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Houston Voice, No. 1078, June 22, 2001
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Houston Voice, No. 1078, June 22, 2001 - File 001. 2001-06-22. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1723/show/1674.

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(2001-06-22). Houston Voice, No. 1078, June 22, 2001 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1723/show/1674

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1078, June 22, 2001 - File 001, 2001-06-22, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1723/show/1674.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1078, June 22, 2001
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date June 22, 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Marshaling Pride Get to know the 2001 Pride Parade Grand Marshals: Mitchell Katine, Dalia Stokes and Blake and Gordon Weisser Page 21 ISSUE 1078 www.houstonvoice.com ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JUNE 22, 2001 INSIDE Jack Valinski never expected to spend more than a few years in Houston, but 20 years after his arrival, he's still here and is a driving force behind Pride in Houston Page S Ever wonder what it's like to build one of those elaborate Pride Parade floats? Go behind the scenes with the award-winning Krewe of Olympus team as they construct this year's entry. Page 25 After a 5-year hiatus, the Pride Festival returns. The post-parade event will draw 45 vendors and live entertainment to Garden in the Heights. Sunday, June 24. Page 25 Mayor's non-discrimination order upheld Texas Supreme Court dismisses Councilman Robb Todd's su it challenging policy to protect gay city employees by\\ ENDY K. MOHO ' The Texas Supreme Court 1Ssucd .i ruhng Thursday dis­missing .i lawsu t O\ er Ma\ or Lee P Brown·s city hall poli­C} banr..ng d1.SCI1mmatton based on sexua: orientation. The c;ise began m February 1998 '\\hen Houston City Councilman Robb TodJ and busmessrnan Richard Hotze su d Brown and the City m an effort to 1m alidate the mavor's exccuh\ e 0rdcr banrung sexual onentallon dis­cnmmation Bi..t the ston goes back C\ en farther. In 1984, Houston City (ounc1 apprmcd a ban on dis­crirninatton based on sexu 1 onentatton m cit)' hmng, pro­motton and contracting. The e\ent sp.mned an anti-gay group known as Campaign for Houston that spearheaded a petillon dm e for a referendum on the proposal. An executive order banning sexual orientation discrimination issued three years ago by Mayor Lee P. Brown, seen riding in last year's gay pride parade with wife Frances, has been upheld by the Texas Supreme Court. A lawsuit brought by City Councilman Robb Todd challenged the mayor's right to issue the order. The speaal clectton drew the largest turnout up to that point m Houston's history and the non-d1Scrimmation poli­cy w:is soundly defeated by a 4-1 margin. Todd argued that Bro\rn's executive order nullified the >- Continued on Page 10 CDC, AIDS groups def end study 011 you11g gay men Critics say CDC data insufficient to support claim t hat HIV rate is 'a larming' among gay youth by LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTO'.'\-The U.S. Centers for Disea'e Control & Prevention and leaders of some of the nation's most prominent AIDS organizahons appeared surprised last week when gay critics challenged the findings of a recent COC report asserting that HIV infections are rising at an alarming rate among young gay men, especially young African-Anwnc;in g.1y men. Writers for gay newspapers in San Fr.mcisco and Chicago iomed gay ioumal st and comml'ntator Andrew Sullt\•an m argu­tng tha t the data on which the COC based its conclusions was inadequate Sulli\'an, in an opinion column in the Ntw Rrp11bllc, notl'd that the COC report appear' to base its conclusion about the incidence of n~w I II\ mfechons among young gay ml'n on a sample of only 3 peo­ple spread across six cities. Sulli\'an also argued in his column that the timing of the COC's rdca'e of the report might han? been moti\•ated by politics. At least one objecti \'e, he said, could be the desire to secure more funds for the COC's programs in the upcoming congressional budget drliberahons. Officials with local and naltonal AIDS orgaruzahons dismissed the cntici m lcv­elrd by Sulli\·an and others, saymg they ha\ e observrd f1rsth:md how young gay men, in particular young African-Amencan gay ma!~, Jppear to be affected d.:spropor­tionatelv hy AIDS. CDC off1u.1ls acknowledge the data they used to reach their conclusions were prel.m­inary But the)' insist that thctr fmdmgs are st.1ttshc.11lv \.'lid, and they said they lelt duty-bound to release the mfonnatton quick) y to mable prevention programs aimed at gay} outh to respond Two experts in mathematics and stahs­hcs 11ho re\'ie\\"ed the ClX" report said the CLX''s methodology in data analysis appears sound and meets accepted scientif­ic st:mdards, although one of the two said the COC may have mflated the significance of the data in statements to the press. The criticism of the COC findings so far has come from Sullivan's commentarv and from articles by gay journalist Bob Roehr in the San Francisco Bay Arra Reporter, and gay writer Paul Varnell in the Chicago Free Press. Both are gay newspapers. Veteran gay and AIDS activist Michael Petrehs, a longl!me cnttc of establishment AIDS organizations, has abo weighed in with lu.s own criliosm of the CDC report. Debate O\'er findings The COC publis~~d its report June 1 in the COC 1oumal Morbidity and Mortality \\'cckly Report. The report statc'<i that 4.4 per­cent of men betwl'C'n the agC's of 23 and 29 who ha\ e sex with other men-and 14.7 per­c~ nt of Afncan-American men who have sex "1th men m this age group-were being infected annually With HIV in six large cities. The report pomtcd out that the latest > Continued on Page 10 2 JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE You won't need these at our nighttime pride parade. (Unless you happen to~ standing tmder the 8 ~ft disco ball.) It's the premier pride event of the year in Texas and the most exciting gay and lesbian community event in the the entire Southwest. Pride Parade 2001 is a celebration of our community's diversity and unity. A night when the city of Houston sparkles with joy and togetherness. Last year, over 150,000 people gathered under the glow of an 8 1'2 ft. disco ball, raising their voices as one. This year, we invite you to become a friend of pride and share in the vitality of our community. See you there on Saturday, June 23rd, at 8:45 pm. The parade is on lower Westheimer between Woodhead and Whitney. The celebration continues on Sunday, June 24th, at 1:00 pm with the return of Pride Festival at Garden in the Heights, 3926 Feagan. Come experience the local GLBT culture first-hand on a lazy Sunday afternoon. Shop the vendor bazaar, speak with club representatives, enjoy the artists & entertainers, and be energized by motivational speeches. Tickets are available at Basic Brothers, 1232 Westheimer, and by mail from the Pride Committee of Houston, P.O. BOX 66071, Houston TX, 77266-6071. For information call the PrideLine at 713-529-6979. www pndt'houston.org HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 WHEN YOU COMMIT TO HIV CO Bl 110 THE Y, CL • Proven power against HIV' • Generally well tolerated to help you stay on treatment • •strongly recommended• as part of a fo"t ront regimen in DHHS Guidelines' SAFETY INFORMATION Many pabents have~ trouble sleeping. mow-s~ trouble cOOCl!rltrating. ancUor U005Ua1 cteamsa few Inn after st.arbn!} SUSTIVA. lhey lend 10 g:> away after you have taken the medicine for a few weeks. A small number of pallents have had severe ~ <triWl!)e thoughts. or atwn behavior. d you have these ~ you should contact yoi doctor immediately tD OISCUSS yoi therapy. There have been a few oeports of !Uidde, but SUSTIVA has not been e5talilished as the cause Mold to moderate rash IS a common side effect of SUSTIVA. Women should not become pregnant while taking SUSTIVA. because borth defects have been seen IO animals giwn SUSTIVA. SUSTIVA should not be taken by patients who are also tal;Jng airy of the following: Hismanal" (astemizole), Propulsicl' (cisapride), Versed" (nudazolam). Hakoon• (triazolaml. or '"JOI derivatives as there is the potmtial for serious and/or ~~ thre;itemng side effects.· See Patient Information about SUSTWA on the followvlg pages. Once Daily SUSTIVA efavirenz ~ DuPont Phannaccutocals Company sus• VA. Ind the Sl.NBl.RST LOGO .. ·-mn. ol DuPont --c.n_,, """""'' 0 2001 DuPont - ... - Coml>O"J • Tho brands lis1'd .. rogl\l<r<'d .. adomarts of their~""""" and .. nae lradomarts of Oul'onl l'harmac!u!iah c.._ ~.i,,,_.., 1. lll'C Study 006. Sus1iv.>'ZOVl3TC..,,.,. (1VllINmc. 2 Guidolinos b ... Ibo of-Agoro 11 llV-­nl - ,.,.. oo Clinical Proctcn for,,...,,... of HIV lnl«1>0I\ ~of Hool!h and Humln ~ ftbnlaty 2001 Because Life Goes On www.sustiva.com 1~ (1-80G-474-2762) 3 4 ~"">!.-1lf.-=- Once Dally -SUSTIVA efavirenz SUSTIVA111 (efavirenz) capsules Patient lnlormatmn about SUSTIVA* (sus-TEE-vah) for HIV :Human lmmunodef1c1ency Virus) Infection Generic name: efav1renz :~h FAH-v1h-rehnz) Please read !hrs •nforma• on before you start taking SUSTIVA. Read I again each time you re' II your prescnplion m case there rs any new mformat1on Don t treat this leaflet as you only source of 1r.'ormat1on about SUSTIVA. Always discuss SUSTIVA with your doctor wher. you start takmg your med1cme and at every visit. You should remain under a doctor's care wh.~ using SL.STIVA. You should not change or stop treatment without first talking to your doctor. What is SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA 1s a med1cme used to help treat HIV, the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune def1c1ency syndrome). SUSTIVA rs a type of HIV drug called a "non-nucleoside reverse transcnptase mhrbitor" (NNRTI). How does SUSTIVA work? SUSTIVA works by lowering the amount of HIV In the blood (called "v1ra1 load"). SUSTIVA must be taken with other anll-HIV medicines When taken with other anll-HIV medicines, SUSTIVA has been shown to reduce viral load and mcrease the number of CD4 cells {a type of immune cell m blood). SUSTIVA may not have these ef'ects m every pallent. Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SUSTIVA JS not a cure for HIV or AIDS. People taking SUSTIVA may stm develop other mfectlOllS assooated with lllV. Because a! this, it 1s very important that you remain under the care of your doctor. Does SUSTIVA reduce the nsk of passing HIV to others? SUSTIVA has not beer. shown to reduce the nsk of passing HIV to others. Continue to praclice safe sex. and do not use or sha:-e dirty needles How should I take SU ST I VA 1 • The dose of SUSTIVA 1or adults 1s 600 mg (three 200 mg capsules, taken together) once a day by mouth. T~e dose of SUSTIVA 10~ children may be lower {see Can children take SUSTIVA?). • Take SUSTIVA at the same time each day. You should take SUSTIVA at bedtime durmg the first 1ew weeks or rf you have side effects, such as dizziness or trouble concentrating (see What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA?J. • Swallow SUSTIVA with water, 1u1ce, milk. or soda. You may take SUSTIVA with or without meals; however, SUSTIVA should not be taken with a high fat meal. • Do not miss a dose of SUSTIVA. If you forget to take SUSTIVA, take the missed dose right away If you do miss a dose, do not double the next dose. Carry on with your regular dosmg schedule. If you need help m planmng the best times to take your medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. • Take the exact amount of SUSTIVA your doctor prescribes. Never change the dose on your own. Do not stop this medicine unless your doctor tells you to stop. • When your SUSTIVA supply starts to run low, get more from your doctor or pharmacy. This rs very important because the amount of wus in your blood may mcrease if the medicine 1s stopped for even a short lime. The virus may develop resistance to SUSTIVA and become harder to treat. Can children take SUSTIVA? Yes, ch1.dren who are able to swallow capsules can take SUSTIVA. Rash may be a serious problem in some children Tell your child's doctor nght away 1f you notice rash or any other side effects while your child is taking SUSTIVA. The dose of SUSTIVA for children may be lower than the dose for adults. Capsules containing lower doses of SUSTIVA are available. Your child's doctor will determine the nght dose based on your child's weight. Who should not take SUSTIVA? Do not take SUSTIVA 1f you are allere1c to SUSTIVA or any of its ingredients. What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? Talk to your doctor nght away 1f you: • Are pregnant or want to become pregnant •Are breast-feeding • Have problems with your liver, or have had Hepatitis • Start or change any medicine •Have side effects while taking SUSTJVA • Have a history of mental illness. substance or alcohol abuse What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? A small number of patients have had severe depression, strange thoughts. or angry behavior. Some palients have had thoughts of su1c1de and a few patients have actually committed suicide. These problems tend to occur more often in patients with a history of mental illness. You should contact your doctor immediately 1f you think you are having these symptoms, so your doctor can decide whether you should continue to take SUSTIVA. Many patients have dizziness. trouble sleeping. drowsiness, trouble concentrating, and/or unusual dreams a few hours after starting treatment with SUSTIVA. These feelings may be less noticeable 1f you take SUSTIVA at bedtime. They also tend to go away after you've taken the medicine for a few weeks. If you have these side effects. such as diwness, 11 does not mean that you will also JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE have severe depression, strange thoughts or angry behavior. Tell your doctor promptly 1f any of these side ef1ects contirue or if they bother you. There 1s the poss1b1 1ty that these symptoms may be more severe 1f SUSTIVA is used with alcohol or mood altering (street) drugs You should avoid dnvmg or operating machmery 1! you are having these side effects. One o~ the most common side effects 1s rash These rashes us~ally go away without any change Jn treatment. Ir. a smal. number of patients, rash may be serious. Jl you develop a •ash, call your doctor promptly. Other common side effects mclude tiredness, upset stomach, vomiting, and d·3rrhea. However this 1s not a complete l:s! of side effects reported with SUST'VA when taken with other ant HIV d·ugs. Do not rely on this leaflet alone for mfornat1on about side ef'ects. You· doctor can discuss a more complete 1:st of side effects with you. Please contact your doctor 1mmed1ately before stoppmg SUSTIVA because of side effects. Tell your doctor or other healthcare provider if you notice any side effects while takmg SUSTIVA. What about birth control, pregnancy, or breast-feedin11? Women should not become pregnant while taking SUSTIVA. Birth defects have been seen in an1mals treated with SUSTIVA. It is not known whether this could happen 1n humans. You should use a condom or diaphragm in addition to other methods of birth control while taking SUSTIVA. Inform your doctor immediately 1f you are pregnant. If you want to become pregnant. talk to your doctor. Do not take SUSTIVA if you are breast-feeding. Talk to your doctor 11 you are breast-feeding your baby Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA may change the effect of other medicines (mcluding ones for HIV). Your doctor may change your medicmes or change their doses. for this reason, 11 1s very important to: • Let all your doctors and pharmacists know that you take SUSTIVA. • Tell your doctors and pharmacists about all med1cmes you take. This includes those you buy over the-counter and herbal or natural remedies. Brmg all your medicines when you see a doctor, or make a list of their names, how much you take, and how often yoi; take them. This will give your doctor a complete picture of the medicmes you use. Ther he or she can decide the best approach for your situation The followmg medicines may cause senous and hfe-threatemng side effects when taken with SUSTIVA. You should not take any of these medicines while taking SUSTIVA**, • H1smanal9 (astem1zole) • Propuls1d {c1sapnde) •Versed• (midazolam) • Halc1on• (lriazolam) • Ergot medications (for example, Wigraine• and Cafergot9) The following medicines may need to be changed or have their dose changed when taken with SUSTIVA••. • C11x1van• {indinav1r) • Fortovase9 {saquinav1r) • B1axm• (clanthromycin) How should I keep SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA is available as 50 mg, JOO mg, and 200 mg capsules. Keep SUSTIVA at room temperature (77 FJ in the bottle given to you by your pharmacist. The temperature can range from 59'-86 F. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. How can I learn more about SUSTIVA? Talk to your doctor or other healthcare provider if you have questions about either SUSTIVA or HIV. For additional informalion you can v1s1t the SUSTIVA website at httpJ/www.susliva.com. This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use it for any other condition or eive it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. If you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emer11ency room Immediately. • SUSTIVA'" 1s a trademark of DuPont Pharmaceulicals Company •• The brands listed are the registered trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of DuPont Pharmaceuticals Company. D1stnbuted by, DuPont Pharma Wilmington, DE 19880 6495-03/Rev. February, 2000 HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 INSIDE National news •• .. ..••••••.•.•. ... . 6 Texas news . . .... ... .••. •... ...... .7 Quote/unquote .....• ..• . •. . ...... . 18 Health news •••••••••••••••••••••• 37 PRIDE NEWS Gay church groups .......... ... •...• 8 Meet the Pride Grand Marshals •. .•. .• . 21 Krewe of Olympus burtds float ......... 25 Pride Festival returns ...... . •. ..•... 25 Pride Fun Run cancelled .........•... 30 Parade route mop •.•............... 33 How is Pride funded? ............... 33 VOICES & ECHOES Cnin: Picking gay rights botdes ....•.• .12 Aremdiieldt. felilg Pride ii Alson's wake ... 13 'Ethan Green' .................... .13 OUT ON THE BAYOU Bayou Calendar •...•..•.••.•...... 31 On Stage: 'Oedipus Rex' and 'Night & Doy' •• . 35 Eating Out al King Biscuit .•..•.•..... 39 Community Calendar • . . . • • • . . . .42-43 Occasions •.••••••..•.....•.....• .4 6 My Stars! .....•.•..............• .47 CLASSIFIEDS .......••...•... ...... .44-45 Issue 1078 All mater al In HO\.ston Voice is protected by federal copyright law and rray rol be repro­duced without lh8 wrltter consent of Houstor Voice The sexual oroe,,lalion ol advertlset'l, photographers. wr·ters end cartoonists pub­lshed 1181e.n Is neither nferred or ll!l'liod. The oppGaronce of ,...ames or p1C1011al representa· lion does not necessarily ll'dicate the sexual orrentatlon o! thal person or pel"SOI'$, Houslon Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take respons1bH1ty lor Its return The editor reserves lhe right to accept. reject or edtt any submission. All rights revert lo aulhors upon publlcatlon. Guidelines for freelance conlllbutors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX n006 713-529-8490 NEWS 5 The man behind Pride When Jack Valins~ volunteer executive director of the Pride Committee of Houston, moved here in the early '80s, he expected to move on a few years later. It's been 20 years and Va&nski has taken root in the city and its gay pride celebration that he works to plan aD year lang. Jack Valinski never expected to become a longtime Houstonian, nor the director of the city's Pride Committee by ELLA TYLER Jack Valinski, volunteer executive director of the Pride Committee of Houston, came to Houston m 1981 on "the same day Kathy Whitmire was elect­ed mayor." At the time, Valinski says, he had no idea how significant Whitmire's elechon was. "I came to work for the ABC radio affiliate here, which was then 97 Rock, and planned to spend only a few years here before going to work in New York or L.A. I wasn't out. "Houston grew on me,'' Valinski, a native of Pennsylvania, admits. "I had lived in Syracuse, Hilton Head and New Orleans, and never expected to spend 20 years here." Valinski says one of his favorite aspects of Houston life is that you can wear shorts anywhere (and he does), and the influence of "rednecks." "They are 'good old boys,' and so it's not pretentious here, like Dallas," he said. It was radio, but not his station, that led Valinski to activism. '"When I began to settle in, I started to listen to Ray Hill's show, Wilde 'n Stein on KPFr. He always sounded 'off mike' since the equipment wasn't the best so I volunteered to 'run the (audio] board,"' he said. "Larry Bagneris, president of the Political Caucus, was a frequent guest on Ray's show, so I got involved with the caucus and the parade." Valinski also inherited the WUde 'n > Continued on Page 11 Local gay group 'embrace diversity' all year From car enthusiast to grandmas, there's a support network for everyone in the community by KAY Y. DAYUS Houston's large gay and lesbian com­munity not only celebrates pride and diversity during the month of June, but all year round with its many and varied groups withm a group. For instance, there's LOAF, HOG, TATS, CATS, the Classic Chassis Car Club, BiNet Houston, Asians and Friends, Mizpachat Alizim and even the Lone Star Nudist > Continued on Page 11 Lesbians Over Age Fifty (below), marched in last year's Pride parade chanting, 'Two, four, six, eight, haw da yo1 bow your grandma's straight?' The Classic Chassis Car Club (left) offers gay shade tree medtaniu fel­lows hip and the chance to shaw aff their wheels. These are just two of tlit many special interest ..t support groups witlllil Houston's gay co-.ity. 6 NEWS JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE around the nation Dramatic jump seen in LA same-sex couples reported in Census figures NEW ORLEANS-Census figures released Wednesday showed the number of same­sex partners rose by more than 650 percent m Louisiana-from 1,333 to about 8,800- smce 1990. "There's been a pretty dramatic increase m acceptance in society in the last 10 years and a lot of people who were closeted prior to that are more open about their lifestyle now," said Elayne Angel, a lesbian who owns a body art and piercing business m the French Quarter. Nationally, unmarried partner homes, regardless of sexual onen­tation, increased 72 percent from 3.2 million m 1990 to 5 5 m1lhon in 2000 Fewer than 5 percent of the country's unmarried partner househo.ds consisted of samc-sex couples m 1990 Comparable numbers for 2000 wil. not be known until all state figures ar( released Other rewly released Census fi&ures showed that. ebraska's population includes 1.l12 ga)' mak couple households and 1,220 lesbian household, Direct comparable figure~ frorr 19'10 were unavailable, smce the option to md1cate same-sex households was only a sa'Tlp .:in some forms that year NY judge says he marries convicts so they avoid 'deviant sex' behind bars ALBANY -An upstate New York judge allows county convicts to marry to keep them from "grtting trapped in deviant sexual behavior" behind bars, the New fork Post reported. Last week. shortly after Robert S. Gorghan, 51, was sentenced by another judge to 12 to 25 vears m state pnson for raping a 21-year-old woman, he married his vtctim's mother m the d1arnbers of State Supreme Court Justice James Canfield. The 1udge said he weds "scores" of convicts each year to help them avoid gay experiences. "So we should tum [inmates) into homosexuals? The courts ruled that to be cruel and unusual punishment, no offense to the homosexuals. Rnther than getting trapped in deviant sexual behavtor, I'd rather they have heterosexual, conjugal opportunities," said Canfield, 60, a Democrat who's been a judge since 1992. He said he does it in part because no other 1udge in his county will perform such ceremonies. Senate okays two amendments about Boy Scouts for education measure WASHINGTON- Two amendments to the Senate's version of this year's education bill could affect how the Boy Scouts of America and other groups gain acre;s to school facilities. Last week, the Senate approved a provL~on sponsored by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C) that would withhold fed­eral education funds from public schools that deny equal access to meeting space for the Scouts or other youth groups that "prohibit the acceptance of homosexuality." The second amendment, offered by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), said that no organ­ization can be banned from using school facilities because of its belief:. on sexual orientation. It passed by a vote of 52-48. The bill still must go to conier­encc cornrruttce. President Bush has said he does not favor the Helms' amendment. A bil supporting the Boy Scouts from Sen. Jesse Hebns (R-N.(.) was passed by the Senate last week. U.S. Agriculture Department advertises for specialist on gay issues WASHL'\GTO:-\-The Agnculturc Dl.'Partrnent is advertising for a "gay and lcsbia.n pro­gram specialist" who would help improve working conditions for the agency's gay employees, according to the N~w York Times. Gay civil rights advocates s.lld Tuesday that they believed it was the first ttme an administration had sought to hue someone to handle gay and lesbian L%ue:. m the federal workplace. "It's a big deal. It tah'S an enormous amount of time to affoct !hi:. kmd of change within an administration," said E. Julian Potter, who was President Bill Clinton's gay ha1- son. Mimicking employee relations programs now common in corporate America, the sproal­ist's duties will include dealing with barriers to recruitment, hiring and career advancement. The job posted Tuesday on the Office of Personnel Management's Web site (www.usajobs.opm.gov) evoh·ed from a senes of employee advisory councils created last year by the secretary of agri­culture, Dan Glickman, and inherited by his successor in the Bush adrninistratmn, Ann M. Veneman. CA·er the years, federal agencies have created special positions to handle issues con ccming employees who are Hispanic or woml'n, for instance, but the Agriculture Department job appears to be the first comparable position for gay workers. Federal appeals court upholds sweeping San Fran domestic partner law SAN FRA.:\ClSCO-Reiccting arguments by an Oluo company, the 9th U.S. Court of Appeals said that the city's domestic partner ordinance passed in 1997 does not interfere with interstate commerce or exceed the city's authority to regulate, the San Francisco Chronicle report­ed. The ordinance requires companies doing business with the city to provide the unmarried partners of employees with the same benefits they offer married spouses. The challenge was made by S.D. Myers, Inc., an Ohio company that has performed maintenance on the city's elec­tric transformers, and was funded by the American Center for Law & Justice, a legal advocacy agency controlled by Rev. Pat Robertson. Similar laws have been passed by Seattle and Los Angrles, and laws in Berkeley and San Mateo For more news, visit County go into effect in Jul)' A challenge to the law www.houstonvoice.com by the Air Transport Association is still pending. -From staff and wire reports JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE NEWS around texas El Paso PD says initiative to arrest drunks won't target gay bars EL PASO (AP)-Police will be cruising bars over the next five weeks with plans to arrest anyone who has been drinking and appears violent or too drunk to drive. "These estab­lishments are producing intoxicated persons, which not only leads to DWI, but assaults that lead to murder," said El Paso Police Chief Carlos Leon. If the program is successful, it will be extended, Leon said. "There is, on the face of it, no civil liberties violation here," said Melvin P. Straus, chairman of the local American Civil Liberties Union. "This assumes the police do this impartially." Straus said the police must visit bars randomly and not focus on a particular group, such as gay bars, bars frequented by a particular race or blue-collar bars. "We don't want anybody to panic and think we are raiding places," El Paso County Sheriff Leo Samaniego said. "Officers will be looking for intoxicated individuals and other things that may be going on in the establishment such as prostitution, drug sales." Floods destroys AIDS research at Houston Medical Center HOUSTON (AP}-The loss of thousands of lab animals has wiped out millions of dollars worth of federally funded research into a broad spectrum of ailments, including cancer and AIDS. Nearly 80 monkeys and 35 dogs drowned when flooding from Tropical Storm Allison buried basement labs at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. The school's veterinarians, researchers and staff mem­bers said they tried to reach the animals as the pour­ing rain began June 8, but Allison flared up too quickly. The medical school has raised its estimate of research animals lost from 2,500 to 4,700. The other area school with major losses, Baylor College of Medicine, says it lost 30,000 animals in the flood­ing, including rabbits and dogs, but its primates were above ground, a spokeswoman said. Nearly all animals lost at both facilities were mice and other rodents. However, 78 monkeys, 18 adult dogs, 17 puppies and several hundred rabbits were among the dead in the basement of the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, which housed the health science center's main animal care facility. Tropical Storm Allison created severe flooding in several areas of Houston. Among the hardest hit was the Med"Kal Center where thousands of lab animals drowned and millions of dollars of research was destroyed by floodwaters. San Antonio Sheriff, councilman help celebrate Pridefest 2001 SAN ANTONIO-More than 1,000 attended San Antonio's PrideFest 2001 June 16, which honored Sheriff Ralph Lopez and City Councilman Bobby Perez. Lopez served as grand marshal of the parade in appreciation of his public support of Lt. Brian Lunan, a Bexar County deputy who is transitioning from man to woman, the San Antonio Expn'SS­News reported. Lopez is the highest-profile politician to serve as the parade's grand mar­shal. "We pride ourselves on being a sensitive community," Lopez said before the parade started. "We pride ourselves on our diversity." Lopez, dressed in street clothes, rode in the front of a black convertible Corvette, while Christie Lee Littleton Van de Putte sat in the back. Littleton Van de Putte has been at the forefront of battles to secure the right of trans­sexuals to change their legal gender in Texas. Organizers also honored Perez for his contri­butions. Despite criticism from a conservative Christian radio host and others, Perez recently allocated $1,000 from his City Council discretionary fund to pay for the mobile stage used during the PrideFest 2001 picnic. "! think we're all fortunate to live in a com­munity that celebrates multiculturalism," Perez said. "But sometimes that multiculturalism doesn't cross the line where it needs to." The parade ended on a serious note with a can­dlelight vigil to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the AIDS epidemic. Dallas pastors divided after national Presbyterian vote on gay dergy DALLAS-On Sunday, June 17, Presbyterians came to their churches to pray and to hear what their pastors would say about the possibility of noncelibate gays and lesbians serving as clergy, the Dallas Morning News reported. What they heard widely reflected the larger divide in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) nationwide. "We have the oppor­tunity to be Christians at our best," said Dr. Blair Monie, pastor of Preston Hollow Presbyterian Church. "There is a way to disagree in a way that is respectful to the peo­ple with whom you disagree." Highland Park Presbyterian Church, one of the largest in the denomination, heard a different message. "This is a sad day in the life of the Presbyterian Church," the Rev. Ronald Scates, the church's pastor, said on Sunday. "This is very disconcerting." The General Assembly, the denomination's governing body, voted June 15 in Louisville, Ky., to open the possibility of noncelibate gays and lesbians serving as pastors, deacons and elders. The decision won't become church policy unless it is ratified by a majority of the denomination's 173 presbyteries, or regional districts. The voting isn't expected to be completed before next spring. If approved, the 2.5 mil­lion- member denomination would become the largest Christian denomination to welcome non­celibate gay clergy. Form.ore news,,visit www.houstonvo1ce.com -From staff and wire reports When you have issues to deal with, being gay shouldn't be one of them. If you're struggling with addiction o depression, you need a treatment center where you can be yourself.... Where you can talk frankly and safely to people who understand you. We're Pride Institute, the nation's leader in providing treatment for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities. We have programs offering residential, outpatient and halfway house services. You have the power. Call us today. TPRIDE INS'l'IliUil'E 800-54-PRIDE Medicare and most insurance plans cover our programs www.prlde-lnstltute.com Imagine WORKSHOPS Now AVAILABLE! 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September 29/30 713-527-0000 ........ lltnUIM&TlurapisLC'Ol9 7 8 LOCAL NEWS JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE More local churches off er gay-friendly services, groups Goal of many gay Gay-friendly dturches religious groups is to make themselves obsolete by ROBERT B. HENDERSON Even though the religious community is often the source of benign, if not open, hos­tility to them, gay men and lesbians are often deeply religious. And fortunately, there are churches and other organizations of religious people who welcome members without regard to their sexual expression Among those is the Association of Metropolitan Community Churches. The stat­ed goal of MCC is to go out of busines.s when there is no longer a need for them, when the vanety of denominations affirm full acceptance and full participation of gay men and lesbians. There are two MCC congregations in Houston. Resurrection MCC is located at 2025 West 11th St. at T C Jester. They have Sunday worship at 9 a.m and 11 a.m. They also have a large and vaned program to meet the life needs of gays and lesbians. Their telephone number is 713-861-9149. The Maranatha Fellowship MCC IS a more Pentecostal-focused congregation It is located at 1311 Holman. The telephone number IS 713-528-6746. In addition to these churches all of the Urutartan Universalists congregations of the Houston Network encourage full acceptance and participation of gay men and lesbians. It First Unitarian Universar.st Church is one of many local gay-friendly churches that regularly participate In the Houston Gay Pride Parade. 1s a part of the denominational order, though there are some congregations who find it more difficult to aa:ept, according to Rev. Bill Oark. pastor of the Henry David Thoreau congregation m Stafford. Clark 1s gay and a testimony to the openness of the denomination. He said since the dcnommation IS accepting there 1s no need for an advocacy group. Among the gay-friendly Unitarian Uruversalists congregations in the Houston area are First Urutarian Universalists down­town, Thoreau in Stafford, Emerson on Bermg St, Galveston Fellowship, Wirt Road Fellowship, Northwest, Northwoods m the Woodlands and Bay Area. The Houston Chapter of Lutherans Concerned is currently macti\'e, according to Madeline Manning, who had been an active member. She described the current situallon as "awaiting interest." Integrity /Houston is an official ministry of the Episcopal Church, according to Rob Rynerson, a spokesperson. They meet at Autry LOOKING FOR POSITIVE VOICES! • Ryan White Planning Council is looking for volunteers to serve on the council. • The primary responsibility of the Council is to determine what HIV/ AIDS services are most needed. • This year, the council will receive over $17 million from the federal government for HIV/ AIDS services in the greater Houston area. • Your participation DOES make a difference! Contact Georgette Monaghan at 713.572.3724 or email through our website: www.rwpc.org House, adjacent to Palmer Memonal Episcopal Church on S. Main just north of the Texas Medical Center The group meets the second Monday of each month at 7 p.m. begin­ning with a celebration of the Holy Eucharist. "Smee 1986, Integrity has greatly influ­enced what the Episcopal Church has done with regard to gays and lesbians. We have raised a large lobbymg process going on in our general convention every three years," Rynerson said Dignity/Houston is a Roman Catholic organization of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Catholics, their family and fnends Dignity/Houston has their own center at B07 Yale, Suite H in the Heights. The telephone number 1s 713-880-2872. Dignity has a celebration of the Mass at 7;30 p.m. every Saturday evening \\1th the exception of the Pride Parade weekend. Their attendance varies from 25 to 40 each Saturday evening. The group wil. be parh::­ipatc in the Pride Parade tomorrow evening so the Mass will be celebrated Sunday, June 24 at 4 p.m. and followed by an ice cream social. They have a rotating roster of pnests for Mass and pastoral care. "The pnest are basically self-selected. They come lo us because they want to min­ister to our commuruty. We are 100 percent assured the priests who come to us to offer their sen•1ce5 are sympathetic to us and anyope who would come to our organiza­tion. Our organization is based on the belief 'It's okay to be gay, to be lesbian, to be Catholic and active sexually as well,"' Joe Quinn, Dignity/Houston president. While there are many religious congregations that arc undoubtedly a 5afe haven for gay men and les­bians, the following is a listing of those who are committed enough to have an entry in the 2001 Houston Gay and Lesbian Yellow Pages: Bermg Memonal United Methodist Church, 1440 Harold St, 713-526-1017; Buddhist Temple, 1544 Westheimer, 713-289-0058; Central Congregational Church, 1311 Holman, 713-529-3589; Community Gospel Church, 4305 Lilian St., 713-880-9235; Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh Dr., 713-528-3269; I louston Mission Church, 1505 Nevada, 713-529-8225; Saint Stephen's Epi~copal Church, 1805 W Alabama, 713-528-6665 Zion Lutheran Church, 3606 neauchamp. 713-869-1493. Come celebrate your pride during our Grand Opening Weekend Doors open Thursday 8 pm and the action continues until Monday morning. For information or driving directions visit us on the web at www.meatrack.org H• 0 •U • S • T• 0 • N 2915 San Jacinto • 713 528-2028 N'o T_~wels • No Tokens • No· Attitud<' HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 9 "Most deli owners go home at 8 p.m. Mere mortals!'' KATZ'S NEVER KLOSES 10 NEWS JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Equal Rights Rally will be held before Pride Parade > Continued from Page 1 1985 referendum and usurped City Council's authority. In 1998, District Judge Patrick Mizell stopped Brown's order until the case could be decided and said that Hotze had no nght to sue, removing !um from the l.1wsuit. In 1999, the 14th Court of Appeals affirmed the d1Strict 1udge's rulmgs Brown said despite the uutia.I defeats m the lower courts, he was confident the order would be upheld "llus was more than iust a legal issue," Brown said. "It was my duty to put forth an order that addressed fairness in our city. It was the nght thing to do " The court ruled 7-1 to dismiss the case. Justice Craig Enoch dissented in part, argu­ing that as a voter, Hotze should have been allowed to challenge the mayoral order. Todd's office s.i1d the councilman ded.ned comment until he had a chance to read the ruhng. Annise Parker tory for fairness and common sense." She said having a non-discnminahon policy m place "15 the necessary first step" toward eventually offering domestic part­ner benefits to city employees. An Equal Rights Rally has been planned to precede the Pride Parade with the original intent of drawing support for an anticipated non-discrimination ordm.ince that would effectively enforce and replace Brown's exec­utive order. Organizers say they still plan to hold the rally to celebrate the court ruling and to gather support for other gay rights, such as domestic partner benefil'i. "It's still important to get elected officials and candidates on the record as being sup­portive of equal nghts," Parker, one of the planned speakers for the rally, said. "Politicians are not put on record enough," Parker said. "In the past, our community hils been hilppy when they just showed up. ''In the early days, the parades were a political event that evolved into a celebra­tion," Parker said. "It was an integral part of Pride in the past. We're celebrating a violent political act in the Stonewall Riots. It's important to look back and celebrate the fact that we don't have to do that anvmore" The city will close down Wcstheimer an hour earlier than usual for the rally to pre­cede the parade The rally will take place at 6:30 p.m at the intersection of Montrose and Westheimer. Slated to speak at the event arc Brown, Parker, Councilman and mayoral candidate Chris Bell U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Houston and State Rep. Debra Danburg, D-Houston. All speakers were required to sign a statement of support of equal rights for gay men and lesbians, said rally organizer, Grant Martin. "We're trying to get people fired up; get people on record m support of what we do," Martin said. The ruling notes that Todd's injury as a City Counol member due to Brown's alleged encroachment of the Council's power "u vague and generalized, not per­sonal and particulanzed. "All this lawsuit has succeeded m doing is to waste the city's time and money," Brown said "I am now going to take the next step in making this a permanent part of city policy" A new draft of Brown's executive order has been prepared and is expected to be pre­sented to City Council as early as next week, Brown said Non-discrimination policies ''Todd does not and cannot challenge the ant1-d1Scrimination policy's actual opera­tion because it does not apply to him," the ruling continues. "Nor does he sue as a rep­resentative of constituents who face actual or threatened injury because of the policy." Hotze and Todd claim the suit revolved around what they believed to be an illegal order by the mayor and had nothing to do with gay rights. If passed, the ordinance would proh1b1t discnminallon based on race, color, national origin, religion, age, marital status, gender, disability, military service, sexual orienta­tion and gender identity. Openly gay Houston City Council­woman Annise Parker said the timing of the high court ruling, issued two days before Houston's Gay Pride Parade, was "serendipitous" and called the ruling "a vie- More than 1,SOO employers in the nation have non-discrimination policies th.it protect gay men and lesbians. Among them are· • 21 state, including Montana, Nevada and New Mexico • 241 counties and cities, including Fort Worth and Austin • 258 Fortune 500 companies • 325 colleges and universities, including UT, UH and Rice Houston-based firms with non-dis-crimination policies include: • Baker & Botts • Compaq • Conoco • Continental Airlines • Shell Oil • Vinson & Elkins -Source: Human Riglzts Campaign AIDS groups not surprised by statistics > Contin ued from Page 1 the confidence interval was between 2 9 umn that both the COC and AIDS orgaruzations Policy & Training Institute, said he b trou-findings represent an update on a CDC percent and 6.7 percent; for the 2.5 percent have a \'ested interest in a possible exaggeration bled that until recently, \'irtually all AIDS study released in February, which was part incidence among whites, the Cl was 1.4 of the seventy of the HIV infection rate activists demanded. the early release of of an ongoing CDC research pro1ect in six percent to 4.6 percent; for the 3.5 percent "Could it be, with the 20th anniversary research data, especially when it pertained U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000: modence among Latinos, the Cl was 1.4 of AIDS upon us, the CDC wanted to use to the development of new AIDS drugs, as Baltimore, Dallas, Los Angeles. M1am1, percent to 8.6 percent; and for the 14.7 per- the occasion to make headlines'" he wrote. soon as such data became known. New York and Seattle. cent inadence among African Americans, "And could it be that the vast array of AIDS OX: saentist Lmda Valleroy and her team the Cl was 7.9 percent to 27.1 percent. organizations that need the specter of a of researchers used a newly developed labora- Sullivan and Roehr seized on the wide resurgent epidemic to keep the dollars tory test on blood samples taken from partici- range between the lower and higher figure in flowing were only too glad to fuel the fire?" pants in the Young Men's Study that distin- the sample of African Americans, saying this Officials with organizations mdudmg guishes between two types of HIV antibodies. unusually large spread indicates the CDC Washington's Whitman-Walker Oinic, the According to the CDC report, of the 2,942 data were msufficient. The two noted that San Francisco AIDS Foundation, the young MSMs m the study's overall sample, CDC did not disclose how many African l\.ihonal Minority AIDS Counal and the 373, or 13 percent, were HN-positive Of the Americans were in the 38 partiapants on national lobbying coal1tion AIDS Action 373 found to be HIV-positive, 290 were test- whom much of these calculations are based called such an assertion nd1culous. ed for an antibody indicating early infection. CDC.· Release not ~olitical' Reprcsentath·es of these groups, includ- Of that group, only 38 were found to have ing Whitman-Walker Executive Director the "early infection" antibody. Ronald Vald.sem, deputy irector of the Cornelius Baker, said the CDC report con- The report states that it was from this CDC's National Center for HIV, STD, & firITIS what they have observed firsthand sample of 38 people that the CDC calculat- Tuberculosis Prevention, took strong exccp- for years-that young gay men, especially ed a breakdown of the "incidence" of new t1on to claims that the report's release was young Afncan-American gay men, have infections among raoal and ethnic groups. linked in any way to politics or funding. been testing posih\'e for I llV at rates much It goes on to state that, usmg standard Valdiscrn pointed out that the 38 people higher than other population groups. statistical methods, CDC researchers who tested positive for new HIV infections ''We don't need all the data in the world assigned a "confidence interval," or range were part of an overall sample of nearly 3,000. to tell us there's a problem ~ere," s~id of numbers above and below these figures, He said the preliminary findings are support- Baker "It should be to no ones surprise which they are95 percent certain represents ed by other studies, including one conducted that [it's] black young men who are affect-the true percentage of HN incidence for by officials in San Francisco, that show MS~ ed so heavily by this epidemic." each of the three racial/ ethnic groups. are engaging m unprotected anal intercourse Ph II Wilson, founder of the Los For the overall incidence of 4.4 percent, But Sullivan argued in his NroJ R.epub/zc col- Angeles-based Afncan-American AIDS \ Gay commentator Andrew sumvan chCl'ged that the CDC's recent release of a new HIV study may have been timed lo help drum up func5ng. HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 NEWS 11 Valinski cast deciding vote to make parade a nighttime event ;i;.. Continued from Page 5 Stein show. "I had b"een running the board, which was all I wanted to do, but one day Ray said 'I have other things to do. You do the show."' Valinski did that show until the end of 1993, when KPFT canceled it. However, following protests by gay lis­teners, the show, now called Lesbian and Gay Voices, was reinstated early in 1994. Valinski does Lesbian and Gay Voices as a volunteer. He no longer works pro­fessionally in radio, and is now working with computers for a friend's answering service. Valinski describes his relationship with Pride Week and the Pride Parade as "sometimes in and sometimes out­friendly opposition" for several years. "I would volunteer and help with media but nothing more, until one year in the early '90s, when Fehx Gama, who was a co-chair, announced that he was It finally come down to one vote, and I voted in favor of the nighttime parade, but I was worried. -Jack Valinski, Pride Committee of Houston volunteer executive director sick and would have to resign. It was already late spring, so I said I would be co-chair with Carol Clark." The pair co-managed the pride com­mittee for years, but Clark retired two years ago. "She still helps, but said we have become to 'techie,' with computers and all, for her,'' Valinsk1 s.:iid Smee Valinsk1 began working with the Pnde Committee, there have been many changes. According to Valinsk1, It became an independent nonprofit group, separate from the now-defunct Mo~ros~ Activity Center and expanded to a year-round operation. The Pride Week expanded to a month-long celebration and the parade has become a nighttime event. "The parade was dying," Val nski s:l'd "People were sick a'ld it became harder and harder to get a crowd out m the heat Wr were talking about mov•ng 1t to a11other mont1', but Lee Harrini;to~ kept saving we should make 1t mg!-itt me parade." The first mg!-it parade wa5 m 1997. "It fmally come down to one vote, .ind I voted in favor of the nighttime parade, but I was wo"rried," Valinski said. "We didn't even know if the city would let us do it like this, and there were securi­ty issues, but it has been wonderful.n When asked what his other hobbies are, Valinski laughs. "I'd like to go to a few more movies, but I really have a passion for this work. It doesn't all happen because of me. The Pnde Committee is lucky to have a group of volunteers who have such expert­ise and pa.'sion for this work." Valinski is excited about the parade "It's so wonderful to see the mix of com­munity and corporate groups. And after all these years, it's worth it when I hear the young people talk about hearmg about the parade and then coming." Valinsk11s predicting good weather for the parade, "We've always been very lucky with the'' eather" but isn't quite as opttmisttc about the mosquitoes. "Bring ln$CCt repellent/ he said. Asians and Friends. Houston to host international gathering this Fa~l > Continued from Page 5 Club, to name just a few. In fact there's something for everybody-well, just about. LOAF, the apt acronym for Lesbians Over Age Fifty, is a support group, but they aren't all loafing. Take Emma Lou (Scottie) Scott who has been in LOAF since 1989. She has 24 medals to her name from competing in the National Senior Games in bad­minton, discus and shot. Scott said Arden Eversmeyer and others started LOAF about 14 years ago to find others in their "friendship group." Eversmeyer is still an active member LOAF holds regular club meetings every month and has a monthly social event. "We meet without fail; whether there are three of four or 20 members," said Scott. There are no membership fees, just donations. "We have garage sales and other fund-raisers to raise money for postage for the newsletter,'' said Scott. BINET HOUSTON is a support and educational group for male and female bisexuals that meets every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Gigi Wilbur formed the group in 1990 and says membership is about half male and half female of all ages. Is there such thing as a true bisexual? "Absolutely," said Wilbur. "But most have a preference for one sex. Others just fall in love with a person no ma tter what their plumbing is,'' he added with a chuckle. Wilbur believes that safe sex education is important for bisexuals and he holds workshops on the subject. "Safe sex education is one of the real needs in the bisexual community where they have·sex with both genders.'' ASIANS AND FRIENDS HOUSTON is a group that has, in the past, been reclu­sive and elusive. But since Noel Boado became president, he has been reaching out into the community to publicize the group and bring them more into the open. "We've really been promoting our­selves for ov<>r a year and this year the International Friendship Weekend is goil'lg to be held in Houston Aug. 31 through Sept. 3," said Boado. The IFW is an annual international gath­ering of Asians and their friends who share a weekend of friendship and fun. "We expect over 200 participants," said Boado. MIZPACHAT ALIZIM, is an organiza­tion that provides a forum for gay and les­bian Jews, their families and friends to help understand Jewish heritage and roots. The group has social and education­al activities, carries out charitable works and provides a place for Jewish worship. THE CLASSIC CHASSIS CAR CLUB of I louston caters to those who love old cars or just love car and you don't even have to have a car, said president Joe Wilson. The Car Club is one of four in Texas­the others are in Austin, Dallas, and San Antonio-with a combined membership of around 300. Houston boasts the larg<>st group with 110. Most are gay men, but there are lesbians in the group and they would like more. "The club was traditionally male, but we have eight female members this year. It's been a male dominated hobby for so long in the gay community~" said Wilson. The Car Club meets monthly for din­ner and has a yearly Texas statt.' meet, which is in 1 louston next year. "It's a big deal. A national im'itational with lots of gays and lesbians from all over the world," Wilson said. THE HOUSTON OUTDOOR GROUP, or HOG as they are affectionate­ly called, is a group with a love of the out­doors, said president Jon Gray. ''We do lo ts of camping and canoeing and we have pot luck dinners every month at a member's house. We also meet monthly for breakfast." He said. Ml'mbers arc lesbian and gay male, but they'd hke more women. ''Thl'y are,, lot more fun on C.lmpouts and they cook bet­ter," said Wilson. CATS m the Gakcston arl'J and TATS m Houston arc both support groups for transgl'ndcrs in all stages .of transition from male to female and vice-versa. A group definitely not for all is the LONE STAR NUDIST GROUP, which is, sorry ladies, for gay men only. Lone Star 1s a diverse group of Houston area gay men who "enjoy shar­ing nude expcnence,n according to their hterature. Thev meet everv other month for totally nude socials a~d every other month for card and board games and prospective member night. LOAF 713.869.1482 Asians and Friends 713-626-6300 www.AsiansAndFriendsHouston.co m BiNet Houston 713-467-4380 www.flash.net/-bihouse. Mizpachat Alizim 713.748.7070. Classic Chassis Car Club 713.797 .8615 www.ClassicChassisCarClub.org Houston Outdoor Group 713.290.0220 CATS 409.741.2501 TATS 713.780.4282. lone Star Nudist Grpup 713.866.8847 12 l~iji~WI STAFF Executive Editor Chris Crain Editor Wen<fy K Mohon ed torOhoustonvoice.com Production Senior Gn1phic Designer-Natasha Marquez Graphic DHigner-Deborah Duplant Contributon Roch Arenschieldt, laura Brown. Kay Y Dayus, Trayce Disk•!\ Earl D1ttmal\ Enk Erickson, Mike Fleming. D.l. Groover, Robert 8. Henderso!\ Kathreen lee, D.L Murphy. Erin O'Briant, Gip Pla•ter, Ella Tyler, Penny Weaver Photogr.,phen Dalton OeHart, Kimberly Thompson Advertising s .. les Tom Robbins trobbinsOhoustonvoict com Wanda Faulkner wfau kner houstonvoice .com Administration • s .. tes Support carotyn A. Roberu aoberuOhoustonvolce.com National Advertising Representative • Rivendell Marketing Company, I"' 212-242-6863 Publisher- Window Media LLC Preside n t- William Waybourn Edit ori.,I Director- Chris Crain Fin-.ncial Director- Kelty Smink Sales Directpr- Peter Jackson Alt DirectOf'- Rob Boeger M.,rlceting DirectOf'- Eric May rn ......... :?...,.,., Gul1d MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 Loven Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (71)) S2~531 Contenu copyright 2000 Offoce houn: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekd"Y' To submit a letter Leners should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request. but you must indude your name and phone number for venf1Cation. Please S9nd mac! to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Bllld. Suite 200, HMtOI\ T'1<as 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editorOhoustonvoico.com. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. VOICES & ECHOES JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE EDITORIAL Picking gay rights battles more wisely by CHRIS CRAIN Within the movement for gay avil nghts, especially as 1t has become more orgaruzed and monied in recent years, zealous advocacy and calm-headed pragmalism have regularly conflicted and often competed for the hearts and m.mds of our actiVist orgaruzatmns. In any given skirmish in the ongoing Culture Wars, gay rights groups might jump in heart-first, consequences be damned, or opt for a more conservative strategy that bows to some political reality, even as it enrages the ideological purists among us. Getting that mix of zeal and pragmatism exactly right is probably an impossible task. and IS always subject to second-guessing and line-drawing. But the men and women who are running gay civil rights organizations make decisions of this sort every day, sometimes pro­foundly affecting our movement, and our lives. Too many of these judgment calls hap· pen below our radar, escaping any real scrutiny, and that's especially the case with gay rights battles fought in the courtroom. With the shining example of the black civil rights movement, the temptahon is to take to the courthouse to right every anh­gay wrong. But we live in a democratic system, where courts ought to be reserved for only the most important battles, where the political system has failed us. Usually, the capable gay rights attorneys fighting on our behalf make the right calls, picking our battles wisely. But not always, and not in the case of Milagros Irizarry, an employee in the Chicago pubhc schools. She sued the city board of education, chal­lenging the constitutionality of a domestic partner benefit plan enacted in 1999 that extended health insurance to same-sex cou· pies only. 1riz.arry and her male partner had lived together for more than 20 years and raised two children together; and they argued that the DP program unfairly excluded them. Most plaintiffs who challenge the legali· ty of DP benefits find themselves up against the talented crew of litigators at the Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund. But in this case, Lambda Legal and Milagros Irizarry made for strange bedfellows. Lambda Legal argued to the federal appeals court hearing Irizarry's case that the Chicago Board of Education could not extend DP benefits to gay couples unless unmarried straight couples received the same treatment. The DP program for gays, Lambda argued, violated the constitutional guarantee of equal protection. The judges deciding the appeal expressed surpnse that gay rights lawyers were claim· mg that DP benefits for gay couples were unconstitutional, but for Lambda Legal, the issue was one of ideological principle, what· ever the real-world consequences. Lambda Legal bclieves that the whole idea of providing one package of health benefits to married couples, while denying such benefits to urunarried couples, is wrongheaded and perhaps illegal-a remarkable proposition in itself. But if the Chicago Board of Education chooses to fix that inequity, Lambda argued, it is irrational and arbitrary-to the point of offending the U.S. Constitution-for some benefits to go to gay couples and not to urunamed heterosexual couples as well. The prinaple Lambda Legal was defend· ing-that government has no business decid· ing which of our relationships is worth endorsmg and subsidizing--15 noble enough, however divorced it may be from political reality and centunes of legal tradition. But it's worth asking. Is taking govern· ment out of the marriage business a core principle of the gay civil rights movement, or do we simply favor equal treatment for gays? Should our activists be arguing that providing even meager benefits for gay couples is unconstitutional unless unmar· ried straight couples get equal treatment? In Vermont, the answer has been dearly no. The Republicans who control the state I louse there have passed legislation that would open up all the benefits of the landmark avil union law to other l)lpeS of relationships, including urunarrte'd heterosexual couples and others in them to unmarried heterosexual couples. But even if the court had taken the latter opt10n, which Irizarry and Lambda argued for, the Chicago school board would most likely have repealed DP benefits entirely. There are a lot more unmarried straight couples out there than gay couples, and lots of employers, in the public and private sec­tor, are understandably concerned about the cost associated with extending benefits to all unmamed couples. If Lambda Legal could write the rules, the inevitable result would be fewer gays with health insurance, as our ide­ological foes could point to the higher cost of meeting Lambda's hetero-fairness mandate. This isn't the first time that gay rights lawyers have picked their battles poorly, letting their ideological zeal get the best of them. In 1995, the Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, a Boston-based legal advocacy group, challenged the exclu­sion of gay marchers from that city's annu· al St. Patrick's Day parade. It might surprise you to learn that gay rights lawyers are arguing, on behalf of heterosexuals, that DP benefits for gay couples are unconstitutional. committed, domestic living arrangements. Gay activists have bitterly opposed the GOP legislation, and rightly so, as an •attempt to weaken an historic law giving legal validity and benefits to same-sex cou­ples. Thank goodness Lambda Legal's lawyers haven't waded into that battle, tes­tifying before the Vermont Legislature about how unmarried heterosexuals ought to enjoy the same benefits as gay couples who enter into civil unions. In the case of Milagros Irizarry, the appeals court rejected her claim, and the position advocated by Lambda Legal, con­cluding that the Chicago school board could rationally draw a line between gay couples and unmarried straight couples because those in the latter group can always get mar­ried and gain access to the even more prized booty that is reserved for legal matrimony. Of course, that rational difference js a temporary one, as the same will be true for homosexuals when we can legally tie the knot in Illinois. But until that happy day, must even interim DP benefits give way to Lambda Legal's ideological opposition to any sort of marital privilege? And after we win the freedom to marry, making special treatment for unmarried gay couples less tenable, do we really want a gay rights group expending precious resources to fight the good fight on behalf of our privileged, heterosexual brethren? Would a little affirmative action for unmar­ried homosexual couples really be such a bad thing? That sounds like reparative therapy we can live with. Gays everywhere should shiver at our near·miss in the Irizarry case. If Lambda Legal's position had won the day, the court would either have struck down the Chicago DP benefits or ordered the board to extend If the U.S. Supreme Court hadn't unani­mously ruled that the state's gay rights law couldn't trump parade organizers' First Amendment freedom of speech and associ· ation, Gay Pride festival organizers nahon· wide might have been forced to accept any­one wanting to march, including ex-gays and the pedophiles from the North American Man-Boy Love Association. Even the heroic suit filed by Boy Scout leader James Dale, backed by Lambda Legal. was short-sighted and wrong-head­ed. The exclusion of gays from Scouting is undeniably evil and should be challenged, but not in court. Asking the government to second-guess the membership standards of private, non-profit organizations is not the way to win fair treatment. Today, interference from the courts might mean removing the ban on gay scouts. Tomorrow, the courts might force gay youth groups to accept fundamentalist Christians who would try to convince gay teens to pray their way to heterosexuality, or the Michigan Womyn's Festival might be forced to admit men. Even more importantly, a win for the "gay side" in the St. Patrick's Day case and the Boy Scout case would have made pass­ing gay rights laws anywhere else that much more difficult, as opponents could focus on these dubious applications, rather than the core cases of anti-gay discrimina­tion by the government and by businesses that are at the heart of our movement. Fighting our battles in court ought to be an avenue of last resort, when basic fairness is at stake and the political process has failed. We would be better served if our zealou~ legal advocates kept their eyes on that pnze, and left these more questionable battles to the messy public arena. HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 VOICES & ECHOES 13 VIEWPOINT ~!~e:~ ni?.~,,~!.!.~"~~ .~~~,.!11~; ~~~!!~!.~"~!! i~,~.!~,~?.,'!:! .. ~!~! It's difficult to dis­cern the tears from the rain as the gentle Tum (screen writer I excellent massage therapist) opens the door to his stylish Montrose digs only to be greeted by a waterfall flow· ing out from the inside. Through the doorway we see sleek au courant furnishings practically floating. Grape colored sheetrock is sucking up moisture like a patron hearing "last call" at the Mining Company. Tom has the same bewildered expression· as Grandma Bush must have had upon hearing that her favorite Ii'! coeds got nabbed for underage drinking, again. As I sec the lovely hardwood floor buck­ling. I recall something I learned in eighth grade 50ence class about water and electric­ity. I become mildly concerned about the risk of electrocution, and wonder what would happen if I did suddenly su cumb. Would my ashes end up m Greens Bayou VIa some primary school toilet in east Harris County? This would be a far cry from hav­ing them scattered over the English hamlet ofWhatneyplumb-on-Thames, as I original­ly planned. Fearing that my mortal remains would combine with toilet paper used on the butt of an 8-year-old destined to a vocabulary of nothing but double negatives, I charted a course for the closest dry television and squished upstairs. The weather was wors­ening and I was hoping that, in an effort to save the downtown theater district, Marvin Zindler's plastic surgery had been disassembled and was now shielding our cultural center from further destruction. Switching on the tube, I see live televi­sion news doing what it does best: illumi­nating the obvious. After a few nanoscc· only one who missed basic science class. Never have I seen television personalities so such as Eggs Florentine will be replaced Newscasters by the dozen are gripping despt.>rate for a drink. by more pungent dishes. Five-curry had-electrical equipment while standing in The strain of showing the same water dock wtth an anchovy and garlic glaze is chest-high water. sodden video for seven hours and saying guaranteed to mask any other mildew- ! wonder if I'm watching a new game "It's raining" in 6,700 different ways was inspired odor show, "Mediocre News Anchor Roulette" beginning to show. Makeup redos had However, one must be careful of Trendy indoor aromatherapy candles will be replaced with buckets of citronella placed under the dining room table .... Deep Woods OFF® will be the powder room scent of choice, protecting attendees' more sensitive areas. and I keep waiting to hear some frigid British female shout, "You ARE the weak­est link!" Perhaps tele\'ISion management views natural calamity as an opportunity to trim their personnel cots. Years ago, I remembered seeing news anchor, Sher Mm Chow as she endured every hurricane, toxic petrochemical explosion and nuclear meltdown within a 500-mile radius of Houston. Her coverage of Chernobyl was hailed as "glowmg" but I think she resides permanently m an apartment at the now darkened \1.D. Anderson Cancer Center. following in that tradibon, rumor has it that newsmen Wayne Dolccfino and Dave Ward collided and got stuck at the exit of Shepherd and the Southwest Freeway. This blocked the water flow and caused most of the resulting damage, creating the newly manmade "Bayou .Montrose." On the brighter side, no one had to go to their vacation home on Lake Conroe last weekend-they just used the Dunlavy overpass as a boat ramp. I sv.itch channels to see haggard looking weather men who should have left work long ago. At this late hour they would prob­ably be guzzling cocktails instead of per-reached the max factor and I wondered if these guys had Fiberglass bladders. Meanwhile, downstairs, Tom vacillat· ed between he-man, able to remove an entire "Barbie" display case without tus­sling a single synthetic hair, and disonent­ed Iambkm "Oh no," he procl;umed clutching a waterlogged scrap, "My reope for rmnbow petite fours is illegible-just days before my annual gay pndc brun­chcon!" I feel his hostess angst The only thing more unsettl.ng to a guest's palette than black spore mold ts when your 15-year-old arthntic cat takes six minutes to hack up a hairb;ill under the buffet table while you're serving an aspic appetizer. 1 rt.'alize that host:. all over Houston must be facing the same disaster-related party planning dilemma. Trendy indoor aromatherapy candles will be replaced with buckets of citronella placed under the dmmg room table. This is the only way to keep the "Yeah, we love standmg water!" variety of muscular mosquito away from the maior artery that crosses the bone in your guests' ankles. Deep Woods OFF® will be the powder room scent of choice, protecting attendees' mucous membrane damage, especially smce the current trauma team at the local hospital was burrung powdered eggs in the dietary department a mere week ago. After the meal. the parade festivities will be probably be altered somewhat. The disco ball will now be covered with flypa· per to attract airborne pestilence of Biblical proportions. Previously scantily dad mus­cle boys will be covered in protective cloth­ing (unless they want to emulate that guy in the msect repellent commercial by plac­ing their private parts into a Ple.x1glas box full of gnawtng insectS). Included m the parade will be a special marching un;t of chromosomally confused hermaphrodite lab rats recently escaped from a Med Center's genetic research facility These fumes will be easily recog· ruzable by their dreadfully lavered make-up and O\ ersized pumps. . After the parade, activISt Ray Hill has agreed to lead the gammc \'cmun to City Hall where they will demand compensa· tlon for undergoing forced DNA conver· sion therapy-what they will convert back to is not entirely clear. Oka~" Mother Nature, you've proven that Houston really is the "Bayou City." In spite of flood, bugs and mold, Pride will continue. There are lots of folks that could use some bleach and a scrub brush (as could their homes). Let's give them a helping hand Rich An:11sclueld1 is a freelance wnter u-Jzo is currently scouring roery retail outlet m Houston for ~ tasteful bug light chandelier. The Mosuv Unfabulous Social life of Ethan Green 14 JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 15 • 16 EDICATl_DN.GUIDE TRIZIVIR (TRY-zih-veer) Tablets Genenc name· abacavir sulfate, lamJVUdme, and ZJdovudme Read the Medication Gulde you get each time you fill your prescription for Trizivir. There may be new Information since you filled your last prescription. ------ What is the .moillmJl_ortant lnformatio!l.!..!!!ould know about_Trizivir? T"IZM conta1:is abacavir, which Is also called Z'iagerr . About 1 in 20 patients (5%) who take abacavir (as TriZJvt or Ziagen) will have a serious allergic reaction (hypersersitiv1ty reaction) that may cause death if the drug is not stopped right away You mav be bavinq thrs reaction ff,· (1) you get a skin rash, or (2) you get 1 or more symptoms from at least 2 of the following groups: •Fever •Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal (stomach area) pain • Extreme tiredness, achiness, generally Ill feeling • Sore throat, shortness of breath, cough If you think you may be haV1ng a reaction, STOP taking Trizivir and call your doctor right away. If you stop treatment with TriZJvir because of this senous reaction, NEVER take abacavir (as Trizivir or Ziagen) again. If you take any of these medicines again after you have had thlS senous reaction. you could die within hours. Some patients who have stopped taking abacavir (as TrizMr or Zlagen) and who have then started taking abacavir again have had serious or life-threatening allergic (hypersensitivity) reactions. If you must stop treatment with TriZJVir for reasons other than symptoms of hypersens11Jvity. do not begin taking it again without talking to your health care provider. If I your health care provider deCJdes that you may begin taking abacavir (as Triz1vir or Ziagen) again, you should do so only 1n a setting with other people to get access to a doctor if needed. 1 A written list of these symptoris is on the Warning Card your pharmacist gives you. Carry this Warning Card with you. TrIZMr can have other senous side effects. Be sure to read the section below entitled "What are the possible side effects of Trizivir?" ~t Jtl!!m!r! TnzMr 1s a medicine used to treat HIV Infection. Trizlvir includes 3 medicines: Z1agen (abaca'llr), Epivir" (lamivudine or 3TC ). and Retrovir9 (ZJdovudine. AZ'f, or ZDV). All 3 of these medicines are called nucieos1de analogue reverse transcriptase 1nh1bitors (NRTls). When used together, they help lower the amount of HIV in your blood. This helps to keep your immune system as healthy as possible so it can fight infection. Different combinations of medicines are used to treat HIV infection. You and your doctor should discuss which combination of medicines is best for you. Tnz1vir does not cure HIV infection or AIDS. Trizivir has not been studied long enough to know 1f ii will help you live longer or have fewer of the medical problems that are associated with HIV infection or AIDS. Therefore. you must see your health care provider regularly. Who should not take Trizlvir? Do not take Tnzivlr if you have ever had a serious allergic reaction (a hypersensitivity reaction) to any of the medicines that make up Tnzivtr, especially Z1agen (abacavir). If you have had such a reaction, return all of your unused TriZJvir to your doctor or pharmacist. Do not take T rizivlr if you weigh less than 90 pounds. How should I take Tri1lvlr1 To help make sure that your anti-HIV therapy is as effective as possible, take your TrizMr exactly as your doctor prescribes it Do not skip any doses. The usual dosage is 1 tablet twice a day. You can take Trizivir with food or on an empty stomach. JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE II you miss a dose of TrtZMr9 (abacavir sulfate, lamivudine. and zidovudine), take the m1Ssed dose nght away. Then, take the next dose at the usual scheduled time. Do not let your TrIZMr run out. The amount of Virus m your blood may increase 1f your anti-HIV drugs are stopped, even for a short time. Also. the virus rn your body may become harder to treat. Mlru!!ould I avoid while t11klng Trli!Yir? Do not take EplVir, Retrovir. Comb1V1r9, or Ziagen while taking Tnz1vir. These medicines are already in TnziVlr Practice safe sex while using TnzMr Do not use or share dirty needles. Tnz1vir does not reduce the nsk of passing HIV to others through sexual contact or blood contam1natiol'. Talk to your doctor tf you are pregnant or ii you become pregnant while taking Trizivir. Triz1vir has not been studied in pregnant women. It is not known whether Trizivir will harm the unborn child. Mothers with HIV should not breastfeed their babies because HIV 1s passed to the baby In breast milk. Also. Trizivtr can be passed to babies m breast milk and could cause the child to have side effects. What are the possible side eff(!cts of TrizivlrZ Life-threatening allergic reaction. Tnzivir contains abacavir. which is also called Ziagen. Abacav1r has caused some people to have a life-threatening allergic reaction (hypersensitivity reaction) that can cause death. How to recognize a possible reaction and what to do are discussed In "What 1s the most important trformation I should krow about TrizivirT at the beginning of this Medication Guide Lactic acidosis and severe liver problems. The medicines in T rizivir can cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis and, in some cases. this condition can cause death. Nausea and tiredness that don't get better may be symptoms of lactic acidosis. Women are more likely than men to get this serious side effect. Blood problems. Retrovir, one of the medicines in Triz1v1r, can cause serious blood cell problems. These include reduced numbers of white blood cells (neutropenia) and extremely reduced numbers of red blood cells (anemia). These blood cell problems are especially likely to happen in patients with advanced HIV disease or AIDS. Your doctor should be checking your blood cell counts regularly while you are taking TrizlVir. This is especially important if you have advanced HIV or AIDS. This is to make sure that any blood cell problems are found quickly. Muscle weakness. Retrovir. one of the medicines in Trizivir. can cause muscle weakness. This can be a serious problem. Other side effects. T rizivir can cause other side effects. The most common side effects of taking the medicines in Trizivtr together are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite. weakness or tiredness. headache, dizziness, pain or tingling of the hands or feet, and muscle and joint pain. This listing of side effects 1s not complete. Your doctor or pharmacist can discuss with you a more complete list of side effects with Triziv1r. Ask a health care professional about any concerns about Trizivir. If you want more Information, ask your doctor or pharmacist for the labeling for Trizivir that was written for health care professionals. Do not use Trizivir for a condition for which 1t was not prescribed. Do not give Trizivir to om · persons. 6/axoWellcome Part_ NC 27709 November 2CXXJ MG-011 ThJS MedicatiOn Guiae 1ras been approved by the US Food and Drug Adm1111strallon. Aj)ll 2001 HOUSTON VOICE •JUNE 22, 2001 17 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Bringing you the Versatility of Digital Printing Things we can do for you ... Make Fabulous Full-Color or B&W Business Cards including your Scanned Image or Digital Photo ~ John's Personal Training r\ 1201 Worhe1mer 555-1212 cdl 155-0000 Take Your Digital Photo (or scanned traditional photo) and turn it into a wonderful Large Format Poster Display Grea~ for Trade Shows & Conventions .. FISCAL 2000 REPORT Print Your Powerpoint Files (or other presentation files) to excellent glossy paper or transparencies for your next business presentation. Make Beautiful Postcards or other Mail Pieces to promote your Business. We offer full color and greyscale printing on a wide variety of coated stocks. 1i!D1 Wes theimer 713/5i!B-1i!D1 For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! B1uln#11 ln1urancr • Workus (;omp~n1otlon Growp H•ollh • LI/• Jruuro11cr II much mon 6575 W Loop South.SU. 185 &Ilaire, TX 77401 11 ~lliJ@~@/unquote11 "I don't know that I would want to [continue], if my lover left .... Should I have said that, about being your lover?" -Matthew Broderick (far right), asked by USA Today in a joint interview how long he and Nathan Lane (right) would continue in co-starring roles in the Broadway hit "The Producers· "It's too late. The rumors have started." compiled from STAFF REPORTS -Nathan Lane, responding to Broderick in the same USA Today interview "Without him, I'm nothing." -Nathan Lane, at the June 3 Tony Awards, after winning best actor; Lane invited Broderick on stage to share the award with him "You should not express your romantic desire for 'Marcus.' Unless you believe your feelings are reciprocated, you should not make a pass at anyone. Gay or straight doesn't really come into it." -Randy Cohen, writer of the New York Times syndicated advice column "Everyday Ethics,· 1n response to a gay reader interested in a man he thinks might be straight "We started fighting the Nazis too late because we thought it was all about Jews. This is not a discussion of black, gay men; it's a discus­sion of 'World War Ill,' of which black gay men and women are a part." -Rev. Jesse Jackson, at a Brown University meeting of Gay Men of African Descent, blaming homophobia for spreading HIV and AIDS among blacks and Hispanics, in the Providence Journal "Sadly, homophobia is still a great prob­lem throughout America, but in the African­American community it is even more threat­ening. This is an enormous obstacle for everyone involved in AIDS prevention, treat­ment and research .... We have to launch a national campaign against homophobia in the black community." -Coretta Scott King (left), speaking June 8 at the Nat onal Black Leadership Commission on AIDS "I am appalled at the choice of entertainment for a community event .... I cannot in good conscience suggest that we will provide fur­ther support, financially or otherwise." -Ray L. Sandhagen, chairman of SunTrust Bank-Gulf Coast, complaining about three female impersonators who hosted a fund-raising event for the Sarasota, Fla., downtown association. Several members, including the president of Sarasota Bank, resigned over the flap, according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune "There was not one vulgar word said, and there was not one vulgar thing done. There was nothing different than if [Tina Turner, Diana Ross and Cher] themselves did the show." -Lynn McDonald, co-chair for the Sarasota, Fla., fund-raiser, in the Sarasota Herald-Tribune "I realize my life is unique and some people think it's a publicity stunt. Well, it isn't. The relationship with Sandy, Mandy, Jessica and Brandie was a normal one-except it involved five people. They were my girl­friends, and I was sleeping with all of them. It certainly wasn't gay porn.'' -Hugh Hefner (right), Playboy founder, responding to a Philadelphia magazine report that he takes Viagra and that, rather than have sex with his girlfriends, he instead "liked the girls to pleasure each other• while h_e watched gay porn, HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 Do You Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI Smoking Cessation Research Study Use a hand-held computer and nicotine patch to quit smoking Call today 713-792-2265 Congratulations to Pride on 23 years of great parades! Let's light up Houston and "Embrace Diversity" to fight for the rights of the GLBT communities. Let Your Voice he heard! (713)52-DEBRA Campaign (713 )520-8068 District {713)463-0504 Austin 1cuw. VoteDanburg.com Debra Danburg TI-E lNNERSITY OF TEXAS MDANJERSON CANCER CENTER Making Cancer History™ C v 11-jhdft &div M Oft aJttotlier Nv 11-Aef~t te{e/JracioJtt d'Pri)e/ 19 State Representative* D i strict 13 7 Paid for by the Annise Parker Campaign. Steve Kirkland, Treasurer 20 NATIONAL NEWS JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Presbyterians take first step to reverse anti-gay policies Assembly elects moderate leader, rejects ban on gay pastors by RHONDA SMITH The first sign that a gay-affi.mung policy change might be approved al the Presbytenan Church (U.S.A.)'s 213th General Assembly last week was the elec­tion of Rev Dr. Jack Rogers, a theologian and histonan who supports ordaining gay pastors, as the denommation's leader. Several observers also said there were other les.s tangible signs that this annual conference, held m Louisville, Ky~ might be different. "The mood was very open," said the Rev. Dr. Jarue Spahr, the ordained minister who in -992 was barred by the denomina­tion's h.bhest court from becoming pastor at the Downtown United Presbyterian Church in Rochester, N.Y., because she is gay. "It just felt different." California resident Mitzi Henderson, the mother of a gay son and co-moderator of More Light Presbyterians, echoed Spahr. More Light is a coalition of about 2,000 peo­ple and 106 congregations that want the denomination, which has 11,178 congn.-ga­tions, to fully welcome all its members. "In Louisville, there was a change in demeanor and attitudes and 1e;s vilification. Peq>le were thoughtful and respectful." she said. Last Friday, delegates at the annual con­ference voted 317-208 to delete an anti-gay provision in the denomination's Book of Order that requires pastors, deacons and elders to practice "fidelity within the covenant of marriage between a man and a woman or chastity in singleness." In place of the "fidelity and chastity" proV151on, the delegates proposed addmg a sentence that states local church bodies would dctermme church officials' suitabili­ty to hold office The delegates, who are elected by lead­ers m the denommation's 173 local presby­tenes, or regional governing bodies, also voted to ehminate a 23-year-old "authorita­tive mtcrpretation" of the church's constitu­tton that prohtoits the ordmation of "self­afitrmmg practicmg homosexuals" as church officers. "It was time," said Kim Rodngue, one of eight commissioners, or delegates, elected by members of the National Capital Presbytery in metropolitan Washington, D.C., to represent them at the General Assembly. She voted with the majority to overturn the anti-gay policies. Before the proposed changes can take effect, members of each presbytery nation­wide will have an opportunity to vote on them m the coming year If a majority. or 87, of the presbyteries approve the gay-affirm­ing proposals, they would be ratified at the denomination's General Assembly in Columbus, Ohio, next June. In the LAyman Online, a publication geared toward conservative Presbyterians, various church leaders opposed to deleting the anti-gay policies predicted the issue would further divide the 2.5 million-mem­ber denomination. "ThlS certainly will be fought and debat­ed in the prcsbytcnes," said Joe Rightmyer, executive director of Presbyterians for Renewal, a conservative group that sup­ports the denommation's current policies on homosexuality ''There are many of us who are commit­ted to faithfulness within this denomination for the long haul. I hope pastors will go home and find lots of their members ready and willing to work," he said. In addition to the Presbyterian Lay Committee and Presbyterians for Renewal, other groups pushing to block the pro­posed changes include the Presbyterian Coalition, which has 5,000 subscribers on its mailing list, and the Confessing Church Movement, which was created in March and represents 452 congregations and more than 158,900 members. The Presbytenan Church (U.S.A.) news service reported that the Presbyterian Coalition, a group of anti-gay ordination organizations, described the vote last week as "deeply distressing." Gay Presbyterians and their supporters said the victory at the recent General Assembly resulted in part from a successful effort among various gay-supportive indi­viduals and groups lo become more organ­ized nationwide. They also predicted that the vote in various presbyteries on this issue would be close. ''I'd be surprised if thb is ratified," said Hamilton at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Washington. "But to have it voted on positively at the General Assembly shows there's been a change, or we were better organized." Spahr, who also is director of That All May Freely Serve, a coalition puslung for full mdusion of gay people m the denomi­nation, said this wa~ the first General Assembly where her group, More Light Presbyterians, and The Shower of Stoles Project worked closely together The three predominantly gay groups co­sponsored a dinner, operated booths, and shared a hospitality suite at the gathering in Kentucky last week. The Covenant Network, a gay-affirming, predominantly heterosexual group for Presbyterians who support full mclus1on of gays in the denomination, also worked more closely with the three groups this year. More Light Presbyterians board member Marco Grimaldo, a Delaware resident and openly gay ordained elder in the denomina­tion, said the Covenant Network helped, in part, by lobbying some of the most power­ful leaders in the denomination to support the gay-affirming groups. "They called these big churches and said, 'Let's create something supportive,"' he said. "They have a lot more money and people than we do." Another development that pro-gay Presbyterians said signaled the denomina­tion was becoming more gay friendly was the defeat in March of an anti-gay proposal The election of Rev. Jack Rogers as head of the Presbyterian Churdi (U.S.A.) on June 16 signaled a shift to more moderate turns dumg the denomination's annual meeting. known as Amendment 0. This proposal sought to prohibit mimsters from presiding over holy unions for same-sex couples. A majority of the presbyteries voted against it. Baptists close session with assault on gays Atlanta pastor who leads Southern Baptists calls gays 'tumor' by MIKE FLfMING NFW ORLEA.llJS-The Southern Bapti<;t Convention ended its annual meeting June 13 with a keynote address by Focus on the Fanuly founder James Dobson, who s.iid "the dam IS broken" on the Amcncan family due in part to an .mcreasmgly gay-friendly culture. "The homosexual agenda is destroying the family, and prcscrvmg and revitalizing the family 1s why we're called to our me<'t­ing thlS year," Dobson said And James Merritt, an Atlanta pastor who was elected to a second term as president of thc Southern Baptist Convention, criticil.Cd gays, but dtd express conccm for Soulforce leader Mel White, who organized gay protests of the SBC dunng its meeting here List week. "I love Mel White, and we love homosex­uals," Merritt said. "But I believe that when a mm goes to a doctor ¥.ith a tumor, the most kind and loving thing that the doctor docs [is not to) say, 'I'm okay and you're okay.' The most loving thing that a doctor can do is say, 'Iha! tumor needs to come out.m Some 34 protesters were arrested June Focus on the Family founder James Dobson closed the Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting June 13 by asking Baptists to commit to the restoration of the traditional American family. 13 as they tned to carry il coffin into the conference after staging a jazz funeral for gays they said were hurl by Southern Baptists teachings about gays. Last week, Dobson s.Jid the SBC 15 "at war with the American culture of sin." The traditional family is disintegrating, he said, and Christians may soon lose the ability to win younger generations of supporters. "The dam has broken in n.>gards to the fam­ily. l louscholds with urunamed partners have increased 72 percent, and shockingly, mast respondents checkmg that field arc of the horm=ual lifC':itylc," Dobson said of figures rL'C.mtly released by the Census that show a nse in the number same-sex households. Issut:>S from last summer's controver­si, il revision of the Baptist Faith & Mission st.itement hke declarations that women should "submit graciously" to their hus­bards, and that homosexuality 1s among sms hke prostitullon and pornography­were menhonC'li again this year, but not lmahzed mto official statements. ''There is no major [controvC'rsial) issue on the table that's grabbing evC'ryone's attention this year," said Danny Akin, chair of the Committee on Resolutions. The only offiaal word regarding gays came as ~e SB~ offered to end its boycott of Walt Disney 1f thC' company met certain demands, including establishing a reli­gious advisory committee. D1Sney would have to stop sponsoring "Gay Day" in its theme parks, and censor its television programs and publicahons of gay material to have the ban lifted, said Richard Land, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission. The company said it's unlikely it will accept the SBC proposal. -TM Associat~ Press contributed to this report JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE PRIDE NEWS Marshaling Pride Pride Committee, community choose activists to serve as Grand Marshals of nighttime parade by D.L. GROOVER EDITOR'S NOTE: Each year, nominations, then votes are solicited by the Pride Committee of Houston for Pride Parade Grand Marshals. The following are profiles of the Pride Parade Grand Marshals for 2001. DALIA STOKES In Hebrew, "Dalia" means branch or bough. In Arabic, "Dalia" means grapevine, as in Daliat El Carmel, a village Southeast of Haifa known since antiquity for the quality of its wine. I don't know if Dalia Stokes' mother, Katherine, named her after Hebrew sources or Arabic, or perhaps some family antecedent, but "vine" suits her. A branch is dependent upon the tree trunk, and a bough, as we know from nursery rhymes, is easily broken. Dalia Stokes is most inde­pendent and not in any harm of breaking. Whereas a vine spreads with the sun, its many shoots send forth fruit, it intertwines with its neighbors, it grows luxuriant with the season and grows stronger with age. That is Dalia Stokes, female Grand Marshal for this year's Pride Parade. Surprisingly, Stokes, whose name recog­nition has been synonymous with grass­roots activism, is a relative newcomer to political life. She's the first to encourage anyone else to follow her example. You're help is needed, she urges, and anything you care to do as a volunteer is absolutely essen­tial. Don't be afraid to volunteer. "It's really bizarre how it happened. I was one of the people who always did what I thought was my part: which was go vote. You're not a good citizen unless you go vote, and I thought, well, this is great, I'm doing my part. "It never occurred to me that I was need­ed. I had been so encouraged when I had gone to the polls and actually voted for peo­ple who won, like Anne Richards and Bill Clinton. Two elections in a row, that's so cool. But after 1994, I was stunned, like so many people. "I went to try to do something, offer some help, and the next thing I knew I was being asked if I would please consider run­ning for judicial office." A long-shot running against a very pop­ular Republican, Stokes lost but it didn't stop her. Using the campaign and election experience as her education, she saw what one person could accomplish. She also noticed that there were no politi­cal clubs for her peer group, business and professional Democrat women. In stark con­trast, the Republicans had 41 active women's clubs in Harris County. So she floated a trial balloon, people signed up, paid dues, and overnight ROADWomen (River Oaks Area Democratic Women) was born. And what is the message people should draw from tlus year's pnde parade' "Stand up for your rights. People need to be empowered, and the way to be empowered is to realize that they just have to do it them­selves. One night a week you don't have to veg in front of the TY. They need to get out of their comfort zone and volunteer some time." MITCHELL KATINE If there's anyone comparable to the Energizer Bunny in the gay community, he would have to be Mitchell Katine, ceaseless advocate for the unrepresented, champion of equal rights, law professor at South Texas Law College-his alma mater-and University of Houston, public speaker, AIDS activist, lead local attorney in the infa­mous Texas sodomy case, former Texas Real Estate Commissioner, partner in the law firm Williams, Birnberg and Anderson, and this year's male Grand Marshal. Katine is a true activist: he's always moving. He rummages through file cabinets to retrieve the program from his first "AIDS and the Law" seminar from 1989; he rifles the pile of gay peri­odicals and newspapers under the table lamp to find the article on discrimination he wrote; romewhere from the crowded desk. he pulls the flyer he Xeroxed from the Pride Guide that he sends out with each office invoice, inviting the client to the Pride Parade; he scans the framed color photograph on his office wall of German concentration camp Sachsenhausen, pointing out the pink triangles built into the chimney monument to the dead gays. For being in constant motion, though, Katine is remarkably centered. There is a playful peace about him. He is happy where he is. Content. Maybe it's his own inner calm that drives him to help others unfail­ingly. He's found something good and sees the injustice in others' not having it, too. Without his good works, though, he'd be mighty unhappy. "Activists. The term activists has changed over the years. A lot of the true activists are no longer with us, so I feel that all of us who are here and well and capable, should get out and be the activists for peo­ple who used to be. I feel an obligation, a commitment. If nobody's protesting. that isn't right." Katine's partner, Walter, and two fnends will be riding down Westheimer with him, throwing the little frisbees to the eager crowd. ''With each parade it makes people feel more confident, more accepting, realizing there's a lot to be proud of as a gay and les­bian person. We should demand respect, we de:>erve rL>spect; that's what the parade's about, that's what 1ust bemg out and not being afraid to be public is about. '' It's okay to be gay. That's the message 1t sends. Do what you think is the best thing to do. Be free and live your life. "That's what is it: a celebration of free­dom." BLAKE AND GORDON WEISSER If you've ever attended a meeting of Parents, Families, and Fnends of Lesbians and Gays, you're familiar with the small group sessions that occur after the general monthly meeting or presentation. These intimate encounters are where the real work of PFLAG takes place, where con­fidences, tears and laughter are shared in true bond. It's where PFLAG's magic hap­pens, where acceptance and knowledge fuse to banish grief and shame. These sessions arc known as the Heart of PFLAG, but this label justly applies to this year's 1 lonorary Grand Marshals, Blake and Gordon Weisser. This ravishingly adorable couple has been married for 25 years. Llke most inseparable opposill'S, they overlap each other's conversa­tions, fill in the blanks, tum to each other for support, and put up with each other's foibles with heart-affirming tolerance. Blake talks a blue streak, Gordon answers with careful deliberation. Blake is a 21 live wire, Gordon more muted. Together, they're just as cute as Oscar and Felix. And if you want a living example of what PFLAG is all about, what incredible strength its heart has, you need look no far­ther than this loving straight couple. Amid the chinoiserie on their coffee table in their spacious columned living room off Shepherd is the book "Walking a Sacred Path," by the Reverend Laura Artress of Grace Cathedral of San Francisco, creator of that church's popular canvas labyrinth. Using the idea of a labyrinth as metaphor for a spiritual journey of self-discovery, as a quest for inner peace and real meaning of it all, seems appropriate for the Weissers. They have an abiding faith that has seen them through the trials of their grown daugh­ter 's coming out. For them, it was a long jour­ney, but at the end they found not only acceptance but a missionary zeal to advocate for that acceptance. They are PFLAG. To compute how long they'\•e been with PFLAG, Blake uses her daughter's coming out as the benchmark event it obviously was. "She came out at age 40, and she's almost 62, we were m the closet 11 years, so it's about 10 years," said Blake. Gordon nodded. Valerie is Blake's daughter from a previous marriage. "I didn't know she was a lesbian, and neither did she She was married and had three sons in lugh school when she came out And she had not known she was a les­bian. There' s a lot of that these days." Apparently, going mto the closet for a parent who dL~covers their child is gay is standard operating procedure. "When the child comes out, the saying goes, the parent goes m/ Gordon said. "It was incredible what happened," said Blake. "We are very active at Olrist Oturch Cathedral. At adult education hour, they had a panel of three PFLAG parents come to speak. Just Uunk, that was 10 years ago. It was the first tune I had ever heard of PFLAG." It was the first time either of them had ever he:ird "I have a lesbian daughter" spo­ken out loud and in front of strangers. They Joined unmediately, but the closet door hardly fell off its hinges. "You have to learn," Blake admitted. "PFLAG's mission is nurturing. The small groups are called the heart of PFLAG. That's where the sharing takes place, that's where the listening, the understanding, that's where you heal, that's where you gneve, that's where you move. It took a few years of that " Ten years later, the Weissers have become the epitome of activtsts. Gordon's in his third year as treasurer, Blake's chair of the Help Line, PFLAG's telephone support system similar to the Gay and Lesbian Switchbo:ird. Gordon was one of the founders of the PFLAG/HATCH Youth Scholarship program. They never stop their good works. Retirement is not in their vocabularv. When asked what impact they hoped the parade would have on participants and observers, they both answered without hes­itation, ''Get involved." 1ll 22 JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 23 24 Create the perfect meal. l'our choice of 18 different meats & fish, 44 fresh vegetables, and 14 signature sauces on our 35 square foot ~rrill. JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 MONTHS The Heights backyard of Anni Couch looks like Santa's workshop. Santa's gay work­shop, that is, if his elves were memliers of the Krewe of Olympus. Renown for their philanthropJc larges e and fund·raisingaclivity within our commu­nity, some of the Krewe might very well be Santa's elves. Theyd ertainlylmow how to whip up the costume. But right now, you see, these elves are making themselves a float for the Pride parade. Tables on sawhorses e set up in the shade under the garage awning. Guys with X-Acto® knive cut ut the HT words Equality and Diversity using sten­cils. A small noisy fan on the driveway shoots a useless humid breeze into their faces as they squint and cut along the lines. Rainbow­hued 10-foot abstract pipe figures lean against the side of the garage. Even larger figures s tand guard around a tree. Colorful pieces of Coroplast® are stacked nearby, f • dy tQ;he cut mto geometric s!1ape,; for the figures' bod) parts. Papier-mache globt:'S, soon to be finials of columns made from heavy cardboard drum rolls, dry on a card table in the sun. Inside Annie's house, Krcwe members sew fabnc paneb to be attached to the giant fi - ures. Deni~e, surrounded by a dozen helpers, lS learning to balan.:e thr cumbersome giant .she mu~t wear and maneuver dunng the ni~htt1mr re\ d~ this SaturdJ). fa eryone s sweatmg, laughin~, ha\ing a good tune <fJJriBe e;:estivat returns After 5-~·ear nbst•ru-e. 11ost·1•· rade e' e1 • r~•n1·ns "ith 5 'Nidors. lh t• t"Hft•rfainnu•nt Suntln~ aftf"rno na by KAYY. DAYUS The Pride Festival returns to Houston's Pride calendar this weekend for the first time in five years and it promises to be bigger and better than ever, said Jeffery Nea\'es, one of the festi\'al organizers. Neaves said the festival boasts both local and national entertainers and 45 vendors and social agcncws selling everything from food and American Express financial services to custom-made jewelry and othrr crafts. "We're proud of the 45 vendors who have decided to take part in the Pride Festival. They are taking a gamble for this new festival, but they are dedicated to us," Neaves said. He added that others were not so brave when asked to participate. "Some wanted to wait and see how it went and then maybe join next year." "We'll have two stages continuously featuring national and local acts of all varieties. It's a great deal for $5. We have a nice mix; something for everyone," said Neaves. Festival-goers will have plenty of choices: comedian Bob Smith; Suede, "a jazz artist with a sultry voice," according to Neaves; Marcus Hutchinson and Dave West, country and western artists; the Front Alley Girls, an Ohio-based group that does a spoof on the Back Street Boys-get it? Then there's I louston's own Nancy Ford with her Dyke Show, True Soul, rhythm and blues, and much more. And there will be some politicking in all likelihood, said Neaves. Invitations have been extended to Mayor Lee P. Brown, City Councilwoman Annise Parker, State Rep. Debra Danburg, D-Houston, and U.S. :;... Contin ued on Page 31 Pride Fest offers a casual, picnic-like mood for post·Pride celebrations. The event returns this year, alter a 5-year hiatus, and will be held Sunday from 1-7 p.m. at Garden in the Heights. 26 Mart VVIR ESS THE FUTURE IS YOURS . l1ram· WlllilSJ Authorized Dealer *Nokia 5190 FAMILY TIME PLAN • 3000 Total minutes That's 2 phones an • 600 anytime - 20 600 anytime long • 1500 anytime-25 1500 anytime Ion • • JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 Think Ahead. Plan Your Future With VIRACEPT . Because it's strong and effectwe. Keep you· v ra oa.:: down w th the •1 prescribed med cation of rts k d • VIRACEPT works with you to p your I fe on track Because it's easy to live with. IRACEPT easy do g schedule and marageable side effects have been he ng all kinds of people co.,tmue to lead their hves on the own terms. Because it saves future options. When cnoos ng a treatment plan, it's important to consider what opt ns you will have m the future. Stud es show taking VIRACEPT early on leaves you with cha ces m treatment for later. Ask your doctor about your future with VIRACEP.,.. VIRACEPTe .n.e.l.f.in..a.v..i.r m...e sylate ~ --··· VIRACEPT is indicated in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of HIV infection The most common side effect of VIRACEPT 1s diarrhea, which can usually be controlled with over-the-counter treatments. Some prescnpt1on and non prescription drugs and supplements should not be taken with VIRACEPT, so talk to your doctor first For orne people, protease mh1b1tors have been associated with the onset or wo•senmg of diabetes mel tus and hyperglycemia cl-;J.,gec; m body fat and mcrc:.ised bleed ng m "'emoph. 1 cs HIV drugs do not cure HIV infection or prevent you from spreading the virus. Refe• to thee ~;:> rt.:in• n'ormat10"' on the next page F o· :no• "'fo·rnat n, call toll free 1 8~8 VIRACEP~ or v1s1t wwwv racept.cor 27 .................................... 28 ~ VIRACEPT9 (nelllnavir mesylata) TatlalS 1111 Oral Pow<:er lnfonnation for Patients -Vll.IWI'~ ---~mesylale ,.. .. _,,_ __ _,llrlll!IVl- - read llis ..._ l3eliAly llel!n tlkmg 'lllACEPT -·please •11s-eadl11mB!lllll!MWh~)Jslincasamyhlg Im clWlged. ThlS is I IUMlllY 1111 not I~ lllr I caa!l.I .-.j..l.l.l..Q, wlIlll l -aking- llis me'bdJic 1a1ti1o1n - and -II~- dleCIlS<LlsllaSm. 'b'lllJA tCl1E0IPJldT nman imer a 0Xb'll3ewhetl ~ww:EPT 1111 tl10IJld not ctwige .. _natmentwr.IUJIC!sltl:king wllll j<U'docb' A1art And clOJt--tlwt-NOT bt-­VIWV'T. Please lilO read Ille_, "MEDCINES YW SHOW> NOT WE wmt VIAACE"" WHAT IS V1RACEPT Niil HOW DOES IT WORK? VllAC8'T IS used n comlllm!Jon wllh - anllt81r0virll ~in Ille 1nlalmerll ol-'" wllll tunan lrrummde!lclencyvlrus 1H1V1 in!ettlon_ -wtlh ttV - In h dlS1.CllDn al C04 T cells, whi:h 1111 inlatnt ., Ille krmne SyslOm Nf2r I Bve ruOOer al C04 eels llMI been des:nlyed. lhe - - ~acquired lmnu1e deftdency syrO"Cl11t IAlflS). WIAC6'T wo1<s by blod<ilg ttV II'*""" ta prolein<Ul!lnQ -~ whi:h is~ ror ttV., nU11;1y 'lllACEPT 11a1been._,1n ~ raclJce Ille amoinl al ttV II Ille blood ~ 'lllACEPT is not I an b 11V «AIDS VIW:6'T ca> I'll\? raclJce l<U' b aeo11 llll llloess --tlV-wllo IDOll WWV'l lllO """lilJlf'anl n:reasea n Ille r:imier ol C04 cd Clll1I. VllACS'T-bt-.nlogll!IOJwllll--*'9IUCll .. ~~ AZnEiwre..,_ 3TQ.« l!rtfl (StM.lft, 04Tl T~ww:EP'lin-wll!lol!!er-itv;! llllJ:es Ille ..wit al tlV in Ille body,...., IDie!) and - C04 cants. VllWli'T-be """"1by n.Gs, ID:lle9cmlS. Ind ctibln2 yeasol age «-5a.des n intl'lls ywiger rm 2 "9'S al age 1111""" lllking JB;e. DOES YllAC8'T ClllE HIV Oii AIDS? WIACEPT is not a an trtlV-«All!l. l'llcllle~WIACEPT may .. llMlop~lnlec!il:ns .. -ancltiolWllSSOcia!l!d wtlh ttV - Some ol ll10$8 candlUons .. pnell1ll)l1ia, he!pes .... ~ ~-~·(MAC) lr.lectJons and Kaposfssomrna. ll!ere IS no 11<ool 111at VllW:EPT can raclJce lhe r1s1< al hlSmllllng tlV 1n Olllen 1IVOl9' sex"31 contlCI « blood cootlml1a1lon- WHO SHOWl Oii SHOWl NOT TAKE VlllACEPT? ~WlllyaJ-!Qlreedlndcddewhdler...w:arT•-­byw In~ yr:u lledliln. lhe loilowlng stmll be - Alllrglll: I you-bad I seriaua aller;fc-111 \llRACE'T,,.. -llOl tal<a VUIACEl"T. 'bJ - lll9o .... yr:u - ....... iramaastol rrry- llllergies., U>a>ces IUC!las-modales. mis. preseryaMs, .. dyes. 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Takllg Vl'oACE'T tJgd!ler w11!1- Jllll.tlV Jt1'QS rmases llleir ll1lili1y .,llg!llllewn&ftlll9oreclas111eqw\Ji!ytr11Sis!a'tWuses.,IJlJW Based on,...~ ol laklng OllleJ -medicine )<U'docb wlll dlrec1,.. en-b oVIW:EPT and-dolt\' .-.a Th09e ClnlgS.llhollldbetll<e:ilnacenalnorder«llspeclftcDmes. TlliswlD depend en - many limes I Olly aoch meclcir>e sl'lalAd be lai<en l wJll alsodependen_,nstmllbetlk"1....,,«wr.IUJlfood ~analogues: No mug lller3tllon problems were seen when VllW:EPT was given wllh: Re1n>Vlr (zidlMdne. All) Eplvlr~3TC) Zent ISlawdlne 04~ llldex4D !IJlanoslne, td) d you n lal!lng botll ¥ldex (ddl) nl YUW:En Vldelc tllOIJld be t!kell wtllwl 1ood .., ., empty l!Dmadl. Theralln ,.. tl10IJld bke VIRACEP' wtl!t food one 1111' a!ler « llD1 IWl lwO tors lle!trejlll-'/ldex. ---~--(NNllTls): Wilen VlllACEPT. - tJgd!ler wlllt ............ ~ The amoinlolVIW:El'T In yw blood is inclwlged. A dme ~ D nol -"'1en l'IRACEPT II US90 wllll- Susl!v3N ~ TheS!DlllolWIACEP'T In yrultxxl rrray be i'c?aser1Atb!e ~ • not oeeded-VllW:EPT.""" wllllSUsl!Ya- Dlner NllRlls WlACfPT has not been llUdied wtlll - NNR'l1s. Ottier..,-lnlllbHln: 'M>enWWVl'islal<enlng<lller-cnxiv. ie (lndinllW) The..wit ol tlo01 ~in 'f(JI bJoocl may be increased. Qrrenl!y, ther1! .. nosatetynefllcacydatl..-tom 111e UMOl1hls­NJIM'N attooaW! The arnwtt ol WlACEP'I n yr:u bJoocl may be inalaseJI. C&mnlly ther1! are no sa!e!y and elflCBC'f datl - lnlm hi use ol lhis CDl1llli1alJtn 111Wasa8......., The 111101111o1llQUi.w111 - blood m11 be inct=<d- Omr111y awn .. no sa!el'f and e111cacy data mllallle tom h use ol lhil ~ WHAT ME THE SlllE EfftC'TS Of V1IW:O'T7 ll<e II mediciles, Yl'oACEPl' Cll1 cause llkle er..cis. Mos1 al Ille silo e!!ec!S ex;>er1erad wllll 'lllACEPT llMI been mill., moaertte - Is 11>! mos1 ccmmcn Sldo e!leC! n P«1Pe l:!k!ng VllAW'T, and mos1 IClll pa11en1s hid at - mild - at some poJr!I clfill) teatmenl In dinical llldas. llx:oJI 1~20'li o1P11*!1sreceMngWWVT750 mg (llne lalllels) !hree llmes dllJr « 1250mg(!Ivelallletsl1WO ames daily 'altu« JID1 lomell>CGI day lnoalQ111,-can be ar9tilOO ~-mediclnes.IUCllas-.neA-D~)and Olhers. wl1Jch ere~ wtll10IJI I pmcrlpbon Olller side e!feclS 1131 cx:amd in~ .. JID1 ol patJtnl'! 'ICe!VJng ViRACfPT inchJle J1lllJS80. oas and ras11. There.....- - side effects noled n dlnical ltudies ""1 cx:amd In lesshll2%o1palltnl'!~VllW:EPT-.~llkletl!ecll may hiMI Deen U., - M41S NI paUen!s ....- laklng «., Ille --EJ<Cel)lbdlWrtle:l.1l1ereMrtnot11B1YddlonlXe5inllkle elleds "lll!lenb wile lnol!WIACEl'T ailng wtl!t-~--" wl1hlllo6ewt1olookanyh!-ClnlgS.fcra~1111o1side cft'ecls.J1$1o.--.tu111.«"'*111ldll JUNE 22, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOW SHOWl I TAKE VlftACa'T'7 VIW:EPT ·-any wtl!t--· preecnpllon.111.- - rrray preocribt Ille~ tu VllACS'T T-- as 1250 mg (llYe -I laker> two-a day« as 750 mg (llne ~ lakerl llnt trnes a day WlACEPT Jlhould alWays be llktn W11111 meat« a~ - 'lllACEPT - n lllnHx>al8d ., heJI> n::J<e the - easier., swallow Taitt V1RACEPT IUC1ly as - by raur - ·Do not ncr.-« '*'-ftrl-«lhtrunberoldoeesperOly-.lll<llhilmedlcine tor ... mt1 pel10d ol llme ht --hll notructed Do not ..... ,1a.1.u .ng. V -llA.CE-PT- nm CGNU111nt wt111 ,....-. - ~ ~,... madclnt""' Im beer1 pr1ilCIYJed speclrically tor,.., Do not '/te'lllACEPT In GllleB « - --inscrlled b-else lhe~olVIW:EPT-bedlt!er1nllorjlllhntor-~ ~ .. -. .... ,....-.IDCly•-... lhl-­lhe- ol'lllACEPT in 111e bJooclstmll ramam somewrm~ ""' ""9. Mmil'IC - wlll caioe"" ccncenlralicn ol 'lllACEPT., --.,..-not_llJY--.d,.. mlSS I deee. jlll sl'la!Ad lal<e Ille dOCe 85IOOOIS~andlhen11111 'flJI nextlClle<Ued llO&e and lu1ln doses asOllglnally IChecUed. Doling In - (lndudng-14,.... of ago and_, The rec:ommended --ol l'IRACtl'T is 1250 mg (live labletsl - lwO trnes I Olly« 750mg(llnelallletsllai<entvee1lmeS I day Each dmelhouldbelaMnwl:hlmcal«i1111!tmek OoNlg In - 21013 ,.... of ago lheWIACEPT _ 11 _ de!JerlJI! on "81' we91t lhe """""1Wlde dme ls 201D 30 mg/kg (Or 9 b 14 mg/Jlolr1d) per -. taken llWee llmes daily wtlll a meat « tight tnaCk. 1llls cai be aomlrislered - in 1abJet form«. in ctillhn llBble., ta1<a latllels. as VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Dose tnstucllans wlll be provlded by Ille child's- The dme wlll be given 1ne llmeS daily USlng Ille measirlnO 9CCOI> provided. a measirlnO 1l!8SpOm «,.. « J1D1 laDlatl del*dl10 en Ille weig1I and age al Ille dllJl_ lheJ11110U11oloralpow<1er«lablets.,beg1Yen1Dacliklla ~in111ecller1betow - .. ..-.,.,.- .... -_ ". .. Tll-nt1'1·-.D ally -· '-' l"'t~· J_mlTt--+ Ta- 7to<85 15.5I0<185 ' 1 - 851Dc105 1851D43 5 J,. - 105toc12 23to<?65 a 1112 - 1210<14 26510<31 7 1314 - Uto<16 31 to<35 a 2 - 1510<18 35!0<395 9 2114 - 11to<23 395I0<505 10 2112 2 >23 ,505 15 331• 3 In '1'IOISlJlng oral pow<ler 1!>e la>DP « 1e3Sp0cn lhoukl be IJ!Vel • 1 lewl acoop ccn1ails 50 mg ol WWVT Jse only Ille 9CC01> j)<ovJded wl1!l)<U'VIRAW'Tbottle t 1 IJ!Vel 1easpoon antllnS 200 mg ol WWVT Nole A maaswtng "-' used ... dispensing medk:allon lhoukl be <JSed "" .,,.....ng WIACEPT Oral - Ask !W' lllWmaCJSI 1D make ue ,.. - a 'l18Clcallcn 1lspenslng leaSPOOJ1 - -WIAC[pT Onl-bt-"'" The oral powdel' may be mixed wtl!t a small llllOllll ol - lomUa. ltl'l lomluta. ltl'I ~ llJlll)le<ncntl .. oalty loolls IUCll aspllllling«acraam OIEo'l'llxlld lllelJ'lllrt81no1111111JS1belal<enln obtlln111eUdDse. DolllllmlxtrepawmwJ1hrrryaclclc1ood«julce IUdlas~« -~μ-cs lll!JlelllCe.orlll!Jlesauco llecauselhilma-1ttoa18a Onat Ille powder ii mlxell It may be &!Dredi! JC()l11 ~ .. ~nie>1n6tnn.Donot!leatlhe-doseonce11m been prepnl. Donotaddwa!Br10bo11:esoloralpowder WIACEPT powder ii IUPl>iled wllll I la>DP b measimg For help Jn delermi*1Q Ille exact - cl powder "" - dild please ask - -· JU'S8, .. pl1armaclsl WWVT Oral Powder CllfltllnS ~.11ow...ione sweetener. and ll>erefte JlhoUld nol be - by cllJldren wllll phenylkelorU1a (~ HOW SHOWl V1RACEl'T BE STORED? ~ V1RAC6'T and II Olh!r llllJdJClm out GI Ille reach ot Cl1lldrcn Kllei> bolllB - and .:ore at JC()l11 tempera1in (between 59'f 1111 Wf) ~tram IDlJteS cl rncislln IUdl as a lllk «-damp place Heat and .-e "8Y raclJce Ille eftllC1rtene:3 Ol l'IRACEPT Do nol k""ll mediCre 11a1•outaldale«111at !Ill no l:nger need. Be ueltlall!llllrowftrlmaiClne~ lisoutollhereacnot-. DIScu9s 11 IJJISllaW abOlll jW' hell!ll wt!fl j<U'-.,.. !lave que:tn ll>oulww:EP'I « rrry olhe< medlcaton,.. ... ~ask jOU'docb'.JU'S8,« phannaCisl 'bJcailll9ocall 1J188.WW1PT (1.888 &17.2237) d ~ .. Cal 19.V1RACEP'T 'lllACEPT 1111 Agcucn .. Jl!)ISlllred '1ldem:N cl Agcucn ~Inc. Cllpyr911C21Xr. Agcucnl'IWmaceUllcals Inc. Mr1gltsr- A f a•r ••••r AgcucnPIWmaceutcalslnc La Jolla. Cl:'"'""- 92037 USA 1·\'01171-BG HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 So many CDsNideos/DVDs, so little to pay . • Queer As Folk Music from the original soundtrack Showtime/BMGIRCA Victor On Sale $15.99 • • • • ABsolutely FABulous Series 1 to 3, complete box set DVD BBC Video $79.99 • • Rufus Wainright Poses Dreamworks Records $18.99 There's nothing like great music and movies. Especially at prices that allow you to get as much great music and movies as possible. So stop by Borders and listen. Sex & the City Complete 1st Season(VHS)-.... $39.98 (DVD)- ... $29.99 Complete 2nd Season(VHS)_._$49.92 (DVDJ-$39.99 3025 Kirby• 713.524.0200 www.borders.com 29 30 OUT ON THE BAYOU HOUSTON VOICE • JUNE 22, 2001 Krewe of Olympus float captured lighting award last year :> Continued from Page 25 This year's float chairman is twinkling­eyed Anrue, who served as the Krewe's float chairman last year and this year's Ball chair­man. She's in constant motion, supervising, answering questions, just being there. "We need wood," yells a Krewe member, removing hlS bandanna to wipe his face. "Yeah, we need to go get that," she replies. "I can give you drrections how to get there. Wait a minute and I'll go with you." Althou~ float chairman is a voted-on position with the Krewe, no one ran against her this time after her succe55ful gu1Clance last year. "It's kind of who wants to do it. I'll do it one more year, then it's somebody else's tum." The Krewe devotes four months to the Pnde float, and 1t shows. They won Best Lighting in last year's parade. As in years past, their dCS1gner IS Sands S., whose work begins when the National Pride Committee selects a theme. Once he's sketched out his design, it's up to the float comnuttee to real­ize the dream. From extensive fund-raising efforts throughout the year, the parade budget IS fairly hefty, but Annie keeps a tight rem on 1t nonetheless. "It's probably a little bit more than most," Annie agrees, then adds with a smile, "but then we like to parade." If you've ever been to one of their Mardi Gras extravaganzas, you know how much this unique group loves to strut their stuff and have fun. "Do you have another battery for your drill?" shouts another Krewe worker. "Yeah, nght inside the workroom door To the left." After their first meeting on April 7, the float committee met for a few hours each week every month, until they reached this stage. Annie consults her war briefing man­ual, a thick binder with a first page spread­sheet of dates, times, and names of who's attended each workshop meeting. It's filled with checkmarks. "My partner's a computer person, so she does all this," she confesses. "This gives us an idea, this decides who rides. The captain gets thlS, because we're a very work-orient­ed group, so we try to keep up with who all shows up and works, because a lot of perks are based on participation." From the back yard, the group asS1Sting Deruse with her giant green costume breaks into laughter "Is that gonna be too tall for Deruse?" someone says. "It's not too tall, Dentse's too short." "How about platform shoes," another quips. "I've got my own, thank you." Sands' final design, in color and partially rendered in 30, IS taped to the wall of the garage. Periodically, one of the workers comes up to check out a detail. The float itself is fashioned from a goose-neck trailer 24 feet long and 8 feet wide. Two electncal generators to power the lights and the sound system will be hidden inside, behind the rows of Keith Haring-look alike figures running along each side of the trailer. The Krewe's royalty will stand in the stem, inside the encircling arms of an abstract embracing figure. This is big-time lflas~ Mtipuon.www Perhaps the most important considera· tion of all is the float's modularity. All the intncate pieces have to assemble with mini· mum fuss and break apart simply, economi­cally, because Houston's not the Krewe's only parade. This juggernaut has to travel. "After Houston, we go to Dallas for their Pnde parade," Annie says. uwe have two members from Dallas, so we use theu front yard and they live real dose to the parade site, so we 1ust pull a big ol' truck into their front yard, spend Saturday to rebu:.ld, and do the parade on Sunday up there." But right now, their sights are set on tlus weekend, especially when they move all the pieces down to therr space in Near Town to complete this floating leviathan. The mod­ules, according to Anme's plan and Sands' bluepnnt, neither of which has.failed them yet, will be completely assembled Saturday morning, in time for ultimate fine tuning before the parade's evening start. Two Krewe men lug a heavy 2x4 modu· lar frame, painted hke a rainbow, tow.ird the garage where other finished pieces are stored. "Hey guys, is that one done? You'll have to store it behind the shed." The co-workers don't bat an eye, while they maneuver the awkward wooden plat­form. As if seeing exactly where this piece fits into the intricate jigsaw parade puzzle, Sands watches the frame disappear behind the garage. "We wanted to do this one real colorful," he says proudly. "It's fun to do something on paper and then see it actually come to life. It's like, wow." He points to a one-inch dot on his artist's rendenng and smiles "This theoretically's going to be a rotating globe. Of course, it may be nothing at all. It may be just a theo­ry." For sure, though, what you can count on with a Krewe float IS its stunning illumina· tion. The plans for this one will outshine all thcir past efforts: the figures along the sides outlined in twinkling Christmas lights, slo­gans ba
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