes Cru1seN1ght&hquorbust • 0. T.·s 8am-10am. 9pm-M1dmght. 4-Bpm $6 75t: Well. Domestic Beer & •Heaven: 50¢ well 9-11 pm. cover, Schnapps DJ-Scooter Bearden * K J ·s $1 Beer and Well Dnnks • K.J. ·s $5 Liquor Bust 7-10pm • BrazosR1verBottom. $1.00 Well& * Mary's Afternoon Beer Bust Beer 7am-2am Sund•y •Bacchus Pool Tournament. 2pm • Galleon $1.50 Cuervo Gold Mar­gantas all day1mght •Brazos River Bottom. Happy hour to 6pm: 'Showt1me at the BRB" sponsored by Larry Garrett. w MC Kourtney VanWales. 6pm. BRB Band 7:30 •Aub1o·s Free draft 7-10pm, "'Rub1os Presenta·· 10:30 * E/J's $1 Margantas all day • Mother's· 15¢ beer 6pm-1am • Exit. $1.25 Margantas • Rubio·s CLOSED. Available /or pnvate functions. reserve one week m advance •EIJ's Open 7am with Miss Dee.$1.00 Vodka Dnnks 7am- 6pm, Dart tournament. cash pnzes. 7pm *Montrose Mining Co . Happy Hour 4-7pm ($1 10 well & beer). 3 in 1 Happy Hour 4. 10pm. $2 beer bust 4·10pm •Ripcord S 1 Margaritas 9pm-2am m Action, •Club Body Center Lockers $3.25 •JR. s. 7~ cape cods, bloodies. margafltas. & schnapps Noon- 10pm *The Barn Cowboys start1nq at 7pm noon-m1dmte •Galleon: Male strip contest 10pm •J.R. ·s.- Pacific Coast Dancers non­stop 6pm until 2am •Chutes Free pool. beer bust 4- Midmght. happy hour 1111 10pm, hquor bust 8-M1dn1ght •Mary's. Bowler's Special Night * E/J's: Pool Tournament. Open to everyone. Bpm. $50 prize Tuesd•r •Bacchus Pot Luck Night *The Ranch: Beer bust & dance lessons •0. T. ·s. 8am-10am, 9pm-M1dnight. 75C: Well. Domestic Beer & Schnapps •Parkway Athletic Club: Open 10am-10pm •Chutes: Liquor bust 8-M1dmght 11tE/J"s $1 gin drmks all day •Ripcord: $1.25 canned beer Bpm~ 2am •Venture-N: Pool tourney 7pm •Mother's. $1 well, Disco oldies Bpm-12am •Exit. S1 Well Drinks •Rock N. Horse: Pitcher of beer $2, Steak night 7pm •Montrose Mining Co. Men at Work (male dancers) 10pm •Club Body Center 1, 2 pflce rooms & lockers. 7pm-3am * K J 's· All Day All Night Happy Hour-double drinks, 75C beer •Montrose Mining Co. Happy Hour 4-7pm ($1.10 well & beer). 3 in 1 Happy Hour 4-10pm. $2 beer bust 4-10pm *Club Romeo: $ 1 .25 beer • Galleon. Happy Hour til Bpm • The Barn: Steak night, 7pm. $4.00. happy hour 9pm *Brazos Rwer Bottom· C & W dance lessons with Tony & Brent. 9:30 •Galleon: May 10. EN MASSE. 9PM *Brazos River Bottom: Happy hour 7am-9pm. Cheeks of the week contest. 10:30. $100 first prize •Rub1o·s Talent night ($75 llfst place). drink specials. dancing till 2am •Exit. Steak night. 4.75 *The Barn. Super Pacl/1c Stflp Off with M.C. Naomi Sims. 10:30. $200 cash pnze Thursday •Rock ·N' Horse: All can beer $1 *The Ranch: Beer bust & dance lessons •Heaven Male Dance Revue with Hunter and the Headliners and Fantasy 1n Motion at 11pm. M.C Randy Jobe. •Mary's: Sundance Night, 8-close * Mary·s Slop Shot Poot Tourna­ment 9~?, cash pnzes •The Barn· Posse Male Dancers. 9pm-2am *Ripcord $1 50 Margaritas 9pm- 2am •E1J's $1 Well Drmks 9-12pm *Club Romeo S 1.50 well dnnks •Venture-N· Pool tourney 7pm *Parkway Athletic Club: Open 10am-10pm •Club Body Center: Half pnce day noon-m1dmte *Mother's: Mother's Men 10pm- 1am •J.R. ·s· 3 m 1 happy hour, $7.25 fro­zen drmks all day all night *Chutes: $1 margaritas 1n a glass all day/night. $1 Busch longnecks •Exit $1 Well Drinks *Bacchus Steak Night, 7pm (you bnng the meat; we supply the rest) •Brazos River Bottom: Happy hour 7am-9pm. Hot dogs & Ham~ burgers on patio 7-9pm. Brazos River Band. 9pm *Montrose Mming Co Happy Hour 4-7pm. ($1.10 well & beer 31n l Happy Hour 4-10pm. Long­necks (domestic beer & soft dnnks Sl 10) 10pm ·2am.$2 00 beer bust 4-10pm •Galleon- David Rice Lwe on the patio. St.00 Buffet. Bpm * Scandal's; Oldies Night, 50's-60"s- 7ffs Rock & Roll May 13 •Scandal's. Miss Houston ttl Large Pageant. MC Jill Jordan. Miss Texas at Large "88-'89. 9pm. $3 cover Here·s the BAR-ZAAR list places you might consider for drinking. dm­mg and sensual pleasures. 20/20 3611 Fondren. 975-6356 Bacchus 523 Lovett. 523-3396 The Barn 111.1 Pacific, 523-0213 Brazos River Bottom 2400 Brazos. 528-91 l2 Briar Patch 2294 Holcombe, 665- 9678 Club Body Center 2205 Fannrn 659-4998 Chapultepec Mexican Restaurant 813 Richmond. 522-2365 Charlie's Restaurant . 1102 Westhe1- mer, 520-5221 Chutes. 1732 Westhe1mer. 523-2213 Corner Pocket . 823 Congress at Tra­vis, 222-2901 Cousins 817 Fa1rv1ew. 528-9204 E/J'1 2517 Ralph. 527-9071 Exit . 109 Tuam. 528-8623 Club Flamingo . 007 Westhe1mer, 527-8830 Wednesday French Quarter Theater 3201 Lou1- • R1pcord $1.50 well all day s1ana. 527·0782 *ia'::i~~S:m Athletic Club· Open Galleon . 2303 Richmond. 522-7616 •OT 's 8am-10am. 9pm-M1dn1ght. Heaven Pacific at Grant. 521-9123 75¢ Well. Domestic Beer & J.R.'s 808 Pacific, 521-2519 *~l~~ar;J'~y Center Compltmen· Keystroke a club on the move. 785- tary Pizza Bpm-10pm 9258 * Exit $1 25 Margaritas Kindred Spirits 4902 Richmond. • Montrose Mmmg Co.· Nickel draft 623-6135 zg~ 1;0~/:'%J.s10pm-2am. music of K.J,'s. 11830 Airline Ad .. 445-5849 • EIJ"s Beer bust. 4-10 La Cucaracha y Cantlna 3921 N •Rock N' Horse: Schnapps $1 Mam. 864-5069 •Club Romeo: Vodka specials Lazy J 312 Tuam. 526-9343 ~~~':,,s75;~~~i~:c~:ght Bpm· Mary·s. 1022 Westhetmer, 527-9669 *Bacchus Corporate Ladies Mldtowne Spa 3100 Fannm. 522- Happy Hour free hors d·oeuvres 2379 .'j.':~"},ac1f1c Coost Dancers non- Montrou Mining Co. 805 Pac1f1c. stop 6pm unt•I 2am 529 - 7488 •Heaven: 10Cwel19pm·2am.cover Momma·s Money 5:~ Westhe1mer biggest Wed crowd 11" Houston 522-0045' Mother's 402 Lovett, 520-7935 Norma's 5611 Club . 5611 Val Verde. 782-4761 Jo's Outpost . 2818 Richmond. 528- 8318 Parkway Athletic Club , 800 Rosine. 528-5467 Past Time 617 Fairview, 529-4669 Pot Pie Restaurant , 1525 Westhe1- mer 528-4350 O.T.'1, 608 Westhe1mer, 529-8813 The Ranch . 9150 S. Mam. 666-3464 Ripcord 715 Fairview, 521-2792 Rock 'N' Horse 1220 Taft. 520-9910 Club Romeo . 903 Richmond, 528- 9110 Rubio'• ~2 Tuam. 522-1207 Scandal's 1419 Richmond. 528- 8003 Spanish Flower Restaurant 4701 N Main, 869- 1706 Studio 13 1318 Westhe1mer, 52 1- 9030 Venture-N 2923 S. Mam. 522-0000 Pl~y Safe! 1102 Westheimer Daily Specials 522 3332 Sundays Happy Hour Well Drinks La Cucaracha Cafe Y .)S-- Cantina ~ (; .~ 3921 N.Maln ~f ~ 864·5069 OPEN 6AM- 11PM 2 FOR I DINNER WITH THIS AO > "a:' ;;; l. N WESTHEIMER ..... Norm• "• SG 11 Club > "a:' ;;; 2517 Ralph 527-9071 at Westheimer •DAILY BEER BUST• Sunday: Beer Bust - Noon till 10:00 P.M. Volleyball - Stans at 2:00 P.M. Enjoy dinner with us 4:00 P.M. till ??? only $3.00 per plate, orders lO go. Well drinks 6-9 P.M. only $1.00 Michael Mead on the Sax 7-9 P.M. Monday: Dan Tournament 7:00 P.M. $1.00 Margariias all day Friday Hamburger Night - Hamburger, Chips & Pickle only $2.00, 6P.M. till ??? Michael Mead on the Sax 7-9 Saturday $ 1.00 Well Drinks - 4-7 P.M. $1.00 VODKA DRINKS With ._;f;fao, ~'Mon-Fri 7 A.M. - 6 P.M. MAY 5, 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE 23 .... Rock 'N HorH .,! I SpanlshflQWHRHt•uranl Chutu e ALAOAMA ~ ~ c.:; u. f--''~·A'I-'P-'.-!"E-W"'-+---i-~ CO\ltln1 ~ z e e Past T•m• E•ll e HYDE PAAK 8 Ripcord ~~~-r-+-, -.•c- ',---..,------+---lny Je Huvtn e 'e e Tt•• 8 11n PAClriC e MonlrOH Mining Co. Keystroke (Ke-'stn3ke1)n l Houaton'• HOT. NEW bl-monthly club for Women and Frt ~rd• . DJ J .O. ~ R, O L O • IOCAllO' 2-JO I ~otn JJcinto "llOT' VIDEOS! Open 9pm ·lam \lember\ S Gueo,h ~6 AV0NDALE WbTHf "-1fA The Inner City Experience CO\IE CELEBR4 TE . ~ \'D RE\IE.\IBER THC: 0R£~ T Tf\IES ll E 'IE ll ~ D A T Tl/£ SPRl\ G CLOS/\'G P~Rff OE !.EFSTRO!.E KEYSTROKE HOTU'-£· 785-9258 24 MONTROSE VOICE / MAY 5 1989 Friday & Saturday Resular Male Cast Review STARRING Adam Nester & Jack Jesse Alva Saturday male auest: Mr. Jack (G.Q. himself} Ol ~e\)S\et'• OaY) l<amcna ~s A\an tOaY· sun '{\\an . oaY· sa\u ~l.\"e ft~ Sunday Afternoon SPiash Day Show MC Show Director I Ramona Sims " Deitra Danielle De Carlos Special Guest Patti. Q.T's Miss Sex Kitten and her breast that sunk a thousand ShiPS 608 Westhe1mer Open 7 days a week Sunday, May 7 Larry Garrett Candidate for Mr. TGRA 1990 PRESENTS SHOWTI:ME at the B.R.B. 6PM Steak Night begins 6pm Brazos River Band begins 7:30pm MC Kourtney Van Wales Miss Gay Houston 1990 An ALL LIVE show! starring: Kenny Rutledge Gay Lynn Robinson Kathy Riser Jerry Morin Alicia Debe Powell Ken LuQuette Robert De Cola PLUS other talented guests! (Special appearance by the Texas Raisins) Proceeds benefitting the Bering Care Center through the Colt 45's General Charity Fund Join us Saturday and Sunday all day for the Annual Old Timers Conference Good Memories and Good Times all at your Montrose Country Home!! -Bl\AZOS B.IVB-I\ BO'l'TOU ~ B:OVSTON 529-8813 8am:Mon-Sat 2400 Brazos 528-9192 Noon:Sunday MAY 5, 1989 / MONTROSE VOICE 25 1022 WESTHEIMER 527-9669 ••• naturally! [HoME OF SUNDANCE CATTLE-(OMPANY 1 Beer Bust Sat. & Sun. on the patio, 1-6 Hot Dogs on the patio Sat. & Sun. Bring your suit & towel and play in the wading pools in the Outback and tan with us. A Shine for AIDS by Chris, this Sunday (May 7) I pm-lam, sponsored by Bruce/la Duvall, candidatr for Miss TGRA 1990. Proceeds to support the Colt 45 General Charity Fund 6~~ Special Happy Hour 9am- I I am Mon.-Fri. $1.00 well drinks & beer. i~~H~ri.; ~'t~ 0'"".1 su~:~~~E ...:: AFTER HouRs ~I CATTLE COMPANY 2am to closing Thursdaythru Sunday HOUSTON, TEXAS ($1.00 coffee, juices, sodas Ir Artesia) "'1'UR /\. t.\.. Plus - Uve D.J. During After Hours * HAPPY .... HOURS,.. Morning: Afternoon: 7am-Noon + 6pm-8pm + Monday-Saturday Monday-Friday Evening: ~ can11eers1.so DrattB-75C 11 :30pm-1 :OOam Well Drinks $1.7S Monday-Friday Shots $1.00 * 26 MONTROSE VOICE/ MAY 5, 1989 Here's more Soap Tills Bunday, The Galleon presents Its Surf­er Parcy featuring $1.50 CuBrvoritas e.nd Carlbe Jongnecks, all da.Y a.nd all night w1th specl8.l troplCal drinkB e.nd St&k Night &t 6000 p.m also. We underete.nd It's all to be a luau atmoephere lncluding special Ter!akl steaks. John B. (TNT), you had to do what to whom to get a free room at the Drisk1ll for Splash Da,y'? Construction continues on the latest ad­dition to the Armstrong Empire on Paci.ftc Street. The of!lcial opening d&te has not been announoed but tnslders tBll us th&t the renovat.!On Is moving &t an Incredible pace &t what will be called the Santa Fe Trading Company It Is being ha.iled as a contempo­rary Southwest st;yle club for men. .. the only one of Its kind ln Texas Terry (Mary's), we bea.rth&t Tad and Fan­ny have somethlng scheduled for every weekend this summsr (out of town). Can you take lt? Tills Bunday will be the monthly TORA meeung &t 2o00 p.m held &t Chutee ( 1732 Westhelmer everyone Is welcome to &ttend. Heaven. Houston's premiere video dance club will feature a.n appe&ranee by capitol Records' !l.nd. Hazell Dean, sl.ngUlg her hits. "They Say It's Gonna Rain," "No Fool (For Love J: "Who's leaving Wbo" a.nd more Hazell Dean Is the w1nner of many awards for her mUBlC&l accomplishments and holds a Guinees Book World Record for sell- 1ng more records t.h&n any other British fe­male performer. Ms. Dean will appear 1n concert on SUnds;' evening, Mey 14, 1989 &t Heaven, located &t 810 Pac1llc &t Grant 1n the Ilea.rt of the Montrose Arts Dlstr!Ct The M!sB gay Houston &t Large Pageant will be held &t Scandsls next SUnda.Y· Appli­cations are being accepted &t the bar Ask Bo (Past Time) why he went to the dogs Wednesds,y. Are 11us1;Y e.nd CUrtlB drlft!ng apart? It seems CUrtlB has been freela.nclng again. Nurse Davtd's voice Is changing-says he's going through pubert;y-we th1nk It's fur balls. M.1ss Green sure seems to leave the bar whsn she gets Jong distance calls from New Orleane Ask her why Dwayne (BRB) Is now getting Cracker Jacka w1th his cards from Kelth-thJ!lgs are looking better cards e.nd ca.ney corn. what next Dwayne? The Ripcord's W86 Decker Is the cover a.nd main photo feature 1n the current Drum­mer, just out. Showing off, obvtously, Is a natlll'8.l for Wea. Mary's Is offering a rat.her large bar tab to anyone returnlng the film loet when Tad's mind was erased in Austin. 'Ib.eydDn'twant the camera-just the film. What's the rumor alloutJacl!:. H. bumping Rust;y 1n what part of town? • HIGH SPEED COPYl~G • \llULTI PART FOR\1S • C0\1PUTER FORMS • FLYERS • BROCHURES • LETTERHEADS/ENVELOPES • BUSI.NESS CARDS • INVOICES • PURCHASE ORDERS • NEWSLETTERS Print ing • LABELS • CONTl\UOUS FOR'v1S • l'iU.'v1BERl~G • fOLDl\G • COLLATl\G • DRILU\G • TYPESEnl~G • ANNOUNCEMENTS • l,\iVITATIONS • EMBOSSING 5400 BELLAIRE BLVD. BELLAIRE, TX 77401 (713) 667-7417 Our friendly staff, Randi, Larry, J.J. and Will ie are waiting to serve you! Westheimer Store 522-0385 cars "lA'·ON 0102 Buy or Lease a Car or Truck Glen Webber Galleria Area Ford "410 Westhelmer 960-9800 0190 MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guoronteed 100Pacific Air Condlllonlng Servicing 526-3723 Carburetors Rebuilt Electrlcol Repairs All Broke Work 0340 MONEY MARKET NETWORK Entrepeneur and investor bulletin board Where and how 1o·s of lindmg capital 1 00-868-MART G'eneratlfeip Wanted 0650 Wanted actors, singers. comedians. mate dancers for new business. Call 522-3241 for mlormation Supervisor needed lor res1dent1al maid &erv1ce. Must have car and be able to work wec•kdays Call Mrs Wilcox at 529-1916 Truck Dnver needed Good hours. good pay 981..0706 TELEMARKETING AT 1rs BEST No aales fund-ra111ng for non-profit organizations good hours, no e•penence n~esa.ry West Alabama •rea Cal' Debr• 5.£'>-TlOO between 8am-8pm All male C&W band availab tu play occasional weekends tor 4 hours, S 1 OC trps For aud1hon and additional mlorm •ion call Jim at ")28-3249 Work your hours d(ring body rubs. You g looks, burtt. good hands cleanhn 1ransporta11on Mr C 622-3942 Inside desk 1a1esman 1eeded 645-2620 On bus hne Need expenenced cook Apply to Earl or ~~~;·J;~~';;!~nday-Fnday. Charhe"s, PARKWAY ATHLETIC CLUB Part-time instructor Requirements good physical look. en1oy working out. prefer ech:·r.at1onal expenence, personable and able to work flexible hours CAii Ron, 52 :>467 FUN WORK Women's bar lloor staff. rock dancers needed lor new women·s pnvate club. ;~~nenced only Call Alexandra E. 78~ t:,n1~~1t~:1=v~ ~~:pt;6J8;p~~I~~ 5"74 lor deta1· '-Al'' ••'INC·"'' Arts & Crafts 1005 Fences 1028 Furniture 1037 REDECORATE TODAY Brand Of•w lurn1ture some shll "' p lots of styles, beaullful 11v1ng room suiies p.il groups, camel backs, sleepers Con· temp0' ary styles. low prices 868-4 707 1042 Sculpture classes in my Montrose s1ud10 Wednesdays. 6-9pm Anatomy in Clay Beginners and intermechate 524-1753 lie831e"shops 1069 Gary·s Treasure Chest & Resale Shop, 3317 Stanford. 529-6561. Closed on Mon· days. 1()111. of sales donated to AFH Try ~t Fo "'' o; 152t WeRlhe ime r 5289600 Sportswear! Ha1tcut1mg Tanning Mon.-Sat. J0-7 Sun. Noon-6 ri'ret · 1080 'C;~,,. 529- 1414 ~THE 111\f PLACE l\l..IGNMENTS BQ/\KES STQUTS & SHOCKS 1307 FAlll\llEI\ a_·. wE ·:-- -~ "'~"'~ Y-a'rd"°& Garage Sales 1095 The Montrose Country Ctoggt rs are hav- ~~m8 ~a~~bu~1~;:!~{~!~·t~i~~6~~~":i; Kipling) HUGE ESTATE SALE Sat.ISun .. May 6-7. 9am-flpm, 5050 Cedar Creek, Sage/San Fehpe area Clothes. furniture, books. misc FASHION DESIGN STUDIO S ilk and wool labrica, notions. mrsc suede, leather. and snake skin_ Ladies cocktail, evening and formal wear (sizes 8·12). Fr.day/Saturday. May 12-13, 10am unl!I 4pm or by appointment 527·0832 1904 Whitney Pei' Care, Boarding 1164 ~~ ::::f'SJn ~f ~~19 ~.~:;~d=~62 ~o ;&2";· D1var 1!1 rd Trade Services stables 1180 Hou'ses 1404 MONTROSE VICTORIAN DUPLEX Large downstairs duphix. V1c1onan 402 W8'ch. charming 2-1 on quiet corner" with private entrance and good neighbors WOOd lloors. high ceilings, brass/glass ceiling fans. 2 fireplaces. bay window ~~~~rd~A~shF~:!~:;·r!'n~g~~~dgye fenced back yard Much more• Ava1lab18 May 1. $!">50tmonth with last months rent deposit 6 month or 1 year lease Call Louie 623-3283 days. 524·0426 evenings Please message •I nect">sary PECAN PARK House- 2br. 1 bath. l..J D. K. CNitral toeat ~11~dt~;,:1rfi.9~;;i~k ~~v~;~~1 &U~ s~/ 3970 Apa'rtments 1405 COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT Montn Richmond. 111, quiet complex. mce hardwoods c. k8~1u~n;;~.Y el~~;~g 5~~J;St stove (;QMMUNITY MANAGEMENT Wes­lhe1mer1 Driscoll. 111, avarlable May 20 plush carpet. w hardwood. oll street ~~rk~~ii-n~ng tans. only $325 plus elect- Apartments 1405 COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT North Montrose. 1'1, w·sunroom. gas heat­/ stove. apphances. hardwoods. ceiling ~~~~g~~t-blmds. $325 plus gas. electric COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT- M1s­sourvCommonwealth. 2J I, quiet 2 story. ~~~~~t~:i5h~~~uo,ag:s.~~:1~:~~~3~ 9335 Roommates Wanted 1460 Roommate Masters " 'e provide: - Someone lo share expe n11e11 -Per11onal placement aerviee Ca/1683-2276 today! Roommate needed tor targe Montrose home. 529-3970 Roommate to share beautiful town house 2 Bedroom. 2 1/2 bath, 2 car garage 1n fantashc complex Near Lakeside Coun­~ Club For mlo call 497-3673 Gay couple has room to rent. employed ;~}~ee~o se'!~~es. no bar types Homes' for Sale 1601 INNER CITY REAL TOR Planning tc buy vr ,f'.1Se a home. town home. or mu111-lam1ly dwelhng? Wide selection ol properties available. Call now. don't wait' Planning to sell? For a free mar11et analysis of your property call David. 523-27171868-3496 HEIGHTS AREAtSTUDE· 1ST Classic.. Heights hOme. LOr311'2. updated to perlec11on, hardwoods. gorgeous yard. $59. 900, approx $675 molllhly Best pnce m area. Motivated Realty Execu-- t1111 - ia/agent 496-7~00 Commercial Announcements 1750 Gay/ Lesbian Pride Week '89 Volunteers call 523-2575 Stonewall 20, A Generalion ol Pride Churches 1920 /;.;..s1on Mission Church 1 -· - J2Ufo'tnlnol0gln 529-1225 Sunday Worship Servtc" 10:30om Support Groups wery Thursday 6:30pm KINGDON COMMUNITY CHURCH ty f ~ IQUu111 V• ; WOfSh•p !Services Sunday 11am 614 E 1'hh 111'-? 7~ 1 748-6251 Accounting, Bookkeeping BOOKKEEPING 2105 flt y1_ nf•t>d<> rf·r~on 1u Pf>T 01 pi:~ & delivery. Mr---- & .. Jlt1west area 527~8114 Alterations. sewing2112 The be$t Gare ol Lukin SI MAY 5, 1989 /MONTROSE VOICE 27 Pl~y Safe! computer Services 2121.5 Compute< systems consulhng. ci..st( • ..,, p~an:im1ng _ ~ar2'_. 4~ 131 Accounting systems. database design. ~~g~f'ogrammmg. co,..-.u1t1ng Larry counseling 2124 224-1411 1ntormat1 m & referral MONTROSE PSYCHOTHERAPY, P.C. GabrielJa S. Rappaport, Ph.D. Paulo J . Haymond, Ed.D. lndMdual e Famiy e Co­Altematiw Lifesrylcs (713) 529-5800 I~ :~ . -.• ..-_, .... T AXcT-.J..r.-"1 Dentistry 2125.5 ona ut er General Dentistry 427 Westht"imt-r Houston, TX r.uon Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appomtrnc":lt. ('il:il !i24-0fi3X Gyms. Health Ctrs. 2131 11uUSTON r?.t:lCLUB BODY ~ CINTER 2205 Fannin 659-4998 Hair Care 2132 ~LON 1904 DUNLAVY 522-7866 insurance 2138 Arew.und• .cna1 ~ .. 11ht&hiahi:..i amurancr lall .odayforafrft pl"Ub~ ... Mansker Insurance Agency 't\ . .\1at.ro..~re1w 522-2792 AL.:1<1. lfo::-C'OWD~ Rmten, We H.tth. l'.ulnmnaal M'assage llicensedJ2145 Ads n this category massage) are ltended to be from hcensed masseurs and masseuses Unhcensed masseurs and masseuses are listed under 'Body Rubs. section 2260 MASSAGE THERAPIST J V Porro and Associates Colonic Colon ~hon 528-301~ SPORT MASSAGE THERAPIST " V. Porro and Associates Co•omc Colon rngat1on 528-3010 Protess1ona1 relaxing. wonderful mas­~ by JOhn. 526-8652 MASSAGE 529-3970. For a rela:ii;°7ng massage call J Fi:- at 661 V457. State register 1'2492. 1n1out calls Tuesday-Friday evenings 7-10:30pm. Call !or appomtment I love my work' Massage therapy. prompt call back Ronnie 278-3824 Swedish f"la~ age-864-2233 Medical Care 2155 STEVE D MARTINEZ MD 12 OL-.s Tower.4126SW Fwy no.HXX • _77 ·1 Movers 2160 MOVEMASTERS Bo:ii;es. 100. ar 1925 wesu1.:;•~ v..._, M C AmEx welcome 630-65 >5 Plirties 2166 CREW SERVICES :~~7eut0nat bartendmg catenng :;.2u- Plumbing 2182 MASTER PLUMBER L .. ensed plumber residential, commet"· cial repairs remOdel. new 1nstallat1ons F ee e5t1-nates Larry 524-0460 FORT LAUDERDALE LOW RATES H"'elAmt f".;s & .. llle5 NEAR GAY BEACH & All.. GAY BAAS Po.; 30 CTV Pets,~~ 21 HENDAICK"S ISLE TEL 305-462-5072 800-248-£669 8rodl ~ Alt.a1labllt 'Gav&~ rl"(M .;QI/ Montrose Travel International (713) 523-4297 H '1 v~ · X 7" 9 \'ILLA HO\fBRE Typing 2197 HAPPY FINGERS TYPING' 520-0479 Resumes. repc"f""s. term papers, bUs1ness .~.r..r.e. spondence call 1oday Reasonable 28 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 5. 1989 _V_id_eo_T_a~pi~ng~_2_19_9 Body Rubs 2260 GET ACQUAINTED OFFER Y01'r video requirements- by h.gh resolu­lJOn VHS vldeo camera. For the month May Halt prtee on al work Call afte 5p-n ~2 Personals 2220 Tie PERSONALS now ap~ · ,,· , · .. w pages back on our F 1day FOJll' B11rZddr .. .,.. l Gay Matching I • rvmg to meet c~mpa11ble men for 'riendsh1p or more? 1 C mQuc t, the g ... y matching I ~rv cc for men, offers y.ou~ • Detailed descnpuons. • As ur.: confidcnt1al11v • 1)1scrccl mailings. • ~ • Fee"' starting Jt ~O. Call IXUC ~re .nd apph1.:a1ion ~ .!J JJ.l !\!J.,;) ;;1 J ~ 1-800-633-6969 For "'rnlstages by ltcer.sed masseur= an1 nasseuses sec sec11on2145 Massage regular BODY RUBS now appear With the PERSONALS a few pages back n .ur h day Fox/Bar Zaar pages. cieaning. Janitorial2121 IA F F o Ro A e~ !HOUSE · CLEANING! I '!io.<CU!e 'tbJ Harilellenitf"twlQ'! l~~~~~~~---i I Free Estimates, References 529-1916 WE 00 HAROWOOD FLOORS Bonded and Insured 'or your protection , Montrose Voice Classified Advertising ._,:•:::::::'/,:pl.; z:.,-:~t. ... ~,,:,, ::..~~ Frx qgulV jJIP/r, -'<Mllfditlp THE HEADLINES: Headhnewords n bold type centered are$1 each word cm1n1mum $3 per lme) (Centered bold headlines can also appear wjthm the textorattheend fthead andarealso$1 perword,w•tham1mmumof$3per line' THE TEXT'. Each word 1n regular type ls 40C (Add1l1onal regular words 1n ALL CAPS or Bold Words not 1n al' C'lPS are 55C each Add1tC""al BOLO WORDS n au aps •e 70C each) EXAMPLES· r o advertise In the next Montrose Voice. flll out this form, OR simply phone us €j 529-8490 dolly 1Qom.5:30pm We <:an do if all by phOne, and bill you later THIS HEADLINE $3.00 nen each additional word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then .-ch tlddltiona1 word 1ke this 40C THESE THREE LINES' All CAPtTAL LETIERS CENTERED. BOLO. $9.CMJ Then each ad011iona1¥word1t11:eth1s1s40~ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL 'WOFIOS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE 55C EACH. AddlUonal bokt words lik• this in text ara SSC: each. ADDITIONAL BOLD , ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH LONG TEAM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make nc copy cnanges cl.Jrrng the run pay forthefullruninadvance. and deduct 15"9 Run 1r.e same ad ~3 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct Z5"1o BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Bhnd Ad Number We'll conflderit1alty forward au responses to your ad to you by ma ti or you can pick tl'\em up at our office Rate1s$3 for each week the ad runs (Responses w1 tl be torwarded 1ndefln1tely however. for as tong as they come in) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may matl your ad m or phone 1t m You can oav by check, money order, American Expres.' Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Classified ads received by 3r·m Wednesday Will be placed m th~ t week's oewspaper Ads received later w1al be placed 1n the fo1Jow1ng weeks rewspaper •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• tZE YQlt.E We Want Your Film-Developing Business! .............. El:V.ll,._fl'll,. OUR FAMOUS OHf>HOUA PHOTO DtEV£LOPl!rifG AVAILA8LIE OAJLY 1·5PM 409 AVONDALE 92.5% of the readers of the Montrose Voice are "somewhat likely" or "very likely" to use a product of service be­cause they saw it advertised in the Montrose Voice. He'/? Ate you listening? You hcNe someth1no to ser? Put'' here1 96.8% of the readers of the Montrose Voice are employed. The average household income of the Montrose Voice reader is $45,370 a year. Mon tr 'w \bee readers have IT'~ >ntty to spend lots of 1t_ And what dt. t• ry t..Jy? beryth1ng Ell'erydoy For exompJe EACH DAY. on the average, -Voice readers rent 156 automobiles -Voice readers spend $62,000 on clothing - 11,800 Voice readers dine out -6, 100 Voice readers go out to a dance bar or nightclub -311 Voice readers take a domestic vacation or business trip -39 Voice readers take a foreign vacation or business trip -1,570 Voice readers attend a movie -565 Voice readers attend a live theater; dance or concert performance -Voice readers buy 561 paperback books and 253 hard­cover books -Voice readers buy 399 33rpm records, 251 compact discs, 286 pre-recorded audio tapes -Voice readers rent 1,238 video tapes and purchase 159 vid­eo tapes Dorff voo be left out lo a porl ot 'he Montrose Voice Co/I us. We ARE Jtie Newspaper ol Montrose Jerry Mulholland AiNERTISJNG DIREC '011 David Chapman Al" RI 'RfSINTATIVE 1 Lorry Lent AVVE?TIS/NG REPRIJENTATIVE S_ou1,ce . s unmons Mottet Peseotcfl &.rreou. Inc. Prtmory Reoaersh1p Suf\l'ey lor lfle Montr<»e "3tee. concluded Decem­
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