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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
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Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 001. 1999-12-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1406.

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(1999-12-10). Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1406

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999 - File 001, 1999-12-10, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1439/show/1406.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 998, December 10, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 10, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 998 The father of Tracey Lynn Deel, who was shot and robbed last month after leaving a Montrose bar for lesbians, makes an emotional plea for finding his daughter's attackers. Page 3 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE . AND YOUR STYLE . What is truth? Felice Picano may know. but in his latest novel. literary truths become an elusive mystery. Page 17 DECEMBER 10, 1999 'Don't ask, don't tell' comes under renewed fire Parents of slain gay soldier call Pentagon policy on gays a failure as son's killer is sentenced; Hillary Rodham Clinton also criticizes policy her husband created The Pentagons ''Don't ask, don't tdl" policy on gays in the milit.1rv c,1me under renewed attack this week from the family of :1 slain Army private, gay activists, and I lillary Rodham Clinton during a campaign stop in New York. All called for the end to the policy-inknded to make it easier for g.1ys and lesbians to serve in the military-because they said it has failed to work. "'Don't ,1sk, don't tell, don't pursue.' did not proll'Ct our son It won't prott'Ct anyone else's child. This policy must end," said Pat KuttelL'S, reading from a stJtement Thursday after an Army privatt• convicted of bludgeoning her gay son to death w,1s st•ntt>nn>d to life in prison with the possibility of p.1role. "We knew Barry could be deployed and come into harm's way for our country. We never dreamed that he would be killl>d by labeling. prejudice and hatred at home," Kuttelcs said. Glover, who is from Sulphur, Okla., apologized in court earlier Thursday, ~aying he was drunk at the time of the July 5 attack and has since found God. "If I had acted as half the man, even half the soldier as ~ Barry was, he'd be with us right now," Glover said, his \'Oice 2 cracking. ;:; Before the court·martial, Glover admitted to a lesser ~ charge of unpremeditated murder in hopes of rt'Ceiving a ~ lighter sentence. But prosl>cutor Capt. Gregg Engler went t Pvt. Calvin N. Glover, 18, was found guilty of premed1tat· t•d murder Wcdm•sday in the beating death of Pfc. Barry Wincht>ll. rhc offense carries a m,mdatory scntenn• of life in prison; the only question bdore the military 1ury on Thursday was whether he should be eligible for parole. ahead with the court-martial on d a charge of premeditated pv t • ( aI v 1.n N. GI over, 18 (I ef t) was sen te nce d on Th urs da y t o m~~'her. h ff ed h. 1 T d GI bbed d 'd life in prison for bludgeoning to death Pfc. Barry WincheU n en e o er 1s p ea ues ay, , over so an sa1 . b k d b he d1.d no t kn ow w hy he h1't ',V im e h e1 1 "a t 1e as t t wo or th rec (right), a arrac s-mate rumore to e gay. times" with a bat as Winchell slept Glover shmwd no n.'achon to the sentence. I le will also be demotl'<I and dishonorably discharged. Glmw used ,1 baseball bat to crush the skull of Winchell, 21, i1 barracks m.ite, as he slept m his cot at Fort C.1mpbt•ll. There h,1d bt·en a swirl of rumors on the bast• that Winchell was gay, and prosecutors said Glover was driven by hatred of homosl•xuals. C. Dixon Osburn, co-executive director of the Scrvicemembers Legal Defense Network in Washington, said the case proves that the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tdl" policy doesn't work. can continue to ser\'C~-and their superiors cannot m\·esti­gate and expel them-as long as they keep their sexual on· entation to themseh'es. During the court·marttal, a sergeant testified that com· plaint~ about harassment of Winchell by other !-Oldiers who suspected he was gay were not inve,t1gated because superi- Winchdl's family callt'<I for the end of "Don't ask, don't tell." "l think this case shatters any illusions that 'don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue' is somehow a berugn policy," he said. "This is a policy of violence." Under "don't ask, don't tell," gay members of the military ,.... Continued on Page 10 Texas activist takes new role with Millennium March Dual jobs prompt questions of how Dianne Hardy-Garcia will organize a national event and avoid ignoring her duties with statewide lobbying group here in Texas Dianne Hardy· Garcia, executive director of the lesbian Gay Rights lobby of Texas, says her new role with the Millennium March on Washington won't diminish the work of the statewide lobby group. by GIP PLASTER After two years of planning, the depar· tun.> of its founder and numerous attacks on the way it is being planned, details of the Millennium ~farch on Washington plannl>d for April 30 are fimlly bt'Coming clear. The man:h's new vision is largl'ly due to the work of Dianne I fardy.Can:ia, executi\'e dirt'Ctor of Lesbian Gay Right~ Lobby of Texas (I.GR!.). She has taken O\U as CO-C).CCUti\'e director of the man:h and is running thl' c\'cnt's Washington, D.C. office. As l'Xl'CUhve dirl'Ctor of a large and pow­erful stJll'wide gay .ind lesbian org.miz.ition, l lardy-Garc1a has bl'COme one of the most voc-.11 and influmttal actinsts m Tel\as. But 1f Hardy-Gama 15 runrung the march, who L~ at LGRL working to organize and mobilize gav men and k"'bians in Tex .)s., 'Not abandoning anything' "We're not abandoning an} work V\t:''re not abandonmg any projects," said LGRL board co-chair Steve Atkinson of Dallas "We're not changing anything. There's noth· ing changing except Dianne's physical pn.-v cnce not being in Austin." Atkinson s.1id he can contact Hardy· Garcia at any time if necessary LGRL's office staff and board have taken on increased dav· to-day responsibilities in her ab~nce, but Atkinson said the ~hort time frame and the timing of the man:h when the biennial Texa~ Legislature is not m ~s1on make; this a rune when I lardy.Carcia ran afford to be away from Au.,tin. "It's the only time that she could do it," Atkinson said. "It's a very short time frame and whm it's on.'l', she's through and done \\ith it." H.irdy..Caraa asked, and received, per· ml"-"ion from the board to take on mcrea.'Cd rcsponsibililtl>s \\1th the march. She will con· tinue to be paid as a full·time employee of LGRL and L~ expecting to also be paid a full­time salary by the march. The potential of recming two salanes i:; appropnate, Hardy..Caroa said, since she will be doing '' ork to benefit both orgaruzations. - Continued on Page 13 2 SHARE THE SPIRIT Drop sites "Y De<ember 16 Box PROJECT benef1tt1ng BERING CARE CENTER AND OMEGA H OUSE D ONATION I TEMS: Shampoo Dental Floss Cologne/Perfume Holiday Candy Pens/Pencils :.odes T·:.h1rt/S..,eat Sunglasses Decks of Cards Crossword Puules Cotto., Balls Shaving Cream Toothbru,,he' Mouthwash Hand Cream Calendars Stationary Gloves Shirt/Pants Stamps Books Mugs Q·nps Bubble Bath Deodorant Razors Toilet Paper Toothpaste Kleenex Bar soap/Gift soap BV.FFER GALLERY HOUSTON VOICE UH Main Campus, Entrance #16 ~00 Lov<tt, S111te ZOO 8 LAFFER GALLERY The Art Museum of the University of Houston Please call Davis Northcutt at 713.743.9523 Big City Video & Emporium 10105 Gulf Freeway Houston, Texas 77034 Wh11 Pa11 More? All Rentals $1.99 Videos Priced to Sale! BLJliRWiTj ti r Big Daddy TheSP11Wh1SbaggedMe .____'19.9s L $21.95 _J s19.95 large selections o previously viewed movies starting at s4. 99 Paperback Romance Novels at $1.99 Greetin ards DECEMBER 10, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE HAPPY HOLIDAYS The new millenium is quickly approaching. We are kicking off Danburg Campaign 2000. I appreciate and look forward to your continued support. Please call (713) 52-Debra and sign up to volunteer. I need your help! 713.520.8068 District 512.463.0504 Capitol BIENVENUE THEATRE PRESENTS Featunng: Andy Clements Kevin White Mikel Reaper and Christian DeVries ONLY 5 PERFORMANCES LEFT! Fridays: Dec. 10 & 17 - 8:00pm Saturdays: Dec. 11 & 18 - 8:00pm Sundays: Dec. 12 - 6:00pm For Reservations call (713) 426-2626 ADULT CONTENT & NUDITY HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 LOCAL NEWS 3 INSIDE NEWS Around the Nation • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Hawaii court okays lllClfrioge ban ... . .... .4 Former Houston teacher files bias suit ...... 4 Liihel resigns as heod of NGLTF . • • • . . . . . . . 4 Utah hate crimes low ruled useless . . . . . .. .4 ChoBenge lo N.C. DP lows forges on .. . ... .4 Goither's murder was o hole crime, killer soys 7 tfalth News . . ... . ................. 14 Steamy new book documenls goy animals .• 14 F nch doctors urge WTO help on AIDS . . .. 14 New Russian AIDS drug to debut in 2000 .. 14 World AIDS Doy moriced by setbocks ...... 14 VOICES & ECHOES Bimden: Hole on lhe highway . . ..•..... 9 Ehnoi: Anli-goy ads in our paper' . ... . . 9 OUT 0 THE BAYOU Tiuth Seeker .. 17 •. 17 . .18 . .18 . . 21 . 23 25 .. 26 .. 27 .. 31 . . 28 .. 29 .. 30 Police lack strong leads in early morning shooting by MATTHEW A. HENNIE The father of a 31-year-old Houston woman who was shot and robbed made an emotional plea last week for the pub­lic's help in solving the brutal attack. Police have few leads and have been unable to interview Tracey Lynn Deel at length since she was robbed, shot several times in the face and chest, dumped and left for dead in the early morning hours of Nov 28 after leaving Chances, a Montrose bar for lesbians. Friends in Houston's lesbian commu­nity have rallied to raise funds for Deel's medical recovery and joined with her father to post a $5,000 reward for infor­mation leading to the arrest and indict­ment of her attackers. CrimeStoppers has offered a $1,000 reward in the case "My daughter has spent her life trying to help people. 1 can't see how anybody ~ would do this to another human being," ~ Richard Deel said during a press confer- < ence with police investigators Dec. 3. 3: I "For those guys that are invol\'ed, they e< arc going to find you. E\'en if they don't, one day you will ha\'e to meet God. ::;; When you do, you'll have to pay" Ri<hard Dee~ whose daughter was robbed and On Thursday, the Houston Police shot, asked for the publi<'s help in solving the Dt•partmcnt r<'leased a composite sketch Nov. 28 attack • of one of the suspects in the case . Authorities said two young Hispanic males attacked Deel at Whataburg<'r, 3712 South Shepherd, about 3:55 a.m. and ordered about $9 55 in food. Deel called a friend about 2:30 a.m. Sunday and said she was at Chances, which was preparing to close, police said. About two hours later, Deel-who had bn•n shot several times bv a 22-cal­ibl'r pistol- managed to craw( more than 300 yards to awaken residents of an apartment complex at 10280 Windmill Lakes and ask for help. Police would not comment on where Deel lives. Deel's Honda Accord, described as a white, 4·door with license plate \'CB 71C and with a Green Bay Packers sticker on the windshield, is still miss­ing, police said . Poli<e released a composite sketch of one of the men suspected in the Nov. 28 shooting of Tracey Lynn Deel (right). About two hours after the attack, police said, two suspects in the case were \'ideo­taped at two banks withdrawing money from an ATM using Deel's debit card. Some $400 was taken, authorities said. Last week, police released brief video­tape segments of the men using Deel's bank card at the ATMs. A third suspect in the robbery has used Deel's credit card, pohce said. "This L<; a pretty brutal crime," said Sgt. LO. Foltz. "Th<' public should be caubous." Tracey Deel Fund Southwest Bank of Texas Dwayne D. Whiddon 713-235-8881, ext. 1180 Attn: Mail Teller PO. Box 27459 Houston, Texas 77227-7459 Houston Police Department Homicide Division 713-308-3600 CrimeStoppers 713·222-TIPS Gays lose as Exxon Mobil dumps DP benefits DAI.LAS (AP)-Exxon Mobil Corp. has adopted a policy against giving benefits to the partne~ of newly hired gay employees, brl'aking with a policy at Mobil before the companil'S merged last week. The oil giant said Monday it would con· tinue Exxon's long-standing policy of extending spousal benefits only to coupll'S in legally rl•cogmzed marriages. It will also continue to extend benefits to same-sex part· ncrs of Mobil employees who W<'re receiv­ing b<'nefits before the merger, a :>pokesrnan said. l luman Rights Campaign, the largest gay-rights group m the nat10n, accused Exxon Mobil of Iii king a st<'p backward lrom tlw trend of offonng benefits to partners of gay l'mployees, a policy followed by about h,11f tlw country's largest corporations. "Rollb.icks or cancl'llations of th<'se types of policies art· \'Cry rare, and we don't understand why Exxon is doing this," said D.wid M. Smith, a spokesman for the group in iVa:·.hington. "Gay people don't ha\'e access (to lcgallv r<'cognized marriages), so thl')' ar<' being dcni<'d a bendit made avail­able to othC'f employees in the workplace." Smith said other major oil companies, including BP-Amoco, Shell and Chevron offer benefits to same-sex partner.;. Exxon Mobil spokesman Torn Cirigliano said the Irving-based company's policy is to provide bendits CO\'erage only to spou5e5 in legal marriages, including common-law marriages. "We feel basing benefil<; CO\'erage on a l<'gally recognized relationship eliminates the need for the company to establbh cnte­na of its own to asses;, the legihmacy of a relationship," Cingliano said. "That's whether it's same sex or heterosexual." At their annual meeting in ~fay, Exxon shareholders by a 94.1 percent vote rtjccted an amendment to company bylaws that would ha\'e granted bcndits to unmamed partn<'rs. Company directors had recom­mended against the proposal The new Exxon Mobil also ha.~ adopted Exxon's gmeral anti-di~riminahon pohcy l luman Rights Campaign and some share­holders had urged the company to adort .\1obil's rolicy, which sprofically proh1b1ted dascrimination based on sexual onentahon. Since 1998, ~1obil had Jct employees in same-sex relationships get benefit: for their partners and had a policy specifically bar-nng discnrnination based on sexual onenta­tion. "Exxon ~fobil's current policies pro\'!de strong protection against any discrimination on any basis, including sexual orientation," said Ed Bum·ell, a company spoke.~rnan. The Human Rights Campaign said near· ly 3,000 U.S companies now offer same-sex partner benefits, including more than 80 Fortune 500 companies. Three years ago, Perot Systems Corp became the first large Dallas-based company to offer partner benefits to gay and le~bian employees. However, 11 deoded m 1998 to stop offering 11 for new employees. LR. Raymond, CEO Exxon-Mobil Corp. 5959 Las Colinas Blvd. Irving, TX 75039-2298 Phone: 972-444-1000 Fax· 972-444-1348 www.exxon.com/contact/index.html 4 NEWS DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Armmd the Nation Hawaii Supreme Court says gay marriage challenge is moot HO:\OLULU-The Hawaii Supreme Court ruled Thursday that a 1998 constitutional amendment passed by voters renders the move to legalize gay marriage moot. The court ruled that the amendment validates the st,1te ban on gay marriages by removing <my con­cerns about equal protection under the state constitution. The amendment gave state legisla­tors the power to determine whether marriage licenses should only recogmze unions between a man and woman. That L~ something they did m 1994. The court said the state ban now must be gi\'en full force and effect. That overturned a lower court ruling th.it the b<1n was unconstitutional and the state must show a compelling reason for continuing 1t. The issue first aroS(' in 1990 when three gay couples were denied marriage licenses by the state health department They sued the state in 1991. Former Houston teacher seeks up to $1M in discrimination suit HOUSTO~-A former teacher who 1s gay contends the Houston Independrnt School Obtrict discriminated against him .ind failt•d to hire him Ill a year when thl're were more than 300 teachmg vacanoes bec.iuse he is I llV-pos1tive, the l lo11sto11 Chro111clc reported Dec. 4. The charge~ came during a two-d,1y trial before US. District Judge Vanl'ssa Gilmort>. Wilham rllsworth, who worked for the district for five years, argued that hi~ former pnn­c1pal wanted him back after he returned from Jiving in New Mexico for two years. But Ellsworth was later rejected after an interview with llISD, and charged Ill court that he wasn't hired because his former principal was aware that he is gay and I llV-posih\'e 8lsworth wasn't hired in part because of his low scores on an interview test, the school sys­tem said. "HISD docs not dbcrimmate m its hinng practices," said Myra Schexnayder, HISD's attorney. "HISD did not even know that Mr Ellsworth was I IIV-pos1tive" Ellsworth, 51, is seeking back p.iy and front pay until he is age 65. I le also has ,1sked for attorney's fL'CS and puniti\·e damages-a figure that could top $1 million. Gilmore is not expected to rule immediately. Lobel resigns as head of National Gay & Lesbian Task Force WASlllt\GTO~-Kerry Lobel has resigned ,1s head of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force dfecti\'e April 7, 2000, the organization announced last week. Lobel mO\'ed to Washington, D.C., from Arkansas m 1995 to become deputy director of the orgamzation, which focuses on aidmg grassroots activisb at the state and local level. She became exern­tl\' e director m December 1996. Both Lobel and NGI.TF's board of directors s.lid the deci­sion to leave came from Lobel, and the bo.ird praised her tenure with the organization. "!'\GLTF and our movement will forewr be stronger because of Kerry's leadership," said Rachel Rosen, board co-chair. Ta k Force accomplishments under Lobel'.s le.idership included almost doubling the group's budget and staff and expanding the NGLTF Policy lnslltute "think tank." The board will begm an immediate search for a new executive director. Utah hate crimes law ruled useless without named groups SALT LAKE CITY (AP)-A Utah d1stnct 1udge has found that since the state's hate crimes statute doe.s not specifically name any of the groups it is intcndl'd to protect, the statute IS unenforceable. Judge V\llham Barrett dismissed hate crime charges against Brian E. Hitt and Jason Dale Millard, two men who ,11Jegedly attacked and harassed several men they behe\'ed were gay. Barrett ruled that 1.iw w .. b "incomplete" because it does not speci­fy what classes of people are protected by the law. Dcfmse attorney Rebecca 1 lyde argut•d that Utah lawmakers delibcratd)" ml.'ant to exclude protection for gay pl'ople. But instead of eliminating protections just for g.iys, the legislature wiped out all classes of victims, le.w­ing Utah with an unenforceable hatt'-crime law, 1 lyde said. "Born of ignorance, animosity toward gays, and coward Ke, Utah's hate criml> statute is unworkable," Hyde argued Challenge to DP laws in two North carolina towns moves ahead HILL'>BORO ·c,' I. '..C-A challenge to the domestic-partnership laws of Chapel Hill and Carrboro rem.ims ah\'e after a 1udge reiected an effort by city attorneys to qua;.h 11, the Rale('?h News & Observer rt'port­ed Both town~ have local laws allowing the payment of benefits to the domestic part­ners, whether gay or straight, of its employ· !i! ees. Twelve residents of the two towns cha!- ~ lenged the law in June. Attorneys for the ~ towns had argued that the residents did not i:i have the standing to sue. A similar ch.ii· u lenge in 1996 overturned Chapel I lill'1-o ;; . domestic partnership ordinance on the Openly gay Carrboro, N.C. Mayor Mike Nelson grounds that North Carolina law explicitly said he isn't overly concerned by a court rut.ng prohibits common law marriage. "I certain- that supports a challenge lo the town's DP ly don't view this as a setback," said benefits for gays. Carrboro Mayor Mike 'elson, who is gay. "Attorneys make motions all the time; some of them are approved, and some of them are demed. What we're really talking about is how families are treated in our culture." HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 5 6 ------ ----- --~ we ta/le jwride ince&&ra~ (X,(/J(, ~0~ ... OCTRONGEST IDEAS have always been the simplest ones. The one-; that grow from vision. At Chase Texas, it is our vision to manage diver ity as we would any other tratcgic resource. \i\'e ha\'e made diversity an integral component of our culture because we know that bringing collective experience~ and kill-; to the table enable· us to do things that none of u~ could do alone. A simple idea that inspire· great rewards. OCHASE The right relationship 1" everything.rM Member FDIC DECEMBER 10, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 HuslneJJ l1JS•1ranC'e • Workr1 <.un1pd1.rallan Group llt11/th • I.if~ lnsurancr & much nrorr 6575 l\'. l.oop South, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 Insuring Commercial Real Estate? We're the Perfect Location. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Katy Freeway @TC Jester • Houston. Texas 77007 713-961-9455 fax: 713-850-0856 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 NEWS 7 Gaither's murder was a hate crime, killer admits by LAURA BROWN The convicted killer of gay Alabama resi­dent Billy Jack Gaither insists he has been for­given by God, while Gaither himself has not. "I repented, and he is in hell," Steven Eric Mullins told interviewer Connie Chung. Chung's segment on Gaither's murder, titled "Blinded by Hate," a!l'ed Monday night on ABC's "20/20" news program In June, Mullins pied guilty to the Feb. 19 murder to avoid the death penalty. He is now serving a sentence of life without parole in Alabama's Kilby Correctional Center, along with Charles Monroe Butler, the other young man charged m Gaither's death. Butler pleaded not guilty to the crime, but a jury in Rockford, Ala., convicted him Aug. 5. During the trial, Mullins testified that he became angry with Gaither after Gaither "propositioned" him. Mullins said he called Gaither and asked for a ride to a local bar. The two men picked up Butler and then went to a local water­~ hed, where Mullins said he lured Gaither by promising him "a threesome." Butler testified that he knocked Gaither to thl' ground after Gaither "started talking queer stuff," but Ihm walh-d away and let him gl'l up. Mullins then stabbed and beat Gaither, .ind forced him to get into the back of the hatchb,Kk car. With Gaither aim• and bleeding in the car, Mullins and Butler went to a trailer whrrl' Mullins lived, picking up kerosene, Oasis Esplanade an ax handle, and old tires. They then drove to a secluded creek bank where local resi­dents dumped trash. Mullins admitted he beat Gaither to death with the ax handle, then the two men burned Gaither's body on a pyre of tires. Police broke the case when Butler confessed the incident to his father, who told a family friend who then contacted law enforcement. During Butler's trial, Coosa County District Attorney rred Thompson Jr. consistently de;crlbed the crime as motivated by hate. Butler and Mullins "knew that Billy Jack Gaither was homosexual, and that is the only reason Billy Jack Gaither was killed," Thompson said. Mullins confirmed the motive in the "20/20" interview. Asked by Chung if the killing was a hate cnme, "yes, at the time," he replied. Mullins repeatedly said that being gay is "not right," an opinion Chung then described as a "twisted moral belief" that resulted in Gaither becoming "a man Mullins lynched because of his lifestyle." l landcuffed and wearing a prison uniform, Mullins told Chung he wasn't bothered by G.1ithcr's homosexuality when the two first met. "I could respect him being gay if he could respect me being straight," he said. Mullins said his feelings changed when Gaither "broke the respect hne with me" when "he called me on the phone and propositioned me." Mullins said he woke up on Feb. 19 A three level luxury apt .. with rooftop garden & best view in New Orleans. 3 blocks to French Quarter. All amenities. Available for short term accommodations. FOR RESERVATIONS: 800-575-9166 • 504-524-4248 1260 Esplanade Ave.• New Orleans. LA 70116 3 007 S . Shepherd I(•. W . Alabama 713/529-0001 FDIC insured Rates subjecl 10 change. SubSlant&al penalty tor early withdrawal ' M,n•m•,m tMO(l(l 1.0 rlP'1<>«•111'1 P""' <latPd APY Annual PPN"Pl'la Y•Pldl knowing he would kill Gaither, and said the feeling "wasn't any different than waking up and saying 'I'm going to the grocery store."' Asked why he decided to kill Gaither, "l really don't know," Mullins said. "It just seemed like the thing to do . ... 1 didn't think he needed to live any longer." when Mullins went inside the trailer to get the tires and other items because "I was like a chicken with h1S head cut off, and I didn't know what to do." With tears streaming down his face. Mullins said Gaither begged for his life, "but I told him it was too late." Butler said life in prison was "very hard," and "I just pray to the Lord to give me the strength to carry on." "Did you tell him why?" Chung asked. "I told him because he was a faggot," Mullins said. Mullins said he thought he would "get away" with the crime, and he felt guilty about killing Gaither for "a couple of days," but then he prayed and asked God to forgive him. "Did you get an answer?" Chung asked. "Yes, I was forgiven," Mullins replied. Chung then asked why Mullins belie\'es Gaither is "in hell." "Because he is a homosexual.'' Mullins said. "It tells you in the New Testament that is wrong, and if I had a Bible I could ~how you. Liars and adulterers and homosexuals and murderers are all going to hell unless you ask for forgiveness, and I did." FT Breaking down in tears, Mullins said later in the interview that he regretted the murder. "It just never should ha\'e hap­pened," he said. Butler also cried when bneflv inter- ~ -..-. ____________ ___, viewed by Chung about the crime, \~·hich he Steven Mullins, convicted of murdering Billy continued to say was committed totallr by Jack Gaither, now claims he has been forgiven Mullins. 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AMERICA Celebrating 10 years as your advocate. 800-777-8878 www.benefitsamerica.com Member Y IOhcal Assoootion of America Benefits America NA lr>e 8 VOICES AND ECHOES DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE I' EDITORIAL itit1 tAtd ''I V01C8 Anti-gay ads in our own papers? STAFF A.ssociate Publisher Mike Fleming m k e@t'<ousto,,voice com Editor Matthew A Hennie ed1torOhoustonvo1ce com Production Bettany Bartran Graphic ::>es1grer M ke Sweruon - Graphic Designer Contributors llich Arensch1eldt. Kay Y Dayus. Trayce Diskin, Ear Dittman, D L Groover. Robert 8. Henderson, Gip Plaster, Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton OeHart. Kim Thompson, Terry Sullivan Advertising Sales Richard 8. Hayes Ken Burd Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Clusifieds & Directory carolyn A Roberts Carolyn White National Advert1s1ng Representative R1vendell Marketing Company. Inc. 212-242-6863 Publishers Oms Crain Rick Ellsasser rn .......... ~= ....... MEMBER CH ARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Estab shed 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 Lovett Bfvd Su te 200 Houston T xas 77006 (Ill) 529- 8490 (800) 72'). 8490 Fax (713) 529--9531 Contents copyr191>t 1999 Of" e hours 9 am to 5 JO P"" weekdays To submit • letter Letters should be fewer thar 400 words We •eserve the nght to edit 'or content and ngth We w withhold names upon request. bLt you "1USt nclude your name and phone number for vertf1cat1on Please send mall to Houston Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd , Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006, fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editor@houston voice com Op1ruoru expressed therein do not refl"t those of the Houston Voice ~hat 1f you were flipping through this weeks issue of Houston Voice and happened upon page 24, which featured a snazzy ad promoting a day­long conference called "Love Won Out," where according to the ad you could "find answers to your questions about homo5exuality"? A provocative topic, to be :.un.', and the ad's appearance in a gay newspaper might lead you to believe it's put on by a local gay therapy group or even the Metropolitan Community Church. In fine print, the ad says the seminar 1s to be presented by Focus on the Family. For regular Houston Voice readers, that would raise the red flag. Focus on the Family is a right-wing religious group out of Colorado, founded by Dr. James Dobson, a popular talk radio host. It's the same group that was prinnpally responsible for funding last year's "ex­gay" newspaper ads that appeared in m.iinstream papers across the country. B.ick then, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation joined with other gay activists in calling on newspapers to reject the "conversion ads" because they were offensive and went against the entire body of scientific evidence on the nature of i;exual orientation. Surely, 1f we're calling on mainstream newspapers not to run such ad\·ertise­ments, they would never appear m the pages of our publications Yet there 1t was, on page 24 of the Oct. 28 issue of the Bay Area Reporter, the largest .ind most respected gay newspa­per in San Francisco. Not surprisingly, publication of the ad raised the ire of many gay San Franciscans, who took the paper to task for caving into "political correctness" and participating in an effort to mislead those struggling with coming out. The BAR didn't just publish the ad, though. It also ran a front page story about the anti-gay agenda behind the Love Won Out seminar, an editorial­with the headline "Free Speech Won Out"-defending the decision to publish thl ad, and the newspapcr presented a check for $231.60, the amount charged for the ad, to an area AIDS service organization. The Bay Area Reporter claimed that its decision was a principled stand against the same sort of censorship that kept gays from wmnmg coverage 1n main­stream newspapers, though that position confuses a publisher's decision to accept an advertisement with every newspa­per's journalistic responsibility to air all sides in a story or on its opinion pages. In fact, every newspaper i1as policies that result in refusing ads based on their content. Most will not publish explicit or offensive ads or those that advocate ille­gal acti vi ty. Most won't accept advertise­ments that the publisher knows are falsc or misleading. Federal law prohibi ts newspapers from allowing advertising for housing or employment that expressly discrimi­nate on the basis of race and other pro­tected ca tegories (not including sexual onentat1on). Many newspapers make 1t a pohcy to refuse advertisements of any sort by businesses that discriminate against the typical class of protected categories, including sexual orientation. But having a pohcy and enforcing it when it means saying no to money have always been two different things. At the other end of the spectrum, some newspapers won't run ads with content that the publishers strongly dis­agree with or fear their readers will strongly disagree with. That's the sort of timidity that has resulted m the refusal of gay-oriented ads. To th1s day, most big city newspa­pers won't run commitment ceremony ads on equal footing with paid wedding announcements. So where along the spectrum is this newspaper? Focus on the Family hasn't approached llousto11 Voice about placing a similar ad, but we would refuse if they did . If the ad advocated conversion of sex­ua l orien ta tion through therapy or prayer, we would refuse it because we know the claim to be false and mislead­ing. We have that base-level responsibil­ity to our readers. The BAR ad is subtle, though, not say­ing much about the plans for the semi­nar. Tha t sort of hide-the-ball tactic in itself could be considered misleading enough to justify refusing the ad . But there's an even more solid ground. We also will not publish ads by organizations or businesses that we know discriminate on the basis of sexu­al orientation. It's safe to say that Focus on the Family discriminates in hiring and pro­motion on the basis of sexual orienta­tion, rdusmg to accept indi\·iduals who are openly gay and unwilling to undergo "conversion therapy" of the sort prac­ticed at Love Won Out seminars. That policy cannot be taken to say this newspaper vouches for the workplace of every one of its advertisers. We cannot investig.1te each and every advertiser, but where an anti-gay practice is open and notorious, we wi ll not do business. The question, to be sure, isn't an easy one. I.me-drawing can prove cxtn'mely difficult. Local gay-pos1tivc churche~. for example, run ads with th1~ paper but won't perform same-sex m.irnagc cerc­momes and often affilia tc with denomi­nations that won't allow oprnly gay ministers in the pulpit And yet out and proud gay pamh- 10ners fill their pews e\•ery week, testi­mony to their acceptance with at least a portion of our readership. Ultimately, the dec1s10n tu close a news­paper forum down to a parhcul.ir v1ew­pomt 1s .in excruciatingly difficult one for ,1 newspaper publisher, who e gut is with giving ,1 re,1der more speech, not ll•ss So 1t comes down to a case-by-case, soul-searching dccision, .incl JS alw.iys, input from our readers on the issue is welcome We can promise onl• thing. Any time this newspaper refuses an ad based on the policies at issue here, we will report that refusal on thl'se pages, letting you know with whom your newspapl'r won't do bu~J..ness. _ ---~·- ·---~~ HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT Hate on the highway meets a rainbow foe by J\,\:'\DI BEARDP-1 The practice of queer folk.-. putting rainbow and simi­larly identifying 'tichrs on tlw1r car~ has otten bl'l'n a two-edged sword. It gives us a \'isibility to n."Cognize each other, but it ;ibo gt\"CS those that hJte us the same power Still, as .1 dyke who is out, it has lxX'n a lifo chl>Ke for me to put these stickers on my velucle I do it to remind people that I too share U1is world with thrm and to Id my brothers and sisters know they are not alone. Thl' m1d is where I spend a lot of my time and ust1<1lly I'm alone. That's how it was tile WtX'kend before Thanksgiving, going from till' Carolinas to a meeting in Atlanta and then working my way to Tampa B.1y. My gas gauge was showing low, so I pulled into a gas station not too far from the ci ty. Thl·re was a new Thunderbird parked at tile pump ahead of me. I thought nothing of tile dt~rted car, as I f;l't about filling my tank and de.ming my windows. A man came out of the store, crossing tile tarmac to get into the T-bird. It registert-d pl'ripherally that he was bald, wearing shorts and combat boots. Moments after he'd gotten into tile car; loud, nerw-wrnck­mg ht'.1\'}' metal music blasted from his windows. It was so loud that it madt• me wince, the bass pounding in my chest. Thr guy );OI out of tile Thunderbml and wrnt b.ick into tile store; again I didn't pa) WT) mulh attention to hun. lit! l'\.lled the store and stood in front of my car, legs spread, arms crossed. I looked up from the back \\1n· dow where 1 was cleaning off U1e rood grime. The full n.'Jlization of what thi~ guy was about hit me v.ith a force iliat stopped my breatil, the iron taste of fear filling my mouth.. All up and down his arms wen• tattoo..>d tht• S)mbols of the white supremacist mm·ement. About the same time, the lyrics from thC' music in his car filtered into my brain: "white power, mud people, faggots, sp1Cs, kikt'S, wetbacks, kill them all ... " I le looked very deliberately at my front tag: a rainbow background, with "Chicana" engraved in white and a ~ex1c;in flag underneath that. Guess he thought he'd hit the jackpot of intolerance, a two-for-one sale as it were-a Mexican-American dyke. "gun" m front of hm, stLI mmed at me. After about tilrl'C step:. he dropped his hand, turned around and walked to his car I le got into 1t and turned up the music even louder, if tilat was possible Then at long last, time began to move again a~ he pulk-d away from the pump and left. He drow awa) from the highway, and I brl·athed a huge sigh of reLef I had always known that there were people likC' him in the world; today I knew it personally. It wa-; during the trip back home that I wa' nmmded of how much I appm:iated tile qut>er folks who braw the world and put thC' rainbow and other qut-er stickers on their cars It has always been my habit tlhlt if 1 St\.' anotl1er rainbow on the Interstate to waw. The occupants of the other car usually atknowk'lige me and tllt.'l1 Wl' tend to stay clu;e to each otiler going up thC' highway. It ll'IS me know I'm not out there alone and makes me fod safer. I reallv nredt'li that t\\.'l­mg as I hl'adt'li back home. 0:ot long after I had gotten onto ilie Ink rstate, a truck with Grorgia t.1gs pa."-<.ed me \\iili a I !RC equal sign sticker on the back mndow and a couple of d) kes m the froot ~l In an instmt my unea;;1~~ di."1ppean>d; I "-a' not .?!one. A short time later, I met a n.'li trud: \\ith Kentuck-y pbtes, a rainbow stick.er and pink tnangle on thC' back window and a dyke who kept me company alma;t to Atlanta. ;'\;ot only did I fuel lx'tter, but I knew how much 1t makes a diffm'l1Ce when we put stick­ers on our rars and make cUNlve. knmm. To the brother and sisters who rode up thl• road that da\' with me, thanks for your cour.1ge to .T;ake yourselves known. It gives mr great hope and that day it ga\·e mt• grC'at comfort. Randi M. Bearden 1s a self-de.,mbed "Mexican-American dyke" wlw co1ozmdcd of Pro1ecl rFREE. a gay gra:;:;roob orgamza­llon in Gree11v1l/e, S.C., :;lie can be reachoi at 804-322-54 or SC011cana@aol.com. I le ra1st>d his eyes to mt>et mine, the hatn.>d dnpping. He lifted his hand and poin!t'li a finger at me and then slowly brought hts thumb up so ilia! it bt.>came the trigger of his S)mbolic gun. Though he Let us know what you think k rd h. rd . .J Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) nc\'l'r spo ea wo , L~ wo s SCTl'amt>u at or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). me wiili a deafening force. ~ Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions Just when I thought my lungs would '8rT/ must include a name and phone number for verification. bur~t from their fear-induced paralysis, a M~=~, Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, car pullt'<i into the spot on the other side of r; Houston, TX 77006 the pump. At this intrusion of a possible I fax: 713-529-9531 •e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com witness, the guy began to step back, his Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail : hbw4gla@acninc.net www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer Mon.·Fri. 9·7, Sat. 10·5 1212 Westheimer@ Montrose 713-529-6789 10 NEWS DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE First Lady knocks Pentagon's policy on gays - Continued from Page 1 ors felt constrained by the policy Glover never .iddressed the allegallon that he despised homosexuals. His attorneys .irgued that another soldier, Spc. Justin R. Rsher, goaded Glover into the attack. Asher will be tried m January as an accessory. Staff Sgt. Michael Kleifgen testified that Fisher started spreading rumors in March among members of their unit that Winchell, of Kansas City, Mo., was gay Kleifgen and another sergeant tesnfied that Winchell told them that he was not gay. Fisher often harassed Winchell and once, during a scuf­fle, struck him m the head WJth a dustpan, Kleifgen said Kleifgen, Ihm section leader at the time, said he regularly spoke with Fisher and Winchell about their differences. But the problems continued, so the matter was pre­sented to a first sergeant, he said. "Ile said, basically, there was nothing we could do because of the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy," Kleifgen said, refernng to the mili­tary's policy on homosexuals. Kleifgen said he also got nowhere pursu· ing the issue with the company commander and filed a complaint v..ith the post's inspec­tor general. It was not immediately known what happened to that complaint. Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon s.iid the Defense Department 1s working on new training programs for commanders to ensure a fair enforcement of the policy on g.1ys. "There were cert.imly very disturbing charges made rn the course of this trial about the atmosphere at Fort Campbell, and the commanders at Fort Campbell have !'Jid that after the trial is over they will review the compl.ance with the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy and all the relevant procedures and regulahons that flow from that policy," lfacon said. Bacon s.ud the Clmton adrrumstration's pohcy has succeeded in ending the pre\10us practice of excluding gays from the military. Senate candidate Clinton speaks out 0 Thursda} 1 lillary Rodham Clinton said she doesn't support the "don't ask, don't tell" policy, reiterating comments she made two days earlier during a pnvate, Manhattan fund-raiser sponsored by the Empire State Pride Agenda. "I don't believe it's the policy we should have in our military," she said at a news con­ference in Manhattan, adding: "I believe Amencans willing to serve their country should be allowed to do so. They should be able to do so v.ithout discrimination and harassment. I believe fitness to serve in the military should be based on conduct, not sexual orientation." The first lady said she was not uncom· fortable st.ikmg out a position that put her .11 odds with President Clinton. "I'm going to be a c.indidate for the Senate of New York," she said. "I'm going to be stating my positions that will be from time to time different from the White !louse." If elected to the US. Senate, Mrs. Clinton said, she would work to overturn the con­troversial policy, put in place by her hus­band during his first term in office. The group supports equal rights for gays. I fer position was first reported in Thursday's New York limes, whtch learned of Mrs. Clinton's commcnb from partici­pants at the fund-raiser. Mrs. Clinton, responding to a question posed at the fund-raiser, held at the studio of the artist Ross Bleckner, voiced her displcJs­ure with the policy in unequivocal terms, according to participants, the limes reported. There were murmurs of approval and soft applause as she described "don't ask, don't tell" as a failure, taking note of the fact that there has been an increase m the number of gays expelled from the military smce the policy was put in force. "I think, quite frankly, she expressed a view that is an emerging consensus among people who are following this closely," Richard Socarides, the former White House liaison on gay issues, who attended the fund-raiser, told the limes. Socarides said she stated her views "directly and forceful­ly," adding: "I suspect that if you asked the president directly, he would say that this is an area that requires a lot of work also." Although she said she didn't expect Congress to approve such legislation now, Mrs. Clinton said the Pentagon should tJke Hillary Rodham Clinton told gay supporters in New York Tuesday that she doesn't support the mmtary's 'Don't ask, don't tell' policy on gays, a policy her husband created. steps to reduce the instances of gays bemg discharged from the military, the limes said. While her position puts her at odds with an administration policy, she is in line with the views of her likely Republican Senate nval, New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. Aides to the mayor say Giuliani has been critical of the "don't ask, don't tell policy" from the beginning. -From staff and wm· reports 8~ ~ Join us in our excitement as we anticipate the coming of our Lord and Sat1iour, the Baby Jesus at MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Corner of Montrosl' and Hawthorne) Advent Services Sundays· December 12 and 19 at I 0.30am !t~~cfi~~~~~~ An evening of live praise & worship, coffee-shop style $5. Cover charge • $1. Flavored coffees and desserts. This event benefits the Maranatha's Building Fund. Emmanuel, God with Us! December 19 at I 0:30am Special Worship Service in Story and Song to conclude the Advent season Candle Light Service Sunday, December 24 at 7pm Reception to fol low. NURSERY AV AI LAB LE FOR ALL SERVICES. HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 WHAT YOUR PROTEASE INHIBITOR CAN BE: VIRACEPT IS POWERFUL It's tough on HIV. In many people, VIRACEPT lowered the amount of HIV in the blood to levels below the limit of detection of the test used, and substantially increased CD4 cell counts after 24 weeks of triple combination for the treatment of HIV infection when ant -HIV drug therapy is warranted. It 1s not yet known whether taking VIRACEPT will help you live longer or reduce the number of infections or other 1 1nesses that can occur with HIV. Some common therapy. (The clinical significance of changes in viral medications and some HIV related med1cat1ons RNA levels in blood has not been established. The virus may still be present in other organ systems.) VIRACEPT IS EASY TO LIVE WITH Take it three times a day with your normal meals or light VIRACEPT n e lfin avir mesylate should not be taken with VIRACEPT. For some people, protease irhibitors have been associated tablets and ora l pow<Jer with the onset or worsening of diabetes mellitus snacks. VIRACEPT IS GENERALLY WELL TOLERATED People treated with VIRACEPT may experience some side effects; the most common is diarrhea of moderate or greater intensity in 20% of people in clinical trials. VIRACEPT WORKS It's indicated *l:-.1$ NPA Prescription Data 8198 - 5199 - and liyperglycem1a, and with increased bleeding in patients with hemophilia. Ask yoi..r doctor. For more information, call toll free 1-888-VIRACEPT or visit www.agouron.com. _ {Refer to the important tnformatJOn on tile next page) 11 12 VIRACEPI nelfinavir mesylate tablets and oral powder Information for Patients About VIRACEP'r (Yl·ra-cept) Generic Name: nelfinavir (nel·FIN-na-veer) mesylate For the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV} Infection Please read this mformauon carefully befon= taking VIRACEPT. Also. please read this leaflet each time you renew the prescription, Just in case anything has changed. ThlS is a summary and not a replacement for a careful dlSCussion With your doctor. You and your doctor should discuss VIRACEPT when you start tall ng thJS medication and at regular checkups You Sllould n=main under a doctor's care when taking VJRACEPT and should not change or stop treatment without first talking with your doctor WHAT JS VIRACEPT AND HDW DDES IT WORK? VIRACEPT rs used 1n the treatment of people With human immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) tnfect1on Infection With HIV leads to the destruction ol C04 T cells. which are important to the immune system Alter a large number of C04 cells have been destroyed, the infected person develops acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDSI. VIRACEPT works by blocluna HIV protease (a prote1n-cuttmg enzyme). which 1s required lor HIV to multiply VIRACEPT has been shown to significantly reduce the amount of HIV in the blood. You shoold be aware, however, that the eHect ol VIRACEPT on HIV 111 the blOod has not been correlated wnh long­term health benefits. Patients who took VIRACEPT also had si9ntticant increases in their C04 cell count VIRACEPT .is usually taken together with other 1ntlretrov1ral dnigs such as Retro111,. (z1dovudine, AZT), EpM,. (lamMJd1ne. 3TC), or Zent" (stawdme, d4D Taking VIRACEPT in combination with other ant1Cetrov1ral drugs reduces the amount of HIV in the body (111ral load) and raises CD4 counts. VIRACEPT may be taken by adults, adolescents, and children 2 years ol age or older. Studies in inlants younger thain 2 years of age are now taking place. DOES VIRACEPT CURE HIV DR AIDS? VIRACEPT 1s not a cure for HIV infection or AIDS The long-term eHects of VIRACEPT are not known at this time People taking VIRACEPT mar still develop opporllJmstlC infections or other conditions assOCJated willl HIV infection. Some o these conditions are pneumonia, herpes virus Infections. Mycobactenum avium complex (MAC) infections, and Kaposi's sart:oma It IS not known wllelher VIRACEPT w II help you live longer or reduce the number of 1nfecli0ns or oilier IDnesses that may occur. There Is no proof that VIRACEPT can reduce the nsk of transm1tt1ng HIV to others through sexual contact or blOod contam1natron. WHO SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT TAKE VIRACEPT? Together w Ill your doctor, you Med to decide whether VlRACEPT is appropriate for you In making your decision, the following should be considered: Alltr;ies: If you h1v1 h1d 1 serious 11f1r;ic ruction to VIRACEPT, you must not t1k1 VIRACEPT. You should aiso mform your doctor, nurse, or pharmaast ol any known allergies to substances such as other medicmes, foods, preservatives. or dyes If you 1n= pregnant: The effects of VIRACEPT on pregnant women or their unborn babies are not known H you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, you should tell your doctor before taking VI RACE PT. If you 111 breast-feeding: You should discuss with your doctor the best way to feed your baby You should be aware that rt your baby does not already have HIV. there IS a chance that rt can be transmitted through breast-feeding Women should not breul-fHd If they hne HIV. Children: VIRACEPT is avaliable for the treatment of children 2 through 13 years of age with HIV There IS a powder form of VIRACEPT that can be mixed with miJ1<, baby formula, or foods hke pudding lnstructJons on how to take VIRACEPT powder can be found In a later section that discusses how VIRACEPT Oral Powder should be pn=pared II you have fiver disease: VIRACEPT has not been studied m people with fiver disease. If you have river disease, you should tell your doctor before tak ng VIRACEPT Other medical problems: Certain medlC31 problems may affect the use of VIRACEPT. Some people taking protease inh bttors have developed new or more serious diabetes or high blood sugar Some people With hemophilia have had increased bleeding It Is not known w!letlwr the protease inhibitors caused these problems Be sure to tell your doctor ff you have hemophilia types A and B, diabetes me!litus. or an lllCfease in thirst and/or frequent unnation. CAH VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER MEDICATIONS? VIRACEPT ma'f mteract with other drugs, including those you take without a prescription. You must discuss with your doctor any drugs that you an= taking or are planning to take before you take VIRACEPT. Dnigs you shuuld nol take with VIRACEPT: • Seldane" (tertenad1ne, for allergies) • H1smanat- (astem11ole. for allergies) • Propulstd" (cisapnde, for heartburn) • Cordarone-(am1odarone. for irregular heartbeat) • Ou1mdine (for irregular heartbeat), also known as Ou1naglute~Cardioqui~Ouinide~and others • Ergot denvallVes (Cafergot" and others. for migraine headache) • Halc1on" (triazolam) • Versed9 ( m1dazolam) Taking !he above drugs with VIRACEPT may cause senous and/or life·threatening adverse events • Rrtampm (for tubert:ulos1s), also known as R1mactane", Rdadin•, Rifate,., or R1famate­Th1s drug reduces blood levels of VIRACEPT. Dose n=duction n=quired If you take VIRACEPT with: Mycobuttn" (mabutm, for MAC); you will need to take a lower dose of Mycobutin. A change of therapy should be conslden=d If you 111 liking VIRACEPT with: • Pllenobarb1tal • Phenytoin (Dilantin" and others) • Carllamazepme (Tegretol" and others) Tllese agents may reduce the amount of VIRACEPT In your blOOd and make rt less eHective. • Oral contraceptiveS rt11e pill") If you are taking the pdf to prevent pregnancy. you should use a d1Herent type of contraception since VlRACEPT may reduce the effectr;eness of oral contraceptms HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER ANTI-HIV DRUGS? Talting VIRACEPT together with other anti-HIV drugs lncn=ases their ab1l1ty to f;ght the Virus. It also reduces the opportunity tor resistant viruses to grow. Based on your history of taking other anti-HIV med1t1ne, your doctor will direct you on how to take VIRACEPT and other anti-HIV medicines. These drugs should be taken 1n a certain order or at specific times. This will depend on how many bmes a day each medicine should be taken. It will also depend on whether it should be taken with or wtthout food. Nucleo11de 1nalogues: No druo interaction problems were seen when VIRACEPT was given with. • Retrovir (lldovudme, AZT) • Epivir (lamr;ud1ne. 3TC) • Zent (stavudine, d4n • Vid~(d1danosine. ddl) H you 1n= taking both Vld11 (ddl) 1nd VIRACEPT: Videx should be taken without food, on an empty stomach. Therefore, you should take VIRACEPT with load one hour after or more than two hours before you take Vldex. Nonnucleo1ide reverse lrlnscriptne Inhibitors (NNRTlsl: When VIRACEPT 1s taken together with: • Viramunt" (nevirap1ne) The il!IOUnt ol VIRACEPT in your blood may be reduced Studies are now taking place to learn about the safety of combining VIRACEPT with Viramune. • Other tilNRTls VlRACEPT has not been studied W:th ot.'1er NNRTls. DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Other prot1ne Inhibitors: When VIRACEPT is taken together with: • Crixivan• (indlnavir) The amount of both drugs in your blood may be increased. Currently, there are no safety and eHicacy data available from the use of this combination. • NorV11"' (ntonavir) The amount of VIAACEPT in your blood may be Increased. Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. • lnvirase• (saquinav11) The amount of saquinavir in your blood may be increased. If used in combination with saquinavir hard gelatin capsules at 600 ma three times daily, no dose ad1ustments are needed. Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF VIRACEPT? Like all medicines. VIRACEPT can cause side eHects. Most of the side effects experienced with VJRACEPT have been mild to moderate. Diarrhea is the most common side effect m people taking VIRACEPT, and most adult patients had at least mUd diarrhea at some point dunno treatment. In clinlC31 studies, about 20% of patients receMng VIRACEPT 750 mg (three tablets) three times daily had four or more loose stools a day. In most cases, d1arrllea can be controlled using ant1d1arrheal medicines. such as lmod1um" A-0 (loperam1de) and others, which are available without a prescription. Other side eHects that occurred 1n 2% or more of patients receMng VIRACEPT include abdominal pain, asthenia, nausea, flatulence. and rash. There were other side effects noted In clinical studies that OCC1Jrred m less than 2'4 of patients receiving VIRACEPT. However, these side eHects may have been due to other drugs that patients were taking or to the Ulness ttsett. Except for d1arrllea. there were not many differences 1n side effects 1n patrents who took VIRACEPT along with other drugs compared with those who took only the other drugs For a complete list of side effects. ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. HOW SHOULD I TAKE VIRACEPT? VIRACEPT 1s available only wrth your doctor's prescnpt1on. The hght blue VIRACEPT Tablets should be taken three times a day. VIRACEPT should always be taken with a meal or a light snack. You do not have to take VIRACEPT exactly every 8 hours. Instead. you can take 11 at normal times when you are eating. T1k1 VIRACEPT 111ctly n directed by your doctor. Do not increase or decrease any dose or the number of doses per day. Also. take this medicine tor the exact period of time that your doctor has Instructed. Do not stop liking VIRACEPT without first consulting with your doctor, 1ven If you 111 feeling better. Only take medicine that has been prescnbed speclflcally tor you. Do not give VIRACEPT to others or take med1tine prescribed for someone eJse. The dosing of VIRACEPT may be d1Herent for you than for other patients. Follow the directions from your doctor, 111ctly n written on the libel. The amount of VIRACEPT m the blood should remain somewhat consistent over lime. Missing doses will cause the concentration of VIRACEPT to decrease; therefore. you should not min any doses. However. tt you miss a dose. you should take the dose as soon as possible and then take your next scheduled dose and future doses as originally scheduled. Dosing In adults (Including chtldren 14 years of age 1nd older) The recommended adu1t dose of VIRACEPT is 750 mg (three tablets) taken three times a day. Each dose shoold be taken with a meal or light snack. Dosing fn children 2 through 13 years of 1g1 The VIRACEPT dose in children depends on their weight. The recommended dose is 20 to 30 mg/kg (or 9 to 14 mg/pound) per dose, taken three times daily with a meal or light snack. This can be administered either in tablet form or. in children unable to take tablets, as VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Dose mstructJons will be provided by the child's doctor The dose will be given three times daily using the measuring scoop provided. a measuring teaspoon. or one or more tablets depending on the weight and age of the child The amount of oral powder or tablets to be given to a child 1s described in the chart below Pediatric Dose to Be Administered Three Times Dally BodyW•ight Numbor Numbtt Numbor oflov•I oflov•I or Kg Lb Scoops' Te~• T•blds 7 10 < 8.5 t5.5 to <18.5 8.5 IO <10.5 t8.5 to <21 11/4 10.5 10 <t 2 21 to <26.S 6 11h 12 10 <14 26.5 to <31 "' 14 10 <t6 11 to <35 8 16 lo <t8 35 to <39.5 9 211• 18 to <23 19.5 to <50.5 10 21h <!13 2'50.5 15 H• In measuring oral powder, the scoop or teaspoon should be level • 1 level scoop contains 50 ma of VIRACEPT. Use only the scoop provided with your VIRACEPT bottle. ' 1 level teaspoon contains 200 mg of VIRACEPT. N'ote. A measuring teaspoon used tor dispensing medication should be used for measuring VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Ask your pharmacist to make sure you have a medication dispensing teaspoon. How should VIRACEPT 0111 Powder be prep1red? The oral powder may be mixed with a small amount of water, milk, formula, soy formula, soy milk, dietary supplements, or dairy foods such as pudding or ice cream. Once mixed. the entire amount must be taken to obtain the full dose Do not mix the powder with any acidic food or 1uice, such as orange or grapefrurt 1u1te, apple 1uice, or apple sauce, because thJS may create a bitter taste. Once the powder is llllXed, 11 may be stored at room temperature or refrigerated for up to 6 hours Do not heat the mixed dose once rt has been prepared. Do not add water to bottles of oral powder. VIRACEPT powder Is suppfied with a scoop for measuring For help in determining the exact dose of powder for your child, please ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacisl. VIRACEPT Oral Powder contains aspartame, a low-calorie sweetener, and therefore should not be liken by children with phenytl<etonuna (PKU). HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE STORED? Keep VIRACEPT and all other medicines out of the reach of children. Keep bottle closed and store at room temperature (between 59'F and 86'A away from sources of moisture such as a sink or other damp place. Heat and moisture may reduce the effectiveness of VIRACEPT. Do not keep medicine that Is out of date or that you no longer need. Be sure that if you throw any medicine away, 1t is out of the reach of children Discuss all questions about your health with your doctor If you have questions about VIRACEPT or any other medication you are taking, ask your doctor, nurse. or pharmacist. You can also call 1.888 VIRACEPT (1.888 847.2237) toll free The following are registered trademarks of their respective manufacturers· Retrovlr, Epivir/Glaxo WeJtc:ome Oncology/HIV; Zent. V1dex/Bnstol-Myers Squibb Oncology; l11V1rase. Versed/Roche Laboratories Inc; Seldane, R1fadln, R1famate, Rifater/Hoechst Manon Roussel. Hlsmanal, Propulsld/Janssen Pllarmaceutica Inc; Halcion. Mycobut1n/Pharmac1a & Up1ohn Co, R1mactane, TegretoVC1baGeneva PharrNceuticals; Viramune/Roxane Laboratones. Inc; Oilant1n/Par1<e·Davis; Cnx1van/Merck & Co, Inc; fmod1umA-D/McNell Consumer Products Co; CordaroneiWyeth-Ayerst Laboratories; Ou1naglute/Bertex Laboratories; Card1oqu n/The Purdue Fredenck Co; OuinidextA H Robins Co, Inc; CafergoVNovart1s Pharmaceubcals Corp. Norw is a trademark of Abbott Laboratories I lsS11ed 11113197 CAll 1.lal.VIRACEPT YIP.ACEl'f1Strt0iltt""_el.....,,.. _ _-f no ~_.,., Copyrtg'll 01999 AQOUT11<1 ~. Inc. M r10llU rmMd Lt Job. C&I;,.:;,;;:-;;; HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 NEWS 13 Millennium March sets platform, confirms entertainment _. Continued from Page 1 Shl' will likely take a bnef lea\'e from LGRLas the m.irch dr,1ws nearer, I lardy-Garcia said. "fhe position\~ 1th the march is a full-time paid pos1hon if they can pay me," she said, makmg rdm·nce to the finanoal mstability of the April march. "What's really important, though, 1s that the board of LGRL ~ this as an inn-:.tment " March organizer.; plan to share the event's registration list with state and local groups, ml•aning LG RI.could potentially acquire from the march a list of gay men and lcsbi,ms in Texas that the lobby may not already ha\'e in its datab,1se. Pron'l'ds from the march will also partial­ly lx·nefit local and state organizations around the country, I lardy-Garcia said. 'Needed in Texas' Clarence Bagby, a board memlx•r of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and past prl-:.idmt of the I louston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus, said he supports 1 lardy­Garda's work, but would like to see her work­ing on is.sues m Texas. B.1gby Sl'rved on the LGRL board until his ll'rm e\pired last summer. "While Dianne is c\tremely talented and a \'l'rY dfl>ctin• lobbvist, there's~ much more to bl' done here in Texas in terms of organizing a gr.1~N<X>ts structure that it's a little troubling to st'l' that talmt and energy siphoned away for this e\'ent in Washington," he said. Bagby s.11d LCRLh.1s done an effective job of mobihzmg gays and lesbians m large Texas cities, but smaller commuruties in outlymg .ireas need to be organized, too, he said. The mailing list the march will gather will not likely help with that, he said. "It's not going to add names to our Ii.st of people who are going to organize in East Texas, West Texas and in the valley." Bagby said. Hardy-GafCla said she supports grass­roots organizing and wants LGRL to reach into areas not pre\'ious reached, but she s.iid her brief ab::.ence will not impact those efforts. "l GRL. doe;n't run because of me. It runs becauo;e of member.; and volunteer.;," she s.iid. March takes shape Hardy-GafCla 1s m charge of community organizing, outreach and communications for the march. She is also running a Washington, DC office that opened this week. I lardy-Garcia has said she would like to have lx•m appomted co-executi\·e director at least a year ago, but she said she plans to make sure the event runs smoothly anyway. "I'm iust gomg to have to work my ass off," she said. During the few wl'eks she has been at the helm, a number of important decisions have already been made. In addition to acquiring an office, march organizers h.i\·e articulated a \·ision and lined up three big-name celebrities to handle the entl'rtainmcnt. The e\'ent, originally planned as only a rally, also now includes a march through the Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment I People ~ Planetout:com www.planetout.com I AOL Key.Y01d: Plane!Out engage ..,. enjoy strt>ets of the nation's capitol. Actors Ellen DeGeneres and Anne lfo::he and singer \1elissa Etheridge will be among performers who will entertain gay men and lesbians from across the nation gathered on the National Mall. "Ellen and her partner Anne ha\·e scm!d as inspiring role models for a ri.~ing genera­tion of lesbian and gay youth and have fur­thered understanding and acceptance in the larger ~ocicl);" s.iid Ann DeGroot, one of the march's four national c<r<:hairs. Donna Red Wmg, another march chair, s.iid Etheridge will be making her s..oeond appearance at a national gay and ksb1an march. She appeared at the 1993 march. The !vhllcnnium .\1arch will al~ include a march, I lardy-Garcia said this wet:k. Only a rally had been planned. but some groups wanted a march and organizer.; had said rt>eently they would attempt to get permissi(>n from the citv to march. 'Tm c.~ sav confidentl\' that thm• will bl• a march," I lardy-Garcia s.iid. "Th<' pt•rm1t b secure. That was a big concern. It's kind ot complicated to get a march pt•rm1t 111 Washington, D.C" In addition to performances by the entt'r­tainer.;, stage pre~;cntations about p!Jtform issul-:. are planned. Organizer.; rt'Cet\ ed mon• than 40,000 ballots from ~\wal hundrt•d thous.md that were distributed to gay men, ksbians and allies in \'enues acm"-s the nation and online to detcrmme the platform. The group has dedded to adopt a "work-mg dsion" and 1s encouragmg gays to contin­ue submitting ballots by mail, e-mail. fax and at www.mmO\\:org. The eight pnority L«Sues that make up the workmg \'bion: hate crimes legislation; end­ing workplace discrimination; racial 1ustice; family \·alut>s, includmg marriage and partner nghb, adoption and child custody; health care; legal protection for youth; and overtum­: ng anti-gay initiati\·es and laws. Troubled past l lard\'-C,aroa sa.d she 1s awarl' that feelings ha\·e been hurt bv management changl'S the march has undergone. As rt'Cl'ntlv as last month, tormer cxecuh\·e direct;r R0bin frler, !ht• march's founder, rt·s1gned citing creati\·e difft·r­l'nCl'S with the board. From the beginning, the Human Rights Campaign and the UniHrsal Ft>llcm ship of \letropolitan Community Churcht:s, tht: groups who first .innounced the event, ha\·e been criti­(] Zed for attempting to design an l'\·en! without commumty input Dt:tractors have also quest10ned the event's goals and hming. But Hardy-Garcia said she 1s confi­dent that the event itself will wipe away the pain some ha\•e felt. "In the end, what people will remem­bt• r 1s what 1t feels like to be on that mall with thousands and thousands of people ltke them," sht• said MUSCLE MECHANICSSH PERSONAL TRAINING STUD I O -~ 11 · ~'If"' iB-11,wl ft: / Crn;-/.u" 4316 Yupon - By Appointment - 713•523•5330 W~!Jf' yovie goy lving .. h HIV and I ~~.:rg of se lfe IOSU'arce. shouldn I rou be give~ a loce-to-foce corautta•oan r a no-p-ess<.<e. no-oblgoton envrOl'"leflt? 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Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem NEWS DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Heillth Briefs Steamy new book documents same-sex behavior among animals OTIAWA, Canada-A provocative new book about gay animals is challenging the belief that homosexuality is an aberration of nature, the Ottawa Citizen reported. "Biological Exuberance," a ground-breaking review of homosexuality in the wild kingdom, documents hundreds of cases of mammals and birds enthusiastically engaging in sex and long-term relationships with members of the same sex. The list of gay creatures, according to author and biol­ogist Bruce Bagemilil, would fill Noah's Ark. apes and monkeys, dolphins and whales, giraffes, zebras, warthogs and woodpeckers. Lesbian gulls mate for life and raise chicks together. Male manatees splash around m group orgies. In all, the book notes 471 species, including fbh and insects, that exhibit varying typl'~ of same-sex bl'havior. The 751-page work, which took nearly 10 yl'ars to research and write, not only challenges the notion that homosexual­ity t~ unnatural and simply doesn't occur among animals­it contends many animals engage m homosexual sex for the same reason people do-they enjoy it, the newspaper reported The book also explores the debate about the origins of homo:;exuality-genetics versus environment, biology versus culture and nature versus nurture French doctors urge World Trade Organization to help f ight AIDS PARIS-The French medical charity Doctors of the World urged countries meeting at the World Trade Organization summit on Dec 1 to allow Third World states to import and produce anti-AIDS drugs cheaply without fearing trade sanctions, Reuters news service reported. The charity argued that production costs for AIDS drugs were only a fraction of their normal cost. But, it added, "¥.ithout an international campaign, only a small minori· ty of the total of 33.6 million people suffering from AIDS have the right to treatment. ... At the start of this new WTO negoti,11ing round, we demand that existing .. rules J!lowing developing countries to produce and import medicine:; be applied without the threJt of trade retaliation." But poor nations shy away from doing this under the threat of trade sanchons by the United States and West European countries, another French medical char­ity, Nobel Peace Prize-winning Doctors without Borders, charged last week. New Russian AIDS drug may replace AZT, to be produced in 2000 MOSCOW (AP)-A new Russian AIDS drug that could be substituted for the common­ly prescribed AZT will be produced beginning next year. Like older anti-AIDS drugs like AZT, phosphazide slows the repltcatton of the IllV virus, which cJuscs AIDS. But It is believed to have fewer of the side-effects of AZT, which can cause anemia and nausea. The new drug has met with cautious optimism among Canadian experts who carried out IJbo­ratory tests on it in 1997. Vadim Pokro\·sky, head of the Russian Center for the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS, said that phosphaade was licensed in Russia in October and will be produced starting early next year. World AIDS Day marked by events, setbacks around the globe Several events were held around the world to mark World AIDS Day on No\•. 30 and Dec. 1. Among them. • In Paris, Dr. Luc Montagmer and Dr. Robert Gallo, two scientists who were once locked in a bitter dispute over who first isolated the I !IV virus, shared a stage. Montagnicr, of the Pasteur Institute, warned that an effective AIDS vaccine could be 30 years away unless governments change their approach and encourJge wider reseJrch. "Nobody yet has a miracle solution, but there are many clear ideas on vaccines, and governments must enable these to be developed. If we concentrate on just one theory and that fails-what will we do then?" Gallo, director of the Institute of l luman Virology at the University of Maryland, was more optimistic that an effoctive vaccine can be found, and dismisses talks of a period of up to 10 years between its discovery and mJrketing. • In Los Angeles, Southern California activists held a rally focused on the issue of frl•e condoms in gay bars. The Hollywood·b,1sed AIDS I lealthcare Foundation has launched a petition drive aimed at putting a me.1sure on the West Hollywood ballot n·quiring some bars and alcohol-serving restauranb in that city to hand out city-purchased condoms. Bar owners J!ready are complying with a voluntary city·sponsored program to distribute 250,000 condoms, said DJvid Cooley, owner of the Abbey restaurant and bar." Are we now going to have condom police checking the businesses?" he said. Foundation President Michael Weinstein contended that the voluntary distribution has been spotty. • In Beijing, the first nationally televised advertisement promoting condoms for AIDS prevention were pulled from Chinese television because they violated a ban on advertising sex products. The advertisement aired Nov. 27 and 28 on China Central Television's Channel 1. The State Administration for Industry and Commerce banned the ad Nov. 30. The condom ad had been seen as a breakthrough in efforts to reach large numbers of Chinese and confront traditional taboos against discussing sex and contraceptives. ~From staff and wire rq)()TIS HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 10, 1999 GroWlh Hormone And Coning Edge Products Pelllabolin-15CC 1f test suspension Cort Bloc 1corUso1 blockerJ $34.95 Secretagogue-One growth h1rm1ne & IGF-1 40 effervescent growth hermone tablets Androste Denn-lMed leanl &Dec Transdermal testosterone Noradenn- Transdermal Deca durab1lln Ettervescent Creatine 40 serVlnus .................... $29.95 Primavar I. II Methvl Test A True Anabelle C1mp1und Gerovital-Famous Romanian Anti-Aging Drug 60 tabs ......... $19.95 IGF-1 Insulin like growth facter ........ S89.95 Andro Stack &OOmg Strongest Legal steroldal on the planet FREE Bodv Fat Analvsis with appointment! 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We guarantee it is the fastest, most affordable Permanent Hair Renwml treatment in the world market place today. LESBIANS in BUSINESS [LiB] prouBLy pre.sent.s Y2 AY a new year's eve celebration The women of LiB invite you to their annual New Year's party 8:00 pm, Friday, December 31 , 1999 Renaissance Hotel @ 6 Greenway Plaza $100.00 in advance; $1 25.00 at the door Music pro~ ~:;ridgell Tucker on 2 dance floori _,... idnight Breakfast Expanded inner uffet; Champagne toast tnon-olcoholicava11ableJ $99 .00 room rate (includes breakfast on New YearJ Day) for room reservotions call 713.629.1200 by December 21st and mention the LiB Dance for tickets, reservations or information, call the UB info line at 713.529.0077 general admission tickets available at Lobo reserved seating available by mail; PO Box 66012 Houston, Texos 77266i-lf,-.n.Jtr1111•1 on the Wings qf llTlilgination ... DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Guests are invited to dress in the futuristic spirit Qf our Millennium Fant.asy revelry. Fant.asy Packages, Ko/Tlilnce Packages• and General Mmission includ1: Interstellar Prime Ri~ Buff~ Oirmer • 7 -10 pm • Eight (8) 5everage Tickets per person MillenniurnFantasy Party Favors • Extra~.strial Encdunters Panoramas.of the Galaxy • The Colors Of Space Co5111ic.5tar Bursts & Mete~rS~p)l(ers at Midnight Rock the Galai<y wall live Music &D;w1cf ng featurinrihe Owt-of-thls-world sounds of DOPPElGANGER • the FAANCHJSE A<;C!toiT • Thll. ~ER ..E.CKSTIHH RIO GENERALADMJSSION • $149 per person Millennium Fantasy & Romance Pacμge6,.fronr$549 per couple, availalile liy Reservation Only• • Cali (713) 654-1234-or 1(800)233-12:34 Under 21 NOT admitted tc party • No outside !leverages allowed • KIJma!IU,.... i"'lwk (jndle/iglrt Orn111r in Sp111dl~ llryment in Ml If""!"'* 1t ,,.,,,. of pwclllt1. ind /1 non ,.,,,,..U/1/und non· tnllfm/1/e. Other rntrictiollupply INTERVIEW: FELICE PICANO With 'The Book of Lies' Violet Quill author Felice Picano fictionalizes history into a mysterious intrigue by JIM PROVENZANO What 1s truth? Felice Picano may know, but in his latest novel, literary truths lx.>eome an elusive mystery. In "The Book of Lies," the author of 19 books, including the best-selling "Like People in History," takes on another aspect of gay history: his own. Picano is considered one of a shining group of writ­ers who began publishing as openly gay authors in 1970s and 1980s. As a member of the Violet Quill, he joined the company of Edmund White, Andrew Holleran, Chnstopher Cox, George Whitmore, Robert Ferro and his partner Michael Crumley. Picano's work as a publisher extended that contri­bution when he started Seahorse Press, which first published playwrights Robert Chesley and Harvey rierstein, authors Dennis Cooper, Robert Gluck, Jane Chambers, and a little-known photographer named Robert Mapplethorpe who created the cover art for Brad Gooch's first book, "Jailbait." Picano's own work spans an astounding set of gen­res- memoirs, science fiction, sex manuals, mysteries, literary novels, plays, screenplays, poetry and essays. It is fitting that one of the outstanding survivors of that er<1 would cre<1te a literary adventure out of history, com­plete with whimsical appendices of the collected works of the fiction,11 Purple Circle. Ross Ohrenstedt, is led down a rabbit hole of intrigue in search of the evasive Len Spurgeon: baseball player, muse and raconteur. In search of the undiscovered writings of the mysteri­ous Spurgeon, Ross discovers more than he expected, including some viciously competitive scholars-just the sort of intngue Picano is known for. _ With the first British hardback version released in June 1998 by Little, Brown/ Abacus, Alyson Publications has just published the American version of "The Book of Lies." Houston Voice talked to Picano from his Los Angeles home. Houston Voice: It's obvious tlzat "The Book of Lies" would be entertaining even for folks who don't know about t/1e real people you're jictionalizmg Felice Picano: I certainly hope so. One of the reasons I wrote this was that people don't know about us at all, even though in England they call us the gay Bloomsbury group. ::;.... Continued on page 24 lat.ya Peoples alten1ates playing the violin _. sillgllg to aeate a sweet, unique sound. some songs from LA. Two recording artists, Kristen Hall and LaTonya Peoples, share what they've learned and what they love as they release new CDs by PAIGE PARVIN Kristen Hall and LaTonya Peoples have a few things in oommcn: They like to wnte love songs. They like to date women. They are mUSJdans who offer something other than a typiW girl-with-guitar show. And they both recently relealed new CDs 1llllt: a gift from L.A. tome kind of prodigal daughter of the local folk scene, Hall tttumed to her home of Atlanta to show her •&!IClewhat she did dunng a whirlwind two-year stint m a lot Longtime fans got a glimpse of her new dunng a recent performance, where Hall wand CD release party. ''Califorrua-Made > Continued on page 22 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Out In Print BOOK NEWS A tedious but provocative look at Gore Vidal by El.LA TYi.Ek heel Kaplan's new biography of Gore Vidal has received more attenhon for 1ls bulk th.in its conte'lt, and that's a pity. The wntent 1s sup rb Vidal 1s .i m.in of many tac.c<., all mterestmg, .ind Kaplan n:d;es th( lT'OSI of Yid.L's mulll­d1mms10nal I fe \1ost refreshingly, unlike many b10graplucs of gay or b1sou.il mm, \~hKh .icknow l>dg( the subjt.>ct's sexu.1hty but don't talk .:ibout 11, Vidal's sexu.ihty is respected JS n import.int part of his life. In fJct, nearly everyone's sex life is out of the closet m this book. Vidal was born m l92'i to :\ma Core, wh()S(' father was lnomas l~ C'.ore, the blmd scn,1tor from Okl.1homa, and Lt. Eugene Vidal, J flier wl>o was also one of West Point's .ithlchc heroes. He was named Eugene Luther, after his father, but later took Gore JS his fi.rst name. 1-hs maternal grandfather's influence was profound. Though blind, he. loved books. By the time the boy \\as six, Vidal's grand­father was read mg history books to him, mir­tunng the IO\ e of history that would continue to domrn.1tc Vidal's wntmg. 1 lis other contm­umi; theme, fantas)~ was his ov.TJ rnten.><.t St:nator Gore pl.:mncd .1 political carec'r for the young man .• ind although Vid,11 was nc\'er to hold political offict•, he r.in twice, .ind h.1s been an tmportant comml'ntator on pohhcal issues, including the politics of sex. The kindest thing that can be said about :-\ma, Gore's mother, was that her second m.irn.ige, to the wealthy I lugh Auchmdoss, gave Gore even more !-OC!al connections ar>d prestige A uclunclos.s' s next wife was Janet Bouvier, Jae.kw Kennedv's mother. Until Vidal wrote J p1c'Cl' for fsqu:ie m 1963, which didn't look f.Jvorablv on Robert Kennedy, he and Jackie were chummy. Aftrr the arhde, she ncwr spoke to him agam. ~ma had negotiated a small tru~t fund fmm Auclunclos_, for Core, whJCh contnbutl>d to Gore'~ financi,11 independence and mablcd him to write full-time. In addition, Vidal acqu1rl'd ,1 taste for living well th.it fueled his desire to make real money wnting. This led him to wnte for mO\~cs and telcnsion and, under pseudonyms, commC'rcial fiction. As Katherine Ewrhard (taken from the mu{'h-fr!.'­qucnted Everhard Baths), he wrotr a pulp novel-"StJr's Progress"-and as Edgar Box, penned th.rec mysteries. ~1 uch of Vidal's militJry career was as first mate on a fre1ghhupply ship m the Aleutian lsl.ind's, a chain of JSlands stretching south of Al.iska for 1,000 m!..CS. Between runs, there was httle to do but re.id, write ilnd save monry. Vid.1l's first published book, "Williwaw," came from this expc·ricnm It was published in 1946, Books Make Great Gifts! The Essential Clive Barker Gay Renaissance Man Chve Barl<er a best-selling author d1redor, producer, and art1St. is back with a compendium of his award­winrnng short stones $27.50 $22.00 with IQ Firebird by Mark Doty Houstornan Mark Doty author of five acclaimed poetry collect100s and the autoblOQraphy Heavens Coast returns wrth another installment of hlS me11101rs $25.00; $20.00 IQ Left Out: The Politics of Exclusion by Martin Duberman The definitive collection of powerfully-argued and luCJdly-wntten essays by the noted historian. author of Cures and Stonewall $30.00; $24.00 IQ > ,5 BRIGHT Fu//Exposure HALSTON by Susie Bright The sexual pioneer reveals ways in which erotic expression has the power to inspire chal­lenge and transform $22.00 $17.60 with IQ Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister by Gregory Maguire In his first novel. Wicked. Maguire re-imagined The Wizard of Oz fro~the witch's perspective Now 1t s Cinderella's turn $24.00; $19.20 IQ - Halston by Gross &Rottman A comprehensive loOk at the designer based on mterviews with celebrrties insiders. and other designers Includes more ..._ ____ _, than 200 photographs $50.00; $40.00 IQ ® Crossroads Market Bookstore & Cafe WWWECL.KT.CUMCr< · roc1ds. 1tm 1111 Westheimer Road, Houston 71 J..942-0147 when Vidal was not quite 21. "The City and the Pillar," published at the start of 19-IB, soon became a be:,Lscller. It was one of the fnst literary books to haw g.1y men as m,1in characters. In 1998, Vidal published another bcslscller, "Smithsonian." &·tWl'cn those years, he publishl>d more than 25 books. I lis historical no\'els wrre widely praise-cl and sold well; his fantasies were often criticized as scand,1lous, but also sold well. Kaplan, an English literature professor who has pickl-d up a nice collection of awards, thoroughly discusses \"Jdal's writing in the biography. f le outLlnes the stol"); a nice feature 11 you h.in'n't read the book (or forgotten it), reviews its ongms in Vidal's life, and pro\'ldes a critical reaction. I le also details the business side of many of the books-the money and Vid,1l's business and person.ii relationships with his t-d1tors, pubhshrrs and agents. Vidal's frimds and (.'llemit.>S arc iln intm.!ibng addition to the bcxik. I le had a dose and pas­sion. 1tc frimd~h1p \\ith An.1L~ Nin. was g(xxl friends with Tennessee Williams and l'aul '\'e\\man, and often attl'ndcd p.irtics \\ith Pnnccss '>1.irgan.>t. I le and Paul Bowles W('J'C fricnJs, Vidal and Truman Cipotl' wen.> usually cntmies,and he and Norman\lailerneresomc­timcs ronlial and wmctunes fighting. I le ''as also at odds with \V'illiam Buckle\; a relationship that would rod up in court, in a bittl'I' libel suit. Sometimes ~ acrounts get a bit tcd1ous­Kaplan insL~ts -0n gl\ing everyone a pcdigrt'l" ("\\hmm the late l9SO's }.t1x f{.1bb, a consum­mate political operator, a lawyer ,,;th hfa rmts m \1assachusetts polillcs in the 1960s, was appoink-d ilmb.h_-:ador to Italy by l'n'Sident Bush"). But reg.1rdk~<s, Kaplan pro1·ides an interesting social history of the I.isl half of the 20th century Gore Vidal by Fred Kaplan, Doubleday, 850 pages, S35 What your neighbors are reading . . . Mu.rder Undercover by Claire McNab, $11.95 2 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11 95 3 Comfort & Joy by Jim Grimsley, $21 .95 4 Every Time We Say Goodbye by Jane Maiman, $11 95 i; Gay Spirit Warrior by John Stowe, $15.95 6 Innuendo by R.D. Zimmerman, $21.'lS 7 The Long Firm by Jake Arnott, $25 8 7th Heaven by Kalt' Calloway, $11.95 9 Infidelity by William Roo1wy, $14.95 10 Let Nothing You Dismay by Mark O'Doru1ell, 512 Crossroads Market 2 1 4 c; 6 7 BOOKSTORE & GAFF 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 Chop Suey Club by Bruce WebC'I', $b0 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11 QS Murder Undercover by Claire \ ki\Jab, $11 .95 7th Heaven by Kate C.11loway, $11 .95 Openly Gay Openly Christian by RPv. Samuel Kader, $15.95 Every Time We Say Goodbye by Jane Maiman, $11."15 Falcon Best of Legends $8.95 8 Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister b) Gregory Maguire, $24 9 Infidelity by Wilhrlm Rooney, $14 95 10 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 LOBO ~;•N• 3939 Montrose Boulev.ud 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 C~L1Li· some SUSTIVA. is the first HIV drug approved to be taken once-a-day as part of your combination therapy. 1 -ee 200 IT'g capsules together once daily. wrtt> or without food: t>1gt> fat meals avoided. Your doctor may suggest t.iktng SvS~VA at t reduc:e any side effect, you may expenMce. IV 1_-l{~ just did! Once Daily SUSTl"'A efavirenz Preenancy should be avoided r wome'l receMng SUSTIVA because b rt.'1 defects fiave bee!"I seen 1n p!1mates dosed witr SUSTNA Barner contraception Shoo d always be used 1n corri~~tJor with ot'ler 'Tiethods of contraception. Talk to your doctor when you start taking SUSTIVA. SUSTIVA rriay ct> 0 "' t - effect SUSTIVA, an NNRTI•, must be used in combination with other of otlier rred1c1nes (1ncl;,id ng ones for HIV) Always te your doctor HIV drugs. Now li.stedamong yo;.i are talong. startirg or ct>ang ng a:iy prescnptJor or ron- prescnpllori med1c1'.le when taking SUS TVA vour docto rray c'large your 'lled1C1ne-; or change their dose You sho\.o d discuss your pno~ medica: cond1 o:is (such as merital ness. svbs'..mce abv..e, hepatllls. etc. ) writ' your doctor before t.ak.rig SVSTTVA SUSTIVA is tough on HIV. 'duce, the arpount of virus r yoi.r blood .ind 'le rurrbe ells. SvST VA c.an even be used 1n young ch dre'l. 3 years of age or 01der. This is based on results fro,,-. controlled o meal tnals 24 wccKS. Presently. there are no ~ ts 'rorri controlled d1nic.J trials 5hol ig-terrr effects of SUS rNA _ pref~r.re~ anti·HIV drugs-in gove.rr)ment . -· .. · guidelines.' .. We tcr>OW that coping w.il HV rs d ffic.ilt ffiOU&I' Yoor treatl"lellt doe-;ri't SUSTIVA has manageable side effects. Most side effects are mild to fiave to be Ask yoi.r doctor about SUSTNA ~or more IMportant riformation mo< J can be '1Wlaged. fhe most s1gri1ficant side effects associated With SUSTIVA therapy have been nervous system symptoms (dizziness. trouble sleeping. drowsiness, trouble concentrating and/or abnor'l1al dreanis) and rash. These usually subs.de w1th1n the first two to four weeks of treatment In a small number of patients. rash may be serious. Taking SUSTIVA at bedtime may help make nervous system symptoms less notJCeable. •NNRTI • non-nudcoside reverse transcnptase tnhtbitor. fot-. lnlormo"°" on SUSTIVA. al l-80Q..olf'HAA/1 0< _,our-... IC ~Jlwwwsus11Y>.com fot _. lnlormooon on me updated OHHS ~· POf Me ol lhe ~a~" ~Jlwww lwaasorc see the next page for Palle'lt lnfor.natior dbout SvSTIV A FOR HIV Finally, a once dally medication to treat HIV. SUSTIVA. It's about time. www.1u1tlva.com 19 20 Once Dai ly ) SUSTl\r*A efavirenz .. ,.. SUSTIVA™ (efavirenz) capsules Patient Information about SUSTIVA* (sus-TEE-var) tor HIV (Hu;nan rnrnunodef ttency Virus} Infection Ge •JC name· efavirenz (efl-FAH-VI .rehnz) Please •Jad th s fc:-nat O" 'ore YGu start taK ng SUSTIVA Read I again each I me you refill your prescr pt c .:ase lhere s any new nformat on. Donl 'real ttus eaflel as your only source ol information about SUSTVA Always u::.CUSS SLSTIVA w h your doclor w you Siar! laking your 'ledicine and at eve.<y t You she d remain doctors care when us no SUSTIVA You should not ::hange o slop treatment~ ~rst , ng 1, ye r docto· What is SUSTIVA? SUST VA is a ~ c ne used lo hep treat HIV l"e 'II s '!lat causes AIDS (acqu red unmune def c1ency 1 ome Sl.S!" A <S 3 type of HIV drug ca ed a • llJdeoside le'le!Se transaiplase 1-• b IC" (NNRTI) How does SUSTTVA work? SUSTVA v.trks by ow ng the amou t of Ii V n U b ood tea ed 'viral cad"} Si.JSTIVA must be take: w o ant HIV med Cl .; Whe.n ~ wi1" ant HIV med etnes, Sl.STIVA has been •own to •?duce v cad and ease :he number of C04 ce s 1 type cl mmune ::ell 1r bl~ Si.JSTIVA 113Y " t have these effects n every patent Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SUSTIVA :; I e 'or !-<IV or A1DS Peop e taking SUSTIVA may st I develop ?!her 1rlections associat with !-<IV Be= o th s I very 1mpor'art Iha! you rema n under the care o• your doctor Can children take SUSTTVA? Yes dren wtio are able 10 swa rNI capsu es can ta SUSTIVA Flash may be a ser ""'problem sonie ch c· Te you ch lcf~ doctor rJ!i"I Nay I you ::e " or any other s de effects wh le you l<k SUSTIVA T'1e dose ol SUSTIVA lor ch :dren raf be ~ tllan the dose for adults Capsu es .... g lower doses ol SUSTVA are ava lab Y ch d's doctor wi I determ ne !he r Qht dose based I ~wev"I Who should not take SUSTTVA? Do I !aka SUSTIVA t you are a e:g1c to SUSTIVA or acy •! 1!s 1ngred1ents 'Sl1STIVA ~ and Ille SUN6URST LOGO are trademarks of Ouf'l>nl Pharmaceuticals Company Co1>Jrigt:1 t 999 DuPont Pnarmaceui.ca13 Company -r.. brands &sled are Iha •egJSterad tradematl<s ol lhelr ._ - and are not lrademat1<s of DuPont PllarlnllCeUllcala Company DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? Talk to your doctor r gN ?Nlay I you • Are pregnant want to become • g 1nt • Are breast •e~ing • Have prob1e-ns w th ycur liver QI ".ave ~ad " ;:altt·s • Star' or • ".arge any med1c1ne • Haves de effects wh le taking SUST VA (efaVlfenz) • Have a h1sto:y o nental lflne-.s • bstance r a COhol abuse What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? Many patients have d1zz ness trouble s eeping drowsmess trouble concentrat1rg ,mwor unusual dre::;is a few hour~ after starting t• ':'lellt w th SUSTIVA These feel1rgs M.Jy be less "Ot1ceable 1f you take SUS Tr/A at bedt me T'ley also 'end to go ?Nlay atter you ve taken the '!led cine for a 1ew wc:;k• Rarely patients 'ave fl"Ore senous s de effects that may affect mood or abll1ty to think c1ear1y These side effects occu· more often in patients with a histc:y ol l'lf!ltal illness or substar.ce abuse Tell you· doctor promptly ary o• L'lese s de effects continue or 1f they bot'er you There s the poss1blf1ly that these symptc."'IS f!klY be more severe If SUSTIVA s used with a cc.'ol or mood altering (street) drugs Y • should avoid dnVlng o• operating '113ch ~eiy f you are having these side effects One of the most coovnon side effects 1s rash These -ashes JSually go away wtthoul any change in treatment In a small number ol patients rash may be serious II you develop a rash, call your doctor promptly Other commor ~1de eflects •nclude liredness upset stomach vom11trg, and diarrhea However. this s •ot a complete 1st of side effects reported wit~ sus•1vA when taken with other anfi-HIV drugs Do ~ct ·z1y G" this eaflet alone for information about ~de effects Your doctor car. discuss a more complete list of side eHects with you Please contact your doctor unmedlately before stopp1rg SUSTIVA because r;l side effects Tell yo:..r dLttor or other '?ea thcare provider If you notice ary side eftects wtule taking SUSTIVA What about birth control, pregnancy, or breast-feeding? WO!".en sh utd not become pregnanl Mi1le tak ng s1..s•1vA Birth defrn have been o;een In amMals treated w tr SUST VA. II s not known whether Ir s cou d happen 1• "uman~ v~ s~ou d use a condom o d aphragm n add t to ot" • methods o' birth cu trol while tak1•g SUST VA lnfor'll ycu; doctc• ;.11ed ately 1 y::_ are pregca"I If )'OU want to become pregnant. ta k 10 )'OUr doctor Do " I taKe SUSTIVA I you are breast feed ng Ta k to y 1octo· f you are breast feeding your baby Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? SUST VA may cl'ange the effect of other ned cines {1x1ud1ng ones foi 'ilV) Your doctor may change your med cines or change theu doses For tr1s reason 1 1s very 1mportan. to • Let a•: yc.r doct•·s and pharmacists know that y"" lake Sl.STIVA • Tell your doctors and pharnac1sts about al: ried1cines you take This include.~ 'hose yr. buy over-the-courter and herbal or natural re:ied1es Br ng all your rred1c1•es when you see a doctor O' tmkc a list of lhe11 :3mes, how much you take, ard hrNI often you take them This will give ycur doctor a .:omp1ete picture of 1he medicines you use Then he or 5he e<:.n dee~ the best approach I r y'CUr .tua11c• n taken W11~ Sl.ST VA and ::a! ·g I OV• ng '"led '1eS l1il'/ to be er.: ged or "ave 'her dose changed 'Nl'en taken w h Si.IS1VA .. • C.nx va:-11> 1 nd navtr) • Fo~ovase® (S3G 3Ylr) • B ax1n® (clar '""'"'YC " How should I keep SUSTIVA? 5t.s•1vA 1s avaifable as 50 mg. 100 rrg and 200 ng cap• Jes Keep S!iSTIVA at room temperatLre (77 F, n tre bottle given ro you by yo,r ~"arnac1st Tie temperatLTe can range from 59 86 F Keet> St.s•1vA out or the ·~h 01 ch Id· How can I learn more about SUSTIVA? Tak to you• doctor or oth£! '1ealthcare prov dcr If vou have quest ons abou1 either SUSTIVA o HIV F • add t ona nfonrat on you car. v sit the SUST VA webs te at httpJ/w1;A 5US!1va com This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use it for any other condition or give it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. If you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. ~ DuPont Pharmaceuticals W1 mmgt.on. OE 19880 Issued Sepe ember. 1998 DECEMBER 10, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE OUT ON THE BAYOU On Stage THEATER NEWS & REVIEWS An invigorating 'hush' by O.L. GROOVER The British are coming. The British are coming. Thl'<1tncali\•, at least, in Houston during December · First, the work of Charles Oickens ma~eo ~ w?nderful appearance at the Alley in its invigorating, faithful rendition of A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Jonathan Harvey brings us a double whammy of his theatric imaginings with the Ammcan premiere of HUSHABYE MOUNTAIN at Theater LaB while BEAUTIFUL THil'liG continues at Little Room Downstairs. I really didn't want to sec "I Iushabyc Mount;un"-prcss information about the production stressed its heavenly setting and the play's subtext is AIDS. This nearly called out "run away, run away" since it focuses on a subject I didn't care to be lec­tured about again. ! was wrong. horn the first image of the side curtain rising in balloon shades to reveal the Bird Woman from "Mary Poppins" singing her lullaby, 'Teed the Birds," ! was hooked. She sings while a new entrant to Heaven, Danny, receives his wings, providing the first taste of the magical realism that 1s so much a part of the production's charm. The Bird Woman is one of the numerous guises that Danny's mother, Beryl, assumes in his fevered im<1ginalion while he waits in I leaven's anteroom before he is to be "pnsscd through." I le has died of AIDS, <1nd there arc many unresolved issues from his life that nn'C! clarification before he gains entrance, providing the dr<1ma's bedrock. I larvey's new work is a more ambitious play than "lkautiful Thing." Full of surreal touches thnt shift time and location, often with· in the same scene, the drama tells D.mny's talc and U1osc .cl~t to him: his absent yet lovmg motl1cr; his lover, Connor; Connor's brotl1cr, Lee; and his live-in girlfriend, Lana, who hap­pens to be Danny's best friend. To complic.itc matters, Connor has taken a new lover Ben and U11s quintet has its own unn..."-Olvcd ~~su~ to de.ii with before Danny, and all of them, can find fin.11 bmcdichon. Full of I larvcy's wicked wit and vaude­ville touches, "I lushabyc Mountain" isn't .i!way::. successful in it-; preaching on AIDS. We've heard all thL'SC arguments before, even if here Oley are given an English spin. The rants and r JVl~ of "why me?" are rather shop­worn, the medical expositions are dry and somehml>s stop U11s pl.iy dead in its tracks. But the characters, blissfully stoned on weed or drunk as skunks on champagne, kel'P this play interesting, free-wheeling and beautifully daffy. The ensemble cast, clcwrly Jssembled by director Jim Phillips, is of high caliber and embraces the charac· ters with insight and grace. As D.mny's mother, Susan Shofner 1s perfect. A rilre find, shl• is luminous and radi­all'S th.it :.pedal actor'.s warmth not often witne$l'CI in the the;iter. In her many <1ppari­hons, all v,mations on Beryl's middlc-dass Dustin Ross and Susan Shofner in 'Hushabye Mountain.' housewife gradually going dolt)~ she gets to be Mary Poppins, a warped version of Judy Garlilnd m ruby slippers pedaling her cc!e::.tial rowboat as she collects fallen stars, a cigarette smoking statue of Ole Virgin Mary, or sa~-sack dreary Mum sending her latest recipL>s to I?anny in heart-rending letters of guilt. I ler indelible performance is reason enough to see "1 lushabye Mountain." Joel Sandel gives a finely tuned perform­~ nce as Con.nor. Although Danny's the one try­ing to get into I leaven, it is Connor whOSt.> h~art drives this play, as he struggles v-.'ith com­mitment, nl\.'<I, selfishness and forgiveness. In one of many fine scenes, Connor and 0,mny rummage U1rough U1eir CDs to pick funeral music. Unintentional recriminations le.1d to a tender truce and Connor, before he carries Danny to bL'Cl for the last time, mas­sages Danny's neck. It's over in an instant, but tile gesture says everything that's right witl1 their relationship, and Sandel handles it \\ ith poignant restraint. . As an actor, Dustin Ross has a twitchy, neu­rotic style all his own-<lefinitely "theatrical" ~n~. _uniq~e, witnessed to great advantage in Shopping and Fucking" at Theater LaB last season. This innocence and dangerous dicholo'.11y from Ro~s serves Danny well, as he tnes to make sense of tile conflicts con­summg h1m. James Lane as Connor's brotl1er, Lee, has a d • .irk, sexy presence like a young Scan C~nn~ry. I le adds a great deal of warmth to this b1g·hearll'C! bloke, whose love of his gay brotl1cr. and railing against hypocrisy bind all these friends togetl1er. After the breezy, sketchy ~uahty of his "Beautiful Thing." Harvey's ' l lush.1bye Mountain" is a truer-to-lifo fairy talc written with a dramatic hand Hushabye Mountain Theater LaB Houston Through Dec.19 1706 Alamo 713·868· 7516 Ill llLLlll DILLAISI*• • Prices May Vary. See Sture For Dmns. 21 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 10,1 999 Outside 1heD0, V MUSICD1 A ;;... Continued from page 17 Music" fc.itures 10 songs she recorded at her home in LA. After the suc.ccss of her song "Let It R.im," recorded .ind released by vocalist Am.indJ \1Jrsh.ill :.n 1996, Ii.ill s.i1d she worked up th(; confidence to do something shed ilh\.JVs w ... nted. C.,he pulled up stJkes and moved to the West Coast to write songs. H II dove into the LA. music .ndJstry .irenJ, using cort.icts to mJke more cort.1ds .ind "co-wnh'lg with Jnybody they could hook me up w1tr "She w-wmte 50ngs with the hkes of Jenmfc.r Sh'-5, ~teven's d.1ugh­ter, M donnJ b.1ck-up singer DonnJ Dd..or1; Jnd close tnc.nd Joanna dcScynLs, the dJughter of Jr orcrestra conductor ,ind n opera sinJ;er Ir her spJrL time, HJll lcamL'CI d1g1t.1I F odud n, \\1th tre 1d(•.i of rroducing music her5clf. I IL•r nL•wfound talent 1s C\ 1- dL nl on "(.il11orri1.:i-\1.ide \1us ," row in limited relL .. 5L ,md .iva1IJbk through 0Je'llon RL<ords The U) m )' come ... s .i surprise to some I ns, 1 IJll s.: d, be< li5<' 1! represents .m alm~t rnmplete depJrture from her fa!l'il1.:ir .icoust1c folk 5tyle. \1ost of the songs were written w .th othl'f pL'Ople and for other peo­ple, she s,11d, .:illow1ng her to find new modL'S of express:;in ~he described somt• of the songs as sounding like the bands Goo Goo Dolls, Backstreet Boys and N'Synch. "This is really different, I got to try a lot of new things," she said "Here I am writ­ing songs and it doesn't have to be for me, and it's fun'" Asked if she finds it hard to watch other artists perform her songs, Hall said it's just the opposite "I get a bigger high off watching some­body dse doing it. I go crazy in the audi­ence," she said The best thing about L.A.? "The ener­gy," flJll SJld. "There 1s .:i frequency buu in the .:iir because evc.ryone out there is trying so h.ud," she s.:11d, the enthusiasm in her vo1Ce evident. "Some .ire f.i1ling, some .ire succeeding, but e\erybody is working so hJrd It was a motivator; you CJn't sit still there." Atl.:int.1 1s home for Ii.ill, .md she's glad of the ch.mce to sit shll for awhile. She's putting down some roots this tim!'-5he bought ,1 house .md is in the process of renovJhng with the help of friend and musician Andrew Hyra. I IJII 1s also setting up a studio, where 5he'll sharpen her new production skills. %e's looking forward to sharing her tal­ents with other .:irea musici.rns, she c;a1d. "With .i I these new tools, I'm encourag­ing people to come .ind write with me," she <;.:11d. "I .ilso want to fmd vokcs who WJnt to sing some songs I'm writing, and start working with bands who need sm­gles . I would like to get bettu at pro­duct10n and bt• actively involvt•d with the .icts, so that we produce togt•ther" VtvttitvGU PiOPUOf Otv5 presents Beautiful an urban fairwtale \ by Jonathan Harvey Opens Thursday, ~O\'ember 18 at 8 p.m. Plays Thursdays through Sundays until December 12 Tickets $20 Call 713-398-7577 for tickets and more information All shows at The Little Room Downstairs 2326 Bissonnet Produced by special arrangement w11h Dramatists Play Sen,.ice, Inc. Peoples: st ill feeling the love LaTonya Peoples 1s not into labels. But she is into love. Not "in love," you understand-actually she's single-but into love. Ask her what themes drive her music, and she answers without hesitation: Love. Love, and m;iking people feel good. So it comes as no surprise that Peoples' first CD, which she produced and recorded completely solo and released last year, was called "Feel the Love." Her second, "The Spint Within," a more ambitious offering b.icked by a full band, w.is releJsed Dec. 11 A professional v101inist as well JS vocalist, Peoples alternates heartfelt lyrics \\ith mclo­d ;ius violin compos1t1on to produce .i sound that, of course, she dot'5n't like to bbel "If I h.id to describe it, I'd sav .iltemallve R&B," sre finally relented. "It's not cx,1ctly blues, not ex.ictly jazz, not exactly folk. It's ,1 combinJt1on of evervthing." Wh.ite,,er it 1s, Peoples has been pl.iymg It smce she was five vcars old. I ll•r parents introduced her and rer siblings to mu~ic early on, and sht• "just stuck with the vio­lin," J'> well as learning piano and singmg m the church choir m Topeka, Kansas, where she grew up, she said. Not surpns­in~ ly for someorie who \•alucs love .:ibove all else, Peoples cal:s her fJm1lv her "gre.it· e<;! source of strength." At 16, Peoples became .i certified Suzuki V1olm Instructor, then later earned a bachelor's degree m music therapy from Howard University. "Music is something that really makt•s me foci comfortable," she ~aid. "I want music to help people feel good about themselves, to have an overall sense of worth. And it can do that, whether it's listening to someone else or developing a skill of your own. "Music is an expression that does not have to use words, a way to communi­cate with o ther people," said Peoples, who now practices as a music therapist in a nursing home. She also gives pri­vate violin lessons, in addition to per­forming whenever she can. In keeping with her anti-label, pro­love philosophy, People;; doesn't like to define herself as lesbian but as a "lover of people." lier rom,rnhc part­ners do happen to be women, though, she s;iid. Asked if her music sends a special message to the lesbi;ins who come to all her :.hows, she replied that her mes­s. 1ge is univers;il. "It's for everybody, from all walks of life, for anyone willing to be opt•n Jnd feel the love," she said. Peoples says her "ultimate dre.im" is to opt•n a non-profit resource centu for mncr-c1ty kids, where they can be exposed to the arts, using creative expression as a therapeutic outlet and t•ducator. The center would also offer cli1sses in communication, .:ingcr man­agement and social skills, she explained ":\ty heart alw,1y:-. gone out to people who .ire d1s.id,,antaged. Young people rt•ally shine when they arc given attention, positive reinforce­ment," she :.Jid. I KNOW WHO'S NAUGHTY! & I KNOW WHO. "Fun" • The Advocate "Cool Site" • Yahoo "Best online matchmaker'' • HX Magazine NICE! ( .... .............. 1.. .. .... ......0 .. . . ~~ HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 23 Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEWS No place to count calories by TRAYCE DISKIN A loval. suburbanite friend once tried to con\'inc~ me that if one dared to \'enture outside the 610 loop, you might find some of the most originitl and quality food this sprawling city has to offer. After putting this dubious hypothesis to the test one evening and winding up at CAFE RED ONION in Oak Forest, this the­ory proved truthful. Cafe Red Onion is a casual, family-run restaurant specializing in I Ionduran dishes, with a bit of Tex Mex thrown in The empty restaurant can look like a "Honduran l.uby's" as one friend put it. The cafeteria-style tables, and bright lights may not be as cozy as this kind of food deserves, but it was the canary yellow walls that did me in. With the gradual appearance of a bustling crowd, potent and fruity margari­tas and some wonderful food, the place transformed into a festive, neighborhood Joint where one could eat for hours and enjoy. The complimentary chips are bumpy and crumbly, but the pineapple salsa would be excellent e\'en on chunks of cardboard. To start, we ordered soup-Black Bean ($1.95) and Chicken Pepper ($1.95). The black bl•an soup was fairly runny. I prefer the creamy, pureed style, but the thick chunb of peppers and onions made this a hghtl·r, seemingly hl.'althier \'ersion. The chicken soup was not too spicy, and the texture is almost perfectly creamy-just the right viscosity. The shredded pepper and dlCl.'d chicken were ample and hearty. Although an order of nachos is simply gratuitous with such a varietv of choice-, we mdulged much to our disappointment. l,;smg thl• same bumpy chips, the Black Cafe Red Onion 2041 Northwest Freeway (at 43rd Street) • 713-957-0957 Food: t? t? 'f::? SJ Service: t? ~ t? t Value: f:>S> S.>t> Scene: 8'> t> ~ Fine for most Wonh the drive, so live a little As good as rt gets The empty restaurant can look like a Honduran Luby' s, but the gradual appearance of a bustling crowd, potent margaritas and wonderful food transformed it into a festive, neighborhood joint. Bean and Chicken Nachos ($5.95) consisted of an inaccessible mass of fixings, all lumped together abo\'e a pungent, liquidy queso. But the Plantains and Sour Cream ($3.95) were a delight. The thick, meaty fla­vor mingled gently with the burnt-sugar glaze, and the $Our cream countered the sweetness so perfectly that a minuscule dip­ping did the trick. I had the Seafood Enchiladas ($9.95) as an entree. Part of me wanted to mourn the overly greasy sauce these stewed in, but the peppery bite and twice-baked texture found me sopping up whatever liquid I could. The seafood, mostly shrimp and cod, was light and flaky, and seemed to remain int.Kt insidl' the bubbling red torttllas. This dish could ha\'c been a little lighter on the chl>ese, but the light and fluffy nee on the side helped. The com and pepper tossed into the rice scc·med incrediblv fresh, and I liked the con­fettt- hke prC!>ent~hon. The black beans on the side wl.'re the same as the black bean soup I was ser\'ed earlier, now masquerad­ing a-, a side dish. The Mayan Chicken ($10.95) was too bre;idy and lacked a substantial amount of ml.'at, Jlthough the accompanying mango salsa was delicious. One friend lamented the fact that the Sl'r\'ing of the salsa was so mea· ger since the only way she wanted to cat this dish was to smother it in condiments. Another fnend commented that it was fine as fried ch1Cken, but she expected more. The dessert list offered a tempting Mango and Papaya Cheesecake, but unfortunately, the restaurant was out, per­haps a blessing considering the evening's calorie count. Our server recommended some other choices, but none seemed as tantalizing. It would h;ive been nice to end with ,1 tropical, nati\e dish, since so much of Red Onion's strength seems to be in its I londuran dishes, as opposed to the more Tl'X Mex influenced ones. The rt•staurant we left, still filled with f.imilit's, couples and office colleagues, was not the ~1mc sparse, oddly unambient one we l'ntered. And although dLshes must be sclectl'd carrfull)~ there are many \\lnncrs. ... ...................•. : ff l ,ij IN t : .:.. ••...\•t••1.t.i.N... ......:. Chocolates bV ffiark Gourmet Fresh Ground Coffees for sale b~ the pound L~fE TOOPEES 1830 W Alabama (713)522-7662 1209 CAROLINE AT DALLAS 713.759.9323 · FAX 713.759.6812 Lunch: M-F 11 am - 5p"1 Dinner: M-Th 5pm - 9:30pm •Fri & S.i'. 'PM · Opm "HOME COOKING - ITALIAN STYLE" Delivery to all lofts & apartments in Downtown Houston Catering available for lunch and dinner meetings, banquet facilities, and take-out available' Plan your Christmas party with cfrT2~ eJ?,s~~e' ~ ---"'"-' ..... .J WEDNESDAYS • Zenith Roller Rink 8075 Cook Road 281.575.7655 Qo~c>nfun.e.'~ d!TAUAN tJ'R1STORAITTE 24 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 10,1999 • HOUSTON VOICE :..- Continued from page 17 I did VCI) httle o:pl.:urung of the Violet Qt.di n the publiat) That was JI' mtcreshng test, to sec 1f thev would get the book with peoplc not knowing its background HV· What Jo tire members of tire Violet Quill tlunk of the book? FP: I dedicated it to Andrew Holleran. Edmund White read 1!, so they both read 1! before publication. I didn't give it to them to say 'p.iss' or 'fad,' although we continue to give each other work to comment on. I thought they should m1d 1!, to sec if anyt!ung offended them, or scemrd patently false. HV. Did you feel a liberty lo write more freely about tJio,e who had died7 FP; ~ot really. I gul'!'i.~ by the time you gd to the half century mark you pretty much accept things about yourself that cannot be changrd. It's really mixed up. By no meall.5 1s anybody real, exactly ddin.ible. Thl're \\ere only SCVl'n of us and thl're are rune Purple Grcle mcm· bers in thlS book. Even though I fooled around with book title., the gm~·away IS where the mrrator talks about his 0:ancy Drew hidden closet. "The Book of (Jes" is a scnous lill•rary my~tery but abo something of a \fancy Drew or a Hardy Boy-; book, or possibly even a com­putcr game, like Myst where thcre arc m:ips and curses, treasures to be found. HV· As lo academ111, tlrere's some rntr1~ue. Docs tin~ refer tc ccrta111 academics l111vmg been fc led b11 1.terarv /1 axe•, 'uc/1 a~ tire HarrnrJ Gay & Lesb1a11 Re"1etv berng Jwod•vrnked by Dame! Hams when Ire wrote a parody of an academic paper, and tlrev publrshed 11? fP' l\ot really, JI though that was funny. Onc of my closest friends was Grorge Stambohan (J founder of early Gay Studies, Jnd the first cd tor of the popu.ar ".Men on :.1en" ,1ntholo­gies). Between h1M, John Boswell and a couple other people who are still alive, I began to find 01..t that academi:i can really be a crazy. cut· throat \\orld. So this book IS a tribute to them, for gomg tlirough the absolute madness of it. HV: 8111 w/1111 about academic m1srnterpreta­l10n of tire artist's mlent' Ross 1s rn11111ng around trymg to find tire facts, but sometimes ignores t/1e real people and t/1err art. Perhaps that's wiry tlrey're laking a JOY ill leading him around by the 11osc. Fl" Ross discovers who thl'se people were b~· finding out what the sul'Vlvors around them arc like, in the same way that an explo­sion can be investigated through it:; debris Jnd scars. The reader &'l>:- what has taken place in the aftcrmath of this hurricane of writers, who las!t.'I:! for only a brief while-JO years-and did a great deal of damage, whether intention­al or not. One of the things I was trying to show was how art!Sl" go through their lives, what they have to do, and the toll this often exacb on the people around thc·m. In one case, the surviv­mg brother of ~!Jrk Dodge (one of the fiction­al literary group), who's livmg in the lap of luxury off hb dead brother's roy.ilties, cannot figure out what the hell happcnl'I:! 20 years earlier. HV W1t/1 academics ponng over aut/1or's collected wr1t111gs, d·J you become sell conscious about what you want to leave as a legaC!f' ~ P· The Bcinecke lJbrary at Yale collects groups of American wnters, including the Violet Quill .ind the group around Gertrude Stem. Both John Boswell Jnd George Stambolian were behmd the library collecting our work. They ha\·e 22 volumes of my 1our­nals from 1969 on, all the early manuscnpts. Besides collecting the stuff, they have to chem­ically treat 1!, photograph 11 all. They'rc doing a massive job. l~1ch author has agreements with them as to who \\ill sec the work, whm it will be released, etc llV· So, are there j111cy l1terarl( sca11dals for future ge11eratio11s? f P; ~fore personal scand.ils than literary ones, but I don't have a problem with that. When David Bergman w,1s doing The Violet Quill Reader-?Ome of it was pretty juicy-I had to notate who everyone was. Pat Loud (whose family was the subject of a 19iO's TV documentary," An American Family") was the agent for some of us. Also, a graduate student in Baltimore is working on getting more of my journals out (including m a Modem Ubrary Association periodical). We're pretty much in agreement that the dirt gets published, and not just literary dirt, sexual dirt, too. HV: So it nus/rt be a goss111-fil/cd confessional? FP: Not exactly, but it could be useful in othc·r ways if th<.'!>l' people at the Bcincckc are nght Jbout the \'alue of these 1oumals, which I'm not sure about. that it has historical value, by virtue of me being a writer, editor and pub­lbhrr in New York when I was. I got to meet just about e\"C'I') body in the previous genera­tion as well .is my own ,md l.iter gem•ratiorto;­lsherwood, Auden, Williams, I corresponded with Vidal- just by propinqwty. After he read the "!lie Book of Lies," Andrew I loller,in said, 'lt'samJ?ing. know111g all the people, and what you know, that you would make fictional ch.1racters.' I told him, 'Oh that's okay, dear. I'm s.mng the rest for my memoirs.' HV A11tlrors' personal lives become more acknowledged when we /rave dorn111c11tal ion of l/1err love Jwes. E11glislr i11structors ofte11 de11y gay autlrors tlreir sexuality, but tire Violet Quill group sta11ds 0111 by /raving ban 0111 from tire beginni11g. FP; And we were surrounded by lots of homOSl'xual writers who would not do it. john Ashbury, Jaml':i Merrill; they stayrd in the closet somewhat longer th.in we did, maybe until we had Jlready tested the ground. We felt it was literally up to us to do it. HV: The Le11 Sp11rgm11 clraracler echoes Neal Cassady and how /1is exploits to11chcd so many Brat writers. Le11 seems to har>e permeated t/1c1r lh>cs in that Waif. FP: Obviously he hung around with them, and affected their lives. He's a base­ball player, scam artist, con man, writer, hus­tler, porno actor, and not iust their boy-toy. I think we've all known ~omeonc m gay life like Len. He's also the I lenry Jamesian fig­ure in the carpet. Tht> other members arc brought together by love affairs, profession­al Jl'.ilousies. If men like him did not exist, we'd be forced to create them. /IV· ls Ire based 011 an actual ball player? Fl': l'\'l' bel'n sworn to secrecy . • _,11 ee t>•e..,• .. g ca•eca magazi•n es pape•LaeLs smeL:ng :tems ADULT NOVELTIES • ADULT GAMES • PERSONAL ITEMS g()/11£Tll//!lfJ F()l( 4tt tlFEgTYtEg VIDEOS RENTALS & SALES ALL RATINGS PRIVATE ROOMS SCREENS CONTINUOUSLY OPERATE• NO TOKENS NEEDED ADMISSION FEE REQUIRED STAY AS LONG AS YOU'D LIKE! community HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 10, 1999 OCCASIONS • COMMUNITY CALENDAR CLASSIFIEDS • BUSINESS DIRECTORY CARMART • MY STARS Donations sought for efforts to help those in need by ROIH"RT B. I IEl\DERSO;\ ! .. 1st IH'l'k's World AIDS Day markl'd thl' start of two .innual holiday drives to assist tho".' 1mpJcted by I !IV/ AIDS. The Fifth Annual Red Ribbon Toy Orin~. a p.utnl'rsh1p between AIDS Foundation Houston, Texas Children's Hospital and Uni\'C•rsity of Texas at Houston Health Sciencl' Center, ends todav, but voluntel'rs arc nn•ded to bag and dist~ibute the toys on Dl'C. 17. Organizers hope the campaign will bring in 3,000 unwrapped toys to help up to 700 children, said Ken Kelly, communications director for AIDS Foundation Houston. Betwl'en four and six gifts are provided for each child, including a major gift and some stocking stuffers, Kelly said. The Red Ribbon Toy Drive is assisted by the National Leather Association:Houston, whICh stopped its own toy drive to bolster the Red Ribbon effort. Other groups that help includl• KTBU Channel 55, MAC Co~metics, Toys R Us, Weingarten Realty, Kl IYS-98.5 and the Alley Theater. "Last year, we collected around 2,500 toys," Kelly said. "I feel comfortable we'll even top that this year. The response has been really incredible" While the Red Ribbon Toy Drive ends todJy, some volunteers are needed to sort .rnd bag the toys for gender and age, Kelly said. The 10th Annual Holiday Gift Bo\ l'rojt'CI, sponsored by Blaffer Gallery, The Art Museum of the University of Houston, runs through Dec. 16. The dri\'C• benefits clients of Bering Care Center and Omega I louse. The e\'enl grew out of World AIDS Day and DJy Without Art e\'ents, and the drive expanded to benefit Bering and Omega when the two AIDS service organizations :<: merged last year, said Da\'iS Northcutt, .., I loliday Gift Box Project Coordinator at ~ Blaffer GJllery. :-. L-~;&...1-..a:;:.:..._.:..;.;.~--1..1..--.1..-..;....i "At the time, what a lot of museums and Kathy Baker, a program mmiager with AIDS places were doing was covering up a piece foundation Houston, was one of several volun-of art with black fabric," he said. "We did teers on hand in December 1998 to cistribute that for a couple of years, but we decided cmout 2,500 toys to more than 600 clMlck-en we would do something more proactive affected by HIV /AIDS dumg the Red Ri>bon Toy Instead of just being negative, we would Drive. Officials hope to coled even more during take on this pro1cct." this year's event. Blaffer enlisted the partnership of other arts organizations in Houston, hke Museum of Fine Arts-Houston, The Menil Collection, DiverseWorks, The Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston Coalition of Visual Artists and The Art League to help with the project. The project seeks donations of new, basic supplies, like shampoo, T-shirts, deodorant, toothbrushes, razors, toilet paper, dental Ce[e6rating 25 ']ears in the Community Saturcfays at 7:30pm 1307-J/ ']iife • 713-880-2872 floss, mouthwash, calendars, stamps and soap. Drop spots for the items are spread across the city, including Blaffer Gallery and Houston Voice. The donations will be distributed at the Bering Omega holiday part on DL'C. 17. "When we first started doing the pro1ect, 1t was almost all male-some gifts are gen- FREE Long Distanc•! FREE WHkends! FREE Voice Mail1 FR EE Ca lier 101 & YOUR WEEKLY Tru. p., S•cond Bil&ng 100 Minutes $19.95 280 Minutes $34.95 500 Minutes $49.95 800 Minutes $69.95 1500 Minutes $99.95 Premier flX PAGING & WIRELESS 1 2220 Murphy Road, Suite E 281-575-8500 www.callpremier.com der spl'Cific. This year the) 're asking for roughly two-thirds male, one third female. It shows the changing face of HI\' I AIDS," i\orthcutt said. Organizers hope to provide each of the 60 clients with a box of supplies, i\orthcutt said. Toy Drive Dec. 20, 6 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Riva·s Italian Restaurant 1117 Missouri 713-529-3450 Holiday Gift Box Project Blatter Gallery Art Museum of the University of Houston Through Dec. 16 various locations 713-743-9523 Red Ribbon Toy Drive Toy distribution Dec. 17 713-623-6796 Ericson 668 Reg. price $69.95 Premier discount - 19.95 Mail-in Rebate - $50.00 YOUR FINAL COST - FREE Talk time 3.5 hours Stand-by 2-3 days Only 5.7 oz Attached belt clip Easy to Read 3 Line Display 15 Distinctive Ring Tones Stores 70 phone Numbers Aerial Rebate and Rate plans with approved credit only. Free Long Distance and Free Weekends vahd for the first 6 months. A 1 year acireement 1s reQuired. Phones must be activated bv 12/31 99 26 Occasions Birthdays Happy birthday to smger Joan Armatrading on Dec 9 l Iappy birthday on Dec 9 to popular lesbian writer Shelly Roberts. Happy birthday to Broadway !'tar Rita Moreno on Dec 11. Happy b1Tthday to Patty Duke on Dec 14. Happy birthday to Billy Bailey on Dec. 15. Daytime Ripcord cocktail slinger Jim toasb his birthday on Dec. 16. Belated birthday hugs to Candact' Latin, owner of Club Extreme. COMMUNITY The Houston Voice welconres your special occasions. Send e-nrail to croberts®lwustonvoice com. Fax: 713-529-9531 Jrfail: Occasions, Houston Voice, 500 Loirett Blvd., S111te 200. Houston, Texas 77006 Please include a telrplwne number so occasions can be verified and considered for publication s249/sO/s16,499 PERMOIVTH1 DOVVN! S!!.•800•05 10nly'ialePrce$17149 $12501lebale $16.499 PmtbasedonSOdown+TT&L 48 omrs of 5249 W11~ I at cml of SB620 0 7 5% APR WAC. 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