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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 001. 1983-12-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/118.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-16). Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/118

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983 - File 001, 1983-12-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/143/show/118.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 164, December 16, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 16, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Gay Activist Attorney Schwab Dies of AIDS Infections By Robert Hyde The illusive killer AIDS struck the gay community close to its heart Thursday (Dec. 15) and robbed it of one of its more respected and influential leaders, Morton Robert Schwab. It had been announced about a year ago that Schwab had been diagnosed with AIDS. Born in Chicago 36 years ago, Schwab obtained a Ph.D. and went on to become a noted civil rights attorney who was the chief strategist behind the landmark case of Baker vs. Wade, which resulted in sec­tion 21.06-the "sodomy statute" -<>f the Texas Penal Code being ruled unconstitu· tional in August, last year. Don Baker, plaintiff in the case and close friend of Schwab, said, "I personally join hundreds of thousands of gay men and women in Texas to mourn the loss of one of our state's foremost gay rights lead­ers. "Robert and I were comrades-in-arms over the years, something that solidified a deep sense of respect and camaraderie when we were caught in the trenches together." Ro9ert Schwab in 1982 Baker said that Schwab became a close friend of his in 1976. "We worked together for so long," he said near tears. "His loss extends to the entirety of the state, because he's worked with so many of us," he continued. "I'm saddened by the fact that we've lost one of the pillars of our movement, as well as a deep personal frie!lll." Schwab, founder of the Texas Human Rights Foundation and co-founder of Houston's Gay Political Caucus, was also known nationally as a co-founder of the National Education Foundation for Indi­vidual Rights, the Gay Rights National Lobby and the American Bar Association Committee of Gay Rights. GPC current president Larry Bagneris said, "The gay rights movement here in Houston has definitely lost a true friend and we atGPC will truely mourn one of the founders ofGPC. Before his death, he was able to make a large contribution to the gay community with his fight against 21.06." Former GPC President Lee Harrington stated: "Almost all social change and pro- The Newspaper of Montrose Dec. 16, 1"83 lu ue ... 164 Published Every Friday greso begma with the court system. Robert chose this avenue in his endeavor to remove the so-called sodomy statute from the Texas Penal Code. Oppressive and unjust, it affected heterosexual as well as homoRexual citizens. "His efforts were tireless and successful; the gays, in particular, will miss him very much." His body was scheduled to be flown to Miami, Fla., at 10:30 p.m. Thursday even· ing. Schwab is survived by his mother, Mrs. Esther Schwab of Ft. Lauderdale. and by his sister, Mrs. Charlene Touby of Miami. Levit-Weinotein Memorial Chapel, 1921 Pembroke Road, Hollywood. Fla, handled the final arrangement.;. Levy Funeral Directors at 1402 Cleburne handled the arrangements locally. A local memorial service has been sche­duled for Sunday, Jan. 8, at Rothko Chapel at 3900 Yupon in Montrose. Contribution• in lieu of flowers may be made to the Texas Human RightsFounda· tion; 3128 Lemmon Avenue, East; No. 304; Dallas, TX 75204. For additional information, call (713) 522-0100. Do Your Christmas Shopping in Montrose Hollis Hood, p .3 Spirit Soars at the Lighting of the Montrose Christmas Tree By Billie Duncan Hundreds of people lined the street across from Mary'1 last Sunday evening for the annual lighting of the Montrose Commun­ity Christmas tree, sponsored by Mary's and the Gay Political Caucus. They were in faded jeans, leather, cot· ton, dresses, cut-offs. They were holding hands and holding babies. They were neighborhood people of all kinds, both gay and non-gay. And for that brief amount of time, while the traffic rolled down the street and the carols floated up the eky, it really seemed that there wae peace on earth and good will towards man. The Montrose Symphonic Band, under the dynamic leadership of Andy Mills, provided the musical backbone of the evening's Christmas caroling Voices were provided by the MCCR choir (under the direction of John Kirk· land) and the crowd. Also singing wae Sharon Steenbergen in full clown cos· tume. Her strong operatic presentation added immeasurably to the entire sound. This was the fifth year of the lighting of the tree and the fourth time the ceremony has been at Mary's. The first year, the tree was put up at the little park at the begin­ning of Westheimer. The Montrose Singers were there that year to sing songs of peace and love. Some­one called the police. Activists Ray Hill and Phil Slusser were arrested because they had no sound permit. Later that tree was set on fire. Five years later, the mayor of Houston was at Mary's to throw the switch that lit the tree. Aleo on hand were city councilman George Greanias and GPC president Larry Bagneris. After mercifully short speeches by all concerned, Kathy Whit· mire flipped the switch that lit the tree. About the same time, searchlights came on from the Union Jack and Numbers. After one last song, Andy Mille invited interested members of the crowd to join with him and the MSB to go on a caroling expedition of the Montrose. "Over a hundred singers and the band went around," said Mills. "We were invited into the Godfather, and we all went in and sat around the tables and entertained." They made a big circle that included a good portion ~f lower Westhe1mer, Taft, Avondale, Pacific and California. Then they returned for more Christmas cheer at Mary's. Contributions to the event were made by the Westheimer Colony, the Avondale Association, Union Jack, Numbers and Mary's. Jones Accounting and Tax Service Wishes You a Happy Holiday Season From Steven Rayon and Edward Jones We offer Full Accounting Services for all types of business and Tax Returns for the individual and business. Call Edward Jones for an appointment or more information. Jones Accounting & Tax Service * 6234 Richmond Ave., suite 212 266-6511 20°/o OFF E"EIR,,, ....... _..Gi * * Books * Fish Tanks Patio Furniture * Puppies * Kittens * Birds * Fish CHRISTMAS COUPON SPECIAL KAHLUA 750ML Size $1099 WITH THIS COUPON ~ ~~~~ .. ... " 1402 Welch at Waugh Drive 529-9964 • DEC. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 A void the Crowds; Make this a Montrose Christmas By Hollis Hood With Christmas iust around the corner, there is usually the last mad dash of last minute shopping. If you don't feel like braving the shopping center (crowded dur­ing the year and insufferable during the holidays), try your neighborhood first; there are many gifts in store. TLC on Alabama has lots of ornaments for late tree-trimmers and is running a spe­cial on bell-shaped tree lights. Among favorites for trim this year on packages or trees is "The Bear in the Box" and the gold or glass ornaments. For under the tree, the store has a Christmas Choo Choo, a small train with Santa as passenger which can run on a track placed on a tabletop or under the tree (about $25.) TLC also has many specialty items, plus dozens of cards for every occasion and reader, including a gourmet dog snack, festive Christmas glaSBware and mugs (also on special) and all kinds of interest­ing books, such as a manual on how to be butch. Wilde 'n' Stein on Westheimer is also a good place to check out books for the read­ers on your Christmas list. In stock Cha­rles has The Color Purple, a Pulitzer prize winner by Alice Walker, Waylon Flowers' biography of Madam, and Torch Song Trilogy. . Always popular are calendars, particu­larly this year the Working Out calendar, he said, which runs under $10. Wilde 'n' Stein is one of the few places that will have the new gay monopoly game for Christmas, and this game is reputedly a winner. It includes places like Montrose and Cedar Springs in Dallas on the board, and players purchase tubs instead of houses for their properties. (The game sells for right at $20.) Montrose Voice The Newspaper ot Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 MontrOM Vo 0ce Pubt '"!f'V Co CtRCUlATION MontrOM VOil.• 11.000 CGP•• '*~ly 0 111a1 Gay N9wt. 1.000 cop.et WMtty AuthfVSan AritOf'MO Stir, • 000 c:opi• bi~ly total TtUll I,.. 19 . .000 copiet _....,,., l¥g Contenta copyright C1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg publlaher Robert Hyde man•oino «Mor HolllS Hood new• «Nor Chuck Meredith 1ports editor B1lhe Duncan Peter Derksen Jon Cheetwood Joe L. Watts •nter1amment woters Ac et Clark artdsr«.tOt Jeff Bray O'• PhlCS Sonny 01v1s M:eauntmg Lyt Hams 9thefflf&tJO dlfflCl<N Mark Drago •dverti.iino Foundmg Mt1mbtu Gieater Montrose Buttness Guild, G•y Presa A95oQaUon Nt1wt S•rvlCtl ll'll~rn1t1on11 G1y N9WtAgency. PacifH;Ntwt service Larry BUlh (Wahington O C > Syndicat~ fHtur• Se1v1ceJ 4 Writer• (San Francisco> Chrontc:ie Fflatures. United FHture Syndicate. Jetlrt!)' Wilton, Rindy Alfrftd. S1onew1ll Fe11ure1 Syndicate. Brian McNi1ught. Joe Baker POSTMASUA Send 1ddrH1 coueci1ona to 33'7 Montrote •306. Houtton TX 77006 S4Jb:SctJption 11,. In US tn 111/ed .,,.,.,ape S•9 Pl'f yeu (~2 ......,) $29peral ... montha(2etllues).0t$t 25pcrweek(leu lhan 26 iuues) e1ck tuUet $2 00 each N•t;onaJ atJv-'1i$"'9 rel)(Hent•t1~ Joe 01Sa~to, R•vendell Marketing 9ti0 &tn Avenue. New York 10011 f212J 242·&863 A<hett1111ng dHd M TUHday 6 30pm IOf llSUt rei:oued Frt­c1ay ...,.ng Notiu 10 w;J'i'9tt ,,.,. Local 1dvertt1 ng rate aetwMsu1e Sl•·A wn ertect•~ J\,lty 1. t983 Aet.pcnslb1l1t MortltON Voce does rlOC assume r~i. blhly ~or 1dYerllOiflll ct•lmt ll.-ra lhould ""' Monlrooe v°'c. ro anv ~rouw ad'tt~stng Earl at Waugh Drive Liquor said he has brought in five different liquor items just for Christmas. This year folks seem to be looking for less expensive ways to show their appreciation, he said, and he has something in every price range, from boxes of wine at $20 to specialty liquors at leSB than $10. Waugh at Waugh and Welch or Cobweb Liquor on Westheimer should be on the list of where to purchase libacious holiday cheer. For the morning after, give a gift of cof­fee from the House of Coffee Beans in Rice Village. It stocks everything for the coffee or tea drinker and will mix special blends as well. You'll know when you' re close because of the aroma that prevades that part of the shopping center. Possessions on Westheimer has a spe­cial item for that certain someone-a leather jump rope with brass handles. If Arizona Gays Upset at 'Hitlerism' Remark The Arizona Republic newspaper and local gay groups have threatened to try for a recall of Republican Hawley Atkinson, chairman of the County Board ofSupervi­sore following a remark that gays should be ~ubstituted for animals in medical experiments. Atkinson, however, says he has no intention of stepping down and will run again in 1984. In an ABBociated Press article, San Francisco gay leaders likened the remark to Hitlerism when Atkinson said "homo­sexuals and lesbians from San Francisco" should be used in experiments instead of animals. He insists it was a facetious remark which he didn't think would make the newspaper. The Arizona Gay-Lesbian Task Force threatened to mobilize the county's esti­mated 150,000 gays for a recall vote if he did not quit. Despite the confrontation, Atkinson says he can represent gays. "I'm against homosexuality, absolutely against it ... but when anybody calls me up who wants assistance with Maricopa County, I don't ask them what color they are, what race they are, what their creed is." j\~,~~~ to\NQ~ 1l£ W\lt tnRWW~ ~~-~ r<r-~··· that doesn't do it, prehaps he/ she could use a porcelain ice bucket or a leather rag rug. If you are into a huggable Christmas mood, check out the plushy offerings at Critters on Hawthorne. Everything from Elizabear to a stuffed parrot with three­foot legs is available and not that expen­sive. Going to Critters is a lark because of the numerous friendly little pairs of eyes that greet you from little animals peering through the forest waiting to be taken home and loved. The Gay Political Caucus is selling a coupon book for $20 that is just chocked full of two-for-one dinners, movie passes and other discounts. It would be a gift that keeps on giving, for sure. Montrose has shopb that can fill every need. Check out the "really keen" clothes at Googies on California, the furniture bargains at Old Furniture Gallery on Bird­sall or Creative Stained Glass "on the curve" on Westheimer. If your special someone really needs auto repair, check out a gift certificate from One Stop Automotive Center, 200 Pierce. Sports car and English auto repair are the specialties of the house. Also, Taft Automotive, Neartown Gar­age and RMS are in the Montrose area to serve folks in need of major or minor auto repair. Had a hard time wrapping that tire your roommate needs for his car so he'll stop asking to borrow your vehicle? Drop by the Tire Place at Upas and Fairview. These guys will make you a good deal, and they might wrap a tire if they have time. The holidays aren't complete without going out to dinner with friends, and Montrose has a wealth of places to visit. Boulevard Cafe, 808 Lovett, is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Bajas, Ras­cals and the Spud-U-Like will be open dur­ing the holidays with special treats in store. Or give the gift of barbeque-visit Matt Gamer's Restaurant on West Gray this holiday season or take a break at Lui­gi's while shopping. If that someone has really been good this year, maybe a cruise is in order, or at least a getaway weekend in a distant city. Call Bruce at Travel Consultants, 529- 8464, for exact pricing and departures. If you can't get away that far, try a show. Pace puts on several really good ones at the Tower Theatre, and more are .. coming in the new year. Tickets are very reasonably priced, and by giving pleasant enterta.inment, you also can give pleasant memories. Everybody always needs hair care, and Montrose is the place to get excellent ser­vice at several establishments. Gift certifi­cates are available for the asking. So with all the shopping done, you can rest and relax the remainder of the holi­day, and never have to face the freeway traffic. Have a flamboyant holiday sea­son, do something memorable-you have all of '84 to live it down! UT-Arlington Grants Recognition to Gay Group The University of Texas campus at Arlington officially recognized the 60- member Gay/ Lesbian Association of UTA recently with very little controversy or debate. Luan Green, co-founder of the group, said she was told if they ran the organiza­tion smoothly, they shouldn't have any problems. She said the move was encou­raging, esperially in light ofrecent event. barring recognition of a gay group at SMU. The main difference is that UTA does not provide funding for its campus groups, while student organizations at SMU can apply to use the student fee monies. At UTA student groups are allowed to use campus facilities and services, post noti­ces and raise funds on campus. A nine-member committee of students, faculty and staff voted on Nov. 23 to recog­nize the group, with only one dissent:er. This is the second such group to organize at UTA. The earlier one has disbanded. Twiggy's Getting Fat Twiggy might have to change her name to tubby, reports the San Jose Mercury News. The famous stnngbean weighs 20 pounds more than she did in the 60's. "I used to have 31-inch hips," she wails, "but now I have these massive 35-inch ones." .& 4 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 Montrose Mouth By Amanda B. Recondwith Christmas is so-0-0-0 close It's coming• Yes. it's coming! Can you see the lights everywhere, and feel the chill in the air and hear all the cheery carols in the elevators and corridors of our vast metropolis? Christ­mas 1s getting so close. I can almost feel the crowds pressing against me at the airport already• Christmas in Houston has about the same effect on the population as a hurricane evacuation Well, for those of you who choose to stay in Houston this year, there 1s plenty going on-at least for those of you who live in the blessed area of Montrose' -o- Our own Montrose Singers will be giving a wonderful Christmas program at Bpm Friday at St Stephens Church. 1805 West Alabama. If you are not totally hohday'd oU1 by then, drop in and hsten and enioy your very own neigh­borhood singers -o- The Montrose Symphony Band will also be playing at Bpm Saturday at Cullen Auditorium on the campus of good or U of H. The Sym­phony 1s one of the best gay-oriented bands around. and 11 you've never heard 1t, you should go. -o- Th1s Tuesday night 1s the third annual Mont­rose Voice Christmas Party and Pubhc Specta­cle at the Officer's Club Upper Deck. This 1s a public event for the readers of the Voice (you) with a free beer bust. and disco by premiere Houston DJ Ram Rocha It'll be Bpm to 1am­be there (And. 11 we can twist your arm. bring $2 to donate to the Media Fund for Human Rights) -o- T1ckets are now available for GPC's "Night at the Alley," Friday, Jan 27-at the Alley Theater, of course. The play will be "Cloud 9." a popular off-Broadway comedy (see related article inside). Tickets are $12.50 and may be purchased at Montrose Hair Design, 1004 Cali­fornia (Now who would think that a gay organi­zation would be selling tickets for an event at a hair studio?). Just so we all may get political together. there will be a wine and cheese party after the performance -o- And now for a httle Hol1dae Cheere Greedy Seasons to Miss ·o· from Princess Plastic Basket and Blanket B-of Taft Automotive Oh, I love these quaint. d1gn1f1ed Christmas greetings -o- There 1s something wonderful happening on Westhe1mer-maybe not for the drivers of Metro. but at least for those of us who take pride in our little community A group of mer­chants has assembled and formed an associa­tion called the OTC (On the Curve). It is a name that is only too appropriate. since the shops concerned are all located on the bother­some curve between the 1300 and 1400 blocks of Westhe1mer. Among the shops involved are Creative Stained Glass. Whal"s Up. Muscle Beach. Appearances. Nothing Sacred. Stop the Clock, T1z Avenue. Creative Beveled Designs. Fnday's Floflst. The Dragon and The Rat. Facets. and East Texas Omer The recently restored Ftrehouse 16 will be the future meeting place of OTC. Park that car and get out and walk for a change-abandon those massive parking lots and give up those plex1glass domes for real sky and air. Stroll along Westhe1mer and shop at what could become the first inkling of a maiorturn-around for this city's most colorful (and perhaps endangered) street -a- Poor Larry' We send our heart-felt condolen­ces to your hp, after the accident at Mary's last Sunday night It seems that Mr. Bagneris (prez of GPC} was helping unload a transformer from the roof of the building when 1t suddenly slipped and fell on his face. h1tt1ng him In the mouth-OUCH" Hopefully there wasri"t too much damage. and we have confidence that the community wdl continue to hear from you. despite your miury -o- Really, Lola' Even us Housromans(vlle, uncul-lured creatures that we are) were shocked to find out they would serve hot dogs and last year's lasagna at a Ire' posh gathering in Dal­las' -o- Miss Gooch. all of us in Houston are sure that you've already installed your birthday present from Slings N' Things. -o- Get out those Christmas sombreros Saturday night. ya'll!The Gay Hispanic Caucus is giving their big Christmas bash, "Dazzle 'Ttl Dawn." -o- Mary's has really outdone itself this year The tree looks wonderful, and the crowd was so festive and in such good spirits. And what did we see but even some straight people admiring the tree Well, 1f anything, this season brings out the best in all of us, and the great tr.ee on top of Mary's 1s rather like a symbol that Mont­rose is a community unto itself. It is a beautiful tree. (I just wish we could tear down that bil­lboard on the west side') PARTY ALERTS· Saturday, Dec. 17: The Wright brothers flew their first successful flight today in 1903. It lasted 12 seconds and covered a distance of 120 feet-less than the wingspan of one of today's iethners. But order an "Airplane" today at your favorite bar and raise a toast Monday, Dec. 19: Today 1s the birthday of "Barbette," a famous drag queen of the 1920s and the insp1rat1on for the movie Victor/ Victoria. "Barbette• (Vander Clyde was his real name) was born today in 1904 in Round Rock, Texas. -o- Slap Mr. Bray on the fingers, because he did some mistakes last week. Wallace Whitman 1s not Wallace Whitman-he is Wallace Whit­worth. Mr Whitworth has just left the Houston Symphony, not the Opera• And Marilyn Roark played at Central Presbyterian, not First. Well. Amanda B. Recondwith will not make such silly mistakes in the future NfRomn11N I I I I' I UWI I GRRRGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 HAPPY HOUR DAILY - NOON TIL SPM 'HOUSTON I ~l-&I - ~l\ •• •·l!,·:::s:==~i:' 75¢ Well 75¢ Long Necks s-~~" ,",,.,·-~~-. .., ,.~p,~s~- -. .,__ _____2 _7_0_0__A L_ B_A_N_Y ___~ -----5-2-3--4-0-8-4----------11 ~' ,.. ..... ~\G~ . UMD -(0 Friday, Dec. 16 9pm Iii NEW YEARS EVE EXTRAVAGANZA December 31 (midnight) FREE CHAMPAGNE BUFFET TOYS Coming January 6th MILITARY MADNESS Attention Doctors and Nurses The Montrose Clinic reports it is in desper­ate need of your services to see that our community is healthier. And they'd appreciate as little as four hours a month of your time. The clinic now serves at a rate of over 7000 mei:i and ":'omen a year, and they're not making a dime off of it. See what you can do, and place a call to 528-5531 or 665-6917. Men Organizing Against Deception There is a new group forming in Montrose composed of men who say they are "tired of the bar scene, tired of waiting for calls that never come and tired of worrying about all the hassles of dealing with poo­ple w~o don't give a damn about you." Entitled the "Men Against Deception CourU>sy Club," the founders would like those who may be interested to write them at Box 541871, Houston 77254. Ac~o~ding to their press release, they're prom~smg some heart-to-heart fulfilling expenences and are very concerned about physical, mental and emotional welfare. Convicted Killer Dan White to be Paroled International Gay Newe Agency SAN FRANCISCO-Convicted double murderer Dan White will be released frorr Soledad Prison on January 6 after having served a little over live years for the murders of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and gay Supervisor Harvey Milk. The parole plan submitted by White to prison authorities is likely to be approved. Accordin1r to Susan Sward of the San Fra!tc1sco Chronicle, the plan calls for White to be released in the San Diego qounty area, ~n area with a large popula­tion, much of 1t conservative. Specul~tion t hat White might be released 1!' the San Francisco Bay Area was d1sm1ssed by authorities, who indi­cated that White had too much to fear from those angry at the lenient sentence he received for two murders. When White killed Moscone and Milk in 1978, he set in motion the removal of two of the most liberal members of city govern· ment and opened the way for their replace­ment by more conservative members of government, a trend that continues unto the present. Computer Crime Wave Predicted When it comes to computer crime, we haven't seen anything yet. That predic­tion comes from Lawyer August Bequai, a specialist in high-tech criminal cases, reports the Philadelphia lllquirer. Bequai says computer hackers­teenagers who make a hobby out of break­ing into Sl'<'ret records-are only a minor problem. A more ~erious threat arc tho~e who use computers to doctor records or steal trade secrets and other valuable cor· porute data. Even though computer theft costs $100 million a year, Bequai say&, only 22 states have laws against it, and the federal government has none. Florida Rep. Daniel Mica wants to fill that vacuum. He's proposed a bill that would punish computer trespassing by up to five years in prison and a $50,000 fine. His proposal would al8o give eac~ tax­payers a $200 tax break for purchasmg a home computer. Mica says that's to make sure the romput<·r does not become "a social harrit·r hetween the rich and the poor." [.!! • GENERAL REPAIR • AUTO m (") -! :II 0 z (5 -! c zm z C:: ze Cooling 0 ~ 00 • 524~ m > ~ :xi * 011 Change and m 8 Lube s19s5 ~ z oc ~ * Transmission ~ 0 Service s24ts ~ z ~ ~ 1411 TAFT-522-2190 ~ e AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • ~ D EC. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE E/J's Presents Houston Off Broadway in Tinsel & Angels A Special Holiday Show with Guests Cody & Charisse Tuesday, December 20, 9:30pm 1213 RICHMOND-527-9071 WITH THIS AD Buy one dinner special and a friend gets one dinner special of equal or lesser value for 99¢ Serving Breakfast, Lunch Dinner Orders to Go- 521-1015 99~ BREAKFAST SPECIAL EXTENDED THROUGH DECEMBER Christmas Catering Full Service Caterer Party Trays to Go Open Weekdays 7am-11 pm, Weekends t il Midnight Saturday & Sunday Breakfast at 9am Sunday Supper til 10pm <JJ.appy <JJ.oQidays ~om yoU/l ~Lends at CBouQevQJld C~ )~~~-,..~~ 5 Come to our "Hole"y Christmas Party and Bartenders' Drag Show Saturday, Dec. 17 Hors D'oeuvre• Happy Hour Drinks All Night Sunday Buffet just like spindletop YOU NEVER HIT A DRY HOLE IN A FIELD OF GUSHERS! STRIKE IT RICH EVERYDAY! Merry Christmas from the Hole Wednesday Spaghetti Night- FREE HOURS Mon-Sat 10am-2am Sunday noon-2am HAPPY HOURS Monday-Saturday 10am-7pm &fl.\ess!Jlg glllCekest Qkatttude .. . <J"o v\e~ ffiose CWlto <Jlave gu.ppoded CUs artd CBee1eve ()tlk v\llll -9s <J"~ue. Co11tu1ued guccess to v\QQ artd ~et t~e vU.us1c ~!Ve ()11. fttdurrng • Spectacular Collection of EST A TE JEWELRY, MEN'S & WOMEN'S FURS, AND FINE OBJECTS OF ART II ass.mbW for • SPECIAL PRE- CHRISTMAS ONE- DAY AUCTION AUCTION SCHEDULE SUNDAY AFTERNOON, December 18th .. 1 :30 P.M. PREVIEW FRIDAY, December 16th . • . . . . . • . . . 9:00 A.M. until 5:30 P.M. SATURDAY, December 17th . . . . . . . . 9:00 A.M. until 3:00 P.M. SUNDAY, Dttember 18th ... . . •... . 11:00 A.M. unt il S•le Time 19th C •ntury ,..,.MH brc.i.rr ft«urr t~nt whh Ivory tuth, c t &&O. SK"' in ht1ght Two wr!Mfttaift.d Vtetori.ln platPd • ix. bottltt cruf't Ht•. c 1970 1830 H I I WESTHEll\1ER. 2 Block~ Eur of Kirby A In ·.J ••m• ''°"''"I Jtcu.ion,.ns for w.r four ittWdn There Are Political Alternatives A:te you bored with Reagan, Mondale, Glenn and the rest? Try voting for the American Lizard Party, suggests the Bos­ton Globe. It's just one of the dozens of off.the-wall organizations that have filed for the New Hampshire primary ballot. Another group is pushing hard for the Archangel Gabriel, and a third thinks the job's too tough for any one man-or even two. Its name: "The Committee for Three Presidents." Why do they do it when their chances of winning are zero? Says New Hampshire's secretary of state, "probaby to tell their grandchildren." Born-Again Christians Aren't Sexually Adventurous Born-again Christians do it, they just don't do it quite as often, repol'UI the San Francisco Chronicle. That's the conclu· sion of two Denver researchers who asked 365 unmarried churchgoers about their 1ex lives. One in four say they've had a premarital fling, and one in 10 say they do it m.ore than once a week. The biggest surpnae: older fundamentalists have even more lib­eral eexual attitudes than younger ones. But the researchers say the born-again still aren't as adventurous as the rest ofus. Lees than half have ever tried oral sex, and only 8 percent admit to having had a homosexual experience. And No Food Fights, Either Having a little fun on the job may soon coat you your job. Larry Stessin, manage­ment professor emeritus of Hofstra Uni· versity, says more and more bosses are warning that employees who engage in "horseplay" will be fired on the spot, says Boardroom Report.. Stessin claims stunts such as snapping paper clips and practicing karate in the office caused 25,000 injuries last year. But instead of canning the office clowns, Stes­sin eays, bosses should simply give them more work to do. Most fooling around, he notes, happens when workers have too much time on their hands. Republicans Need to Change Image Senator Paul Laxalt hae warned his fel· low Republicans they'd better shake their country club image, but he's having some problems getting hie point across, repol'UI the Washington Post. Writing in a magazine called Republi· cana Abroad, Laxalt said, "We've go~ this unfortunate image that most Republicans ride around in Mercedes-Benzee and eat quiche." . Unfortunately, of the 24 photogra~he m the magazine, 11 were of Republicans wearing tuxedos. Debbie Reynolds Competing with Fonda Move over, Jane Fonda. The newest Aero­bic Guru ia Debbie Reynolds, repol'UI the Pacific News Service. Reynolds' new exercise record, "Do It Debbie'• Way," is aimed at women who ar&-ae Reynolds put it-"39 and hold· ing.'' Even the music ie tuned to an older crowd. Instead of the standard disco beat found on moat aerobic albume, Debbie etretches and bends to the big band eound. DEC. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Coming Tuesday, Dec. 20 The #ontroie Voice 3rd Annual Cb ~{~!!!l~fecfi~ rtg FREE BEER BUST lor the Readers ol the Montrose Voice A Benelit lo/' tbe Media Fund lo/' Numan Rigbti (We 'II be a1/(ina 101 a 12 Donation at tbe /)001) nc1• n9 with DJ Ram Roo6a Plu1: Nou1ton P1emie1e Video $6owina ol Cat p,e11 A11ooiation Film "Not1116e $1ni161 Media Tteal1 16e Ctlg Communilg" The U11ter Deck at the Officer's Cluh 2100 Alhanv Your Invitation T6e Mont,011 Voioe ooH/ial/g_ in~lte1 gou to ou, 3H/ Annual C6,iltma1 Pa,tg and Pu6/io $peotaole Tue1dag, Deoembel' 20, 1983 8:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m. "T'1e U1pe, Deolt" 2100 Albang 12 11161 ,,., 1,, 161 lftllt ,,., 1,, Ha•u Rlf611 FHt ,,,,,, e.16 ,,, 8 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 Better Business in Baghdad by the Bay On the Job By Arthur S. Lazere, C.P.A. The assassinations of Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone in 1978 changed the course of gay activism in San Francisco. Milk, on his third try, had been elected to the Board of Supervisors the year before, becoming the first upfront gay elected official of a major city. Eupho­ria prevailed in the gay community. Established activists experienced a surge of optimism and renewed energy in their quest for social change and legal protec· tion. Many who ere previously inactive were inR · ' success .t.o get After ooting spree, the mood chang euphoria to bitter· nees, from hope to gloom, from a sense of genuine possibilities for positive change to a despairing of such an eventual out· come. The example of violence against a gay man, spread as it was across the front pages and the television ecreens, quickly elicited imitators. Violence againet gay men and women, always a problem, grew markedly in frequency, a trend further ~timulated by the implicit message con· tained in the leniency of the Dan White verdict. Many observed a new and pervad· ing sense of anxiety in the community. In that crucible of thwarted expect&· lions and dashed hopes, a new strength was emerging from a previouely unex· pected place-San Francisco's gay busi· ness community and its fledgling chamber of commerce, the Golden Gate BusineS& Association. Founded in 1974, GGBA had kept a low and closeted profile. (The Tavern Guild, which dates back to the early 1960s, was for many yeare the more visible and politically-oriented organization of bars, bar employees and related businesses.) San Francisco politicians saw the potential clout of GGBA, even before it was perceived by the membership of the organization itself. GGBA'e annual dinner, at which the board of directors for the new year is installed in office, was the first GGBA event I attended, back in 1977. Prominent on the dais and at the speaker's rostrom were Harvey Milk (the proprietor of a camera shop} and George Moscone. Vocal in their support for this emerging ray constituency, the politicians received enthusiatic ovations from an audience grateful for their friendship and awed by such fervent wooing. For many, it was the • first awareness of an enfranchisement for gay identity. It certainly felt good to a then recently-arrived immigrant from New York and its City Council's monotonous and disheartening annual rejection of gay rights. Late in 1977, I attended a monthly GGBA membership meeting and unex· pectedly found myself elected to the board of directors for 1978. In the class of 1978 were a number of new faces, young and energetic professionals, aome emerging from the cloaet for the first time. (Local gay business groupa have found that many of their newer members do not belong to other gay organizations; the bus· iness group providee a relatively comfor· table, nonpolitical environment for participation by some who feel threatened by the contentiousness, both internal and external, which aeema inherent in politi· cal clubs.) It was this new energy which brought GGBA firmly out of the closet at the 1979 inetallation dinner. The dinner program described the organization as "businees people who happen to be gay, working together to build a better com· munity." It was the first time the word "ray" had appeared in writing in a GGBA document. The description was sincere in intent and not unsophieticated in its pub­lic relations message. "Working torether to build a better community" ie about ae unaSBailable as motherhood and apple pie. The board w&11 eworn in by supervisor Harry Britt, appointed by Mayor Fein· etein just a few weeb before to the vacant Milk seat. My speech that evening-as newly elected president-was an articula· tion of the concerns I had heard expressed by GGBA'• board and memberehip. The tumultuous and disturbing events through which we had lived in recent months called for a more outspoken stance on issues that could only be effectively pursued by an upfront organization. During 1979, two situations arose in which the newly-energized GGBA was able to flex its political muscle. An ano· nymous, aggrieved gay employee of Oakland-based World Airways sent me a copy of a memorandum. addressed by president Ed Daly to all employees. It included the line; "This company doesn't need hoodlums, racketeers (or) queers .... " GGBA wrote to Daly, but its protests were ignored. A Coors-type boycott was consi· dered. A key problem was that World Air· ways was outside of San Francisco and subject to no law prohibiting discrimina· tion on the basis of sexual orientation. When World later opened a sales office in San Francisco, we immediately registered a complaint with the San Francisco Human Rights Commission. With the cooperation-and legal force-of the Com· mi88ion, we were able to obtain a pledge of nondiscrimination from the recalcitrant Mr. Daly. The second confrontation of 1979 was of more lasting significance. After the White Night riots, the then-president of the pow· erful San Francisco Chamber of Com· merce, Bill Dauer, wrote a scathingly critical piece about the riot in the Chamber's widely-circulated magazine. In a television interview with gay journal· i11t Randy Shilts, Mr. Dauer was asked about the importance of gay tourist dol· Jars. "There are more legitimate ways to get money," he replied. He was quoted in the San Jose Mercury: "The positive effects of the gay community? There are no positive effects." It seemed to me that, as our community's chamber of com· merce, it was the responsibility ofGGBA to confront our downtown peers. A delega· tion of GGBA board members met with Dauer and explained its concerns. To Dau· er's credit, we never heard an anti-gay remark from him again, and not long after, he hired two well-known gay acti· vists to work for the chamber. The San Francisco Chamber, obseivirft the rapid growth of GGBA membership, sent its well-commissioned salespeople into the gay community seeking new members. There was always some overlap between the memberships of the two groups. But the GGBA board and member· ship have long underetood that the differ· ences between GG BA and the chamber are not only those of sexual orientation. The chamber is controlled by, and works in the interests of, the major downtown corpora· tions. GGBA, on the other hand, is a group of small merchants and professionals. On iS&ue after issue, we would not be able to work with the chamber. Neverthele88, the chamber was certainly viewing GGBA in a new light. Under Dauer's successor, executive director John Jacobs, the rela· tionship between the organizations improved to the point where, in 1983, when a new delegation from the GGBA board called upon Mr. Jacobs, we were able to secure an endorsement by the chamber of the gay employment rights bill, AB-1, cur· rently pending in the state legislature. Of continuing interest to GGBA has been the thorny problem of police/gay relations. In my installation speech in 1979, I promised: "If there are incidents of police harassment of gay businesses, as has been suggested in the press recently, GGBA will speak out and make it clear that anywhere, but least of all in San Francisco, such activity is not acceptable and will not be tolerated by this com mun· ity." Polic C ·er Charles Gain, an ycommun· ndship alone was no suffi to combat homophobia in the police force. A March 1979 GGBA program on the subject drew an unusually large crowd, some of whom were angry ~ over problems with permits and threa· tened closings of baths and other sexually oriented establishments. A Chronicle front page headline the next day trum· peted: "Gay Businessmen Boo Police Chief." Since 1979, GGBA has played an active and continuing role in programs to educate police recruits and familiarize them with our community. In addition, we have supported efforts to recruit lesbian and gay officers into the San Francisco police force. Lazere is on the board of the San Fran· cisco Industrial Development Authority. Hits column originates at the "Bay Area Reporter," a San Francisco gay news· paper. Where Should You Put Your Advertising? Us or Them? The Newspaper Here's 2y~ 1~8h~e-~~g~~d~~~!ght more advertising space in the Montrose Voice newspaper than they did in the competing magazine-and they spent a lot less money doing it. 1. The Voice has the highest Houston circulation-11,000 copies every week. That's thousands more, we have estimated, than the magazine's, which limits its circu­lation in order lo give an "illusion of popularity." 2. The Voice distributes through over 125 major distribution points-dozens more than the magazine. We're not JUST in the gay bars. We're in the shops and stores and guest houses and restaurants. This is especially important for your special event advertising for peo­ple who do not normally come out to the clubs. The Voice reaches these people in addition to the normal "bar crowd~' 3. The Voice is read-not thumbed through. Our readers READ every spread. Watch the people in the clubs on Friday reading the Voice newspaper. And watch those reading the magazine. Our readers flip slowly through the newspaper; scanning every spread-and catching the ads. Many of the magazine readers flip rapidly-stopping here and there-but missing the majority of the advertising. 4 . Yes, the Voice has the higher Houstpn circulation and a format that makes more people notice your ad. But our advertising rates are lower, much lower, than the magazine. For example, the equilivant of a $300 ad in the magazine costs only about $100 in the Voice. Our advertising representatives don't sell advertising based on emotion. They sell it based on facts. Facts that prove Voice Advertising works better-far better. We want you to advertise with us for one reason-and one reason only. That advertising will bring you customers-far in excess of the cost of that advertising. Voice Advertising really works-as hundreds of Houston businesses found out in 1983. And hundreds more will find out in 1984. Call us at 529-8490 and we can go to work for you-bringing you more customers too in 1984. Letters Hall Applauded for Anti­Discrimination Action From Gregg Russell "My review convinces me that not only does the City Council of Houston have the authority to amend Chapter 12 of its code in the manner which you seek, but further that i(such action ~e tak )l Council, yod't ame basis of (Ii • ual preference."-Letter from Stefan Presser, Legal Council, American Civil Liberties Union, concerning the Domestic Privacy in Employment Ordinance as drafted by Gregg Russell. It would be easy to argue about the ver· bage, content and approach of Council­member Hall's proposed alterations of the Domestic Privacy in Employment Ordi­nance. Some grandstanders, both in and out of the gay community, believe that the proposal should be madeinto an issue. I do not agree. Having had an opportunity to review the Hall proposal as it amends my original draft, I am satisfied that changes in con­tent and approach ofintroduction are wise political and legal alterations, so long as they are implemented according to plan. You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of America·s Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers ---- By separating the inclusion of the catego­ries "sexual orientation" and "marital sta­tus" into separate ordinances designed for introduction at separate times in piece­meal manner, Mr. Hall's amendments effectively divide the strength of opposi­tion groups. In my view, this is an astute political maneuver. Furthermore, by plac­ing the enforcement clauses of the ordi­nance into the Affirmative Action Program of the city rather than the Code of Ordinances, the chances of a referen­dum occurring are greatly minimized, while still providing legal redress in cases of discrimination As for the other phases of the proposed draft, I feel confident that those amend­ments will be dealt with at an appropriate time in the future. Although I worked vigorously on the Van Hightower race because of her wil­lingness to take a position on the ordi­nance proposal, I do wish to publicly thank Anthony Hall for his efforts to pursue the agendas of the gay community in such a swift manner. I trust that he will continue to work with the legal depart· ment in order to expedite this proposal. DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 (713) 523-5006 NoT C CRT P: l.O IJY TUIA 80ARD 0" L£G.-. 6"CIALIZAtlON IN ANY AR£A AM/PM SHIFT EARN OVER $300 WEEKLY Join the hottest radio promotion to ever run in the Houston area. We need 50 people in our promotional office with pleasant personalities and voice No experience neces­sary. We will train. Our office has a cheerful, comfortable atmosphere. Plus cash bonus daily. Guys, girls, homemakers welcome. HIRING -NOW. Apply in person 10am-3pm or 5pm-7pm every Monday thru Satur­day. 2727 Kirby Dr .. suite 203 (on bus route) MOVE A THREE DEC. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 TRAVEL CONSULTANTS IY~~~!L ~00~ trtt~~ ~~~[L ~@f!JWJ~IY~~IJ'S) ~~[L ~~~~IY~l(~~ ~~[L ~~~~IY~!~JiJ~ Special Texas Departure January 31, 1984 Call Bruce f.o Key West, Ft. Lauderdale ·extensions a Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 'EM OUT! DAY WHOOP-Tl-DOO Fri. 16th, Sat. 17th and Sunday 18th Saddle up and ride on over for a foot-stomping , toe­pointing, roaring good time at the opening of Houston's new Country-Western bar. HAPPY HOUR all weekend! Present your TRAILRIDE card for a free beer. off street parking 1225 WESTHEIMER 10 MONTROSE VOICE/ OEC. 16, 1983 'Yentl' Proves Streisand Can Do Anything By Steve Warren Via Ga) Preea Aaaociation Wire Service A new Barbra Streisand movie is greeted in the gay community as an entertain­ment eventequalled only by Bette Midler's monthly book/ concert tour and Liza Min· nelli's occasional sneeze. Does Yentl live up to its hype? Creation didn't live up to Yentl's hype, but Yentl comes closer than I thought it would. }'entl is about two subject.; close to gay hearts, tfioagh,not in the way we usually think of them: ci05S-dres5ing and corning out. In eastern Europe 1n 1904, it was unthin­kable for a Jewish girl to be educated-"A woman who studies Talmud is a demon"­except in domestic skills. Yentl (Streisand) was different. She was born asking "Why?" and grew up extracting knowl­edge from her scholarly father (Nehemiah Persof1). When Papa dies, Yentl, rather than board with a neighbor and listen to the local yentas nagging her to marry, cuts her hair and dresses as a boy to get into school. She's taken under the wing of handsome fellow student Avigdor (Mandy Patinkin) and winds up marrying his fianc~ Had888 (Amy Irving). Their wed­ding night may be the most suspenseful scene in any movie this year. The songs are well integrated, and Strei­sand's in fine voice, butthe musicis gener­ally accompanied by montages which Rlow an already too leisurely pace. If you're not fanatical about Streisand, you'll get more than enough of her in Yentl, but the movie ali;o provides more meaningful entertainment than we had any right to hope for. The beautiful and delu:ate Hadass (Amy Irving) 6erves a perfect meal to Avigdor (Mandy Patinkin} and his study partner (Barbra Strei~and) in " Yentl." a romantic drama now playing Films Dining Room Hours Lunch: 11:30 to 3:00 Monday thru Friday Dinner: 7:00 to 11:00 Sunday thru Thursd Dinner: 7:00 to Midnight Friday 6 Saturd Sunday Brunch: Noon to 3:00 Yentl's masquerade and the sexual con­fusion itcreatea-"Who knows what's nat­ural?" she asks at one point in a perfectly innocent context-are as funny as the cor­rea; ponding events of Victor/ Victoria and several Shakespearean plays; but they also raise serious issues about male and female roles and the oppression that reeulta when they are rigidly defined. RESTAURANT & VIDEO CABARET 402 LOVETT HOUSTON 527-9866 When at last Yentl "comes out" as a woman, she'• realized the importance of being herself "No Matter What Happens" (the song could become a gay anthem), because by believing in herself, she can do anything. As director, star, co-writer and - producer, Streisand has ali;o proved she can do anything. Director of photography David Watkin has given the film a beauti­ful earth-toned look, although the mOl't prominent visual ii; Strei,and's face. With short hair and no obvious makeup, she's not a great advertiRement for either gender. Mandy Patinkin's vocal talent goes untapped-the leading lady sings all nine soundalike songs-but his body is dis­played to advantage in a nude swimming scene, and he gets to give his most sus­tained screen performance yet. Amy Irving functions primarily as Yang to Barbra's Yin. Hayes, Remember the Side Door! I M iss You a Lot. Love & Kisses, Denys BAJA'S DECEMBER CALENDAR OF MNTS SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY 11 12 13 Brunch 12 to All Nlff ht Happy New 3pm our Music - P~ular Rock & Nostalff ia Night Night ance Video !Old Fi m Cligs. Old Music Midnipht 5pm to close Midnight Movie} Movie 18 19 20 Brunch 12 to All Niff ht Happy New 3pm Music our P~ular Rock & Nostalff la Night Night ance Video tOld F1 m c1igs. 5pm to close Old Music Midnipht Midnight Movie) Movie 25 26 27 Closed till Brunch New 4pm Noon to Music P°d:ular Rock 3pm Night & ance Video Closed Mldnir.ht 5pm to close tonight Move WEDNESDAY 14 Soap Night featurln~ an 8 and 1 pm showing of "Dynasty" 21 Soap Night featurln~ an 8 and 1 pm showing of "Dynasty" 28 THURSDAY 15 Comedy Night 22 Comedy Night 29 FRIDAY 16 Popular Rock Dance Vlde • Extended Happy Hour 4 to 9pm 23 Popular Rock Dance Vlde Extended Happy Hour 4 to 9pm 30 Soap Night d Popular Rock featuring an Come y & Dance Video 8 and llpm N" ht - showing of lg Extended "Dynasty" Happy Hour 4 to 9pm SATURDAY 17 live ntertainment featurin11 Victor & Patricia 24 live ntertalnment featuring Victor & Patricia 31 Live in the Cabaret Louisa Amaral­Smith 2 shows 9 & 11:45pm reservations only Night of Candles By Randy Alfred WHY? Five to ten thousand marchers joined a candlelight procession from Cas· tro Street to City Hall Nov. 27 to observe the fifth anniversary of the assassina· tions of Mayor George Moscone a nd Supervisor Harvey Milk. A group of local anti-Marcos Filipinos joined the march to mark the birthday of assassinated opposi· tion leader Benigno Aquino. A representa· tive of the Kennedy family and a statement from Coretta Scott King turned this year's annual ceremony into a gen· era! protest against assassination as a political weapori. "We are here for three main reasons," said organizer Cleve Jones as be opened the program in front of City Hall. "To show that we remember Harvey and George, that we love them; that we're con­tinuing their work, to say that no bullets, no coward's bullets, will stop us. For every leader who is shot down, five will emerge the following day .. .. "And thirdly, tonightwesaythatgaymen and lesbians are taking our rightful place among the ranks of decent working men and women all across this planet who stand together in these perilous times for peace and democracy and social justice. That is our message tonight. LONG RUN FORCES: Scott Smith, Milk's business partner, former lover, heir and executor, echoed Jones' thoughts: "The assassin made the same mistake that many others make, believing the leader of a movement is the force behind that movement. Assassination seems to be an easy solution to complicated prob­lems. And in the short run, it can be effec­tive and disruptive. But in the long run, the forces of history win out. "Bullets can stop one person or two or 10, butthere are a million of us left to carry on the work, and that's just what we've done here in San Francisco. That's just what black people did when so many of I .. t I i ,rf ~ their leaders were gunned down. And right now, millions more continue to work for democracy and freedom in the Philip­pines, despite the murder of their leader, Ninoy Aquino." PERSONAL AND POLITICAL: Sim­ilar thoughts came from former member of Congress John Burton, whose elder brother Phil, also a congressmember, died suddenly in April. "We lost friends, but we did not lose theirideals," John Burton told the throng. "We did not lose the direction that this city and our society will take, and your being here is a reaffirmation of the commitment that George and Harvey had to a world that will be at one, with peace, justice and equity for all men and women, regardless of age, race, disability or sexual preference." ALL TOGETHER NOW: Lupita Kasha· wahara, a leader in the Filipino-American resistance to Marcos, sister of Benigno Aquino, and wife of ABC News reporter Ken Kashawahara, sounded a note of solidarity: "Since Ninoy's death, millions of freedom-loving Filipinos have rallied around the battle cry, 'Ninoy, you are not alone!' George Moscone, Harvey Milk, John Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Ninoy Aquino, you are not alone!" HIS HONOR: John Laird, the newly elected openly gay mayor of Santa Cruz (about 75 miles south of San Francisco), told of Harvey Milk's influence on him: "He used to talk about people from Altoona, Pa. . .. Really he was talking about all of us in the non-urban environ­ment that he needed to give us hope. He needed to hold out a chance that we could make our maximum contribution and still be who we are and be honest about it. "And for my!>t'lf at that time, in watch ) DEC. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Dateline S.F. ing Harvey's career, I'd been a congres· sional assistant and a delegate to a national political convention, but I was still thinking about giving up a shot at a political career on the basis that I proba­bly just couldn't be myself, that I just couldn't be honest and open and still make my maximum contribution. "But Harvey Milk held out that dream, and he held out that vision. And when he died it really sealed my dream and my conviction that nothing was going to stop me from being exactly what I wanted to be. "And this last week, when I was given the title of mayor of my city, a title that George had when he died, and one that would eventually have been Harvey's had he lived, it's now my chance to experience how this dream is continuing .... "We have the first returns from Altoona. And we're hearing from Altoona and Bos­ton and Key West and San Francisco and Santa Cruz and Laguna Beach and even Bunceton, Mo." In November, Boston elected an openly gay man to its city council, and Key West, Fla., elected an openly gay mayor. Bun­ceton and California's Laguna Beach had previously elected, respectively, an openly gay mayor and an openly gay council­member. ''The vision is alive, and the dream is growing," Laird concluded. "We're getting closer to the day that there'll truly be jus­tice, and we can all live our lives without fear of persecution. So keep it up." J USTICE? Keep up the demonstrations, for one thing. Several are planned for Jan. 6 when the killer of Moscone and Milk will be released from prison. Dan White will have served five years and 40 days for two counts of voluntary manslaughter. Alfred's column originates at the "Sen­tinel," a San Francisco gay newspaper. 1983 Randy Alfrt!d, all rights rt!St?rut!d. [Latat\] ITALIAN BEEF HOUSE • Italian Beef Sausage (with green peppers) • Italian Sausage Sandwich (with green peppers and grilled onions) •Italian Meatball Sandwich • Polish Sausage (grilled onions, mustard and relish) •HotDogs (Chicago style) 2703 Montrose at Westheimer ORDERS TOGO 526-8709 12 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 Montrose Art Avant-Garde Art Crowd Gathers Just Across the Bayou By Jeff Bray The drive in the car was hysterical enough-Marilyn and Kathy in their evening gowns, Marshall and Mark in nice tUJ1:edoes, and me in my New Wave outfit, make-up and all. We had all received our invitations to the gala event at the Jack Pearce Warehouse, 908 Wood, north of downtown. across the bayou. Actually, it was a little frightening as we got to that "no-man's land" area on that side of the city-especially dressed as for· mally as we were. There was a beam of light swirling in the night sky above the bayou, and as we drew closer to the mas&ive white ware­house, we could •ee what looked like a K· Mart parking lot on Chri8tmas Eve. Thousands of cars covered the area. and the thumping of loud music filled the air, rather like sitting at the stop light in front of Mary's on a Saturday night. We parked the car and walked across the pitted gravel lot to the rough street, then down the block to the massive three story warehouse where all the noise was coming from. Around us, others were walking, like moths converging on a bright fire. Eve­ryone was dressed to kill. Some were in Punk attire (whatever that really is), and others were quite formally dressed, look­ing as though they had just left the opera. After all, this was the sort of avant-garde event that stimulates an otherwise drab evening-even for the jet sel Jack Pearce Warehouse: Looking like a scene from "The Day After" but containing creative fuel for the future. At the door, we paid and walked into the most bizarre fantasy setting ever con­cocted for semi-public amusement in Houston. The city was left behind. Reality was thrown away. Men wore eye shadow and lipstick, and women dressed in expen­sive rags and diamonds. The place was Sf'flthing with people of every walk oflife-many looking like they didn' t belong and others looking like they would never leave. I couldn't help but wonder where all these beautifully weird people lurk during the day. Had the party dragged them out of their lairs like old stoats? The first floor held a massive dance floor and lobby, with several stairways leading up to the second floor. The Hous­ton New Wave bands, Voices and The Switch, played hard-edged music in the new mode, while a multitude of the glitter­ing crowd massed around the stage, danc­ing and hopping. Yes, gays and nongays shared the floor, end it really made the whole event so much more interesting. On the second floor, literally hundreds ffie vMontkose CQ11t.1c wouQd Qtke to take this oppoktun1ty to thmtk the community ~ aQQ ob tts suppon.t ovek the past two yeakS. CWe Qooh ~wru.d to se.Mng you as yoUA ~xuaQQy 'J°M111Stn!Hed CDisease CQ11t.ic 11t the 6utUAe. CWe rue a voQunteek-opekated cQ11tiC stk1vuig to gtve you the best ~ibQe sekviCe at the Qowest posstbQe cost. fieMy CAAiStmas g <Jlappy JJew qjeaft 104 WESTHEIMER AT BAGBY 528-5531 of people preSBed into a large room, hung with colored fabric and neon art, while cryptic fashion was displayed on a make­shift runway. The models were certainly not what would be seen in a regular haute rrwnde ramp in Milan or Paris, but then this is Houston-Space City-land of the future. The effect was to shock, and the clothing shocked and pleased and added to the totally decadent atmosphere of the whole event. On the third floor, more art was dis­played in separate galleries. In fact, the whole warehouse is full of little galleries and studios, occupied by a host of Hous­ton's most gifted photographers, sculp­tures, designers and painters. The artists were hard to trac'k down because of the massive press of sightseers, but the art was truly original and inspira­tional. George & George, photographers, had some of the most unusual photos on dis­play. Particularly interestmg were some black and white pictures, depicting murder scenes. One photo had a vampy looking woman wearing feathers and leather. She carried a meat cleaver in her hand, and the bottom half of a man in jeans wa.a lying in front of her in a pool of blood. Another photo was called "Child Support," with another vampy looking woman holding a set of tongs with an unmentionable piece of male anatomy dripping from them. Again, the legs of a man were lying at her feet in a pool. Aside from these grisley little photo funnies, much of the other photography was beau­tifully done, and certainly not as sadisti­cally. Other interesting art displayed on the third floor was the neon sculpture of Jon Piccinin. His was certainly some of the most colorful work in the building, being illuminated by neon gas and formed into intriguing shapes and brilliant colors. His is not the normal type of neon art that is mesa produced in the novelty shops (palm trees. flamingo, etc.). His neofl sculptures are very sophisticated, looking as though they would actually be more at home in some big corporate office lobby than on the front porch for the neiglibors to see. Neon art is surprisingly reasonably priced, and Piccinin says that contrary to popular belief, neon does not cost that much to maintain. The colors neon offers are brilliant and exciting, and although neon has bt!en around for quite a while, the art of molding it for more than restaurant signs is comperativelv new. There were so many artists represented that it would be impossible to cover them all in this story. The best thing to do is to see them for yourself. There have been rumors of this ware­house art community spreading over the city for the laat couple of years, and it was all too evident that the rumor was not false! The whole building simply burst a t the seams with creativity. It was the type of place that one envisions gifted artists of the future writing about in their autobiog­raphies; like certain alleyways of Paris and London, or inspirational settings like lofts in New York or villas in Biarritz. Well, this is Houston, and as an artistic center, the city is not that terribly well estabHshed in the world-but something is changing. With the end of the oil boom, the city is searching for new and more lasting means of notoriety. There is a sculpture boom downtown, and publications are begin­ning to find some creative vent here. The movie industry has been having a field day in Houston over the past few years (Term• of Endf'arment and The Man Who Loved Women), and now there are some real art communities springing up. The reason for the great warehouse event was to promote a new cultural infor· motion and half.price ticket center called SHOWTIX-something many major cit­ies in the world have. SHOWTIX is a story in itself but. in short. it will provide last-minute opportunity for people to see cultural events at lower pri<'es m Hous­ton's fast-growing cultural C'enters (for information, call Arts For Everyone, 522- 3744). After many hours o~wandering through the warehouse, drinking wine and talking to artists and other visitors, we finally made our way out to the carefully guarded parking lots. It had been a night to remember. The neon hallways; the pound­ing music; the wonderful fashions; the light-hearted and thoroughly entertained crowds of people, looking like children exploring a hidden world of wonders for the first time. Indeed, we had seen some­thing that was hidden and wonderful­real originality in a city that seems sometimes to hide its talent behind glass and marble and granite. This was bold illumination and creativity thrown open to the world through the medium of ware­house walls and iron elevator doors-not silent, shiny underground passageways and melodical muffled Musak compart­ments. Beware, Houstonians. One of these days, if this trend continues, you may not have to go to New York or San Francisco for your entertainment. Who knows. They may have to start reserving their tickets in advance to come here! Acclaimed Art Mistaken for Junk A campus work crew at Williams College in Massachusetts recently bulldozed what they thought was a heap of junk. Trouble was. it was really an internationally acclaimed work of art, reports the Boston Globe. There was no comment from red-faced college officials, but the artist says she's "upset and surpriaed." Come get your holiday spirits! There's plenty of fun & festivities for all. GRAND OPENING SUNDAY, DEC. 18 with the LITTLE BOBBY REVUE and Many Guests EMPLOYEE'S DRAG SHO~ (whichever ones will participate) MONDAY-Doug's Happy Hour 2Dm-8pm TUESDAY-Amateur Drag Show, 9pm WEDNESDAY-Wet Jock Short Contest, 1st Place $50 1st Place $50, Runner Up $25 ~,_..i«A. HUR/FRI/SAT- Rebel Outlaw Band SUNDAY-Little Bobby Revue with Lealo, ,__.c_--._ Bobbi Shane, Sandy Taylor and special guest.__.,._... __ MR. EXILE CONTEST COMING SOON 1011 BELL THE HOUSTON TRADITION 659-0453 '"T/IF ULT/MA rt BAKED POTATO" 416 Westheimer Houeton, TX 77006 520-0554 Christmas Special Old Fashioned with salad s400 WITH THIS AD offer expires 12-31-83 LAZY J LOUNGE presents Special CHRISTMAS SHOW Friday, Dec. 23rd, 9pm starring *Champagne * Diana Wright * Robbie Roberts *Tracey & * Mr. Ron Sioux MERRY CHRISTMAS From the Lazy J NO COVER Open 1oam-m1dnight Monday-Thursday 10am-2am Fri. & Sat. Noon-Midnight & then some on Sundays Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 5-lpm Saturday 10am-noon 312 Tuam, 528-9343 , 14 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 I Won't Dance; Don't Ask Me Commentary By Sharon McDonald To me, there is no more awesome sight than a dance floor filled with human two­somes moving in time to a common beat. I know Eleanor Roosevelt said no one can make you feel inferior without your con­sent, and I believe it. Situations, on the other hand, frequently make me feel inf~ rior without my consent and having to perform on the dance floor is one of them. It's during adolescence that dancing first rears its ugly head, along with other timely delights like menstruation and body odor. As a teenager, I was blessed with only moderate acne and personality bland enough to spare me overt social ostracism. By some quirk, I was a nondes­cript swan, secretly waiting to tum into my true ugly duckling self. I watched those around me who fell as casualties of the teenage social scene and knew that there but for a set of braces, 30 pounds, or four square inches of pimples, went I. Those execruciating years introduced me to the particular despair endemic to the dance floor. But what I felt then at those awkward high school dances was just the tip of the iceberg. In retrospect, it was rela­tively easy-if anything in those days could be described as "easy"-to bluff my way through social obligations without ever really learning how to dance. My high school years and several that fol­lowed were years of dancing with hetero­sexual men who are notorious for having invented the Brick Wall School of Danc­ing. This is closely akin to their Brick Wall AIDS Not 'White Gay Man's Disease' as Many Thought B,Y Dion B. Sanders Via GPA Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO-City officials, health­care professional. and leaders of the gay and minority communities reacted with shock-and in some cru;es, anger-to the disclosure that up to 40 percent of the more than 2.500 AIDS ca,;es in the United States are ethnic minorities. Gay newspapers around the country recently carried a copyrighted story revealing data from the National Centers for Disea~e Control in Atlanta that showed that more than 25 percent of all AIDS cases nationwide are black­including Haitians-and that an addi· t ional I4 percent are Hispanic. Amazingly, less than 1 percent are Asians and ~a tive Americans, according to the CDC statistics, which were as of Oct. 19. You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of Amef/ca·s Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers The high percentage of nonwhite AIDS patients sharply challenges a widely held belief by the general public-and esp~ cially by minority communities-that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease"-a belief that s tems from a perception of the gay community ne being exclusively white. Harry Britt, the only openly gay member of the San Francisco Board of Supervi~ors, told GPA that he wasn'tsur­prised by the year· long period between t he first dissemin ation of the AIDS ethnic data by the CDC and the reporting of it by the news media. "'Gay' triggers into the American con· sciousness a certain image-a white image," he aid. adding that "the general slowness of the press in dealing "ith (the gay oommunity) except in the stereotype of the white male" is the chief reason why the AID::> ethnic data had not previous!)' been reported m the media-main. trcam, gay or mmority School of Emoting. No men I ever danced with thought my erratic swoops and lunges on the dance floor were the least bid odd; they were plunging about with equal abandon and equal ineptitude. Later, when I can out, I entered a politi­cally active circle of feminists whose last brush with fashion occurred a decade before. De-emphasizing personal appear­ance was a feminist statement. We hung around one homey women's bar, lurching our way through our favorite songs, unperturbed by prevailing community standards about what constitutes a dance. The life of gay women before feminism was never like this, I am told. You had to know how to dance, drink and shoot pool to win the woman of your dreams. Any\)ne doubting this should have seen the two 60-year-old women I saw clear the floor one night waltzing wonderfully to an old. old tune, showing the youngun's how it's done. It seemed like I'd only been out of the clost a few months when dancing, real dancing, experienced a revival that has yet to subside. No longer did shuffling around face-to-face with your chosen vie· tim suffice; suddenly couples were kicking and twirling on cue. In a matter of months, the happy camaraderie of the local bar became the close scrutiny of anxious eyes looking to pick up dance pointers. And I'll admit it, this change did not exactly cause my contemporaries to dance a path to my door. Okay, so I'm not so light on my feet, but I have a great personality. But people are so fickle. My friends stopped asking me to dance with them altogether, and my lover atarted pretending she was dancing with the woman to my left. Dancing now meant you had to do a predetermined ser-iea of steps, in sequence and in time. Well, forget it. A wiser woman than I would just resign hereself to learning how to move it with the big kids. Not me, boy. You won't catch me in a gym full of third graders going, "One, two, three, turn!" I ignored TM, est and macrame, and I can outwait this silly and tenacious preoccupation with actual skill on the dance floor. Alright, so I don't have rhythm. I'll wait 'til the Old Values come back around: Money, Looks and Power. They're a lot more versatile and easier to acquire. McDonald, who liues in Los Angeles, is co-winner of the 1983 Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Work in Feature Writing from the Gay Press Association. Her column appears here and in other gay newspapers. ALL A OARD Now ... Ride in Widebody Comfort to Los Angeles ... EASTERN'S l-1011 Wisperliner Departs Daily at 5:35 P.M. -o- Starting January 9 New Widebody Service to New Orleans, Miami and Las Vegas. Check our Affordable Fares! Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at-738-8615. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTEFIN America's favorite way to flySM DEC 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Airing SMU' s Dirty Linen on National TV Commentary By Joe Baker I must hand it to students and administra­tors at Southern Methodist University. The majority of them might be bigots, homophobic, naive or somewhat ignorant. But they are true southern ladies and gentlemen. They don't like to air their dirty linen in public. Airing it in Dallas is nil right. It's even all right sometimes to air it throughout Texas. But, please, not on national televi­s10n. The folks at SMU have been in a tizzy all week over an invitation extended to a flamboyant anti-gay activist lo appear on Phil Donahue's talk show. Ted Brabham's invitation lo appear on the popular daytime program, along with a member of the Gay and Lesbian Student Support Organization, has brought public expressions of dismay from SMU adminis­trators and student leaders for fear mil­lions of viewers will see him as a poor representative of the university. Kind of ironic, isn't it? They didn'tmind cheering Brabham on when he was the leading critic against recognition of the campus gay group. But that was when the story was rela­tively confined to SMU's own backyard. Once it hit the big time and started to draw national publicity and attention, theSMU folks got embarrassed about their self­appointed guardian of campus morality. It seems that Brabham is a little too "flamboyant"-that's their word, not mine-for SMU. Funny, hey, isn't "flam­boyant" the word used usually lo describe us? Nobody has tagged Leslie Cooper with the word, either She's co-chair of the gay support group and also has been invited lo appear on the Donahue program, along with Brabham. Indeed, Leslie is anything but flamboyant-and I'd bet thatSMU admin­i~ tratore and etudent lenders were wish· ing she could be viewed as the official representative of the university. But, of course, she can't because she's on You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of Amenca's Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers the "wrong" side in this battle! Reportedly, when SMU officials learned that "Donahue" producer Susan Sprec-ker had invited Brabham to appear on the show, they pleaded with her to reconsider his appearance, or at least to allow a less controversial student leader. Sprecker refused, sticking to her judge­ment that Brabham speaks for a large number of SMU students who oppose recognition of the fledgling gay organiza­tion. The "Donahue" controversy has added new fuel to the campus uproar over gay rights that has raged since the gay sup­port group first sought recognition as a campus organization last spring. The stu- Dial a Gay Atheist-t.'­fA 24-Hour Recorded Message} presents Marlene McPerson as 'The Virgrn Mary" Jn '!4 Wayward in a Manger" 24 hours a Day at (7131457-6660 -,\'-American Gay Atheists POB 66711, Houston, TX 77266 dent senate has voted twice-the last time 16-15-not lo sanction the group. Brabham, who admits harboring aspi­rations of a political career after gradua­tion, calls himself colorful and articulate. And he likes controversy-and publicity. Some SMU administrators and student leders started questioning Brabham's motives after a move he took before the second senate vote in October. He infuriated th<•m by sending 1,000 SMU alumni a letter asking them to notify university Pre,;ident Donald Shields that they oppose the gay organization. The letter-written on SMU stationary-also asked for contributions to educate the pub­lic about the "dangers of homosexuality." Shields responded by makmg a public statement to disclaim Brabham's letter, saying Brabham was not acting on behalf of the university. Shields said he resented the implication thathe could be swayed by pressure tactics. SMU students leaders also then began disavowing Brabham's style and actions. The result: He's not just as controversial among those who agree with him as he i,; among the university's gay men and women. Student body president Homer Rey­nolds says it is not only admini~trators and student leader,; who are dismayed over Brabham appearing on the Donahue show. He says the majority of the students feel that way. " I think the concerns that were articu­lated lo me were not just frustration, but sheer disgust that a persons such as Ted would, in essence, be representing SMU on national TV," said Reynolds. "He's an opportunist, a media hound. He'll do anything to get his name in the press, and that turns a lot of people off." Personally, I think Brabham's televi­sion is a god-send. He's ju~t the kind of spokesman against homosexuality that the SMU gay groups needs to gain public support and achieve official campus recognition. Keep on talking, Ted. Keep on doing your dirty tricks. ThiR country may have a few problems. And people may not always agree with each other. But there is one thing for sure: big-mouthed bigots always come across as big-mouthed bigots. Isn't television wonderful? For those who are interested. the Donahue show in quei;tion will be aired in Dallas on Jan. 10. Factory Leather Sale Sunday 12-6 • Monday 10-8 THISEUROPEANINSPIREDLEATHERSOFA RETAILS FOR OVER •2,000°0 WE'LL SELL IT FOR $999. Leather Sofas $999 Your Choice of 5 Styles, 13 Colors LEATHER CENTER Designers & Builders 10175 Harwin #102, Houston 981-5874 VISA. MasterCard Financing Available Layaway Delivery Available 5 Year Warranty Monday 10-8 • Tuesday-Friday 10-6 • Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 12-6 16 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 Over the Rainbow (and Beyond) Commentary By Dan Siminoski, Ph.D. Stonewall F~aturee Syndicate Of all my memories of the 1979 Gay Rights National March on Washington, the image I recall moet clearly came shortly before the end of the rally at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. It had been a glorious fall day, with blue skies, white clouds and a light breeze that snapped the flags all around the Washing­ton Monument. One hundred fifty thou­sand people had come to make themselves visible to our government and demand equality under the law. I was standing at the side of the stage as Holly Near began to sing the Judy Gar· land s.l.ii&dard from ~y "Over '!lllll!'R"'ambO~." ~ singinK w electric. sparked by the ll'lagic -of the moment and the power of our mingled voi· ce.; I cannot speak for everyone's feelings, but mine included tears, pride, satisfac· tion and faith in the continued growth of our struggle to be free. In The Wizard of Oz, the rainbow repres­ented both escape and arrival-ei>cape from a world ofloneliness and frustration, irrival in a place of technicolor hopes and imitle,;s potential. Like Dorothy, many of 1s have felt isolated and unloved, and lave dreamed of some time or place where Ne might know security and affection. For is, as Dorothy discovers, witches have :>een all too real, and powerful wizards with empty promises all too plentiful (especially in election years). And, as Dorothy discovers at the end of her odys· sey, the place to struggle for change is right here at home, in the real world of ordinary people and routine,;. \\ihen we sang with Holly Near those familiar lines of yearning for something better and freer, we were in part reminding ourselves of our goals and purposes, affirming to one another that we would make it to the Promised Land, to that pot of gold at the end of our quest. But while it is important for us to consider long-term goals, it seems to me that too much empha­sis on our dreams may leave us just as unsatisfied as Dorothy was in the Land of Oz. What we need is an image of ourselves that is less concerned with dreaming and more occupied with doing. What we need is a political program. Neither I nor any writer or activist I know of is prepared to present a fully· developed manual for accomplishing the goals to the gay or human rights mov~ menl But some important steps are being taken by the architects of one strategy, which I believe may be the moat powerful idea of the 1984 elections: "The Rainbow • Coalition." Though the image belongs to You·re Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers many, it is most associated with Jesse Jackson, the black activist and Demo­cratic presidential candidate. It was incor· porated as the theme of the recent March on Washington for Jobs. Peace and Fr­dom, at which blacks, Hispanics, women, gays and others united to strive for indi­vidual goals through collective action. The "melting pot" was once the common image of a society in which ethnic differ­ences would be minimized as all individu­als became "Americans." Though pleasing in history, this image is patently absurd in application. Americans are far from equal with one another, and differen· ces among us are based more on race and class than on any other factors. The "Rainbow" concept offers an image of groups working together, each still as dis· tinct as the bands of color in the rain bow The proponents of the Rainbow Coali· tion urge minoritie, to ignore their differ· ences and to emphasize common goals by uniting on voter registration projects and by agreeing on candidates to support in 19114 The program bego three questions, each of potential interest to the gay com· munity: (1) Is such a coalition feasible, or might it tend to weaken incumbent progressives, largely in the Democratic Party? (2) If a coalition candidate (probably Jackson) were to enter the presidential primaries, most observers agree there would be little actual chance of winning the nomination. Therefore, could a coali· tion candidacy justify itself through increased voter registration, deeper atten· tion to coalition issues in the campaign, and election of candidates to lesser offi· ces? (3) Is there a place for gay issues and candidates in the coalition, and would support for Jackson offer lesbians and gays a better political str \ . The11e are large questions that gays and others will be debating for months, per-haps years in the future. However we feel about particular candi­dates or strategies, one thing is certain. C:ay political muscle was evident in every ·ace in which the Human Rights Cam· paign Fund made an endorsement in 1982. That success was made possible by sizea· hie contributions of time and money, and by some fine work by our national and local organizations. But we haven't unco· vered more than the tip of the iceberg of potential gay power. As will all minorities, our cnmmunities are under-registered, our candidates underfinanced, and on elec­tion day, fartoomanyofusdonotvote. We ' · ' ac f these tenden- 4 . - a rea nee to return control of the Senate to the Democrats, a party historically friendly to the neejls of minor-ities. And we have the best opportunity in our history to elect and reelect supporters of the Gay Rights Amendment, and then push for serious committee hearings on the bill. These are not dreams to be realized at some indistinct point in the future. They are specific opportunities that we must commit ourselves to realizing in the months to come. If we do, and if we main· tain that commitment, I believe that pas· sage of the Gay Rights Amendment to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 will be possible before the end of the decade. Dr. S1mmoski is a political scientist and has been a in the ga · s · -ment for a decade. He may lie writ· ten at 1221 Redondo Blud., Los Angeles, CA 90019. ~1983 Stonewall Features Syn· dicate. ..:::;:-:::::.. :-.:: - -------_-_- _.-. •- -r"- - - ----;::.;..-- FULL MOC>i\r-&§i:--:. ~·::::- CHRISTMAS MADNEss- Tuesday, December 20, 10pm COME GET YOUR PICTURE TAKEN SITTING ON SANT A'S ??? AND GET A FREE SHOT! NIGHTLY HAPPY HOUR 10PM TIL 12:30AM En~~iji)~~~ ~=-:::.'(,.~ 1022 westhelmer- 528-8851 - New DJ Wayne Barton, Hot! Hot! Hot! DEC. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Mark Janas Shapes Montrose's Boys in the MontroseLive Chorus for Tonight's Christmas Concert By Robert Hyde The Montrose Singers are presenting their annual Christmas concert this evening (Dec. 16) at St. Stephen's Episcopal C.hurch, and since September, their new director, Mark Janas, has been pulling every string from his professional back· ground to whip the group of volunteers into what he calls a "really spiffy organi· zation ." Tonight, he sincerely hopes that the -1. •..z.. ..•.. ...~ ceomn.! !!~)' will apprecillMl.his endeavors HF bfings his ~ gay chorus • together for the music so cherished during this season. Accompanied by piano, organ and brass, the chorus will enter the church singing a processional especially arranged by Janas inspired by his love for Gregorian chants which have been haunt­ing music lovers since the Middle Ages. Although the piece is the traditional "Oh Come All Ye Faithful," Janas directs his own personal interpretation, which is based heavily on his classical training. Also joining the chorus will be soloist Stella Zambalis, a mezzo soprano recently involved with the Metropolitan Opera. On a more accessible level, the tradi­tional favorites will be sung, as well, and there will be comedy numbers designed especially for this performance. The con­cert's finale will be a sing-along to wrap up the evening. Afterwards, members of the community are invited for waisal, good cheer and a chance to get to know the boys in the cho­rus, as well as Janas himself. When Janas first joined the group in September, after being invited to do so by Montrose Singers president Clark Moore, it was only a group of 12 gay men who simply wanted to pour their hearta out in song-many of them had had no profes­sional training. Today the group consists of 30 members, all intent on being one of the best choral groups in the country. Under Janas' direction, they might just make it. "My plans for the group are to see it increase in number and ability," Janas said in a recent interview, mentioning that he would eventually like to see the chorus increase to 48 excellent singers. "And I'm always amazed at how much better they're reading music and how ever­ything is coming faster" To some, Janas might seem a bit arrogant-or temperamental-as "they" say in the art world. But his charm is dis· arming, and his arrogance might just be a little justified-he's worked with Leonard Bernstein, has a master's degree in con­ducting from Rice University and has toured Europe twice with his baton in hand. Furthermore, his chorus members sincerely appreciate him. "I don't think I'm temperamental at all," he said, smiling and looking a bit amazed that he even had that reputation. "I always try to keep (the chorus) excited at rehearsal. If I think they need to be cheered up, I'll try to joke with them. If I think they're acting like kids and need a little discipline, I throw a little tantrum every once in a while. They understand what I'm trying to do, I think." Then Janas set back and took a closer look at himself, perhaps thinking that some of the criticism might be justified. "I'm too much of a perfectionist for my own good," he said. "Being a perfectionist gets me in trouble lots of times. Sometimes I plan beyond the scope of the group involved- sometimes my own scope. That'1 something that an artist always has to watch out for. Planning for some­thing you can accomplish in more time than you have is always something I struggle with. "I've always been too much of an optim­ist. I also know it takes optimism to grow. You have to believe that something can be better and much better. If you aim at a five, you might get a three or four. Ilyou aim at 10, you might get that five. That's a rule of life." Go to the concert this evening and see what the boys in the community have come up with. I have a feeling that we'll be in for a special treat. And I know they've certainly worked very hard at it. Diversity Players, tllat ou o-br you Noel Cowa11d's Private Lives and entertained packed houses for several weeks at the new room at the Pink Ele­phant, is holding auditions for its next production, the more serious Boys in the Band. Auditions for the play will be held this weekend on Saturday from 3-6 and on Sun· day from 1-3 at the Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland. One final audition is scheduled for next Wednesday from 6-8. For more information, contact Joe Watts at 266-1111 or 522-2204 (evenings). Montrose Singers' Mark Janas NYC Gay Men's Chorus Scores with Christmas Album By Robert Hyde It's not Johnny Mathis or Nat KingCole­and it's miles away from Elvis Presley­but if you get in a reverent mood this holiday season, you might want to pick up the New York City Gay Men's Chorus Christmas album, A Festival of Song. Not only is the album a major contribu­tion to the gay community-it's the first recording by a gay choru s on a major label (Pro-Arte)-but the selections are per­formed well enough to stand as a compari­son for our local groups. Under the direction of Gary Miller, the 150-men cho­rus displays all of the attributes that packed New York's Carnegie Hall several times, as well as Lincoln Center. Most of the album is sung a cappela, that is to say, without instrumental accompaniment, and this approach to most of the selections allows the chorus to display their musical talents and cha!· lengea them to the maximum, since a cap­pe/ a is extremely difficult, especially when sung softly. In Bruckner's Ave Maria, the voice balancing is perfect, and the chorus per· forms it as if it were written for them. "La Virgen lava pansies" is another fine piece which offers a nice solo effort on this traditional Spanish carol. Michael Praetorius' "Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming," a very inspirational piece and nicely done, demands repeated listen­ings. Also the differences in the men's voices emerge in Gabrieli's "Jubilate Deo." The highpoint of the album is Thomp­son's interpretation of Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Even­ing" from his "Frostiana_" This selection opens and closes nicely with piano, and displays the chorus' best use of vocal tex­ture. I could almost see the snow falling softly in a New England wood. The chorus does have problems, how­ever, which make the album fall short of four stars. The baritones are a bit heavy on Vaughan Williams' "God rest you merry gentlemen." Sweelinck's "Hodie Christus natus est" needs to be lighter-it's not the joyful piece it should be. And Thompson's "Alleluia" is monoto­nous to the extreme. Imagine listening to the same word for five minutes and 59 seconds! The voices are also too heavy on SUBa's "The Chanticleer's Carol," although the trumpets and trombones in this piece area NYC Gay Men's Chorus taking a break from their May recording of their Christmas album nice change from the a cappella of most of the works. Unfortunately, the instru­ments are too loud, and it's difficult to hear Susa's words. Otherwise, Kountz' ''The Sleigh" cap­tures all the spirit of Russian Volga boat­men desperate to catch the last sleigh into Moscow, and you can almost see the !um-berjacks in the traditional "O Tannen­baum," which is sung first in German, then in English. For the most part, appreciators of inter­esting classical music should enjoy the album. It's also a nice professional boost for the gay community and a recording event of which it can be proud. MCCR Choir to Present Cantata The MCCR Choir will present their annual Chri11.tmas Cantata Sunday night, Dec. 18, at 7:30 p.m. at the church at 1919 Decatur and extends an invitation to the everyone in the community to come and enjoy traditional Christmas music. This year's Christmas festival will fea­ture Christmll8 spirituals, a Christmas medley, "Twas on a Cold and Wintry Night" and "Symphony to the Savior." These selections offer many favorite car­ols and a few new ones. Choir members will also be featured in solo works throughout the concert. ''We found this music to be enjoyable and challenging," said John Kirkland, director. ''The use of new and traditional Christmas carols i8 the reason." He stated that the concert represents many hours of choir members' personal dedication, and that the group of musi­cians is an asset to the entire gay commun­ity. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 Montrose's Robin Mosely Is Working Her Way Up to Cloud 9 By Billie Duncan Now, let's see, the actor who plays the stuffy father in the first act plays his own effeminate son in the second act whose lover is played by the same man who played hi~ mother in the first act. Confused? That's only the beginning. How about this one. The white man who plays a black servant in the first act plays a fiv~year-old girl in the second act. Not only that, but the second act takes place 100 years later than the first and the char­acterg have aged only 25 years. The play is Cloud 9 which opens at the Alley Theatre on December 29 on the Arena Stage- It is expected to draw a large gay audience. That is not to say that the play is a gay play, per e- Iti~ a play about breaking free of sexual stereotypes-whatever they are. One of the players in the production is an Alley favorite, Montrosean Robin Mos­ley. "It 1ounds very confusing," she said, "but it will take maybe three minutes into each act to figure out what's going on." Robin seems to have a handle on what's going on in her own life, in any case. Her father was in the Air Force, and she ActreBB Robin Mosley was born in Wiesbaden, Germany, about 30 yeare ago. She went to 13 schools in 12 yeare and lived in at least six different states. Travelling around helped her to learn skills that ehe would later use as an actrees. "You have to learn how to per­form. You have to learn social skills early because you're going to constantly be meeting new people. You have to be very aggreaive. "I would entertain constantly as a child. I think the motto was 'anything for a lauah.'" Robin &miled. "I think I learned young how to deliver a line. 'Cause I was such a amartaaa." Aa far u seriously getting into acting, Robin explained, "When my older sister did it, I wanted to do it. I wanted to do everything she could do. I remember when 1he used to hang out at the Dairy Queen and I wanted to co bane out at the Dairy Queen, too. "But I was 1till more interested in get­ting on my bilr:e and going exploring the quarry than hanging out at the Dairy Queen and eating french fries and talking to boys. I was atill at thatltagewhere (it's) 'Let's go poke a stick in that hole and see if a snake comes out.'" Most of her life she lived in San Antonio, but she came to Houston in 1972 to go to University of Houston. She has yet to graduate. "No papers. She's no pedigreed girl, this," joked Robin about herself. Even though most of her acting has been at U of H or the Alley, she did a stint at a dinner theatre in the northern part of the 1tate. "I wae the belle of the Texas Panhandle for about two weeks." Festival as Lady Macbeth, dircted by Sid­ney Berger, to whom she gives great thanks for casting her in so many incredi­ble roles at U ofH, including Olphelia and Juliet. "Having the opportunity to play those roles at that age .... It was great." From there whe went to the Alley's Apprentice program. "The first year I did the children's show and laundry." In the children's show (Alice m Wonder· land) she played the Mock Turtle and Humpty-Dumpty. Her costume for Humpty was more of a house than a cos­tume. "Inside it looked just like an out­house," she said. One day, one of the crew put in a roll of toilet paper. "Aa the Mock Turtle, I looked like a giant green cheeseburger with ears and a tail." Her work ae an apprentice so impressed the Alley staff that they brought her back to be a member of the company. She has been working there ever since. "Most people my age (in theatre) have been out of work from the years 20 to 30, and I rot the chance to a<i one stage show after another in a big theatre with big pro­duction values. I've worked with some really fine people." As for her future, she admitted, "I think I would like to live in New York for a while and see what I could do." But right now, she is submerged in doing Cwud 9. "This play is geared towards making everybody look at the way they perceive people's relationships. It's very powerful writing in a very palata­ble, entertaining form.'' The play is being recommended for mature audiences only. "People might find the language shocking. Some of it is very graphic." As far as any personal relationships in Robin's own life, she would only say, "I have a lot of friends." Some of those friends are people who have seen her over the years and know her to be one of the very best actresses around. Cwud 9 would be a play to see, in any case, but with Robin Mosely in it, it is certainly on my must-eee list. o Duncan's Quick Notes There are shows and there are shows. And some shows show you things you've never seen before. In any caee, there were plenty ofthinrs that nwi had never seen before at the leather faehion show that was part of the first anniversary celebration at the Rip­cord, 715 Fairview. Boots Adami of Leatherwork1, which has an outlet in residence in the Ripcord, came up with the idea for the show and off they went. Boots ineisted that the models wanted to be known only by their firat names. They were Mike, Gilbert, Charle1, Al, David, Randy, John, and Duane. It see1n1 that there were more men than that on stare, but someone we all know lost her purae that night with all her notes and everything. David modeling in the Leatherworks fashion show at the Ripcord Randy prepare• ro go on stage at the Leatherworb fcuhion show at the Ripcord bandage in the traditional flesh color. Lookinr eleekly simple was the slick black 1traight jacket, complimented with matchinr boots. For those who do not care to be over­dressed, that aection of the show illso included an outfit composed of a suspen­sion harneae and 1tandard jock. The next section was the beautifully understated jeans and shirts entry. Lovely. After all the food and drink offered by the Ripcord, it's a wonder Yours Truly could find her head the next day. Oh, the food! There were three tables laden with everything from cold cuts and cheese to oysters on the half shell. There were meatballs, shrimp, even rumaki. The board of directors of the Ripcord worked for two days on the feast and it showed. Following that wae a particularly intri­cate 1howinr of restraints, tit clamps and whips. All were color-coordinated in the evening's favorite shades. Owner Vince Janis told me the week before, "If you're going to have an anni­versary, do it in style." And that is just what they did. But back to the show. The emcee was Maude (Richard Smith), who went leather and became known as Motorcy­cle Maude. As usual, he kept things going and managed to 11ing dishes in every direction. Randy and David then showed off some outstanding chaps that were nicely complimented by T-shirt and tank top. The theatre she played was out on a highway in the middle of miles and miles and miles of cotton fields, but her name was on the marquee. So she took a picture of the marquee. Then she panned around and took a companion 1hot of the cotton field a. When 1he rot back to Houston, she appeared in the Houston Shakespeare The show itaelf featured some really darling ite1n1 in the bondage section, includin1 a full neck-to-heels multi­strapped apparatu1 in thia year's fashion ehadea of black and silver. In a light.er mood wu the full body ace '/. The Finale of the Leatherworks fashion show at the Ripcord David eported plain arm bands, while Randy charmed the crowd with his studded rauntlet. Harness, jocks and briefs were next (need I 1ay more), followed by David and Randy again in vests and boot straps. Every detail of both outfits was carefully orchestrated to go with their exquisite Rip­cord t-shi rts. All that was left of the fashion show was the finale. All the models showed up on stage in harnesses with lighted candles. They formed a triangle There was a moment of silence. Then they burst into "We Wish You a Merry Christmas." It was a hit. Then Tom Beck and Danny Villa joined in song to the true and sincere delight of the crowd and especially this reviewer. All in all, the show was a hoot and the night was too. Now, if I can only find my purse. If not, I will take some other purse with me when I go see the Montrose Sym­phonic Band's Third Annual Christ­mas Concert on December 17th at Cullen Auditorium at the Univereity ofHouaton. If you have never been to one of these concerts, ro. It ie an evening of joyous fun and really wonderful musical entertain­ment. Another fun Christmas show is The Gift of the Magi at Chocolate Bayou Theater Company. Diane DeMille as Della and Michael P. Giles aa Jim both display that rare combination of good acting talent and excellent voice1. And, talking about talent, the finals of the Exile's popular talent contest will be this cominr Tuesday, December 20. Hmm, that'• the same night as the VOICE's Chriatmaa party and the Houston Off­Broadway Holiday special at E/J'e. Some nirhts it'• just really hard to decide what to do. One night that will be particularly tough for decision-making will be New Year's Eve. There will be so many ehowe that night. Even B.ia•s will be bringing back live entertainment with the appear· ence of Louiea Amaral-Smith. There are so many other specials that I will just have to cover them all next week. Stay tuned. Still Looking By Tom Dolan There I was in my '65 VW, rubber tipping my gums as instructed by my periodontist rocking the car forward and back waiting for the light to change, when wh~ should pull up next to me but Dirk, my steady, the only almost-constant in my life. I rolled down my window and hollered "Hey, Dirk! Where ya goin'?" ' "I'm on my way to the Gondola. Wanna meet me there?" "Sure," I said. The Gondola is an Italian restaurant offering two meals for the price of one on Thursday nights. No sooner had we given our order to the waitretJ8, "Two cannellonis, please,'' than the trouble started. "Would you like to come over for quiche tomorrow night?" Dirk asked. "Gee, I'm sorry, Dirk. I have other plans." My friend looked stricken. "Are you seeing somebody else?" he asked. , "I ~ave the feeling no matterwhatleay, Im m trouble," I said. "I'd rather not answer questions about tomorrow night." "You're going t? have sex with him, aren't you?" he said. "I have no idea," I replied. "You're open to it, aren't you?" "I can't rule it out," I said, beginning to squirm. "What kind of work does he do?" asked Dirk. "He's an artist." "You're susceptible to artists." "I'm susceptible to men," I said. "Is he good-looking?" "I'm not answering any more ques­tions," I said, as two steaming plates of cannelloni arrived at our table. "They smell great!" I crowed. "I can't eat," said Dirk. "What do you mean you can't eat?" I said. "I'm too upset." "If you choose to be upset, that's your business. I'm going to enjoy my cannel­loni," I said, digging in. "I don't know how you can sit there sucking up cannelloni under these circum· stances," said Dirk. "If you don't ease up, I'm going to have indigestion. Would that make you happy?" "Yea." "Lieten, stupid, we love each other," I said. "Let's not be miserable." "If you Jove me so much, why are you seeing this other guy?" "It's important for me not to feel ou:ned. I'm tired of the compulsory Friday night fuck." "You're hurting me," he said. "You're hurting yourself. Peripheral relationships can enhance the primary one." "Bullshit!" "One man's bullshit is another man's wisdom. Anyway, I'm not going to marry this guy." "You don't know that," he said. "You're right," I admitted. "But what makes you think I'm going to run off?" "I just feel it," he said. "Your feeling& are off the wall. But if you choose to create a purple monster, go right ahead! It will be amusing." "Amusing?" "Allow me to embellish the fantasy. This guy is an Adonis. As soon as he steps into my apartment, we plunge into bed and stay locked in an obscene embrace 'ti! dawn, when we pack our suitcases and head for Niagara Falls." Bald Men Superior Real men don't have hair Author William Taylor claims in TidbltB Magazmt> that baldies are sexier and more ambitious. He believes chromedomes are superior because they're further along the evolu­tionary ladder than lower forms, such as apea or guys *ttll hair: Saye he, 1'It's precisely' a man's male- • neee that makes him bald " • ' ' •, "That's enough," he said. "I'm sorry," I said. "Well," said Dirk, "you got what you wanted," one of his favorite expressions. "So did you," I chimed as if on cue. "I guess thi1 is it," he said with the aire of a 19th century tragedian. "Not again'i" I said with mock surprise, sucking up the last of my cannelloni. "I didn't think it would happen so soon," said Dirk, "I'm not ready for it." He has­tened to add, "I think I'm going to freak out.'' I used to attract guys that liked to watch Saturday morning cartoons.Now I attract guys that cry. "I'm going to cry,'' announced Dirk. "Please don't cry in the cannelloni. You'll ruin it," I said. "That's not funny," he said, choking up. "I should have said I was working late DEC. 16, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 at the office." "You've ruined my evening," he said. "You're not exactly making mine," I said, addinir "I'm sure you'll devour that cannelloni as soon as you get it home." "How can you be so cruel and heart­less?" "I'm only being honest. Honesty is a powerful aphrodisiac." "So is love. Can we negotiate this thing?" asked Dirk. "Sure," I said. "Let's start with the pre­mise that you're manipulative and I'm paranoid." "Who's manipulative?" "You are. That's why we have so many con11icta," I said. "We do n-0t!' he screamed as heade turned. "Don't you ever say that!" Glaring at his untouched food, Dirk con­tinued. "You're making a big mistake." HAL & DAVID Commentary "I know," I lied. "I love mistakes. They're wonderful opportunities for per­sonal growth." "I can't stand the thought of sharing your body with another man," he said. "Then think about something else," I said, adding unnecessarily, "Half a loaf is better than none." "That does it! You're hopeless." "Shut up," I said. "I will if you will," said Dirk. "Do you want to go home and fool around?" I asked. Dirk smiled acroe11 cold cannelloni and said, "Do they put whole dinners in a dog­gie bag?" "Let's ask," I smiled back at him. Dolan is a syndicated 11ay columnist u•ha lives in San Diego. His articles appear here and in other gay publications. POPULAR WEST COAST MUSICAL COMEDY TEAM GALA AETUAN ENGAGEMENT THAU DEC 23 ji )•il~4..J111 •Ji 1" 1~ :';,- 1"-!-; ~. 4' '1 ,, ii ]~ ~~·Ji til~"]l1 ii till.~ ' JI~ 1llL I I L: h ,, ~-... • .._ ..4 u Ja, I I ..-1 :J - 2702 Klrby-524-6272 °1"': ~lh:f/ 11 reservotlons requested JOIN US WITH SAMANTHA SAMUELS FOA NEW YEAA'S M I 20 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 .. ~/YL~ 0 l\fAV~W"p~ ~ * LP's * EP's * T-Shirts * BUITONS *IMPORTS* ETC. r A!Nl!C> ERC>'TIKUS I Don't buy until you check our prices on "Top IO" and most new releases Reg. retail 899 OUR PRICE 699 Come in and Face the Music 2024 Westheimer-next to Academy-520-8800 ANNOUNCEMENTS • BUSINESS OWNERS We losl - -en ~ tl'I tnts dttectory Montrose community orgenaza­bons ptus busirl.... Nl'Yln<J as dtatnbution pomts lor Ille MONTROSE VOICE • nchcatos this hat og lo• MONTAOsEVOICE dtstr bu1ion point DRIVING TOI NOlANA 12122·12/27 through Memphis Nashville. 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GREENWAY PLAZA AREA Roommate 2 br/2 bath on Timmons Male or tema1e $225 per month • Ya .. ectnc Dan. 850-0769 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED HELP WAHTED Pet Shop and Bord Chnlc 3118 Smith II !!gin BOOKKEEPER & AA Futl charge. prepare statements payroll. tax reports, travel Send resume with phOto Personnel Dept No 1. Box n1923. Houston 77215 ADMINISTRATOR­OFFICE/ TEL.EPHONE Start 1ommed1ateJy Good Income now w ith a great future for right guy L1v•1n (room & board fumiohed). Info (713)521>- 5524 FOR SALE, MISC. FREE CATALOG Eel skm leather gifts lor men and women. Christmas delivery The Buckeye Com· pany Box 7653. Houston 77270 EROTIC VIDEO CASETTES $25-35 Formats VHS Beta I. Daniel 526- 9112 HANOVER SHOES Fine quality men• shOes al factory/direct GAYEST XMAS SAL.E Erotica and old balls (Xmas ornaments, that Is). Paperbacks and gay magazines reduced to S 1 each Hardcore alao Video tapes $20-35. 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Plus all three subscribe to virtually every gay news service and syndicated writer, including the Gay Press Association Wire Service, Stonewall Features, and a dozen independent writers who relate gay life to everything from business to movies to politics to sex. Yes, send 0 Montrose Voice 0 Dallas Gay News 0 Austin/San Antonio Star for 0 6 months 0 1 year. RATES. Montrose Voice OR Dallas Gay News-$29 for 6 months or $49 for 1 year. Montrose Voice AND Dallas Gay News- $44 for 6 months or $74 for 1 year. Austin/San Antonio Star-$16 for 6 months or $29 for 1 year. The Star with either the Voice or Dallas Gay News- $37 for 6 months or $64 for 1 year ALL THREE NEWSPAPERS- $52 for 6 months or $89 for 1 year Name Enclosed is 0 Check 0 Money Order (Make payable to Montrose Voice Publishing), or charge to my 0 Visa 0 MasterCard D Community Credit Card . (If charge, give credit card expiration date and number Montrose Voice and Dallas Gay News are published every Friday The Star Is published every other Friday. Subscriptions w ill usually arrive In your ma•lbox on Saturdays 1n Texas or Mondays elsewhere. Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DEC. DEC. 16 17 DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. 18 19 20 21 22 For additional intormat.on or phone numbers tor eventa hated below look tor the apcnsonng organ1zetion under ·organ111t1ons'' tn the ~ontrou Cl1sa1!1ed Selected Events through 7 Days -.FRIDAY: Committee for Pub­lic Health Awareness's "Shar­ing Group for the Worried Well," 7·8pm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett -SATURDAY: Choice's Les­bian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm Dec.17, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park -SUNDAY: Choices meets 12:30pm Dec. 18 -SUNDAY: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets Dec.18, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin mMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 U10NDA Y: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Lesbian Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meets 2:30pm Dec. 20, Spindletop Room, Univ. Center, Univ. Park •TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm Dec. 21 • THURSDAY: Winter begins at 4:31am, Dec 22 • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:3().9pm on KPFT Radio, FM·90 •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Christmas, Dec. 2.5 •IN 1 WEEK: Lutherans Con­cerned meets Dec. 27, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •IN 1 WEEK: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet ?pm Dec. 27 9/N 1 WEEK: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets ?pm Dec. 27, Bering Church, 1440 Harold •IN 1 WEEK: Interact meet­ing, Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm Dec. 28 •IN 1 WEEK: Integrity meets Dec 29, 4008 Wycliff •IN 2 WEEKS: Greater Mont­rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm Jan.3, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei­mer •IN 8 WEEKS: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm Jan 7 •IN 8 WEEKS: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets Jan.10 •IN .'l WEEKS: Houston Data Profe"Rionale meet 7;30pm Jan.10. East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main •IN 6 WEEKS: NOW's Les­bian R1ii:hts Conferenre, Jan. 20·22, Milwaukee •IN 6 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference, Jan. 27·29, Houston 9/N 8 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12 •IN 8 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb. 14 9/N 9 WEEKS: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 9/N 11 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 9/N l ,'l WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 9/N 15 WEEKS: April Fool's Day, April 1 9/N 17 WEEKS: 1984 Rain· bow Festival, Galveston, Bless­ing of the Shrimp Fleet, April 14-15 9/N 18 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Founda­tion let Southeastern Lesbian­/ Gay Health Conference, Apr 21, Atlanta 9/N 20 WEEKS: First primary party elections in Texas and party precinct conventions, May 5 9/N 21 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 9/N 22 WEEKS: Texae Sena­torial District Party Conven· tions, May 19 •IN 28 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Con­vention, May 25-28, Los Angeles •IN 23 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 •IN 24 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 •IN 26 WEEKS: Texas Dem<>­cratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston •IN 26 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anni­versary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More in '84," June 15-24 9/N 86 WEEKS: "Series 8" Gay World Series Softball Tour­nament opens in Houston 3pm, Aug. 26 (tentative), Memorial Park, lasting to (if necessary) Aug. 31 Fr1n(;11CO. CA 94114 ('15) 863"°3624 N•t;onel G1y Tuk Foret 80 Sit'! Av. New York. NY 10011 -~212) 741·5800 NGTF1 Cn11&11n11 - (800) 221 •7044 ICM.itstde New YMStat1) Tex11 G1y1L11bt1n THk Forc:e- POB AK. Denton 76201 (817) 387-8216 Ac1pe11I c;:;oru1- (Montroae) Church ""Ot" Chnst 777-9286 ~the Sun-clo GT.ciry";;;; Booka. 704 F1u~1ew-522·71195 subgroup of l/H Inc. COf"t+ Cetta 7pm Tues ACLU-1236 W Groy- 524~5925 --~­A° 1DSHGij';ne-c10 -Gey Sw11ch~3211 AmerTc;i; Gey AthetSta- 457-8660 - Ai'irO'Ra1nbow Aii11nce- 520-9451 (voic~ ~52 (TTY) ~~~~f~,:·1~~1 Robert Moon. d1r"20i Benng Memon1I Unlled Method11t Churc-,;= 1440 H1rold 526-1017 '9rv1e;e 10 SOem Sun ~~~;h~~7~1.• t4~~;~ether (BWMT}-eJO Gey Cho1cH lesb1~p-e10 Gay Sw11~ 529-3211 meeta 12·30pm 3rd Sun. 1lao1ee Lii· b•an Mother• Chnahan church of the GOOd Shepherd 1707 Monlrose serv1co11pm Sun B•blestudy7 30pm Thurs (Montroae) Church ol Chnal 1700 Mootrose- 7_77-9286 serv•cn 11 Im Sun Church or Christian Faith 217 F11n;1•w 529-o 9005 serv•ces 10 4Slm Sun & 7 15pmWed Bable study 7 15pm Tuea & Sun. chOlr practice Wed 1tterJerv1c• Church of Peo1ecos111 Unit)'- 1217 RtChmond- 850--7296. 52().5690 Serv1cn 7 30pm Fr1 111m Sun Citizens tor Human Equelity fCt1El- P08 3045. 772S3- 680-3.146 bolird mMt 2nd Tues Clippert POB 956. Richmond 774e& Con ~·s-meets at Brazos R1-:er Bottom 2400 Brazos-528--9192 Committee for P-u-bl_oc_H_e_a_lth-A-,.-.,-.-n.- .-.- POS 3045. 77253-526-6333. 522·50&4 Shenng Group for the Worried weir meet Fn. 7"'8pm Montrose Counwhng Center Communrty Go1pel Center-1100~ ~18 Cong Aytz Chey1m-rnHt1 at ccf211 Fa1rv1ew-68&-8997 aervtee & aoc1al 8pm 2nd & 4th Fn Amencan Gay Diane Foundation-2700 Meson-52 .... 5791 ~Y.~;:~~f~ ~~~7~ ~~·& .~?.~ 730prn Sal 111 Un111rt1n Church-5210 F~s:i57'1 servtce 11 1 S.m Sun ~rs=s20--1~288 _ ______ _ Gay & Ahve Sharing Exper1.nCe (G~28=" 1311. 528--0891 Gey & Lesbt1n Arch1v11 of T ex11 1ff11i1te of 11H Inc Gay Asian CIYb-2615 Waugh 112' 77006 Gay H1sp1n1c Caucua-866-5252 Gey NYrws AIJlance-880-9488 Gay -Po11t1cai ~G~PC>=PQB~ 77266-521-1000 meet 4600 Mein 1217 7 30pm 1st & 3rd Wed Gay· Pride -Week ·13 Comm1ltM Clo Manon Colem•n. HollH or Colem1rt 801 w Alaba,,,. 523-2521 Gay Sw1tchbo.lrd-POB 362•. 77253-629-3211 mtorm1t1on, counMIU'IQ. referr11s. TTY AIDS Hothne Greater MontroH Bus•nHs Guild-contact throogh Montrose Voice meets 7 30pm. lat Tues. commun~ty room. Liberty Bank 1001 Wn­thetmer GreeNpomVFM1960 Arel F1r-Aw1~- 821-9681 Homoph1te Interfaith All11nce-729 Minor- 523-6969 Hooston Area Gay-& Lesb11n Engineera & Sc1ent1sta-52&-7388 ,,,..ts 7pm 4th Tu11 ~tort C11)--H-;11-901 Bagby ____ _ Houston Community Clownt-862·8314 ~61ta Prof115'on1ll-meets in EHt Room.. Holiday Inn Central. "640 $ M11n-523-- 69tt meet 7 30'p-m-2nd~Tu_n_;__~--­Houston Motorcycle Club-Clo Mary·s. 1022 W•lheuner-52&-8851 ~NO°rth-Prof1n1--ono-ls---PO~S~3&ll>-.-H-u-m-­ble 77336-Brn a1 821-7129 ~POS 1804i, n222~·l732. 529- 7014 1ff1h1ted groups 1r1 lnter1ct, Gr1c19lynn G111ery·s A Piece tn the Sun. MontrOM Art All11nce. Gey & Le1b1an Arch1ve1 of Te .. 1. Gly Switchboard. MonlrOM Symphonic Benet Mont~ tOH Ctoggers boerd meet 7 30pm 11t Thura (varied k>cation1), educ1t1ona1 forum 7 30pm 3td Thurs Ingersoll Speakers· e;:;mu-P08 391, a;n;;r; 77401~9-40&! ~~~~~ .!2::~~~.·~~~~;~ = ~POe 16041. 77222-529-7014 meet 4th Wed, Bering Church. 1440 Harold, 7 30pm e KPFT Radio FM-90-419 Lovett Blvd-526- 4000 ''Wilde ·n Stem·· g1y r1d10 ahow Thurs. 730-9 ()()pm KS/AIDS Foundat•on-1001 W•the1mert193- 524·AIOS La;;81cyc11 C~•v•d 682-045'. carol 529-4975 ~.Center Gay Alcoholica & A1an:o:n=1'214 Jo Ann•e-521-9772 Leab•an G1y Aeaource Serv1ce-Univers1ty of Houston, 4800 C11houn. b01t 309. 77004 - 749- 1253 meets 2 30pm 111ern1te Tuetdays. Sp1n-­dletop Room. 2nd floor Univert•ty Center Dec. 16, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 L•b•an Mothers subgroup of Choit~ 1st and 3rd 5at 6 30pm. 210 Fa~ ept 1 lutherarw Concemed-m&eta at Grace Luthe-­ran Church., 2515 Waogh-521...()863. 4~11'3 rneet 2nd & 4th Tues evenings Men AgarMt Oeoepllon Courtesy Club-POB 541871 77254 ~lttanCommun1tyChurchoftheRewr· rect.on ll.'CCR)-1919 Decalur-861·9149 pol· luck dinner 7 30pm 1st Set monthly, aerv~u 1045em & 7 15pm Sun & 7 15pmWed. memMr• ship .nqu1rers ciau 7.30pm Tues educahon CIUSM TUM & Wed eves Montrose Art Afliance-521-2481 1tM11t1 llH Inc. meet 2nd Thurs :'1B°:n~,~~~h ~~!::!~.c!' ~~~"~~~r~ berry MontrOM CJv1c Club see Neartown Auoelat1on •Montrose Chnic-104 W•theimer-528-5531 open weeknights &-10pm Montrose Coonaellng Center-900 ~ .... u •203-5~7 AIDS victim support grOYp ,,_,. e 30pm "'°" Montrose Singers-car) Lawrence~ 1ftet &pm rehearsal Mon eves. Benng C"°rch 1"40Harold Montrose Tennis Ctub-R1ch 11 524-2151 plly Sun 1030lm-1 30pm M1cGregor P1r'k MSAJ MOO Nighl Bowr ng-pl•r Stadium Bow1, 8200 Bra.m1in-528-t5 75 or 499-9036 MSA/T~ Night ~Mixed Le1gue) 8ow11ng· pllly St1d1um Bowi, 8200 Bri•mam-981·1523 MSAIGruter Houston 1Men·11 Softball-523-- 8802 d1y. 523-0&13 eve MSA/Gruter Houston ~Men·a) Sottbatt 5er181 II Commun1c1t1on Comm1tte1-POB 22272, 77227 ··s.nes 8" Gay World Senes open mg (ten­tative) 3pm Aug 26. MemonaJ P1rk MSA/Women 1 Sottban League-72&-9371 MSAIVolleyb111-1180·2930-g1mH 730pm Tues. Gregory-L1nc<Mn schOOI. 1101 T1t1 Montrose Symphonic Band-meets 11 Bering Church. 1440 H11otd-527-9669 meet 7 30pm TuM. 1H1h1t1 l/H Inc MontroH Welch subgroup Neertown Alsoc Mu1t1ngs-meet1 at the Barn.110Pec1fic~ 9427 club night Thurs ~:~IO~hc:~::-Ft~~~~~;j~}..•· Neattown Asloc1a11on (MontrOM Crvte Ctub)­meets at Bering Church. 1440 Hirokl-522~ 1000 "'"1 7pm 41h T.- New Freedom Chr1st11rt Church-812 W 111h- 591-1342' __...,.. 10.m Sun, 7 30pm Wed Perk People-c/o Neartovrrt Commyn1ty Firehouse-7•1-2524 Paz y uberec<>n-POB 600083 772li0-523- ll061 RecrM-1<>-,,.-,- L-and~F~und--Co~m-m-,-tt.- -.-. ...,-,-,.-n-g Club proflCt Texu Bey Area Gaya-332-3737 meet Thurs evening Te•a 8ay Area Gay Youth--a.:J.?-3737 mMt bf .. weekly T.ffi _H_u_m_o_n_R~1-g_h_ll_F_o_u_nd_o_1-,o-n---1-8-15 Commonweaith-522-2824 ~-Ct-o_M_a_ry-.-.-1-022--w-n-,-,,.,-.,,.-,-- 5211-8851 Conroe~ esbt1ns-Klithy It 4091 756-9069 meet 8pm 2nd & 41h Ff' LAKE CHARLES-O. gn.ty-R1 1 Box 216C. Longv lie LA 70652 MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS RELAXING SENSUAL RUBDOWN $15 Chuck, 521-3496 ~DSOME_VE_R_SA_Tl_L_E_E_S_C_O_R_T_ Buck. 520-6735. TEXESCORT-524-9511 Models. escorts & masseurs ''We do care enough to send the very best• Ma1or credit cards honored Monthly medical certificate. Have a real fun time with the rightguyforl'ou..,,..,, ______ _ FUU. BODY MASSAGE Tenst0n release. relax & enjoy Very sen­sual Call for appo>ntment Tom (713) 524-7163 RELAX 6 ENJOY The BodyWorks massage For appoint­ment. call Bill, 526-2470 BODY MASSAGE In or out Bruce. 521-2009 PERSONALS G/WiM 48 DESIW­gays. lesbians interesled in occult. super­nalural Larry Box. Box 66973. Suite 130, Houslon, TX 77006 --aiRBARA_L_O_VE _ S_D_E_B_B_l_E __ I will always love you and will always be there! Love. Barbara AMATEUR PH'"o'"T"._O.,_G,-R-APHER GM interested 1n hear1n11 trom other pho­tographers for shon tnps. portrait ses­s• ons and n•ght photography, etc ~ter 868-9425. evenings BIG BEAUTIFUL BLOND GWM 6 , 175 lbs , 30, very attract•ve architect, onto art. remodeling houses. exercise. touching Seeking new friends. lovers. 1&-30. tnm, no drugs Send photo to Box 164-Z clo Voice SPANKfNG_S_A_ P_A_D_D_L_f_N_G_S __ _ wanted by GWM. 31 Wnte J•m. Box 35833. Houston 77235-5833 TIRED OF BARS GWM. 20. 6', 180. looking for same Writa "Todd," Box 2355 M•dland. TX 79702 AFFECTIONATE, ATHLETIC attractive very cute. GWM. 26, ST. seeks s1mp._ fun down-to-eairth buddy type k~'SP1.! .. ~~·~~,8~~;·~~;·.a~~~o~~~n 77098-1698 AFFECTIONATE fun. honest male seeks others Serious 26 Call 85(}-7578 between 6-10pm only UNIOUE GIFT IDEA --~ Give a man Tex Escort has gift cert1h­cat• avatlable for that special person who has everything else For mform1t1on call 524-9511 Ma1or cred1I cards honored BODY MASSAGE In or out Bruce. 521-2009 Oh My Ghod! The invitation has a consent form attached! 22 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 16, 1983 Psycho Ill "Hey! You! ... Yeah, that's right! I'm talkin' to YOU!" Gary Larson's two books, "The Far Side" and "Beyond the Far Side," are available at the Montrose Voice offices, 3317 Montrose, suite 204, for $4.00 each ~ 2 .t 0 ~ u z < ~ z :"<' .. The Far Side by Gary Larson Whaiam I doing here ? I can+ play +J.i;s fh;ng-' I'm c:r ~t. forcrJir"J-ouf-k:IJCI' 00 0 The elephant's nightmare ~ Games you can play with your ca t. "I don't think I'll be able to tell the kids about this one." /' I GWM COUPlE Both mid 30°1. professional. seek frlend(s) 1nterealed 1n friendship, tun Call 52&-5233 CAN WE TALK? ~h~~u·r~r~~~~!l"'~~~'.1n~2re~~/~~ some bars. stable home hie. GWM 25-40 It you're sincere. call 863-700. MISTER NICE GUY seeks same. 30-<45 New lo Houston. lnlel­hgent. good-looking, protess1onal Near ~pslown Mall. 995-1127 _ _ _ HAIRY LIFEMATE SOUGHT by 45-year-old man No smoking, booz­ing. drugs Larry, 481-2892, 6-9pm. ATHLETIC, STABLE GWM, 27, seeks GWM, 20-30, tor tnend­sh1p. possibly more Am warm. inlelhgent, active, attractive Desire a relat1onsh1p ~~~~~~o~~~i~o~en\~~~1~!!~0e~x101~'.i Clo Voice -roG'ETHER WITH MEANING attractive, GWM, young, 35. 5'11 ". 158. sensual. sensitive. monogamous. Chris· 11an. seeks special guy(s) 23-26 John. ~6734 (keep trying) CHRISTMAS ORPHAN? GWM. 165. 36. alone-seeks GM to 44- let me v1s1t over Christmas Eve and Day tor warmth and friendship, More 11 possi­ble and wanted Please try. Serious only 526-5300 GWM WANTS ORIENTAL ~::' B•~:~Si. ~~~~~~~o~~hfr~~le TM - COWBOY, SKIER, BACKPACKER moving from Cal1torma. 6', 160, B WM. 2134 Stanley Hills Onve, Los Angeles, CA 90048 ---RUBDOWN NEEDED mascuhne. GWM. 29, seeks massage ~ nov1ceo under 22 years 781-8280..;_ FURRY TYPES WANTED tor permanent relal1on1h1p/triendsh1p by monogamous. sens1t1ve, sincere. affec­tionate, art1111c. endowed Scorpio cuddler (W· M, 33. 170, OK/BRN, hazel). Vaned interests Serious replies only lo Box 1114-A c/o Voice. ---WATCH THAT TIDDYI Easy on the tldd1es. Caesar okay'/ I love you, Robby - MASTER HAS DUNGEON Wanta bollom slave-lover BO, SM, toys. SM Call Sir Lou. 526-3140 HAPPINESS IS ••• a handsome. healthy, humorou1, happy hunk as your escort or model from • TexEscort 524-9511 Major credit cards honored Security •nd d 11cr e tion assured TOP TRAINER NEEDED Bollom trainee wants lo expand BO. SM. toy expenencee Call Mac. 52&-3t•O SMOOTH NONSMOKER W1M seeks fnend that en1oys1ports, out­doors. home. ResponS1ble. mature. any race Bearded. 53. 5'11", 175 lbs , unh1- boled, deaire 10 please. no drunks or dru9s Picture Box 163-1 c/o Voice PEACEFUL l!ASY FEELING Tall. altm. GWM. 31, desires warm encounters with sensitive touchable bears Box 163-H Clo Vo•ce. ATTRACTIVETALL WOMAN GWF, 26. tired of bars and head games Need 11ncere woman Wnte 163-F Clo Voice SERIOUS FRIEND RELATIONSHIP­Prot ... 1onal. mature. GWM, 5'11 ", 160 lbs . dark brown hair/eyes, masculine, loving. versatile, seeks same. Letter. photo, please Box 163-G 'Iii Voice -- LOVERS SEEK FRIENDS Both in 30's, blonde. 5'9", both protea­S1on1I. like sports, work in city, live near Sugarland Wnle Box 58606, Dept 697. Houllon 77256 - - LOUIS MISSES SAMI Sam1 Bame contact Louis Anyone else knowing h11 whereabouts, please do same 163-0 'Iii Voice LOOKING FOR FUN? Lovers seek "friend& • Check us out Wnte Suite 1183. Box 66973. Houston 77006 FOR MEN OF al l colors-BWMT- your social alornatlv._all Gay Switchboard for 1nlorma1t0n. 529-3211 BWMT-12 DAYS ot Christmas Joy- Black & White Men Together lnf0<ma11on Hotline 52~3211 (Switchboard) RELATIONSHIP OR FRIENDS GWM 50 5·9 ' 170 lbs , looking tor 1er1ou1-m1nded replyt; only Not into bars or dope Age no probtem Call 688·1S.1 FINANCIAL BACKER OR partner wanted to build homes in boom· Ing Austin Masculine. sane (512) 445- 5888 G/W COUPLE One 36. 6'1 ", 156, moustache Other 29, 6'1' . 160, moustache Good-looking, nice bod•n. versatile Photo and info on pret­erenoea. gets same Bo• 163-A Clo Voice COWBOYS SEEK OTHERS Masculine. healthy. se•y lovers seek e•COPllonal 11ng1eo1couples who are dlS· creet open. tenSUlll and honest for fnendshlp, tun or whatever No phomes. plast
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