Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Montrose Voice, No. 136, June 3, 1983
File 001
File size: 13.93 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 136, June 3, 1983 - File 001. 1983-06-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1673/show/1644.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-06-03). Montrose Voice, No. 136, June 3, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1673/show/1644

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 136, June 3, 1983 - File 001, 1983-06-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1673/show/1644.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 136, June 3, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 3, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript The Newspaper of Montrose June 3, 1983 Issue .. 136 Published Every Friday The Man Who Draws Those artoons Meet Gary Larson. If you beat your dog in Seattle and the dog howls, and your dog-loving neigh­bors complain to the Seattle Humane Society, the next face you're liable to see at your door is that of 32-year-old Gary Larson, a friend ly, quiet, humorous but no-nonsense animal protection officer whose job it is to see that you stop. Right away. He also, in his own words, likes to "scuba dive, ski, jog, hoard small child­ren in my basement, etc . . . the regular stuff. .. " He also likes snakes, and col­lects them. "Mostly kingsnakes, with the exception of one 14-foot, 150 pound python I innocently raised from a hate· hling. It provides some cartoon material but does nothing for my social life." While not watching out for other animals (and, warily, for his python, Gary Larson uses a pen to create odd creatures, human and otherwise, to peo­ple a land of his own creation. This is "The Far Side" and every week in the Montrose Voice we present some of its inhabitants and their predicaments. INSIDE THE MONTROSE VOICE The Glass Art of Gene Hester MONTROSE ART, PAGE 16 Columnist Sharon McDonald 'Gets Mad' COMMENTARY, PAGE 23 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 "WE SUPPORT CELEBRATION 83" l''ll/'7 0 c 0 c I_ L1L•I'-' 1_11-1llCT1-1N II 1_11_1 _I I 1_1 II μ Rhetta Hughes -From Broadway and the Original Tina Turner to Star at Rally By Hollis Hood Tina Turner, legendary mistress of rhythm asnd screaming so~], will head­line the Gay Political Caucus' rally culmi­nating this year's Gay Pride Week celebration on Sunday, June 26, Larry Bagneris announced at that organiza­tion's regular meeting Wednesday, Jqne 1 at the Main Street Holiday Inn. Dale Beverly told members that there will be a "media blitz" very soon and that ticket.a have already gone on sale at Tick­etmaster, Ticketron and the Summit box­office. Terry Harris suggested that persons buy tickets at the Summit saving a 75¢, commission fee. June 14 is the scheduled date for a press conference about Gay Pride Week. Repre­sentatives of all 62 participating organiza­tions will present a brief outline of their organization's purpose and involvement in the week of festivities. Bagneris solicited volunteers to help the day of the rally at the Summit. Persons representing the media, telephone and mailing committees also asked for volun­teers to a88ist with various immediate pro· jects. Voter registration tables will be set up on Westheimer during Gay Pride Week, as weH as at the Summit, they said. A reception for out-of-town visitors will be held June 25, Saturday. "Everybody talks about what we have done here in Houston," said Bagneris, Hand we need to give the people in Shreveport and Okla· homa City and all the other places that will be visiting the energy to go back and organize to get out the bloc vote in 1984." He expressed appreciation to Ed Jamai.l, Ray Collins and Walter Strickler for their help in Summit negotiations. . . The contract with the Summ1t1s 32-legal pages in length, Bagneris said, a~d "at one point we thought they were gomg to charge us rental on the restrooms for the event." That was only the beginning. Ms. Turner's contract stipulates that she must have fresh fruit, 24-hour limo service and "presidential accomodations" to name a few. Harris said the Caucus is looking for twelve comp rooms for her entourage. "But we added a contract rider of our own "said Ba.gneris, "Ms. Turner will ride on the GPC float in the parade that day." In new business, it was noted that the Comedy Wor~hpp will ljave a fllndraiai!r on Thuradai ~ flight and tliaf Men • Togethe.r, a New ,Yotk--Oasea gay' ,trou~ ¥rill premier in Hopston on Friday. 'Men · i1 spoo&OPed by C1tizen8 for Human Equality. Norman Gu\ltnan informed the gather­ing of a DemocratiC. rally at Bavari•n Gardens, near Waugh at Memorial, on Saturday, June 4. He asked for volunteers to help assemble the booth at 11:00 a.m. that day. In return, helpers will receive food and drink and a chance to meet the governor and other dignitaries. In closing remarks, Bagneris ag~~ appealed to members to encourage partiet· pation in the GPC rally. "Dallas may not have a gay pride week parade because of lack of unity," he stated, "so invite your friends from Dallas down. Throw a cot on the floor and let's have everyone here to bring this celebration to the national level with San Francisco and New York." Citizens Rally to Oppose MTA Bond Referendum By Hollis Hood Opposition is mounting to the June 11 MTA bond referendum on financing the heavy rail system, said the opposition group's spokesperson, Mary Jane Smith "We are organizing in neighborhoods and the response has been very success· ful," she said. The purpose of the group is to organize all the smaJler groups who oppose the rail into one coalition which wiU have more clout. "MTA has not lived up to its promises thus far, and it would be foolish to autho­rize them to spend $3 billion more for a train that will only service 1.8 per cent of the population," she said. "They cannot claim to help clear up the freeways-they will always be filled, so how is the train going to help congestion?" Councilman John Goodner agreed to chair the committee which is ditributing material, addressing civic groups and in other ways initiating opposition to MTA's plan. JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 House Bill 2138 Dies in Committee With the ending ofthecurrentTexaslegis­lative session, the threat of House Bill 2138 coming to a vote also ended. The bill died in committee. Even so, gay men and lesbians need to continue lobbying efforts against such a propoaal said an aide in Rep. Debra Dan· burg's office. ''The people with the Alert Citizen's Committee and the Dallas Doc­tors Against AIDS are not going to let this issue die just because it didn't pass this session. We have seen what they have been able to do in two months ofmobiliza· tion. They will not stop so neither can we." Wheels Fall off Skate Craze They're still clogging the boardwalk in Venice, California, but elsewhere in Amer­ica, skaters seem to have rolled to a stop. The Los Angeles Times reports that a national poll by the Roller Skating Rink Operators Association has discovered that half the households surveyed had at least one "lapsed skater"-someone who hadn't strapped on skates in the last year Association spokeswoman Susan Cloidt says the glamour skaters of a couple of years ago are gone. Says Cloidt, "We've lost the Gentleman's Quarterly type of customer." Household Vending Machines You may soon be able to get a Coke from a vending machine without ever leaving home. The soft drink industry is worried that, what with home video games, com· puters and cable TV, people may never leave their homes to pick up a six-pack. So, reports Beverage Industry News, they're busily developing an in-home soft drink dispenser, which sells for about $125.00. Industry observers say these dispensers could be the biggest thing since the non­returnable bolt.le. Montrose Mouth Daytime Hours now at the Montrose Clinic The Montrose Clinic will be open during the day beginning June 6. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays the schedule will be 10am-5pm and open again Monday through Friday evenings 6:30-9 30pm. Appoint­ments are preferred during the day by cal­ling 528-5531 . A small service fee of $15 is required which includes a complete STD exam, test­ing and medications if needed. This action is in response to increased patient needs and it 1s hoped will reduce patient waiting time, said Frank Berrier, clinic director. -a- Harris County Democrats will host a .. coun­try fair'' fund raiser June 4 at Bavarian Gardens with Gov. Mark White. Then that night, they°ll have a black tie (optional) ··aayou Cotillion" at the Meridian Hotel. -a- Lmda "Luly" Simpson-and her hubby­and the new owners of the "same ol' Hole" on Tuam. She·s formerly of GBI. so stop in and say howdy and see the changes in the bar and patio -a- The Lambda Bike Club rode a leisurely 15 miles around Memorial Park (twice) last Sat­urday. June 4 the Bike Club will be riding through the streets of Montrose in an attempt to pick up new members along the way. The ride will cover Fa11v1ew. Westhei­mer, Alabama and Richmond from Bagby to Kirby. They will be wearing white shirts Anyone desiring to be "'picked up" should wear a white shirt and nde the streets of Montrose from 11 :30 to 1.30. they say The bikers will end the ride with a pool­side party, sponsored by Sports Coverage Unlimited, at 3333 Cummins Saturday June 11, the group will load their bikes into a pickup and head for Gal­veston for a ride along the seawall. For this ride, bring your own lunch and the cost of the gas will be split among the group. Bring your swim suits and prepare for a full day of fun in the sun, a spokesperson said -<>- Charlotte's annual "'Best Little Whorehouse in Texas Review" featured "the 'Weathergirts'-Shelby Morton and Greg Burgess·· doing ''It's Raming Men.'" All trps for the performance were donated to M.O Anderson Hospital for AIDS research. Mor­ton and Burgess said $150 was collected during their thra.minute song and extend thanks to everyone for makmg the evening so succdessful. -a- The City Health Dept Mobrle Unrt will be at Charlotte's. 911 Drew, Sunday to conduct VO screenings 5-9pm. Screenings will also be held at MidtowneSpa. 3100 Fannin, Mon­day. 9pm-1am. -a- Neartown Civic Association's affiliate group, the Montrose Watch. will meet for a training session at 7pm Wednesday, Ju~e 8. at the Firehouse, 1413 Westhe1mer. Applica­tions for volunteers to help patrol the neigh­borhood are being accepted -a- The Montrose Chorale is now an Independ­ent organization separate from the Mont­rose Symphonic Band. according to Chorale director Robert Moon. Everyone who enjoys singing 1s invited to "'become a part of our song .. st Bering Church. 1440 Harold on Wednesday 7:30 p.m. -a- Gafveston's newest gay bar, Trammp's, is located just about a block from popular Ste­wart Beach Owners Chip Herber and Steven Futrell invite all of us beach bums from HOU$tOn to visit their new club at 627 Winnie Street at 7•h. UNIT Wednesdays~ Pacific Street Madness 8pm-2am 2 for l Cocktails $1 Longnecks Grill open Daily llam-llpm TlillOUC.1 ...... --- DIVE ..S.....I.T....Y..... _______________ ~ 110USTON CJAY PRIDE W, EEI~ Wednesdays! Pacific Street Madness 8pm-2am 2 for 1 Cocktails $1 Longnecks Citizens for Responsible Transit Release Plan for Houston Citizens for Responsible Transit, a loose coalition of individuals and groups opposed to MTA's transit alternative and bond referendum, released an alternate transit plan lest week. The plan firstdemandsthatMTA_honor its commitment to put 909 buses m the fleet by 1983; they are 387 short of that figure. (This includes extra buses and altemateA). It further demands that MTA install frequent, comfortable crosstown bus service as promised, and implement the road improvement and grade separa· tions as set forth in the 1978 plan. It should initiate unbiased transporta­tion research including the opinions of the MTA Citizen Advisory Board and the tax· payers on what would be th~ bettt altern~ ­ti ve for Houston. MaJor transit ref'earchers havl' discouraged the use of heavy rail in Houston and even MTA's own efficiency experts advised against building a rail at this time. CRT wants MTA to pledge to develop a conservative, flexible system which is cost effective: subsidy to each bus route must be limited to 60 per cent of operating expense as stated in the 1978 plan, MTA must apply recommendations of the Mc Kinsey Report, and live up to the pledge of pay-as-you-go for capital projects made in 1978. The referendum is a clear viola­tion of that pledge, they said. "The essence of this plan was endorRed Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright ei 983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publ1sl'l9r.ed11or. Wilham Marberry 00.lf'JNS m1n~er. Acel Clarlc gt1plllcs Sonny Davis ««JUlll•ttg Holhs Hood ~n~•ng.Oitor Eddie Chavez spans «1'1or. Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee COflltJOcl/mg wr•ler.s Bob Jones. Mary Cadena, Juhe Hornngsworth. John Cooper, Larry Popham COfllf10Ut1ng photogr1pher.s Ly! Harris lldv11t1slttgd1rec:tor Mark Drago lldv•rl•S•llQ' Jon Cheetwood cz.u.t>MJ 01r.t<S1ng Forest & Sizemore Co dlStrtbu/IOll Fountbng MlmNr Gr .. ter Mol'UtOM Bus1oeu Gt!Od. G1y PT•• Auoc111ion .N..-.s.. S. 1f\o'tee1· lnt9JTI1toon1fG1y ~Agency. Pr.c1lic:New"t Austm SIHffu C.potol New. 5-niee Syfld•Ul«I FN/vrl S•rwcu ' Wflflf.S (S.n Fr1nc11CO) etwon1c .. F .. tur•. Un•lecl F .. tut9Synd1C111. J<lffreyVo{•ISon Rind)' Alfred, $tonew1H F11tur• Synd•Clll. Bn1n McNiught, Joe Biker POSTMASTER s.nd lddrlM eo<rect1on1 10 3317 Montroae 1309 Houston, TX 77008 Sublcflption r1t1 Ill US 111 SHl«t ll'lvllope $-49 per., .. , (52 INuel). $29per11• months (29 iuuea). or$1.2Sperweeli: Ci.ts tNn 21 ittuetl Nitionel advlft,.mg ,.,,, .. 1nl1flVI Joi 01S1blto. R1....,,d1U Mark .. ing. e6f115th Avenu1. New York 10011. (212) 2-42·8683 Advert1•mg d .. dhM T!.191dl)'. 5 30pm. IO< IHue re!HMO Fri· !':,,:'i~1 ~.,,,,.,, LOC411 ld'lert•IH'lg ret• tchedu•1 f1Y9-A ;,:.A•~-;t;: .~.!:,,~ ~: ,:~~ ld¥1rt111rig r•1• schedule :~~':;~~.::~:::~s11:::=.;:::na: VQ6c• lo any c11eep~1.,. •dv1rt111ng by four transit specialists who spoke in Houston this past April," said Klein. ''Those four gentlemen came here without fee to advise us against heavy rail. We had better heed their warning." Gays Organize for New Hampshire Primary The gay community in New 1:fampshire, home of the nation's first pruna_ry, h.as begun to prepare for the 1984 pres1denbal election. On the weekend of May 20-22, r~pre~en­tatives from several gay or~ani~tions met with Tom Chorlton, executived1rector of the National Association of Gay and Lesbian Democratic Clubs, the group anch~~~=· explained New Hampshire's plan for electing deleg~tes to the 1_984 Democratic convention m San Franc1s~ and presented an. over.view of th~ s1x Democratic presidential campaigns According to Chorlton, "~I.I six cam­paigns have responded pos1~1vely to ~he National Association's ongoing lob~r1ng effort.8 which began last September. Jim Fullington, a leader of a successful gay organization in.th~ H!111over area an~ the National Associations key state con tact, was invited to meet with Sena~r Allen Cranston and his New Ha!11psht~e staff less than a week after Fullm~on s name was submitted by the National Association, they said. Lesbian Mothers to Meet Shelia King will speak on the topic "You Have Nothing to Fear Unless You're a Lesbian Mother' at the next meeting of Choice's lesbian mother's group at 6:30 p.m. June 4, 210 Fairview, apartm~nt. 1: Local attorney Patricia O'Kane will Jom King with information on custody and family law in Texas. The group will also discuss summer activities with and without, the children's participation. 1 The mother's meeting is a subgroup of Choice's Unlimited. It meets the first and third Saturdays of each JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 month at 6:30 p.m. at the above address on Fairview. Forum on June 11 MTA Bond Referendum The League of Women Voters of Houston will present a forum to inform the votera on the issues involved in the June 11th, $2.25 billion bond referendum for bus and rail. The meeting will be held Tuesday, June 7 in the conference room of the Hous­ton Galveston Area Council (HGAC), 3701 West Alabama, at 7:30 p.m. Alan Kiepper, general manager of the Metropolitan Transit Authority, and John Privett, executive director of the Tu Research Association of Houston and Harris County, will be the speakers. There will be a question and answer session fol­lowing the presentation of the speakers. The public is invited to attend. There is no charge and reservations are not required. New Legal Rights for Unmarried Couples in Calif. The California Court of Appeals has held that unmarried people who live together have the right to sue for loss of consor· tium. An action for loss of consortium means that one spouse can recover for losa of the other's sexual services. The Appeal Court, in the case of Buthcher v. Superior Court of Orange County, ruled that a couple need not be married as long as they had a eta ble and significant relationship. Leonard Graff, legal director of National Gay Rights Advocates, said the holding was a significant development in the Jaw. "The court didn't, in any way, limit its decision to heterosexual couples. There is no reason why this ruling shouldn't apply to gay couples as well" The Court held that a person who injures another adult can "reasonably expect in our contemporary society that the injured person may be cohabiting with another without benefit of marriage." Conference Asks: 'Who Are My People?' The 8th International Conference of Gay and Lesbian Jews will be held in Miami August 4-7. . The word "Miami" when translated into Hebrew, becomes "Mi.Ami" and means "Who Are My People." This coincidence provides a theme for the conference which asks, "Who Aie My People?"-as Jews .. as gay men and lesbians, and as responsible adults. For registration information, contact: The 8th International Conference Com­mittee, 19094 West Dixie Highway, North Miami Beach, FL 33180. Association to Benefit from San Francisco Party The Media Fund for Human Rights, the charitable and educational arm of the Gay Press Association, will be one of the bene­ficiaries of a giant Gay Freedom Day benefit party in San Francisco on June 26. Dick Collier, Jr., owner of the popular dance club Trocadero Transfer, has rented Brooks Hall, located directly underneath the Civic Center, site of the post-parade celebration, for the event he has dubbed ''Metropolis." "There's never been a party where the parade actually culminates." says Collier, who haa lined up Grace Jones and Tech­nique to provide entertainment. A. mul­timedia presentation will recall parties of previous decades, and a light_ show by l..af'erium will feature the first indoor use of a 22-watt krypton laser. Metropolis was conceived as a non­profit party, but Collier's appli~ation came too late to clear the bureaucratic hur· dies. Instead he's offering a portion of the profits, mostly to the fight against AIDS and to the Lesbian, Gay Freedom Day Parade Committee, but to a number of other civic and community projects as well, including the Media Fund for Human Rights. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 402 Lovett 527-9866 PATIO BAR NOW OPEN 4PM TILL, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY NOW APPEARING Luisa Amaral-Smith and Geoff Allen In ~rdn to allow us lo maintain the high quality o/mtntainmmt that you expttt Ba1a's now has a SJ dooTChargepn pttson on FRIDAY 0-SA TURDAY NIGHTS ONLY. Happy Hour 4-Bpm THE ULTl/llATE BAKED POTATO Now Stroh's Beer Virginia Apuzzo (left), executive director NGTF; New York Governor Mario Cuomo (center) and keynote speaker U.S. Army Sgt. Perry Watkins at the su:th annual Fund for Human Dignity Award6 May 16 in New York PHOTO MORGAN GREHWALO N .Y. Governor Addresses Gay Awards Dinner Mario M. Cuomo, governor of New York, announced formation of an "interagency task force" to coordinate the work of state agenciea involved with AIDS in hie address at the Fund for Human Dignity's sixth annua1 awards dinner May 16. Prefacing hie remark.a before a capacity audience of 450 in New York's Plaza Hot­el's Grand Ballroom, with "I know your special concerns," Gov. Cuomo called AIDS "a bizarre, savage killer," and announced, "Yesterday we iuued an exec· utive order which sets up an interagency taek force on the crisis that will bring together all relevant state agencies and a concerted all-out effort to find ways to help." Prior to this, Cuomo designated April as "AIDS Awareness Month" in New York State and authorized a $100,000 grant to Gay Men's Health Crisis, Inc. The governor also promised a state level executive order "to deal with the subject of discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation will be iaaued by me as gover· nor." His appearance marked the first time a state governor had appeared at such a gatherina. The Fund for Human Dignity is affil. iated with the National Gay Task Force. The benefit annually recognizes people who have made "diatinguiahed contribu· tions to the education of the American public about the Jives of gay men and les­bians" and which, this year, also cele­brated the 10th anniversary of the National Gay Task Force. Former Congressman to Head GRNL's Special AIDS Lobby The Gay Right. National Lobby has announced that former Congressman Jim Corman will head a opecial AIDS Lobby· ing Taak Force. The taak force ia expected to eignifi­cantly aaaiat the short-staffed GRNL in dealing with the many AIDS-related mea· sures on Capitol Hill, as well as bringing conoiderable extra clout to GRNL'o AIDS lobbying efforts, they said in a prepared preu release. Joining former Rep. Corman are Judy Goldsmith, the president of the National Organization for Women, and Dan Brad­ley, tormer head oi theNabonal Legal Ser~ vicea Corporation. Allan Jonas the former president of the American C~ncer Society, has agreed to serve aa a special advisor to GRNL on ita AIDS efforts. Former ConJZressman Jim Corman GRNL's Executive Director, Steve Endean, indicated that other prominent communi ty Jeadera may a lso soon join the AIDS Task Force. Rep. Corman, who represented the San Fernando Valley of Calif. for 20 years, can be expected to substantially enhance GRNL's Capitol Hill AIDS efforts, GRNL said. During his time in Congress, Cor­man was a leading advocate of both civil right.a and national health insurance. New Head Person at Human Rights Campaign Fund The Human Right. Campaign Fund, a national pro-11ay civil ri11hta political action committee, recently announced the Vic Ballik, new executlue director Human Righta Campaign Fund PHOTO • LfJOH MOSU!Y appointment of Vic Basile as its new exec­utive director. Basile is a Washington, D.C.·based gay activist and labor union organizer. HRCF. in it.a first major elections in '82, raised more than $600,000 and won 81%of the Congtteeional races it entered. Some SF Police Alarmed Over AIDS Contact International Gay New• Agency San Francisco police officials wiU start issuing plastic resuscitation devices and rubber gloves in response to officers' fears that they might catch AIDS during emer· gency first-aid work. The announcement has been greeted by a mixture of hoots and groans from the gay community because of the misinfor­mation about how AIDS might be trans­mitted implied in the police action. Health care officials have also said that the police are using iB-judged, alarmist tactics. The gloves and face masks will be dis­tributed at police stations throughout the city. "We think this should resolve the problem," Deputy Chief James Shannon said. "All we're doing is putting in a little more hygienic practices for officers. And if they use these hygienic practices, they're not going to get AIDS." Dr. Constance Wofsey of the AlDS Clinic at San Francisco General Hospital, said that she had tried to better inform the police about AIDS, but her explanatory sesAion haR been reduced to a lO·minute tapt· Mhown to poli<'e officers. Wofsey said that she "emphasized that AIDS cannot hf> spread through casual or professional contact" that does not involve sexual relations or exposure to blood. There are no cases of AJDS being transmitted solely through contact even m hospital or laboratory situations, she added. The distribution of masks and gloves came aftu the Police Officers Association iSBued a bulletin claiming that officers wer(' at risk if they were spit upon or bitten by an AIDS victim . The bulletin also recommended that officers submit a writ· h•n rt•port if they handled clothing of an AIJ>S patient. Spokesman Shannon explained the hys· teria·by saying, "There's going to be a lot of hy8teria when you don't know what the hel1 is going on. But we're not running at this liko a bull in a china shop. We should have made gloves available to officers years ago, just as a matter of hygiene." Captain Richard Klapp of the Mission Station, which includes the gay Castro District, said, "I've seen no manifestation of wild alarm or panic and I'm out there with the officers every day.They just want to know more about it because they're con· cerned for themselves and their families." Mike Hebel, welfare officer for the POA, said he would like to see better mouth·to· mouth resuscitation devices and zip-lock plastic bags in which officers could store evidence from possible AIDS patients without being exposed to blood. "Let's say an AIDS victim had been beaten up, there's a knife wound and blood on the jacket," said Hebel. "We'd like to see the same kind of plastic bags used that people at San 1'Tancisco General Hospital get." Deputy Fire Chief Charles Cresci said that rubber gloves were also distributed to firefighters two weeks ago. The depart­ment had already been using resuscitators equipped with disposable plastic mouth guards. "The more we were reading in the paper about AJDS," said Cresci, "the more con .. cerned people got. We now take the same precautions with AIDS that we would with hepatitis or any infectioua disease. It'• all the aame with us." National AIDS Forum to Plan Long Term Strategy Taking what gay medical and political leaden1 railed a much needed step towards long t<'rm planning, AIDS researchers. JUNE 3, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 7 orgamzations and health career providers will gather in Denver June 9-12 for an intensive strategic summit conference to map out national planning for patient care, organizational cooperation and pol· itical strength, 13illed a• th• se<ond National AIDS Forum. the workshol)'-oriented meeting His really targ<>ted to thOO<' directly working with. AIDS care, politics and reAearch," said Jeff Richards, Forum program CO· c-hair and San F?fncisr.."O board member of the Nat10nal Gay Health Education Foun· dation Co.chair Helen Schietinger, outspoken coordinator of the University of Califor· nia, San Francisco, Kaposi's Sarcoma CHnic, said, "It's just now dawning on our community that AIDS is not going to dis­appear tomorrow. That's true. We have to plan strategies at every level now for the long haul ahead. And our planning must be cooperative, and national.'' FOR THE TOTAL MAN LOOK YOUR BEST, FEEL YOUR BEST. At Continental Hair & Body Works. we do more than just hair. TANNING. We tan you with our UVA Euro­pean tanning bed in total privacy. MUSCLE TONING. We build and tone your muscles by Electro Muscular Stimulation. We call it the lazy man's way to a beautiful body. Plus we have THE BODY WRAP-for imme­diate loss of inches (as seen on the Phil Donahue Show). HEAD, HAND AND FEET EXPERTISE. We relax and regenerate you with reflexology: the art of stim­ulating the nerve endings to increase proper blood flow and oxgenation of the cells. HAIR. NOW OPEN UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP LINDA 'LULU" SIMPSON Featuring: Free Sunday Afternoon Buffet Wednesday Night Steak Night $300 Happy Hours 7am- 7pm Monday-Friday with 75¢ bull shot and bloody mary specials Manager Danny Miller 109 Tuam-528-9128 And of course. your hair. Designed to fit your lifestyle by Teri. our certified MARKHAM professional. (MARKHAM PRODUCTS available.) At CONTINENTAL HAIR & BODY WORKS looking and feeling your best is made easy. Continental Hair and BOdY WorkS VISA· and MasterCard accepted. Gift certificates available. NOTTINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER 14441 Memorial Drive • suite 10 • Houston. TX 77079 (713) 496-2943 Tue-Sat. Call for appt. 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 ............. City Council Candidate Opts for Central Jail •• •• By Holla Hood A centralized booking procedure in a cen­tral jail ia one way to help alleviate jail overpopulation currently plaguing enforcement facilitiea in Hou11ton, said David Jones, recently announced City Council candidate for at.large position place four. That council seat was pre­viouely held by the late Homer Ford. Jonee, a mayoral appointee to the Police Chief• Advisory Committee, encouraged Mayor Whitmire and County Judge John Lindu.y in a reeolution to appoint a study committee to examine the factors contri­butin11 to jail overpopulation and abueee of prieonen detained in the Houston City and Harria County jaila. He hu been man balling support for the rNOlution. The Gay Political Caucue is one of many oraanization.a which has voted to endo?M the resolution. "The ay1tem u it exist.a affects poor peo­ple generally more than anyone else," he aaid. '11ie black.a think it discriminate. &11ainat them, but it actually discrimi­nate. against all disadvantage people. Justice is blind to the ethnic, butitissome­ti. mee blind to the humane concerns as well." Jones an attorney and former staff member in the district attorney's and attorney general's officea, said he got out of the 1ystem becaWIO he didn't like the valuea that it fostered. "I had occasion to visit many jails and prieons during the nine months I was for prehapa a ZO.minute court appearance. "If they were out of jail, it would save the agency money and they could hire their own awyef '' I I n Jonea also·favors hberauielion of pre­trial release procedures, a power jud&'e8 have, but rarely use. Of 39,000 persona booked in 1982 only six per cent were released on penional recogllizance. A1a­tin's figures reflect 86 per cent release and Galveeton 25 per cent. Jonea was instrumental in getting cleri­cal work in the police department turned over to clerk• and freeing up officers for police duties. He wu alao involved in the scheduled overtime for oflkera so they could earn extra money on the beat and ·not aa BeCUrity peraon1 at a bar. But all government i1 not in law enforcement, he emphasizes. "A councilman ahould be involved in all levels of government.'' he said. "Espe­cially in a city like Houston. He hu to be aware of how the city is being affected by all le&'ialation at the national and state levels aa weJl. I see that a councilman of the future will have to take a new role in city government. A much more expanded role that just representing one area." • • •• 1. nnova t•m s•• • • • Located in the heart of Montrose • • 1506 w Alabama serving all tho • ~ community's travel needs • • SPRING AND • SUMMER SPECIALS. • • •• Weekend Galveston • •Party Coaches (Sat. & • •sun. departures) . . . • •Round-trip $15 per per- • •son (with compl i menta~ • eye-openers). • •• New Orleans Food • •Festival (July 4th wee- • • kend) ... all inclusive, • • $159 per person • •• Acapulco 4 days/3 • • nights ... $239 including: workin~ on the Ruiz case, which eventu- David Jone•, candidate for Houston ally resulted in prison changes." He des- City Council Jones says he favors a fair housing ordi­nance and would move toward ending sex­ual preference discrimination wherever it was found. He favors regulating the amount of political contributions to cam­paign funds so councilperaons will not be awayed by special interests. Jones has mixed feeling, he says, about MTA'a propolled transit plan. 01 was for it at firat, but the more I read about it and reeearch it, the more I wonder if it's the right thing to do. I definately think an elected MTA Board is eomething to con­sider." : air & hotel • • • cribed the conditions aa dehumanizing. People were sleeping on cold wet slabs or on table tope in community cel1s. 4 Jt was smelly. It got in my nostrils until I became really sick of it. I was so dis­gruntled by where I aaw these people. We take a pe-non and make him as unplea­sant as po88ible. It's a disorienting effect on thoee dealing with them. You begin to become immune to the stench, and you begin toceaaetoaeethem upeople. That's when it'a time to get out." Since that time, Jones baa been activly pursuing ways to stream.line the jailing more applicable. This has been tried in some other cities and seems to work. The important thing, he stressed. is to get the petty offender out of jail and back to earning a living. It costs the law enforcement agency $30 per day to hold a prisoner. A court-appointed lawyer is $100 In addition to Jones, Anthony Hall and Nikki Van Hightower have also announced to run for this council seat. • Montrose Travel Club • • 523-3051 • ! Commercial Accounts ! .... 523-6835 .... ••• •••••••••••• d~:!:,m and keeping the jail population ~ "Medical emergencies as well as uaaulta by priaonera are well docu­mented," hia resolution reads. "If these problema are not addreaaed by responsible officials, innocent Harria County citizens will auffer and thecity a.nd county could be liable for lar&'e money damage awards to people injured in the jails." The Naked Truth is ••• We can't make ends meet if ~ou don't come see us. We He recommends that the study commit­tee explore theae specific remedies: allow police officera to write citations for jailable miedemeanora that could be reduced to Clau C m.i.ademeanora or municipal viola­tions. Better utilization of the county's pre­trial release program for non-violent defendants. Provide full time m&lliatrates to review bail and pre-trial release options. Establish a centralized booking procedure in a lingle jail. Establish a bona fida clas- 1ification 1ystem to reduce a888ult& and prevent suicides. lie explained that when someone is picked up for a minor charge, that the bond might be so high, the penion would spend three days in jail because he cannot make the bail. After that lime he may end up with a fine, but bu alill l<>1t three da}'11 of time he could have been out earning the money to pay hi1 fine. The doubling of customary minimum bonds for all offenses and the increase in" arreata in 1982 bu not deterred crime, said Jones. but only increa8ed jail population. The matter of how to accomodate these extra prisoner• becomes a serious consid· eration at budget time. He noted a duplication in booking proce­duree where county prisoners are taken to the city jail fir11t. Booked there, they then wait to be transferred to the county jail where they are booked through the same procedure again. He propounds that one central jail facil­ity with one booking procedure would be are having our Hottest Summer Sale, Prices stripped to the bare minimum Old English Furniture 1138 W. Gray, 521-9145 * Wide Selection * Reasonable Prices * Customer Service * Major Credit Cards *Delivery Available Come in and see the new load. Right to Privacy Foundation Announces Projects At a recent meeting of thP board of dir tors of the relatively new Right to PrivS(Y Foundation, they approved an 1983-84 program focusing on documentation o't discrimination, analysis of the federal gay civil rights bills, what the impact has be<"rf of local gay civil rights laws, and extended investigation into tht political viability of candidates supporting gay civil righ ts. This is all according to a press relrage published by the group. The board also approved the establish· ment of a network of "ReRearch A88o~ ciates" who will, according to Rick Davis (the Foundation's Educational nd ReAearch Director), provide an important rettearch and analysis base previously missing for those working in the area of gay civil rights. Foremost among the projects approved will be completion of the foundation's efforts to document discrimination in employment, housing, and public services against gay men. The foundation will pub· lish a short pamphlet presenting the dis· crimination experiences of a number of individual lesbians and gay men rather than focusing just on cold, abstract atatis­tics. A aecond of the four projects will report and analyze what happens to elected offi. cials who atand for re-election. Are they defeated because of their support for gay civil rights. Are they attacked on that iesue? Or does their support bring them additional campaign workers, contribu­tions, and votes? The third major proje...1. involves a care­ful analysis of the current federal gay civil rights bill. Among other things, this study will examine whether, as Rev. Jerry Fal­well and others have charged, thooe bills would grant "special privileges to homo­eexual1." The final major project is that of deter­mining and documenting whether those places which passed gay civil rights laws some years ago have experienced the "parade of horribles" opponents warned of: teachers advocating homosexuality in the classroom, churches forced to hire homosexual ministers, etc. Lubricant May Reduce STDs Tests of a new lubricant at medical IC'hools have been termed "stunning" in its effectiveness at ki1ling viruses and bac· teria in sexually transmitted diseases, according to a recent article in Update, a Southern Californai newspaper. Bruce Voeller, founder of the National Gay Task force, and a biologist have b~n collaborating with David B. Goodstem, Advocate publisher, in developing thelub· ricant. The group recently donated the controlling interest in the prevention pro­ject cooperation to the Mariposa Foudna· ti on Teats result.a 1how that the lubricant killed herpes 1 and 2 viruses completely within 60 seconds, and killed bacterial causing gonorrhea, syphilis, trichom~ nas, and chlamydia. It may also be effec­tivt> against other dise1u~e1. The "moin" tests will come through the Family Health International in North Carolina and Voeller expects Food a.nd Drug Administration certification to fol. low a sucC'eAflful result of thel'le tetita. The Bottom Line Mo1:1t toilet seats are the wrong size and dQn't give enough thigh and buttock sup· port. That's tht> word from Englan~'s Uni· veraity ofTtthnology, as reported m New &:·~n~~~tgra.~~~z::~~re researche.rs tested 205 volunteers on five t.ypes of toilet seat.A, the condusion was that both men and women rut.eel the 11tandard model as the most unromfortnhle- --- BUND IMAGERY ... .-... 7r-1_,,, ~'"' 45% OFF Mini Blinds • (~ lnstci!ollOli ·- ·g<:if·More 9!ndS) ._f ,.i' /Of. "tli ... Q ~ I 1 ) ' .( ~ ,~'"'ti. ,,, •1:t1 ... ....... , ' Veitl<ol8tin~ Verosol 91\ddt~ • 'Cuotom Dropery ostom Bedspreads Wood Mini BHnds WolfUpholS!trV '• Commemol - Aestdentlol (oft T odo\I For A Free Est11T10te (713) 523-2670 JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 POTLUCK DINNER Saturday, June 4, 7:30pm Come and bring your favorite dish Continuing Education­" Discovering Your Spirtual Gifts" Tuesday, 7:30pm, during the month of June MCCR 1919 Decatur 861-8149 (Last 2 Nights-This Friday & Saturday Montgomery, Mayes & Stritch) Appearing June 7-11 and June 14-18 LOU ANN MILES 2702 Klrby 524-6272 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 Perry Confident of Eventual Acceptance into National Council of Churches A private way of life. Fmm1k-10J ·.\fonm 'atWJ C1m®111111111m1 By Steve Warren The acceptance of the Universal Fellow­ahip of Metropolitan Community Churche9 (UFMCC) into the National Council of Churches (NCC) is hardly a foregone conclusion, but Rev. Troy D. Perry remains buoyantly optimistic. "We're behind the scenes and we know where our support'• at," said Perry, founder and moderator of the board of eldera of the primiarily gay denomination. 0 1 believe with all my heart that we can pau the eligibility test if that comes up in November .... We passed it with their com­mittee, but the committee report they keep pushing back .•. .'' The 266-member NCC Governing Board met recently in San Francisco, where the UFMCC question waa the main item on their agenda. The board is scheduled to vote in N ovem her on whether to accept the report of their committee which has already declared that UFMCC meets the criteria for membership. If the report pas ... , the full NCC will vote next year on UFMCC's application, with two thirds needed to win. "We feel like the longer they wait the better off we are," Rev. Perry said. "To know ua ia to love us. _ •• The longer they wait on WI the longer we have the oppor­tunity to dialogue with them •.. and as they discover who we are and what we're all about and what we're teaching, that makes all the difference in the world." The two daya of dialogue in San Fran­ciaco attracted national media coverage, mostly centered on the atatementa of a few individuala representing opposing point.a of view within the council. Father Alexander Doumouras, a Greek Orthodox prieet, suggested that his and seven other Eairtern Orthodox churches might leave the NCC if UFMCC joins. Rev. Cecil Murray, pastor of an African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles, was quoted as calling lesbians and gay men a special threat to black fam· iliee, which he indicated are in enough trouble already. ••tt•s very interesting," said Rev. Perry, ''That the CME (Christian Methodist Epi8COpal) church has issued a press release saying 'We don't agree with the AME ... they do not speak for us. There are people on our Governing Board delegation who are supportive of the membership of UFMCC.' 80 that's a breakthrough for us that all at once the black chuches are div· iding on this iuue." Valerie Ford, a lay member oftheChris­itan Church (Disciples) told the press she felt more comfortable in MCC worship &er· vices than those of her own church or the NCC because of an anti-feminist attitude in the mainline churches. Rev. Don Eastman of Dallas has been one of UFMCC'a liaisons to NCC's Faith and Order CommisErion. In San Francisco, JU.v. Perry said. "they had a panel di.8CU8sion-Aeven of them to our one tEutmant I leaned over over to Nancy !Rev. Elder Nancy Wilson) and aaid, 'My God, that's Just not fair-seven to one.' She said, 'Oh no, thia is real good . It's uaually ten to one! I was so pleased because he was really able to hold his O¥t"ll He waa juat brilliant. "'The next morning the ... Membership Constituency Committee- of the National Council of Churches gave their present.a· tion and they were very ~upportive of our entrance. Then we had three people who gave their testimonies: Jim Sanmire (pas· ter of Golden Gate MCC and newly appointed chaplain to the San Francisco Police Depl); Pat Evans, a black lesbian from San Jose, a deacon jn our church there; and Nancy Wilson-and they were all brilliant." "That night we held a worship service in the Old First (Preebytenan) Church and had 805 people in attendance. (There are lower eetimates, but all over 500.) We were pieaaed. That building was full-the bal· cony, every thing. We had about 150 members of the (NCC) Governing Board who came to worship service .... " Don Eastman's theme on Tuesday morning had been "God always made room for the exceptions, no matter what the law said: Barren women, eunuchs, peo· ple who were not Jewish, and homosexu­als; and we really hit them with that." "My meuage to the (NCC) in my ser­mon was twofold. One was, people still tell us we're dying and going to hell. All we can say to them is as the blind man did who met Jesu.e one time. The religious leaders of his day said, 'Don't you realize the person who touched you had to be a einner because he healed you on the Sab­bath?' The man's answer was, and ours is too, 'I once waa blind but now I see. That's all I can testify to, what happened to me."' ... Th.e other (sermon point) was, I told the group very honestly they don't have to worry about the UFMCC too much; we only have 27,00 members •.. but that means of the 22 millioin gay people in America the largest portion of those are still in their churches, and they're going to have to deal with the gay people in their churches.'' "I believe with all my heart that there must be at least a million or so gays who are in their churches .. . closeted and frightened to death and trying to come to terms with their sexuality; and if homo­phobia reigns supreme in those groups and they can'tdeal with it, then definitely there'• problems." The worship service apparently opened the eyes of a few NCC members. In the receiving line afterward, Rev. Perry said, "If I had one I had a hundred who told me, 'You·ve made a difference here in this wor­ship service tonight for me.'" In their interaction with UFMCC, a number of NCC members, including some on t,he Govemiwi Bol'J"!, bavecopt1M>Utas l{sbib.11 'Bnil gay men. '"Some of the ;.Pover11ing BoMd members wish we ' wouldn't sa'j that.' Rev. Perry remarked. "Not the gay ones necessarily', butaoms of the other onee don't.want their denomina­tions to know they have gay people there. Wei~ that'1 not our problem, that's theire. We won't name names because we feel those individuals have to decide to do that, but definitely there are gay people there." "Tommorrow the National Council, the next day the World?" Surprisingly Rev. Perry revealed that that time-table may be reversed: "You can't join the World Council of Churches until you are members of a national council somewhere, that's the way it works. Of course we may still wind up in the World Council by joining the National Council of Churches in Nigeria. We're praying about that and our group may do that, so we may end up through a third World country still members of the Word Council of Churches." UFMCC has seven member churches in Nigeria. The denomination, which marks its 15th anniversay this fall, is in nine countries now with a total of over 200 churches. The UFMCC biennial general confer· ence will be held outside of the United States for the first time July 10-17, in Toronto, where the first MCC established out.ide the U.S. will be celebrating ite tenth anniversary. The main orderofbuei­nest1 will be considering a replacement for the feHowship'a present organizational structure. Rev. Perry believes the one being pro· posed '1will last a hundred years, with a little fine tuning.'' (TLC) THE LAMMEY CORPORATION hOl\\. AJ.ib.:Ul\l Hlit.,..lon. T(.·~ ""7(')()6 7H.524 . .860 11w STRATFORD ~onBraldwu 'IJ/621-H.llO NERR'POlJN GRl2RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 Relax indoors with all of the fragrances of Spring and Summer .......... now available at TLC. There are Soaps & Toiletries from world famous Crabtree & Evelyn .. Incense from Floracopia, Scarborough & Primo ... Room Sprays .. Candles from Faroy & Lenox. NOW OPEN Mon thru Thur to 9 PM Everyday peclal-1/2 Price Drinks to all arriVing at Mary's on a Motorcycle! JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Mary's sup~ the Colorado Regional Gay Rodeo June 3,4,5 Tuesday & Wednesday's Movie PIATINUM BLONDE starring Jean Harlow, Loretta Young All Day Wed. & Thurs. Sat. & Sun. Special Happy Hour Prices to noon to 8pm all in Mary's T-Shirts Eye Openers Wednesday Special 10pm to 2am 75¢ beer PARKING IN SIDE LOT 5PM-8AM WEEKDAYS. All DAV WEEKENDS (TOW AWAY ZONE OTHER TIMES) HOME OF HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLUB & TEXAS RIDERS AFTER-HOURS NIGHTLY 1022 WESTHEIMER S2S.8851 MUSIC av lAARY FOUGHT Larry Fought-DJ Every Weekend 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 'Let's Do It One More Time' From Gem> Leggett The Southwest Texas conference of the United Methodist Church (held) its annual meeting in San Antonio May 29- June I. In the olden days the primary excitement was the reading of ministerial appointment&. Methodist preachers are not called traveling preachers for nothing. Folks never know whether they were staying at their churches for another year, or if they had to start packing parsonage parcels immediately. Hysterics were an acceptable response to this reading­whether motivated by the joy ofleaving a really drudge of a church or the pain of finding oneself appointed to that drudge of a church. Nowadaya Methodist conferences are not nearly ao exciting. Reports are heard, monies are allocated and a few safe debates over helping third world leftists are drearily recited while wives shop at Joske'1. However, •ince 1971, thinga have been different for the San Antonio conferences! In 1971, theconferencetookawaymymin­iaterial orders because I was a homosex­ual. Unfortunately for the conference, this was not done in the usual "let's get him quietly out the back church door and con­tinue our little businesa at usual church games Some radical gaye from East and West Coaste (the Sugar Plum Fairies), some early U of T gay libbeTS along with a few hardy San Antonio gay movement folks (including one or two street jotas-God bless them) insisted that the oppression of gays and lesbians by church structures come to an end. The resulting conflict­which devastated the straights and invig­orated the gays-was reported around the world. Every major newspaper in the U.S. car­ried the story, Newsweek and Life ran pic­tures and Eaquire gave the Methodists a dubioUI achievement award. At the con­clusion of the Newaweek article, the biahop wu quoted as saying "The Gene Leggett affair is cloeed." Well, dear readers, that was only the beginr,ing! There has not been a confer­ence aince 1971 without strong and visible gay current. 1timulating and stroking the frightened libidos of the Methodist hie­rarchy What good has this done? In term• of Methodist politiCI and policies, practi· cally nothing was accomplished until two conferences ago when a new sympathetic bishop came to town. (He also happened to be black.) It was to be a new era of dialogue and loving exchangea that would validate self-esteem and elevate the gay "problem" to the same boring level as world hunger. (Don't get me wrong-I am against hunger and know personally the terrible reality of the "'haves'' who don't give a damn for the "have-nots.") After 12 years of hard struggle, one lone gay United Methodiet l'!ymon-.T.roy Stokes-got elected to a minor position, and all hell broke loose from the rabid fringe• of our Chriatian flocks. This year's conference may see homophobic craziness at a new all time high. If the return is so little. why invest the energy? AJJ Ulual , it'• the little things that count. (And you can embroider that and hang it over your bed.a!) Gays and lesbians come up to me and say "I read about it and it helped." Ministers who are closet gays secretly come around for a handshake and even an embrace. Straight ministers whisper that their personal ministries have been enriched: good old lay people from our country churches drop me a note and 88Y that for the first time they under­stand and can talk to their lesbian daugh· ten. l k>vt it! So. sweet gays and lesbiani; of San Antonio, we"re going to do it one more time! (Editor's note: Uoett's letter u·a.s written 1uat prior to the rmzfermcr. At tire galMr' ing on May 3(), IM United Metlwdiat Church of Southwest Texas affirmed its ban on gay pl!Ople in the ministry. Leggett staged a siknt protest by kneel­ing at the meeting after he was refused permisaion to address the delegates. The vote against Leggett's position was about 800 lo 100. Leggett is an active lay member of the Oak Lawn United Metlwdist Church of Dallas.) KS/AIDS Foundation Responds to Atheist Group To Don Sanders, American Gay Atheist• From Michael B. Wilson, M.Ed. , president KS! AIDS Foundation, Hou.a ton Thank you for your recent letter of May 13, 1983, and your many comments and sug­gestions. Your observations are interest­ing indeed and I appreciate your obvious concern and taking the time to express your opinions to our group. A. I'm sure you must realize, there is a segment of our society who feels comfort and accomplishment from participating in such activities as the Candlelight Vigil for Public Health and the Evening Prayer Service. We as an organization are dedi­cated to accepting all views and working together against the AIDS epidemic, coor­dinating and cooperating with varioua and differing beliefs. We feel we can aH work together against a common foe. Therefore. I invite your group to join with us in supporting our cause in the way you best see fit. We would appreciate your organization having some type of fund ­raising event tailored to your own beliefs in our behalf. Please find a "Fund-Raising Event Endorsement Application " enclosed which needs to be completed prior to such an event. Thank you for your organization's help in our fight against AIDS. Together, let's beat it! Voting No on June 11 From Neil Iabin While I have not followed the details of the MTA's bus and rail proposition, I have felt increasingly uncomfortable with their questionable reasoning and their arro­gant and heavy handed behavior. Over the last few months, I have appreciated the excellent coverage of the rail vs. mono­rail debate by the MONTORSE VOICE and I would like to publicly thank Hollis Hood for her in-depth reparting and analysis. The public is being told by MT A officials that the solution to our traffic problems lies in a heavy rail system that the public must approve. At the same time, they admit their proposal will reduce freeway traffic by leas than two per cent. Some­thing is not right. Since most of the congestion is along the freeways, it seems reasonable, quickest and most coet effective to build an initial "rail" sytem above the freeways with con­venient intersecting bus Jines (and future intersecting rail lines). However, the MTA saye it cannot build above the freeways because the State Highway Department has jurisdiction and plans to double deck the freeways-that is not a rea8"'n, but an excuse. Opposition to the monorail has focused on (a) that no other city has one, therefore it cannot be a good idea, (b) that the fed­eral government allows financial aid for heavy raiL but not monorail systems and (c) that the monorail is inadequate and unsafe. The first two arguments are excuses and not reasons. Given the excuse type reasoning of the first two a~guments , I don"t believe the MTA officials when they use the third .. catch all" argument­especially when they decide that the monorail is safe and adequate for part of their Phase II plans. Such reasoning caused me to view the MTA propasal with suspicion. However, their heavy handed and arroga~t approach to the public solidified my dis· trust. It is heavy handed to tie any and all bus improvements to the rail plan, telling voters they cannot have any bus improve­ments unless they vote for the rail plan. It is heavy handed to contr1J:ct to purchase the rail cars before a decision has been made to build the rail 'systein. The tax credit deadline argument for the purchase is an excuse and not a justifiable reason for "forcing" the public's hand. . Jn addition, the MTA's confusion of wishful thinking with public assurances that their financial plan was in order makes me distrust them even further. However. in my opinion, the last straw concerns the arrogance of the MTAleader­ship. When a group of concerned citize:ns organized a major public forum-Wlth experts from across the country-the MTA refuled to accept an invitation to participate. The MTA proposal might still be ti per· formances. Tickets are $8-$25 at Ticke.t­master or Union Jack. The event ts sponsored by Citizens for Human Equal­ity. Theater or Theatre From Billie Duncan Although the preferred spelling for movie houses and playhouses in the dictionary is "theater." the preferred spelling for thosr establishments in practice is utheatre ... All textbooks that I used during both undergraduate and graduate work used the spelling "theatre" when speaking of the entire realm of plays and play produc­tion. In Houston, almost all playhouses use the speliing "theatre" in the names of their establishments. Two exceptions are Chocolate Bayou Theater and Main Street Theater. (Editor's note: It 's always a pleasure to hear from Billie Duncan. She is correct that most Houston live theaters are refer­ring to themselves as "theatres," using the British •J>£11ing of the word. But the VOICE will continue ta b<! stubborn and keep it our Policy to spell it "theater," the American apelling-the exception being in ca.ae of typos, which we are famous for.) League of Women Voters is Active From Phyllis Frye Although I've been a member for more than 5 years, I never really got involved with the League of Women voters (LWV) until this past January. The followmg observations are personal-yet, I feel that they are accurate observations of a member. When I studied LWV in depth, I saw its strengths as well as how lesbians and gay men could benefit as members. (Men can join.) I saw that a) most every position that LWV-national, state and local-has on iasuea is closely parallel to my own view on many i88uee. Also, the issues on which LWV has a position are wide ranging. The range covers but is not limited to reproduc­tive choice, D.C. 11elf-govemment, ERA, national security, water quality, toxic sub­stances, domestic violence, resuable energy sources and regulation of hazard­ous radioactive waste. Strengths ofLWV can be summarized in three phreases: in-depth study, grass-roots consensus and extensive monitoring and lobbying. Once LWV has a researched consensus, it does monitor and it does lobby. LWW is very political. But LWV is non -partisan, issue·oriented, political. Policymakers and politicians perceive LWV in a variety of ways, but always with respect for what it says. They may or may not like or agree with what LWV says. They know that it went through a labor· ious process of study and membership con­f! ensus to obtain ita JX?tition on the issue usually taking a mmimum of two yean. Letters LWV is not reactionary and politicians know it. Currently, LWV in Houston is studying three iasues that are of interest to all citi­zens. The national study on national security and arms control is a two-year endeavor. What are the elements of national security? World hunger, support of dictatorships, excessive budget defi­cieta or limited natural resources? Is arms control only a nuclear issue? Or is the sale of conventional arms, reduction in mil­itary salary or the John-Wayne-swagger of our leaders also involved? Only with thorough study can the membership be adequately informed. LWV-Houston is also involved in a con­tinuing study of women under Texas law. Thus far, the committee members have published pamphlets on intestacy and wills, choices of attorneys and spouse abuse. The study continues into the other areas of domestic violence including child abuse as well aa lobbying the DA's office for policy change and monitoring of dis­trict courts. A third study is new and will be within the natural resource& portfolio. The new committee will study the quality of Lake Houston water. This includes buildup in the watershed, effluent quality and drink­ing water standards. Once the studies are completed, they're presented to the membership for group dis­cu88ion and consensus. With consensus, appropriate committees can lobby legisla­tors, monitor and testify at hearings. LWV-Houston is to begin a new state­wide study on redistricting. Redistricting is of special interest to any of you GPC types. This study is beginning soon in leagues throughout the state: tell your friends around the state to get involved. The plane including having a completed study and membership consensus prior to the 1985 Legislature. LWV can then lobby to have meaningful laws passed many years prior to the next census-before l~g­ielators get anxious about the next redts· meting. There exists a position on the Adminis­tration of Justice Committee which reads, "support of removal of certain areas of human behavior from criminal prosecu­tion ." There is also a position on prison reform. Yet, the committee is unstaffed. The Health Committee is understaffed. One of its p<>Ritions reads in part "support the establishment of comprehensive pub­lic health services." Surely AIDS should fit within the word, comprehensive. By helping to staff the committee and updat· ing ita position, you may see LWV as another recognized lobby group pressing for inclusion of AlDS in current programs. (Note: I emphasized the word, inclusion, for the benefit of many folks who disap­pointed me greatly last August through October.) These things can be done if you join LWV and get involved. All members, even inactive ones, receive a monthly back­grounder on a relevant and timely issue. Membership is only $30/ year. Call me for information at 723-a368. Try Our New MEXICAN MENU Carne Gulsada Plate Pollo Gulsada Plate Beef Taco Plate Fajlta Plate with free Coke-$3.95 Open 11am-1pm everyday (till midnite Fri. & Sat.) Imported Beer & Wine Famous hamburgers, shish-kabob, tacos, gyros Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shop 1536 Westhelmer 528-4655 JUNE 3 , 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 SATURDAY PAJAMA PARTY 11pm till ... ATTHE SUNDAY T-DANCE overlooklng the pool and patio 6pm-10pm NO DOOR CHARGE Register Now for Your FREE LISTING in the 7th edition of the Gay Areas Business Directory Houston/Montrose Section now in preparation SPECIAL OFFER: A custom trademark ad is FREE to the first business that takes our a 1/3 page or larger ad in each classification Call for details at 713/524-7200 Or write us at Gay Area Telephone Directory 3317 Montrose, Box 1010, Houston, TX 77006 ~GO.A.D~, ICn W147M51m S'u 'f 1"111"t11"Ct. 'CA''9 4'11"4" 1'6~1-'39•05~ • 1 WANT TO BE LISTED IN THE tfa.tt~. ol.R'Em'AY I a uthorize and request hstmg and blication in the Gay Areas Private Telephone Directory. and this authorization is good until! cancelled or changed. NI• Ollll •111• Nkklt• If 11111.,. U• ....... "" 1 ........ ! .CH... .. ~ ~ I I NOTE: D Please contact me regarding advert1sment(s) 0 Send advertising information-add $1 postage & handlong "Serving the Gay Community Since 1978" 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 'Return of the Jedi' By Steve Warren AB you might have expected, Princesa Leia doeo not die atthe end of Return of the Jedi and leave Luke Skywalker and Han Sol free to romp through the universe enjoying laser sex together. Nor do R2-D2 ALBERT CLARKE PHOTO R2-D2 !Kenny &ker imide) and C-3PO admit-u we've known eince Star Wara-that they're lovers, and reveal how droids do it. Actually, nothing about Jedi is much more 1urprising than thoee details save the discloerue that Luke has a twin 1 eieter (guess who-when there's only been one female character in the series); and that comes early on. To compensate for the script's predicta- Gargle Your Smoking Habit Away If you're trying to Irick the smoking habit, a Canadian doctor may have figured out a way to gargle it away. A. reported in Neu: Scientist magazine, Montreal physician William Najaar says hie mint-flavored mouthwash is 85% effec­tive against smoking. It's called "Tabarin," tastes like green mint and sells for about $14 a bottle in Canada. The doctor says its contains mineral salta that won't affect the taste of your food. But take one puff on a cigarette, and your mouth will feel like "four dozen chewed-up c1gan." <''•puD.t"..P"t' MEXICAN FOOD JlVTHENTIC bility, director Richard Marquand moves the action along with the pace if nQt the coherence of Raiders of the L-Ost Ark. There are fewer dead spots than in either of the first two parts of this trilogy. The first half-hour is open! resolving the situation from the end of The Empire Strikes Back. Han Solo (Harrison Ford) has been captured by Jabba the Hutt-a lizard-limbed Orson Welles-and frozen in carbonite. Within 24 hours-or whatever constitutes a day on Tattooine-all of our heroes penetrate Jabba's inpenetrablefor­tress and rescue Solo. Princess Leia (Car­rie Fisher), in an iron bikini, has never looked so feminine nor acted so masculine. Meanwhile, back at the Galactic Empire, they're rebuilding their space sta­tion to make the Death Star "the ultimate weapon." All that stands in their way is the rebel force led by Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), "the last of the Jedi." Luke's goodness is pitted against the evil of his father, Darth Vader, who has succumed to the 0 dark side" of The Force. Dark equals evil is a racist concept, but that's countered by having Lando Calris­sian (Billy Dee Williams) as the dark side of the good side. The plot, Freudian father-son conflict and all, is just an excuse for a string of adventures which already look like the video game they will soon become, and which find the protagonists facing certain death at least every 30 minutes. The best of these episodes is during a high speed forest chase on the equivalent of airborne motorcycles. The special effects, while not always as perfect as I remember them being in Empire, are still astonishing. The Rebels' war room is equipped with what looks like holographic computer animation, and most of the action is so lifelike we can accept it without question. Then there are the creatures, a mixed bag in more ways than one. Our old favor· ites have never been in better form­except poor Yoda. whose cameo is badly synched and largely unintelligible. New to this film are the marvelous bloblikeJabba and his Felliniesque court, some of whom suffer from too much Muppet influence; and the 66 Ewoks, a forestful of stuffed animals come to life. Nitpicking aside-and my mother alwaya told me not to pick my nits­Return of the Jedi is a powerfully pleasing package that reminds us what the joy of moviegoing i1 all about. 'Track Two' Did Its Job By Steve Warren Via Gay Pree• A..oclation Wire Service Track Two left me feeling I know every· thing there is to know about Toronto's gay Celebrate Gay Pride Summit Rally June 26 CHAPUL TEPEC 813 Richmond Films Harrison Ford as Hans Solo, Luke Skywalker as Mark Hamill and Peter Meyhew as Chewbacca, their hands tied behind them, are brought before Jabba the Hutt FRANK CONNOR PHOTO Luke and Darth Vader (David Prowse in thia scene) in a lightsaber duel ALBERT ClARt<E PHOTO community. A dangerous attitude per­haps, but that's my problem; it shows the film did its job. On Feb. 5, 1981 , Toronto police spent an estimated $250,000 in tax dollars raiding four gay bathhouses. They arrested 286 men, most of whom have since been acquitted. Thia incident was the catalyst that politicized the city's gay community, bringing thousands to the streets for the first time the following night. The raids and their aftermath form the core of Track Two and take up nearly half the running time. The rest is spent recal­ling the rather limited historyofToronto's gay movement Body Politic, the city's gay newspaper, has been publishing for more than a decade, and efforts to secure gay rights legislation have been going on nearly as Jong. The paper still operates 60s style­run by a collective with no payment to writers or other professionals who volun­teer their services; yet they've been having to raise money for four years to pay legal expenses stemming from charges that might be seen as a response to their con­frontational politics. The Hmoral majority" in Canada goes by the name "Renaissance." Despite their influence in the wake of Anita Bryant, lib­eral John Sewell was elected mayor in 1978, He spoke to a rally after the first Body Politic bust, declaring, "! believe that good mayora do stand up for commu­nities that are under attack." (This got an ovation from the San Franci11co premiere audience which had once hoped to hear such aentimenta from ''Lady Di"-Mayor Dianne Feinatf'm .) Two years later Sewell was up for re­election and openly gay George Hislop was running for alderman in the 6th ward. Homosexuality was a major issue in the campaign, the mayor never backed down from supporting us; both men lost.· Homophobic forces in the police depart· ment read the election results as a man· date, and the bath raids occurred shortly afterward. Unless producers Gordon Keith, Jack Lemmon (not the actor) and Harry Suther­land have done a subtle, skillful propan­ganda job, the balanced view they offer shows Toronto'• gay community hasn't yet "progressed" to the point where it's tom apart by factionalism. On the other hand, divisiveness could be the reason it's tak~n them so long to accomplish any· thing. They certainly aren't as far along as San Francisco, where even relatively small factions wield some power but we waste moAt of our energy fighting each other. There are flaw1 in Track Tu'O: redun· dancies that should have been eliminated; too much time given to certain individu· ale; and a silly "dramatization" of a raid on a bath full of young men engaged in wholesome activities-swimming, play­ing pool and dining at the snack bar-that looks like an outtake from The Ritz. These are not reason& to avoid2 Track Two when it plays in your area. Unlike most so-called documentaries, this one pu11hes information rather than a point of view. Dept·nding on the 1ituation in your city, you ran look on the state of Toronto's lt>Bbiane and l(BY men a~ t·itht>r nostalgia or a preview of the futun. JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Tuesday, June 7, & Thursday, June 9 THE COPA PRESENTS THE PRELIMINARIES TO Miss Gay Houston Plus the new All Male Copa Dancers All Night Long Every Wednesday 25¢ Bar Drinks, 2 for 1 Canned Beer 528-2259 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 Montrose Art Windows Open Environments for Artist and Patrons By Hollio Hood Sunlight filters through soft browna and orange tones painting a prism on the work table. A radio murmurs to itself in the comer. The only other sound is the hum­ming of a fan and occasional sliding of glasa piecea being placed into a door. The atmosphere could be isolating for some, but for Gene Heater, Montrose stained glasa artisan, it is the atmosphere for crPating enduring pieces of art from multi­colored bits of crystaline sand. "I try to aaoiot people in realizing that a window is more than something that separate& the outside environment from the interior. It can be a work of art. as well," he said. Heater has received national, state and local recognition for his work. among them his uwindows." free-standing window-sized stained glass pieces. In 1981 he placed third in a national competition, end recently he was a semi· finalist in the Fragile Art '82 in the archltectural / traditional category. His work has been showcased in Glass Magazine and he is orie of seven glau artists featured in the March issue of Tua.a Monthly. A native of the tiny west Texas hamlett of Haakell, He.ter didn't grow up enter­taining thoughts of becoming a renown artist. "Everybody was aatisfied doing what had always been done. I was expected to be 1atiafied too, but there was something missing." Looking for that missing something led him to creative pottery work in college. He earned a bachelor's degree in art/biology at Midwestern State University and later returned to gain another fine arts degree "Windows" are Gene Hester's favorite in free form glass desiRn in ceramice and printmaking. Between period.a of study, Hester joined the Peace Corpaa a volunteer in Malaysia. The culture impressed him greatly. "Ever· ything waa so simple there," he 1aid. "Those people didn't worry about insu­rance, or bills or traffic. We didn't have televiaion. I didn't even look at TV for a year, and found I could do just fine without it." Doing without many "modern conven­iences" made him realize how complicated people aHow their lives to become. Qu ity Dental Care. MV The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Core, we believe on living up to our name And that means not only g1v1ng you quality dental treatment, but providing 1t at a price you can afford we·11 customize your payment pion to your family budget. Plus, you con save up to 20% of your costs w1tfi our Quolident membership plan. even 1f you hove dental insurance Quality Dental Core. Complete dental services at a price you can live with Now that's something to smile about Ouality Dental Cara Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway at Kirby 523-2328 Bung 1n this od and get o complete denial check up, d109noshc lMO'J'S ond your ieerh Cleaned few $25 00 Offer expun July It;, 1983 Gene Hester at Genesis Art GlaBB Studio "I try to keep that same simplicity of purpose in my work," Hester said. "Most of my truly 'artay' work deals with simple shapee, concept.a of color and space. I like to use the 'raw' edge of apiece of glaas,"he said running hie hand over a wave-like crest in a stained sculpture. Hester became interested in glass while trying to survive economically from pot· tery making. He first learned the tech· nique, taught it to others and as he mutered the craft adapted it to his own interpretation gaining expertise and patrons. He is one of the founders of the Houston Gla88 Artist Associatioh and was presi· dent of that organization for five years. It's purpose ia to promote appreciation of glass arta. He takes commissions to support his favorite "habit"-the free form windows and personalized stained glass a.rt pieces that adorn his studio. An expertatreatora· tion in all traditional styles, he i.a much sought after for detailed work. However, Heater says his real joy is in taking an idea and making a truly unique piece of art from it. "Someone will come in with a picture and aay 'I want it to look exactly like this.' I'll aay, 'But this picture may not represent the true colors in the glass, or a different design would be more personalized for you,' but I make it exactly as they want it." Malring it exactly, perfectly, has led him to commissions throughout the U.S. He is now consulted regularly by several devel-opera when stained gla88 is called for in a structural design. He also works with a etching studio in the Heights on custom pieces. "I like talring different kinds of glaas and using them together," he said and illustrated with a work currently undergo­ing completion. It was a double door con· atructed using beveled glass, textured glau and even shower door glass. All cut in flowing style to create the illusion of a free form madonna with the halo in the archway, "Because the doorway reminds me of a church," hi> said. "I don't prefer the rea1istic interpreta­tions," he said. "'Anybody can make a flower look like a flower. I like the stylized. There is no reason to hang on to the past in art when it 1s 1983 and there ts a big excit­ing world out there to experience in art," the festival veteran said. Hester hopes to combine his galJery pie· cea with the architectural work in even more provcative ways, he said. He also expressed interest in glass blowing; the use of "hot" glau. ustained glass is cold aa opposed to hot glass which is blown," he explained. The one thing that has kept him form experimentation is Houston's hot summers. 04Can you imagine getting a furnace hot enough to melt gla&1 in the middle of the summer here? It just isn't worth it." But, as with hie other art forms, if he decides it'a worth it, it aurely will be. And the pieces he will create will be as graceful and colorful as the windows that shade hie world. Creative Hair Designs For Appointment Call 526-4494 3220 Yookum at Westheimer Late hours available by appointment 2 WEEKS FREE RENT Dunlav . v Apartments Swimming Pool Security Cable TV All Adult 1 bedroom $340 526-0199 2212 Dunlavy KIPLING APARTMENTS Security Cable TV Laundry Room All Adult Covered Parking 1 Bedroom $310 522-3437 2120 Kipling WES COMPANY 789-8277 Protect your most valuable possession For glowing skin that looks Younger & Younger A complete skin care treatment formulated for those special people who care about how they look 1. Cleansing Miik Creame-8oz.-$8.25 The cleanser can be used on the most tender skin 2. Honey & Almond Scrub-2oz.-$9.00 The treatment refreshes, unclogs pores, cleanses and brightens the texture of the skin 3. Skin Toning Lotlon-8oz.-$8.00 This lotion improves the skin tone, closes the pores and stimulates the skin 4. Solr De Fete Mask-2oz.-$15.00 The beautifying results of this mask are immediate-even on the most sensitive skin. It soothes as it renews tired complexions 5. Aloe JoJoba Creme with Vitamin E-2oz.-$10.00 A creme that softens & helps prevent premature aging 6. Creme de Excellence-4oz.-$14.50 This special formula 1s enriched wi th collagen, truly a creme of excellence ~Y-oun-ger- & Y-oun-ger-. Pl-ease- se-nd m-e -the -M-ail -to -You-nge-r &- Y-oun-ger.- PO- B-ox · following 42809. dept 352, Houston. TX 77242 NBme Addreaa City State O'hona ITEM Z<p Sales Tax Postage & Handling T 01a1 Enclosed PRICE Include $2.00 per order for postage and handling. Include 6% sales tax for Texas addresses Allow 2-3 weeks delivery Visa & MasterCard accepted D Check or Money Order 0 VISA exp date 0 Mastercard exp date Credit card• Siqnature JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 DO YOUR FRIEND, AND YOURSELF, A FAVOR. INTRODUCE HIM TO Crabs .. •re not the end of the= 1s 100% effectrve in removing world, but they can certainly deal1 hce and nits_ So the make 1t unpleasant. RID next time you or your 1s a hqu1d treatment that friend discover crabs. 1s available without pre- do yoursetves a faYOr scnplion. It's safe and rt and gel RIO 11·0 ut.. kills crabs in ten minutes. tt'1 aval&able without Each package includes a a p,.ocripllon at your patented fine-tooth comb that local ptwmecy. And • - · You've Tak.en Your Pride to the Streets ••• Now you can take home a handsome, fashionable souvenirof"Pride Week '83" .. Custom Designed •. • SUkscrecncd ... Bold. Fllshlon Colors . .. · ··::t~hn?::~r. Dodt sit on it! Place your order now & wear them with Pride ----------------------- Namt· Si7l" Si2H<lOJ - _ M(32 3-ll __ LcJ& Jli Color - --- KeI~· Gn:'C"n. . ·a\y Blur~ Royal Blu~ ~ -· Solid or Str1pc ~~~r;~~ tf!~1i??o ~<-~~~!~~'1e~k~~n1ue- 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 Montrose Live Montgomery, Mays and Stritch: Music in the Air By Jon Cheetwood The excitment of thia group ia truly infec­tious. and they have recently been infect­ing crowds at Ra.ocals during a three week engagement. They charmed crowds in Austin and Corpus Christi also when they opened last month for a touring David Brenner show. "We had all the people doing our little signs and stuff," said frolicsome blonde Sally Montgomery. "They really got into it. Which is neat." Their enthusiasm should carry into their recordings are well. "We were in the etudio in March," she said. "We recorded four tunes, that will hopefully be put in a mini album, if it gets picked up." 'We are llhopping three major labels," said Billy, the Stritch and pianist of the trio. "We're hoping, waiting," said Mayes. The future is filled with possibilities, they said. Perhaps they will do a college tour with Brenner; possibly the record will hit big, They are also looking forward developing a circuit in the southeast for performances, and developing new mate­rial. But one thing is assured: success for this group with their "off the wall humor. (Please don't say anything about our bad jokes!)" Since Sally and Sharon Montgomery met in 1978 at the University of Houston (Sharon played a tap-<lancing tree and shrub), they had been fast friends. Then in 1981 they discovered Billy and have been a performing threesome ever since. '.'Our first job was at Ra.ocals," they 1&1d. And this past month they celebrated their anniversary aa a group there. In addition to local clubs, the group has played in the north (Dallas), and the far north (Rhode Island), in Corpus and in Austin. "We've been very lucky in Houston," said Montgomery, "because there are a lot of influential people here. Some people who have seen ua know concert promoters. They say they have worked very hard in the past year preparing for the ubig break'' and intend to be ready when it comes. While waiting, however, they are involved in the Univenity of Houston's production of Th• Wizard of Oz. "It'a moetly because we love Cecil Pickett, who ia directing the ahow." He taught Sally and Sharon acting. The group likena themselves to brother and aisten. After one misa:ied plane too many tempers will flare, but "we'll peek out and say are you having fun without me? We fight together, but we love each other," said Mayes. 1'When we concentrate on business we all concentrate on business very hard and we are not thinking about being friends, but sometimes we just have to go off and play." They are also very complimentary of one another. "Billy does all the harmony and comes up with mUBt beautiful arran· gements." "I pay them a lot to say that," added Billy. The group is developing a security within itself which is apparent in their shows. A. they say "our senses of humor mesh," So next time you have the opportunity to aee them, request the House of Pies Song­it'o a sweety. and they'll love doing it. o Men Together Opens Tonight Men Together, an eight·man gay dance troupe opens tonight in Houston at the Tower Theater on Westheimer. Perfor mances are scheduled through June 5. Houston is the final stop on a IO-day Texas tour for the New York-based com­pany, having performed in Austin and Dallas. The group traces its roots to Gay Pride Week 1981 when Roger Tolle and John Torre performed "Images of Men" 8jl part of the celebration. With the support of the Glines Foundation, the company was formed under the artistic direction of Tolle. Tolle previously danced with the Bev­erly Brown ensemble, Theatre for Bodies and Voices and toured with the New York Baroque Dance Company. Men Together is brought to Texas by Community Productions, a Dallas-based gay arts company founded and directed by Don Baker, former president of the Dallas Gay Alliance. It is the nation's only com! pany solely devoted to promoting gay arts outside New York and San Francisco. "Men Together promises to be our most exciting event so far," said Baker. "Plus, ten percent of the ticket purchased will go to a gay support group of the purchaser's choice." Curtain time is 8:00 p.m. for all perfor­mances. Tickets are $8-$25 at Ticketmas­ter or Union Jack. The event is sponsored by Citizens for Human Equality. o 'Boys in the Band' Comes to Montrose After a auccessfu) off.Montrose run The Boys in the Band, starring several l~ls including KRBE radio personality J~ Wa.tts, comes to Channing Hall, First Uni­tarian Church, 5210 Fannin, on June !Oat 8:00 p.m. aa a benefit performance in the fight against KS/ AlDS. James Der's new production of Mart Crowley'• c18""ic comedy-drama looks at gay life during the 601 and brings up the many changes that have occurred since then. "Several new touches have been added," said Watts, "to this production to make it more tender and not quite so neg a· tive. lt'a a classic play and quite entertain­ing." The play will run June 10, 11, 17 and 18 with all the box office proceeds at $6 per ticket going to benefit KS/ AIDS victims or to research or administration costs. The production was well received at its Bay· town premiere in April. Seating is limited so reservations are neceaeary, 522-2204 or 424-1928. o Theatre Southwest Slates Champagne Opening The world premiere run of The Joy of Hex, a Batirical comedy about an Arizona Indian beauty who becomes a TV super­star, will kick off with a champagn open­ing Friday June 3, said director Bonnie McFerrer Sharon Arpel plays the lead in Joy. Her character is an overnight success, but she still has the tribal curse hanging over her. Her 1ituation is worsened when she tan· gles with some advertising and public relation• zanies. Others in the cast are Rich Moore, Leon Charbonneau, Clay Henry, Don V Beve­roth, Marilynn Thibodeaux and Wendy Pitsch el. The play ia written by Montrose based author Eddie Cope and his collaborator Joe Hale. The comedy will run four weekends. For reservations call fi60.5527. o Montrose Chorale Schedules Rehearsals The Montrose Chorale has regrouped as an independent community chorus whose unifying factor is music and whose goal is excellence of performance, said its director Robert Moon. Moon experience ranges includes vocal performancee with Dallas Summer Musi· cala, Houston Grand Opera, Texas Ren­naiasance Festival and Cambrata Soloists. He holds a bachelor's degree in music from North Texas State University PHOTO OON BEAl<MAN Lucky Leon Charbonneau IS in the middle of a squabble (Sharon Arpel on the left, Wendy Pitachel right) in "The Joy of Hex," opening June 3 at Theater Southweat PHOTO OTTO BERK Roger Tolle and Drew Minter perform in "Men Together," a gay dance show opening tonight (Friday) at ther Tower Theater Rex Gillet (left) and Joe Watts •tar int he "Boy• int he Band" in Channing Hall JuM 10, 11, 17 and 18 a• a KS/ AIDS uictima benefit and a master's in music from the Univer· sity of Houston. The chorale is slated to perform at the Fred Paez Memorial Concert June 25 and at "Men and Women Together, An Even· ing of the Arts" on June 20. An ensemble of chorale members, Bayou B'Ju, will also be featured on those occasions. "The new Montrose Chorale rehearses on Wednesday evenings from 7:30 to 10 in the choir room of Bering Church, 1440 Harold," said Moon. "We encourage anyone with vocal aspiration to come join us and become a part of our song." For more information call 521-2006. o Planetarium Follows Numbers To the beat of reverberating music, laser images of pure intense color will dance across the 50 foot doomed ceiling at the Burke Baker Planetarium in the Houston Museum of Natural Science beginning June 10 through September. This unique form of entertainment is called "Laser Magic" and displays all laser capabilities accompanied by classi­cal, pop, country-western, jazz and rock music. Since its discovery in 1960 by Theodore Meiman, lasers have been used for such diverse and useful tasks as delicate surgery, welding surveying, checking grocery prices and printing newspapers, as well as lighting up one of Houston's most popular clubs, Numbers. Performances at the Planetarium are $4 and are scheduled on Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. For more information call 526-4273. o Country Playhouse Salutes Tennessee Williams The Country Playhouse's Theatre Lab will present "An Evening in Tribute to Tennessee Williams" in the BJack Box (rehearsal hall) June 8-11 at8:00 p.m. The program will be two one-act plays, This Property 1s Condemned and I Rise in Flame, Cried the Phoenix. Property stars Sandre Charbonneau as Willie and Matt Rippy as Tom. I Rise (ea· tures Patrick Mitchell as D.H. Lawrence, Joan Brooks as Frieda and Pam Edelen as Bertha. Both plays are directed by Arlene Baker. o Ravi Shankar in Concert Pandit Ravi Shankar, aitar virtuoso schooled in the purist traditions of North Indian Classical Music, will perform in Jones Hall June 5, Sunday at 6 p.m. Acclaimed in in Europe, Asia, Australia and the Americas, his artistry has been compared to that ~f Horowitz, Keifitz, Casals and Menuhm. He has composed several innovative works merging the con· cepts of Western and Indian ClaRsical Music including "Concerto of Sitar and Orchestra" commissioned by the London Symphony Orchestra and the "Garland of Ragas" commissioned by the New York Philharmonic. Shanker enjoyed a lengthy afolsociation with thP rock group the Beatles at one time. He has written numerous film M""orts, mo1Jt recently for "Gandhi." Tickets are available at Ticketron for $10.S:lO. o Funny Thing Happens at CBTC The Tony Award winning musical, A Funny Thrng Happened on the Way to the Forum, with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Bert Shevelove and Larry GE>lbert is now playing through July 2 at the Chocolate Ba~ J Theater, 182.1 Lamar A combination of the nonsense of Roman comedy and the madcap pace of vaudeville, A Funny Thing Happened on thf' Way to thr Porum concerns the conniv· ings of a slnvt> who tries to smooth his masters way to the love of his life in order PHOTO JON CHEETWOOD The "Mother of Montrose" contest at Mary's recently saw Scott (right} win the title Cyd Charisse stars in Windmill Dinner Theal<!r'• "Bell, Book and Candle" June 7.July 3. Call 464-7655 for reseruations to gain freedom. The mishaps along the way create mounting confusion and comedy. Mainatage tickets are $7 and $8 dollars for Thursday.Saturday curtain at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday at 3:00 p.m. o Big Early Ticket Sales for 1983 'Texxas Jam' If first-day ticket sales are any indication, the "6th Annual Texxas World Music Fee· ti val" will match its predecessors as one of the biggest, best-selling rock 'n' roll events in the area. In Houston , more than 20,000 rock fans turned out in torrential rain, high winds and occasional tornadoes to buy tickets for the Astrodome show set for June 19 with Styx, Sammy Hagar, Triumph and Ted Nugent. With similarly discouragmg weather to c:ontend with, over 15,000 intrepid music buffs in Dallas bought their tickets for the June 18 Cotton Bowl show featuring the same hard rock.in' line-­up. The "Texxas World Music Festival" is produced by Pace Concerts of Montrose and prf'Af>nted by Budweisf'r. o UST Faculty Presents Concert The University of St. Thomas Department of Music hn1t announced a faculty concert for this Sunday, June 5, at 8:00 p.m. at UST'a Cullen Hall, 4001 Mt. Vernon. The program entitled "Music America" will feature works of several American compo&f.>rs: Louise Farrenc, Phyllitt Tate, Thea Musgrave, Scott Joplin and Aaron Copland. ' For more information please contact the music department ~t 522-7911 ext 340. AdmiHion ia free. ' · FIGHT FLEAS EFFECTIVELY With our full line of flea and tick products for pets, home and yard. We've got what you need including Adam's Flea-Off, Vet-Kem and Daltek products 1640 Weathelmer 521-92n 2377 Grant at Fairview-528-8342 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer KRAZEE HOUR DAILY 9-10PM KRAZEE TUESDAY 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer 9pm-2am ART FESTIVAL Sunday, June 5, and GRAND OPENING PATIO BAR Happy Hour noon-6pm daily, $1 well drinks, 75<t beer NOW OPENING AT 12 NOON WITH BIG JACK A People's Place. Your bartenders: Big Jack, Steve, Daniel, Andy, Ronnie, Pewee, Morrie ***** Commentary 20 M ONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 A 'No' Vote is a Positive Vote By Hollie Hood Radio commericals sponsored by the Com­mittee for Houaton Bus and Rail str .. s that a "yea" vote on June 11 for the bond referendum will be a vote for an expanded bua 1yatem and the beginning of a solu­tion to all of Houston's transit woes. Non­sense. The commerical doesn't say that the Metropolitan Transit Authority gets some 80 per cent of its funds for bus improve­ments from grants already, and that it could double its system and operate it for free with sales tax revenue without a refer· endwn. The commerical doesn't point out that a mere 20 per cent of the funds asked for will go toward buses. If it did point that out. citizens might question why that alternative hasn't been accomplished already. Metro ia happy to trot it.a statistics on improved on-time performance, increased vehicle mil ea between accidents and breakdowns, but they are not as anxious to point out that the bus fleet is still only half ofwhatitwa&1upposed to be by 1983 and there is atill no effective crosstown service. They do not point out that none of the grade separations promised, along with the previoW1 two promises in the 1978 Regional Mobility Plan, have been accomplished. The point of all this consternation, · folk.a. is that if they can't do what they were 1uppoeed to with the money they were aiven, why ahouJd we trust them with billions of dolla.n to do something of ques­tionable value to moving people from one place to another, namely the train. The public relatione efforts of the Com­mittee are laudable. But then they have the lerVice of MTA'• own public affairs director who took a one year leave to orchestra its activities. Leave without pay-isn't it wonderful to know altruism is not dead. Check out where the vacation expenses come from next year. Metro has certainly changed its arrog­nat. antagonistic tune in the past two montho when they found out they needed money from the people that they had been treating as robots: You will have a rail and you will like it: Invariably the piper plays the tune he thinks you want to hear when he knows you hold the magic penny. The public relations effort is beautiful­and beautifully deceptive. A yes vote doesn't mean there ,.;ll be less traffic. It doesn't mean that the ay;otem won't require maasive subsidies after installa tion. It doesn't mean anyone will ride it. (1 get VlSiona of all the drivers on the freeway looking at one another saying, but you were supposed to start riding the train.) A yee vote doesn't mean that Montrose will be not be blown away in five years by commericalization and high rise condos. It doesn't mean that a monorail couldn't do the job just a& well, in most cases by MT A '1 own admiuion, and more cheaply. MTA, listen up, people will ride the monorail-they love it. Not so the heavy rail ouUook in Montrose. A limited number of exclu..,ivc townhomcs by Allan Edwards, known for his fine cusmm home!), arc now av.ulahle. Nestled in the charming lle1ghL' area, the><: townhomes offer total luxury and C00\1't~tcnt, clQ!,e· in location. For more information about thi~ fabu lous townhome investment, contact Steve W'attcrs at 868-5888 There are many opponents to the refer· end um, but they aren't big developers with lots of money to spend on printing and radio spots and subtle PR piec .. disguised as newa on Channel 13. They are just peo-. pie who have taken the time to become informed, and with that information, become outraged. Distinctive 'Jbwn/iomes from tlie $90's t:o $200's A no vote on June 11 i1 a vote for pro­greu, progre&B we can pay for as we go, u was promised in the 1978 plan. Prognsa to make the MTA accountable to the people it allegedly serves. A no vote won't leave them without recourse. If they don't have a continguency plan ... well so much for people who would want to freeze Buffalo Bayou. ALLAN EDWARDS BUILD E R 11211 i 11\"" 1131U iJ,_~ I~ ii 2700 Alha11y, l luu,1011, lt•xa~ 7700b ()()~~·~C3 June 17, 18, 19 - I N C The Law Dealing with AIDS By Henry Walter Weise On1y a year ago I read in the paper of the death kl AIDS of a man kl whom I had once given legal counseJ. At that time the disease was something wihtout immedi­acy. It was sad, perplexing, but at a dis­tance. Thie last year has changed that. As a professional whose prime focus is the preparation of wills and the administra· tion of decedents' estates, I have been called upon frequently kl deal with AIDS­related problems. The experience has been both sobering and heartening. Our humanity, with all it.a frailtiea and nobility, is exposed at the deepest level. Here are a few vignettes from this past year of experience. CHARLES: He called in May kl find out how long it would take to draft a new will. He didn't mention hs disease, but others had told me he had AIDS. He told me he wanted to make substan­tial changes. His old wilJ, which left every­thing to his parents, no longer reflected his wisht'8. He said he would call in a day or two. He never did. Six months Jater en uncle called to itay Chrles was dead. Charles had never writ· ten that new will. He had been unable to face his own mortality, perhaps hoping that delaying writing a new will would somehow delay the ultimate end. BARBARA: Barbara didn't look old enough to have buried a 32·year--old 1:1on, PauL When she first came to see me she had just C'Ome through a three-week siegt> which ended with his death . She wa.c. tmd at u lifo loet but there wa~ no bitterness or rancor, She was proud of accomplishment&, sup· portive of his life and fully understanding of his expression of himself as a gay man. Wh<·n the hearings our local gay rights bills were taking place in the New York City Coundl, Barbara was honored when 8he was asked to speak in support of the bill. "But what could I say?" she asked, not fully appreciating the powerful effect of the pro-gay testimony of the mother of a deceased victim of AIDS. MAJOR SMITHFIELD: At the other ends of the spectrum was Major Smith· field, the father of another AIDS victim. When I spoke to him about the will in which his son left everything to a lover of four years, the retired Army major became abusive. He warned that he had substantial financial resources and would fight the will. Finally, he threatened kl expose the surviving lover as a "queer. '' KENNETH: Kenneth was diagnosed with AIDS in January of 1982. He was in and out of the hospital for nearly a year. His lover, Ralph , was not about to suggest that he write a will. Finally. Kenneth was hospitalized for one last time. His rondition deterioriated; he could barely sign his name. A non· lawyer friend hastily drew a wiJI which Ktnneth signed, thret> days before his death. The will, which leavett everything tu Ralph, is being contested by Kenneth'• older brother. In the end. bad planning benefit.ti no onE-. BRUCE AND BOB. Bruce was worrried and frightt>ned when he came totheofficl'. His lover, Bob, had been diagnosed with AIDS and was hospitalized with f;erious medical problems. Bruce waa worried for the futu re-Bob's, Spike Diet Finally, a good word about high heeled ahoes. They can help you lose weight. For years, women who wear "spikea" have had to listen to warnings from podia­tri• te about all the damage they do kl their fttt and leg muscles. But according to American Health magazine, high heels make walking MO difficult that those who wear them burn IO percent more calories in thttir !itride. his, theirs together. But he was clear· headed, and he understood that there were a variety of legal tools a laywer could con­tribute kl ease the burden. I prepared wills, mutual powers--of­attorney and designations of committees for each of them. Six months later Bob is alive, his disease symtoms in remission, and he is optimistic for the future. AIDS, like any other calmity, offers the opportunity to aee the human condition in microcosm. Sadly, it is providing us with a whole new set of heroea: victims, Jove~·s and friends. 1983 Henry Walter W•i••, a New York City attorney. Hia column appeara here periodically and in other gay publication.a. JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 IMPORTANT MEETING NOTICE IMPORTANT MEETING NOTICE MEETS TUESDAY, JUNE 7 Liberty Bank Community Room (entrance 7 '.':i':i ~:the1mer) 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 Houston Teams Win Honors By Eddie Chavez Citiea like Tulsa, San Francisco, Chicago and San Diego certainly saw many Hous­tonians visiting their communities as they competed in regional, national and inter­national tournaments this past weekend, May 2S-29. Dirty Sally'• Brunch Bunch, led by manager Dimples DeSale, flew back after capturing the Sooner'• Invitational Soft­ball Tournament in Tulsa. The first game saw them taking on the Fox Trax from Kansas City. That game acored a wallop­ing 15-0 for Sally'a. In game twow they took on the Kansas City Rangers and overpowered them 12-4. They met their match in the third game when the Topeka Lambda Lancers over­whelmed them 13-3. Tim's Outlaws from Tulsa went down !(~l then the championship began. The Lambda Lancera were caught unaware and loot their finlt game 12-1. Sally's came right back in the second game of the series and aolidly beat them 15-1 to gain the Southwest regional crown. The Montrose Tennis C.Jb sent their top players to San Francisco for the Third Annual U.S. 0]><'nly Gay Tennis Touma· menl Don Keesler captured second place, Tim Calhoun placed third and Rich Ryan came in a fourth. That folks, says a lot for the Houston tennia players. A reception is planned to honor these winners at a member' a home at 3:00 p.m. Sunday. For party information and loca­tion call Jim Kitch, 527-9178, or Rich Corder, 524·2151. The Windy City lost aome money to our bowling leagues. In an exceptional bowling aeriee, Ed McKelvey (a former president of MSA bowling) represented Houston in one of the highest achieve-­menta. A ainglee series of 674 for bowling forefather Gerald Hagan, first president of MSA bowling, placed in the singles category also. Monday'• Prez Steve McConaughy and Randy Tutoo Ellis placed highest in dou­blea competition followed by the notorious Pam Weaver and the Thursday's sexytary Rich Mayer. Noberto Kemper placed in all events. The Balboa Volleyball Association wel­comed memben of the West End Stare (former national champs) and the Houe· ton Hurricane. The Hurricane placed sev­enth while the Weat End Stare took fifth. Weet End member Sammy Ramirez was named the first all-etar of the tournament receiving a ata.nding ovation. The West End team also received a 1tandingovation on their sportsmanship and their competi­tive playing. o Women's Playoff Scheduled for Sunday Thia Sunday four teams will be battling forthe topepotain theMSA Women'sSoft­ball League. The River Rata. Briar Patch Renegades, Sporta Coverage Unlimited and the Montro..e Voice'aFirstEdition are all deadlocked in a four-way tie. Action begino at 11:00 a.m. at Fonde Field with the last game acheduled at 4:00 p,m. o Barn's Spaghetti and Sock Hop Tony Fonzarelli has announced the Bam'o fundraiaer hit of the softball league. 'A Fonzarelli Spaghetti Dinner' is on the menu along with wine and a dinner aalad for June 8, Wedneaday. The food will go down good aa cheerleadera will treat you to a sreat 1urpriee. Prize9 will be awarded for the 'Oldies But Goodies' Sock Hop participanta for the many conteeta that are planned. The Barn aoftball playen will 888ist as gueat bartenden from 7:00 p.m. until midnight. "The entire bar will be aet up for the fundraiser." he aaid. ••The upstairs, down­otairs and patio ban will be available. For Barn player swings and misses one in game against Dirty Sally's two~::k~oe JONES ago. Sally's won the match 13-6.game Ptf()TO 808 JONES Brazos Riuer &ttom player runs for a score in upset game won by Charlotte's two w•eks ago, 8-7 $3 a ticket you couldn't buy more fun. It'• also for a good cawie. The Barn'• fun­draieer hopes to raise enough money to send the team and it.a cheerleaders to the Kanoaa City Tourney in September. MSA Women's Softball Le~ STANDINGS Won Loet River Rabi • 2 8"0"'0 Sport• Cover1ge Unlimited • 2 800 Montroae Voice lat Edition • 2 800 Bri1r Patch Reneg•del • 2 800 Klndreld Spirits 8 • 800 Twins 51! ••• 550 T--shtrt' •HI Hopet 5 5 500 Coffee BHna Spec1•I Blend 2\\ rn 250 DoubMt A Swingers 2 8 200 MCCR'Angela 2 8 200 M•non & Lynn· a Just Ua 0 10 000 THIS WEEK"S GAMES <MDI"* .S fondl Fltllll J GB 2 2·• 3 5'h 8 8 • Sunday. June S Playoffs. 11•m-Spm, between River Rats. Brlu P•tch ReneglKtel. SPorts Cover8ge Unlimited. Montrose Voice 111 Edition Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Following recent competrt1on A LADDER 1 Rich Ry1n 6 John Ryan 2 J•n M•uld1n 7 David Robicheaux 3 Don Keuler 8 Jon Colbert 4 Tim C•lhoun 9 D1vid Garn 5 Aon l1ridrum 10 R1ndy Dickerson MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS Following M•y 26 compellttOn 1 C11•mrty l•ne 2 M•rrlyn & the F•b 4 3 Kindred Spmts Overdrive 5 HIGH GAMES L•rry Salas 253. Mui Hall 214 Sieve Stepleton 2GC Sports 'lfSA Greater HoU1Jton Softball League LAST WEEK"S RESULTS Saturdey. M1y 28 no games scheduled Sunday, M1y 29 no games scheduled STANDINGS Pct GB South D1v1s1on G11leon 7 1 Montrose Voice 7 2 Jim"1 Gym 3 • Briar Patch 2 6 Catch One 0 • NorthD1vis1on Dirty sa11y·s • 0 Brazos Awer Bottom 5 3 Montrose M1ne/JA1 3 5 Ch1rlotte·1 3 5 Bun 3 6 BATTING LEADERS through June 22 S75 778 •29 250 000 1 000 825 375 375 .333 bN9d on at IHst rs r1rna at bat 11 3'• 5 1·• s•• ABRHAVG 1 8111 Schmidt OS 26 18 18 692 2 Jerry DeSale OS 19 10 12 632 3 M•ke Morri.on OS 24 12 14 583 4 Mario Marchenn os 21 15 12 571 5 Tim Boates MV 23 8 13 565 6 Jimmy Cates os 18 6 10 556 7 Bob James MV 29 11 16 552 8 Ken Bailey OS 26 14 14 538 9 Gary Gano BARN 23 7 12 522 10 Scotty Paulus MV 23 16 12 ~22 THIS WEEK'S GAMES I ... ~ g•m•" L""Y field From M~h'OM. go OIA RiCJlmond. pMI Korby. II'! on Eatlaic141 I Saturday. June 4 Jim's Gym vs Charlotte·s. Spm Catch One vs. Montrose M1ne/JA1. 6pm Barn .,. Montrose Voice. 7pm Bnar Patch vs Dirty Sa11y·s. 8pm Sunday. June S Galleon 'II Montrose M1ne/JR1, 6pm Jlm"s Gym vs Barn, 7pm Dirty Sally's va Cl!ch One, Bpm Montrose Voice vs Brazos RB. 9pm Commentary When Elton John Got Mad By Sharon McDonald You should read the column I was going to write you this time. I had it all planned. It was going to be about the time Elton John got mad at Tom Snyder on the Tomorrow Show, and then it was going to talk about gay anger in response to homophobia. See, I was going to otartout telling about how Synder was interviewing Elton, ask­ing him about the year he'd stopped per­forming and gone into seclusion, 1978 or thereabouts. Anyway, Elton had gone into this long isolation, and emerged a year later with new music and an announce­ment of his bisexuality. And Synder hunched forward and raised those furry eyebrows of his and asked, "You knew when you made your bisexuality public that a lot of people might not like it and might stop buying your records, didn't you?" And right on cue, the camera zoomed in for an extreme closeup of Elton John's face. It was angry. He made no attempt at politesse as he shot back, "Yes. And that's just Tough." Well, then I was going to talk for a while about how I loved that Elton had scowled and that he didn't act in the least accom­modating. And I was going to say that yes, I know some gay people think Elton pulled Sharon McDonald his punch by say.ing he's bisexu~l ~stead of gay. But despite my never mlBsmg an isaue of People, I am not personally well enough acquainted with Mr. John's sex life to make an authoritative statement on that point. And then I was going to talk at some length about anger in general ("It's a nat· ural human response to pain") and gay anger in particular (HGay people who feel no anger about the status of their people in society have something wrong with their perception"). I hadn't quite worked out how I was ll'Oing to wrap it all up, but I'm sure it would have come to me. Instead, I got that damn phone call. There are probably fewer than ten adulta in the contiguous United States who have never received an obscene phone call. I am not among them. A. a rule obscene phone calla do not upset me. I pick up the phone, Jisten for 30 seconds, and hang up. They're an occupational hazard of urban life, ~d sooner or later everyone'a number, hterally, comes up. There'a only one obscene phone call I've ever had that's disturbed me, but I'll get to that in a minute. Here'• the kind of phone call I ~ot when I sat down last night town~ this oolum!l: the phone rang, I pic~ed it up and sa1.d hello, and the caller quietly hung up. Tino might have been a wrong number, and at worst a minor annoyance, but for the fact that it was the fifth time this week. And this is the third week I've been getting these silent calls. My first reaction to a call like this is to either ignore, deny, excuse, or forget it. Who wants to really think about ouch things? I don't knowwhatmadelastnight different; maybe it was because it was dark, and quiet, and I was alone. I couldn't shake the creepy feeling for hours after­ward, and for the first time I allowed myself to acknowledge the effects of those calls. For starters, I felt manipulated, tricked, humiliated, and ridiculed. I also felt invaded, powerless, and most of all angry. That's how I feel whenever I've been used, whether it's a betrayal by a friend, an inequity at work, or a stranger on the phone. But when I stopped to confront the change in my heartbeat last night, I found more than anger and hurt; I also found fear. This is not a random caller looking for an anonymous ear. The repeated calls. The stubborn silence. The feeling that lin­gers has an ugly familiarity. If what I sus­pect is true, this is someone who knows me, and the incidents then take on a sick· ening quality. Someone has feelings­either positive or negative that they cannot expre88 directly, and yet feel com­pelled to vent anonymously. Someone who's in my life, u a friend , as an asso­ciate, as an acquaintance. This queazy feeling of undefined yet intimate jeopardy is what I've brushed aside all the other times. It reminds me of the one blatanly obs· cene phonecaU that I couldn't brush aside. It, too, was from someone I know He called me by name, then said some things I wish I'd forgotten by now. He is a gay man. The sense of shock I felt then was pro­found . I'd taken it on faith that gay men were one category of people who could be counted on never to sexually harass women. PoliticaJly maybe, but not sexu· ally. To find that the one place where I expected to be totally safe from sexual harassment was no haven was deeply di1· turbing; all the more so because I knew that othera would have as much trouble accepting that as I did .. I ~ew in~tinc· tively that, like the rape VICtim quesboned about her whereabouts and style of dress, the burden of proof would be on me. When I did eventually tell several lesbian friendo what happened, they were disbelieving: was I sure I'd heard right? How could I know for certain it wa1 him? Couldn't I have misunderstood? I never conf:-onted the caller, even though we ran into each ?ther fa_irly of~n at gay events. I was afrBJd; afrBJd of him, first of all, though he is hardly an impos­ing figure. But he had intruded Of! me man intimate way, and now I was f!i.gh.ten~ . And I was afraid offurther hurmhation ifl confronted him and he called me a liar. So for more than five years I've silently wea· thered a waive of dread, revulsion, and anger each time I've seen this l!lan, who parenthetically is a hardworking com­munity activist. All of which bnngs me back to Elton John. I had set out last night to write an orderly progression of remarks on the sub· ject of anger, but waa interrupted by a phone call that threw me into the "':ental and emotional chao1 of the real thmg. I don't know what I can do about the phone calla I'm receivin1 now; the caller hangs up much too fast to witness the visceral anger he or she generates in me. But I do know what I can do about the man who called me several years ago. I can tell him to his face what Ithinkofwhathedid, and if he doesn't like it, that's just Tough. McDonald, who lives in Los Angeles, i.B co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outatanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Presa Aasocrotion. Her column appears herean in other gay news· papers. JUNE 3, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE A NEW MAN'S BAR IS COMING SOON! ~~~ Read This HYou Are Concerned About AIDS Every day the press presents new art1clcs, stallstics and theoncs about AIDS, and u's up to us to try to son them all out. Many ofus are notable to make much sense out of the bewildering assonmcnt of 10formation provided by the dally papers, the gay media, magaz10cs and television . 1bcy tell us we are at a high risk, yet the medical community can provide no answers about the causes of AIDS or give us hope for a cure. Now, the monthly publicauon AIDS Update and Media much IS dedicated to helping bring some order to this chaos. Out of their own sense of frustration , our editors, who are pubiishing professionals with more than twenty years experience 10 New York and Chicago, r-::°'.~~-·1!!~~==:1 are detennined to search out and bring zr1.~ to their readers all the pertinent infonna- M I~ 1§1;; tion that becomes public about AIDS 3\5.U,~a:r;IW!j@D each month. CDC CONTINIJ£S RESEARCH ON AllS Our media watch program is kecp10g daily records of published repons in the New York, Clucago and West Coast papers. Houston's own M.D. Anderson Hospital, the Howard Brown Memorial Clinic 10 Chicago, Atlanta's Communicable Disease Center, and numerous other AIDS foundations , climes, hot­lines, and the like are also impor­tant sources of infonnation which our editors are tapp10g. Additionally. we are conducllng mtcrvicws -.-ith AIDS vicums, cancer specialists, dennatolog1S1". and public health offic1als, asking all of them pointed questions on subjects that are often glossed over by the general media. All of this effort is be10g done to help keep you abreast of the AIDS drama as u unfold~-to make sure you don 't miss the news. the mfonnauon. the statisucs. and the advice that we expect "ill be forthcom10g 10 this struggle to maintain our health aftd our dignity. A one-year subscnption, twelve monthly 1Ssues, is JU t S20.00. Your copy of AIDS Update and Media Watch will be mailed to ) 'OU discretely 10 a sealed envelope. Send your check or money order today, and start your subscription with next month's issue. ------ - - -- -- -- - - -- --- ~- --- --- -- -- -- ------ - - - -i : I l Media Walch Publication, P.O. Box 30201, Houston, Texas 77249 l l Yes. please send me 12 monthly issues of AIDS Update and Media l 1 Watch . Enclosedismycheckormoncyorderfor$20.00. l I I 1I I NAME I I I 1I I ADDRESS t I I I I : CITY STATE ___ ZIP____ : I I ~--------------------------------------------- 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 3, 1983 Dateline S.F. A Year Ahead By Randy Alfred CONVENTIONAL WISDOM: The 1984 Democratic National Convention ia com­ing to town, with 3923 delegates, 1310 alternates, and 2600 accredited journal­ists. The conclave will meet in the arched, underground cavern of the Moscone Cne­ter, named after the mayor was asassi­nated in 1978 along with Supervisor Harvey Milk. The Moscone Center is located in the city's South-of-Market neighborhood , only a couple of blocks from a score of gay bathousea and leather bars. ln fact, the current floor plan for the convention calls for the podium to be on the south side of the center. That's Folsom Street. ALSO IN 19S4: The Advocate, national gay new•magazine, will retun to L.A. It moved ita headquarters from Smogland to the S.F. auburb of San Mateo in 1974 to be out of reach of the demonstrative activists of both city centers. THREE R's: State Aasemblymember Art Agnoa (D-S.F.) has a new strategy for Assembly Bill 1, his legislation to ban employment discrimination based on sex­ual orientation. In past years, Agnos has been unable to move the bill out of commit­tee. Thia year, Agnos has A.B. 1 through two committees and ready for a floor vote whe­never he thinks he has the votes to pass it. He needs 41 votes, and he thinks he's got 35 or 36 ''hard'" votes, 39 or 40 "soft," and that depends on who's nervous on any given day_" The prestigious Los Angeles Times has endorsed the bill, as has the Sacramento &e. San Francisco's newspapers remain to be heard from. Agnos has his staff solic­iting endorsements from every paper in the atate that had the good sense to oppose 1978's unsuccessful Briggs Initiative, which would have banned gay teachers. Other lobbying is aimed at the three R's; rural&, religionists, and Republicans. To get the 45 votes he wants before bringing the meaaure to a floor vote, Agnoe wants to get support from Republican legislators from liberal, suburban districts and from aolana of both parties who represent the state's Central Valley and mountainous east and north. Wisconsin is the only state with a gay· rights law. Agnoe is impressed that the law's author, Representative David Cla­renbach, got Republican Governor Lee Dreyfus to sign it. Clarenbach'scampaign for the law was spearheaded by clergy, and Agnos is now attempting to line up clerical backing for A.B. 1. Will California's new Republican gover· nor, George Deukmejian (called Deukrea­gian by some), sign it, if both Assembly and Senate pass it? Agnos is hopeful: Deukmejian haa said he is studying it, and the governor also has the option of allow­ing the bill to become a law without his signature. Furthermore, the new governor has not rescinded former Governor Jerry Brown's executive order banning discrim­ination by state agencies. We'll keep you posted. GROOVES OF ACADEME: The Uni­versity of California is making its own progresa. David Thomas, Associate Pro­fe& 10r of Political Science at U.C.-Santa Cruz, convinced the administration there to appoint Australian gay liberationist Dennis Altman Regents' Lecturer. Tho­maa and Altman are now teaching a spring-quarter course, "Sexual Politics: Leabian and Gay Liberation." Thomas says the Altman appointment is "unprece­dented." ABUSE: Arthur J. BreSBan, Jr.'s film Abuse played at the Castro Theater in April as part of the 26th San Francisco International Film Festival. It's about a graduate-student filmmaker preparing a documentary on child abuse. He encoun­ters a 14-year old abuse victim, and they fall in love, gradually and inevitably. The documentary within the semi· fictional, semi-autobiographical story expertly delineates the child-abuse prob­lem in America. The wrap-around story contrasts a supportive, non-abusive, counter-abusive man-boy love affair. Abuse is a disturbing film both visually and ethically. You may not be able to watch some of the graphic scenes between the teenager and his parents, or some of the photo stills of abused infants and children. And you may not be able to forget the staggering questions the film poses about social-service and legal sys­tems that threaten the rescuer and protect the abusers. BOOKED UP: Lenny Giteck's Cruise To Win is an excellent guide to positive think­ing and non-zero-sum gaming as a way to develop more satisfactory relations with new acquaintances. That means more satisfactory, as well as more relation­ships, so you can use the book as a guide to developing permanent relations and not juat for tricking. It's available for $12.45, including pos­tage and handling, from Pantera Press, P.O. Box 99389, S.F., CA 94109, or $10.95 at bookstores. If that sounds like a lot, think what it would cost you to attend just one of the half-dozen or so uworkshopa" summarized in Cruise To Win. OZ A.ND ENDS: I've finally got it figured out. Hu Na will play tennis on the Ma11, and Mainland China will grant asylum to the Beach Boys. Remember, real men eat leather quiche. Alfred's column originates at the "Sen· tinel." a San Francisco gay newspaper. <>1983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved. DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIAL Beef on Chicken Kabob, $3.95 (fries included) 1/2 pound burger $2.95 (fries included) Served 11am-2pm #a Visit our new Sweet Shop ~ .'l;:rnal..f;,wlua ly ~l~t .f.ft/tL t ~ Special Occasion Cakes Party Mints & Catenng 2047 Marshall across from Alabama Theater 521-9516 LIVE ... EXCIThtG ••• FROM tE.W~K "Tolles dancers touch and hold each other wrth nothing to hide, nothing to fear.· Banylame ...... The Advocate ~~~~~~~~~~--. A GAY COMMUNITY BENEAT 10% c:J 'PX bckel pnce goes to lhe 9"f orgaraalJon c:J 'PX chooce. PROOUCTIONS ORDER YOUR TICKETS NOW PRICES: $8, $12, $15, $20, $25 DAUAS--May ZT, - pm May 29-2 pm & B pm Hd a Stale, Stale Fair Grooods (214) 521 -2007 Urvon Jack & Oossroads Mid. AUSTIH--May 3HI pm Hogg Audotonum, Unr.oersrty ol Texas $ponlomd by the Gay Students Asaociallon u.wors.ty o1 T- (512) .... 1-3678 HOUSTON-Juno 3, 4. s-3 pm r ..... ~ Sponoorod by cmz.,... lor Human Equalrty 1lcl«llmasler(713)799-9555 or•Urwon.Jilcl< JUNE 3, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Selected Events through 7 Days mFRIDA Y-SUNDA Y: Denver First Gay Rodeo llSA TURDA Y: Lambda Bicycle Club meets, then tours, from 1 lam, unless raining, at 210 Fair· view, apt. r • SA TU RDA Y: Choice's Lesbian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm on "You Have Nothing to Fear Unless You're a Lesbian Mother." 210 Fairview, apt. 1 llSATURDAY: Leabians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm -.SUNDAY: Montroee Tennis Club playo 10:30am-1:30pm, Mac­Gregor Park 9.MONDA Y: AIDS victim oup­Port group meet.s 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 9.MONDA Y: MSA Summer Sea­son Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain •TUESDA Y: "Gracielynn," fem· iniat duo, 7pm, Gracielynn Books, 704 Fairview • TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meet.I at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •TUESDAY: Greater Montroae Business Guild meets 7:30pm, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Weetheimer •WEDNESDA Y: Montrose Watch training session, 7pm, the Firehouse, 1413 Weatheimu •WEDNESDA Y: Montroae Cho­rale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-lOpm • THURSDA Y: 5th National Leabian/Gay Health Conference opens, lasting to June 12, Denver • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n St•m gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPIT Radio, FM-90 •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls. 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Compoaero Concert, June 10, New York •IN 1 WEEK: Wrangler M.C. annual Stampede in Dallas, "Celebrating a Decade of Deca­dence," J une 1~ 1 2 •TN 1 WEEK: Flag Day, June 14 mIN I WEEK: Lutherano Con­cerned meets June 14, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh mJN 1 WEEK: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meeta June 14 •IN 1 WEEK: Houston Data Profeuionals meet 7:30pm, June 14 Eaot Room, Holiday Inn Cen­tr~ l, 4640 South Main •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucu1 meets, 4600 Main "217, 7:30pm, June 15 •TN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week ("Unity Through Diversity'') beg­in. a in Hou1ton, June 16 •IN I WEEK: Gay Pride Weelc Annivenary of police raid on Mary'1, 1022 Westheimer, June 16 mIN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: "A Salute to Gay Businesses," June 17 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Familiea and Friends of Gays reception, Liberty Bank Commun­ity Room, 1001 Westheimer, 12· 3pm, June 18 mIN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Montrooe Sporto Auoc. softball game, June 18 •IN 2 WEEKS: Father'• Day, June 19 mIN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Hou1ton '• 0 Salute to Dallu Day," June 19 •IN 2 WEEKS: Dallao Gay Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JUNE JUNE 3 4 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 5 6 7 8 9 For add1 •Ooal 1nf0fm1hon or phon• numbMI IM~ents isled below. IOok for the fPOnlOnog org1nl- 1111on under Org1nu:11ton1· 1ri th Mori1to.e C1us1l1ed Pride Parade, "Marching Out of Obscurity, Into the Dream," June 19 mJN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Black and White Men Together afternoon and evening event.a. June 19 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: "Men and Women Together, An Evening of the Arte" at the Swim Club, 2114 Peckham, June 20, with Montrose Chorale and Mont­rose Art Alliance • IN 2 WEEKS: 7th Annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival opens J une 20, lasting to June 25 •IN 2 WEEKS: Summer beings at 6:10pm June 21 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Weeko Montrose Sport& Auoc. variety show at Numbers, 300 Weathei· mer, Jun(' 21 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Variety show sponsored by Gay Switchboard, Montroffe Counsel­ing Center & MontroAe Clinic June 22 • IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: "National Day of Remember· a nce" sponsored by gay religious groupe, J une 23 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Woek: "Salute to Gay Youth" June 23 m/N IJ WEEKS: Latino Day, Gay Hispanic Caucus 5th anniversary dance, Noche y Dia Ballroom, 2103 N. Main, 8pm-2am, June 24 •IN IJ WEEKS: lot Latin Ameri­can & Caribbean Gay/Lesbian Conference June 24·29, Bogota, Columbia •IN IJ WEEKS: Full moon, 3:33am, June 25 •IN 3 WEEKS: Gay Pride Weeko Mardi.I Gras Maddnees Inc. after· noon fundraiaing carnival for AIDS research, June 25 •IN 3 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Symphonic Band, Montrose Chorale and Kindred Spirit.a Enoernble in Fred Paez Memorial Concert, "Festival Cho­rus," Cullen Auditorium, Uofll main campus, J une 25 UN 3 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Pride Parade down Weethei­mer, 5:30pm, June 26 •IN 3 WEEKS: Gay Pride Paradee June 26 in San Fran­cioeo ("Strengthen the Tieo, Break the Chains") and Memphis ("Gay Righta are Civil Righto"); and Gay Pride March in New York City •IN 3 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Political Caucus evening ral ly at the Summit. June 26 m/N IJ WEEKS: Montrooe Civic Club (Neartown) meet& 7pm June 28, Bering Church, 1440 Harold m/N 4 WEEKS: Twin Cities Good Time Softball League invi· tational July 1-4, Minneapolis mIN 4 WEEKS: Lone Star Gay Softball Classic, Houoton, July 2-3 •IN 4 WEEKS: Blue Boy Claooic Bowling Tournament, July 2·-t, Seattle •IN 4 WEEKS: Independence Day, July 4 •IN IJ WEEKS: Metropolitan Community Church general con· ference, Toronto, opens July 10, luting to July 17 •IN IJ WEEKS: International Gay Assoc. Conference o~ns July 11, Vienna, Austria, lasting to July 16 mJN B WEEKS: 8th Interna· tional Conference of Gay & Les· bian Jews opens Aug. 4, lasting to Aug. 7. Miami mJN 12 WEEKS: Reno National Gay Rodeo openo, Sept. 1, lasting to Sept. 4 • IN 13 WEEKS: Sixth Biennial International Convention of Dig­nity, Seattle, Sepl 2-5 m/N 13 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Chi· cago, Sept. 3-5 m/N 18 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 5 •IN 13 WEEKS: "Come Out and Sing Together," lot North Amen· can Gay Choral Festival, opens Sept. 8, laoting to Sept. 11, Lin­coln Center, New York m/N 16 WEEKS: Human Righta Campaign Fund annual dinner, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, SepL Tl 'tiN 17 WEEKS: Texao Renaio­sance Festival open1 near Plan· tersville Oct. 1 and 2, also running Oct. 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5&6 m/N 1 B WEEKS: Oct. 8 dead.line to register to vote in November elections •IN 18 WEEKS: Columbuo Day, Oct. IO mIN 21 WEEKS: Halloween, O
File Name uhlib_22329406_n136.pdf