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Montrose Voice, No. 161, November 25, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 161, November 25, 1983 - File 001. 1983-11-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1267/show/1242.

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(1983-11-25). Montrose Voice, No. 161, November 25, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1267/show/1242

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 161, November 25, 1983 - File 001, 1983-11-25, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1267/show/1242.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 161, November 25, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 25, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Commentary Life After 'The Day After' By Peter Derksen ent situation: the option of mass uncons­Transformations of human conscious- ciousness. In a way much more powerful ness, in.dividual or cultural, occur when than newspaper editorials or talking the previously unthinkable becomes thin- heads on the news, we have experienced kable. While it may be optimistic, or at an event none of us ever wants to see. We least premature, to attribute a civilization- are obliged, by a very distinguished panel wide coneciousness-raising to ABC's film, of experts, to rest assured that full-scale it was clear, both during the film and nuclear war will probably not take place panel discussion afterward1 that nothing because logically it is not in anybody's less than that will do. best interest to start one. That is very cold If someone could magically abolish comfort to me, with recent events in nudear weapons, that would alter the Lebanon as a reminder-as if there were means, not the potential, for species sui- not already enough examples in history­cide. Indeed, given the choice between that one person's logic and perceived self­chemical, biological or nuclear warfare, interest may be quite different from the latter might be the ex.it of choice for another person's. Danny Villa's Zap Clap Review Billie Duncan's Montrose Live, p.14 those of us who care to balance one type of Before rational humanism became the horror against another. Tihkering with mode, people lived with the constant pre­the meansofwarfarewithoutdealing with monition of their own or society's destruc­tht" causes is a spectacular waste of time. tion by forces beyond th~~:ir personal And conventional ways of talking about continued page 5 ._ ____________________ __. ~N~o~r :c:a1n: t:hneay:.~gtilvieone tth~e~ ctoon atenxyt isna twishfiacch- ··················--------------- these discussions usually occur: the pecul­iar post-Renaissance concept of human beings as consisting of an ego, supposedly rational mind and sack of flesh. In no other way can I explain the present situa­tion, where the power to eradicate the human race Hes with two competing ideol­ogies whose chief concern seems to be "who get.a to do what with whose things." We are not satisfied by social structures or strategies based on that concept of humanity, because deep inside us we believe, or at least would like to, that there must be something more to us than just that. Broadcasting the film removed one of society's options for dealing with the pres- MONTROSE v 0 I C E The Newspaper of Montrose Nov. 25, 1983 Issue ... 151 Published Every Friday all and Van Hightower Toe to Toe in Runoff By Hollis Hood Ballot& cast in the Nov. 29 city council at-large position 4 runoff will determine the outcome in one of the hardest fought candidate campaigns the community has seen in some time, the one between Nikki Van Hightower and Anthony Hall. Van Hightower, founder and director of the Houston Area Women's Center, has consistently been a proponent of human rights and gay rights. "Everyone should be treated fairly," she said. "We need the best talent we can get, and that talent should not he judged on some extraneous personal charateristic." When asked if she supported an employ­ment ordinance which included protection via sexual orientation, she said she wouldn't be afraid to "draw fire." "['ve always drawn fire," she said, refer­ring to her stance on human rights that has in the past been viewed by some as radical. "But [would not support an issue that had not been researched or that had no chance of passing "I believe elected leaders can make a difference in the lives of citizens and should feel a responsibility to enhancing the quality of life enjoyed by those per­sons," she said. Hightower mentioned that she can represent those concerns for quality ?f.life, aa evidenced by putting feet to opm1ons when she formed the Houston Area Women'• Center some years ago. Van Hightower supported the conven­tion center building, dubbed it "desira­ble," and supported the Houston Housing Authority's decision to raze Allen Park­way Village. '"That place is uninhabitable. It's sup­posedly helping, but it's keeping the poor in a ghetto where they can be easily exploited-that's not the way it should be I would support smaller housing proJects that would blend into the surrounding neighborhoods," she said As a resident of Montrose, the candidate Although Van Hightower trailed Hall citywide m the first balloting, she easily led him in Montrose. The runoff is Nou. 29. said she supports bayou beautification, a greater emphasis on the arts and a com­mission to study solutions to Houston's water woes Van Hightower has received numerous awards and honors, including the 1980 Hester House Humanitarian Award, and holds a doctorate in political science from New York University. She is endorsed by virtually every city law enforcement organization, among others. and was also endorsed by the Gay Political Caucus llall, on the other hand, received the endorsement of Mayor Kathy Whitmire and has been endorsed by numerous civic and business groups. "I am avidly for equal nghts and have been," he said. "Government should not be in the business of regulating the indi­vidual's right.a, unless protected rights are being vioJated." Hall has also received many honors and awards for distinguished service, includ­ing a Jisting in Who's Whom Texas and the Susan B. Anthony Award from the Harris County Women's Political Caucus for legislation on behalf of women. He is an attorney and holds a degree from Marshall Law School. Hall gave up his city council seat repres­enting District D to run in the at-large race because he "wanted to become more involved with the lifeblood of the city." He gained his former seat on a record of public service in the Texas legislature. He voted to repeal Texas Penal Code 21.06 there, and in Houston as councilman voted to repeal the cross-dressing ordi­nance in 1980. He is an active member of the Democratic Party and supported inclu­sion of the Gay Rights Plank in its 1980 national platform. AB the runoff date nears, Hightower has been marshalling Montrose backing. She carried it decidedly on Nov. 2 with 66 per­cent, and is now trying to garner more of the vote outside the Montrose/University area. Hall is trying to capture more support in Montrose, where he faired badly while keeping the citywide backing, apparenUy by election percentages. So it's anyone's guess as to how the elec­tion night figures fall. Both Hall and Van Hightower carried only about a third of the vote citywide­hence the runoff-and the outcome of the election will appear to depend on how many of the presently uncommitted cit· ywide citizenry either side can muster will cast a ballot on Nov. 29 COMPLIMENTARY WELL DRINKS FRIDAY, NOV. 25-7PM-IOPM Nov. 25, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Vice Conduct Sting Operations By Robert Hyde Houston Police Department vice officers made several visits into the Montrose area recently, and some members of the com­munity are questioning their motives as to whether or not they were here because of community demand. Ray Hill, gay activist and GPC board member, said a "general heat on the book­stores" began Wednesday, Nov. 16, when vice officers entered Asylum, Studs, the Ballpark and Mr. Peepers, and that sev­eral customers were arrested at the latter establishment. Twenty vice officers, most dressed as decoys, also made news later in the week when they arrested 34 people along the lower end ofWestheimer from early Satur· day evening through the wee hours of Sun­day morning. HPD Sgt. McMullen, a vice officer, said that 34 people were arrested in the sting: 19 on charges of prostitution and 15 "street hustlers" on a hitchhiking charge. Hill said that halfofthosearrested were transients. One man arrested is a Jesus advocate who distributes "Jesus loves you" pamphlets along the streets, Hill said, and questioned whether or not the community wants these types of individu­als taken in. Whether all of the arrests were legiti­mate is questionable, but Hill said that the community can expect 11a great deal more of the same." St. McMullen said that the vice officers were responding to "complaints from the businesses and citizens in the area." Gay Man's Execution Again Scheduled By Chris Church/ Nile Scene Via GPA Wire Service TALLAHASSEE-Florida authorities, in response to a second death warrant signed by Gov. Bob Graham, have scheduled the execution of condemned killer Robert A. Sullivan, 36, for 7:00 a.m. Nov. 29. Sullivan, who has spent a record 10 years on death row for th e shooting of a Dade County (Miami) restaurant man­ager, received a stay of execution from a federal court in 1979. He presently has an appeal pending in a Miami circuit courl This may be true, since several civic organizations, i.e. the Greater Montrose Business Guild and theAvondaleAssocia­tion, have urged police over the past few months to "clean-up" prostitution on lower Westheimer. Hill feels that the sting operations stem in part from publicity generated by local news media. "News media reports are turning the cops on," Hill said, with a lot of anti-gay publicity. Most of this recent adverse publicity stems from Ed Falk, who represents him­self as a Montrose business man and is being featured by Channel 13 as a spokes-man for the area in a current series on vice. "Falk is a moral majority nut," Hill claims. "He has no legitimate ties to Mont­rose at all." He said that Falk is in Hous­ton representing a Taiwanese firm specializing in the production of fasteners for light industry, such as nuts, bolts and screws. Hill said that Falk was reknown at radio station KPFT when Hill managed the sta­tion asawaradvocateandaJohnBircher. He was later dismissed from the board of directors of the station, Hill said, because of his flagrant, anti-gay sentiments. Hill said he has reported Falk's stance on gay issues to Channel 13. Dallas Benefit Nets $20,000 for Groups By Joe Baker/Dallu Gay New• DALLAS-Two hundred and forty-eight gay men, lesbians and friends shared an evening of "Visions'' last Saturday night to benefit the Human Rights Campaign Fund and the National AIDS Lobby Pro­ject. More than $20,000 was raised. The Dallas Dinner Committee's second annual black-tie dinner at the Fairmont Hotel attracted 100 more people than last year's affair. Attending the $150 per person dinner were gay rights leaders from throughout Texas and the country and several elected officials, but most of the guests were "just plain gay folks" who were committed to advancing the cause of human rights. The evening was entitled "Visions." Helping guests to share their visions were keynote speakers U.S. Congressman Bill Green (R-N.Y.) and Virginia Apuzzo, exec· utive director of the National Gay Task Force. "The cause of gay rights is not a 'them versus us' situation," Green said in his address. "Gay rights is human rights. A government that permits discrimination of gay men and lesbians endangers the human rights of all." Green, one of the earliest supportera of gay rights and presently one of the staunchest and most effective supporters of AIDS funding legislation, told his a udience that both lobbying and educat­ing are important in furthering the cause of gay rights. He swd elected officials and the public have a lot to learn, but stressed that HAmerica is learning." "We are talking about a human rights :'::.r i ~~~;11~e~ ~~:J:1 s:f:i1:r1:f:ue~~ derstanding and prejudice, but we can succeed." Green, who repeat.edly used the pro­nouns "we" and "us" when discussing the fight for gay rights, called the Human Rights Campaign Fund one of the more powerful political action comnuttees m the country. He urged gay men and women not to ignore the Republican Party in their strug-gl?; Progressive Republicans are rebuild­ing," he said. "There are candidf:lt.es .who deserve your support and contributions. Let them know you are prepared to help them if they help you. Hold them accoun­table." Green said human rights legislation­gay rights-should be supported by both progressives and conservatives in all the political parties. "This should be an iBBue especially dear to conservatives who believe in less government interference," he said . "Government has no business legislating in anyone's bedroom." Apuzzo told guests that it was an act of courage for them to attend the fund­raising dinner, and noted a lot of them were at different steps in their personal involvement for gay rights. Montrose Mouth Holiday Party Season Well , it's holiday party season now. After the turkey, it's time to try and sort out all the season's invitations. The Voice (that's us) will be having it's annual "Christmas Party and Public Spectacle" in mid-December. And you' re invited. Watch this space next week. -o- Houston's KS/Aids Foundation received an honorable mention in the Nov. 24 issue of The Advocate for its AIDS Play Safe Week of Sept. 18-25 The magazine stated, "the Houston venture goes a long way toward thawing the paralysis of fear that has seized too many men. Playing safe with sex gives people something to look forward to other than deadly panic. And it reinforces what is positive about AIDS, if such a thought can be entertained for a moment: that is, that gay men still have much to be grateful for, much to celebrate-above all , their affection for each other " Rice University strikes back, demanding equal time from St. Thomas. which has been monopolizing this space. So, here we go' On Dec. 2, the Rice Chorale will have a Christmas concert; on Dec. 3, soprano Jeanette Lombard and pianist Mary Norris will perform; Dec. 4 has two concerts scheduled-the Campanile Orchestra's at 2:30 and violinist Serg1u Luca with pianist Anne Epperson; on Dec. 6, the New World Strings Quartet will perform; and on Dec. 8, there will be a "Messiah Sing-Along" (at St Paul's Methodist Chu rch) with fu ll orchestra and scores available at the door. For more information, contact Roslyn Ruetha1n at 527-4933 And then the University of St. Thomas will present a Wind Ensemble on Wed., Nov. 30, at 8pm in Cullen Hall. For more information on this concert, call 522-7911 , ext. 240. Douglas Bone is the new owner of the Exile with David Laland the club's manager We kinda got them mixed up last week. Sorry But the important news is that the Joker's back on the wall at the club, thanks to Frank Mary's is having 1t"s .. sometimes annual" Mr and Miss Mary's Contest Dec. 1 (Thursday, a week after Thanksgiving), on the patio P1ckels is handling the whole affair The Officer's Club is starting a new Thursday tradition at least through Decemeber: 2 for 1 beer and well drinks 9pm-2am Baja's will have having a splendid Thanksgiving Smorgasbord starting 6pm Turkey Day "Now, to help fill up this space, we give you a li sting of some unforgetable events that happened in years past this coming week . Nov 26: King Tut's tomb was opened today In Egypt 1n 1922 Nov. 28: Rita Mae Brown 1s 39 years old today. She's the author of The Rubyfru1t Jungle . Another author, Will iam Shakespeare. married Anne Hathaway today in 1582 Nov 29: Admiral Byrd flew over the Soul Pole today in 1929 Nov. 30: It's Mark Twain's (Samuel Clemens) birthday. Twam was born in 1835 Also on this day, Oscar Wilde died 1n 1900 -o- Here's something to stlck in the back of your mind. You'll never know when you'll need It Richard Cornish was the first man to be convicted of a •·homosexual offenseh 1n America He was executed m 1624 4 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 25, 1983 RESTAURANT & VIDEO CABARET 4 LOVETT HOUSTON 527-9866 Special Thanksgiving Smoraasbord Thursday~ov. 241 6pm All you can eat-~14.95 -o- Luncheon Buffet Monday& Tuesday Nov. 28 & 29 -0- Dinner Buffet Monday, No~. 28 -0- Baja's has facilities for private luncheon meetings on weekdays & facilities for private parties during the holiday season. Baja's will be closed until 4pm Thanksgiving Day TLC Wishes You & Yours A Happy Healthy Holiday Season! DECORATIONS GAMES, TOYS, WRAPPING, NOVELTIES CARDS, INVITATIONS. CALENDARS, PLANNERS BOOKS BOXES, BAGS, TINS, BAS COOKING, EATING. DRINKING ~U¥~wAitE (TLC) THE LAMMEY CORPORATION &02 w. AJabamo Houstor\ Texas 77006 nJ.524.5860 OPEN 10 to9 Mon. thru Thurs. lOtoe Fri.!Sat. AmEx/ MCa.rd/ Visa Nov. 25, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 One Last Time: The Infamous Rascal's Encounter Between Greanias and the GPC AIDS May Be Foreseen in Eyes By Robert Hyde Kent Spear, aide to councilman George Greanias and a representative of Hous­ton's gay community, tried to clarify an incident at Rascal's which erupted between the councilman and Gay Political Caucus President Larry Bagneris on the Saturday preceding election Tuesday dur­ing the GPC bar tour-an event which alarmed some members of the community who are still confused over exactly what went on (see VOICE issues of Nov. 11 and 18). While it has been reported by some that a heated exchange took place between the president of the GPC and the councilman (an exchange which they feel was devisive of the community), Spear said that the meeting was low key and was only the result of a minor misunderstanding between Bagneris and Greanias. The seeds of the incident were planted when the GPC endorsed candidate Nikki Van Hightower in the Position 4 Council­at- Large race over Anthony Hall, who is supported by many members of the com­munity, as well as by Mayor Kathy Whit­mire. Spear said that Greanias, following an established City Council procedure, chose not to endorse either Hall or Hightower. In addHion, the councilman declined a place on both Mayor Whitmire's and the GPC's bar tours. Furthermore, and because the commun­ity had reached "fever pitch" over the endorsements, Spear said, Greanias felt awkward when asked by Bagneris to par· ticipate in GPC's tour. Greanias was also disturbed that he had Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Montr~1~tf:L:¥?b~'no Co ~~~i~~~.~~F=~~fy Contents copyright • 1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm HenryMcClurg publiah« Acel Clark •tldlf«:f(N Jeff Bray f/Tlpl uc. ~~cr:!n~~;•s Robert Hyde m• n•f11nfJed1tor ~~~1::;~ Ch1~1!"4::.::;:11h Billie Duncan Peter Derksen Jon Cheatwood en1~;:,;;,:,a!~~'•" Ly! Harns •d'lfft,.lflfJdlf~/(N M:.,~:,~~o :...a::.a~':!:;'.:' Gre• ter MonlrOM Bus1nen Guild. Gay =~:ffV•c.• lntet"n•t1ona1 G•: N-• Agency. P•cihc News Auslm BurHu C•p1tolN...,.1 $ef"ll1ce Synd1c.IWI f Hlure s.~,c•• & w,,,.,, (S.n Fr1nc1sco) Chronic!• FHtur•. Umttd FNlure Synd1e11te, Jelhty W1l1on R•ndy Allrtd. Stonew1U Fe•ture1 Synd•c•t•. Bri•n McN•ugh1. JoeB1ker POSTMASTER Send 1ddreu correchons to 3317 Montrose •306.Houston.TX77006 SfJtucnption r•1einUS 1n1Hled ert11e/~ S49peryHr(52 1uu.sJ. S28 per1111month1 (28iU4J .. ).or $125per week (le .. lh• n28111un) 8.ck lslU91 S2 00HCh N•l<ON/lldvem11ngr•P1• .. nr• ltv• Joe O•S• balo. Rrvend911 M•rkehng 615& 6th Av11nue. New York 10011. (2121 242-6863 A°"'llllflf/ deed/Inf Tuesday 5 30pm tor ••ue rele&Md Fr1- d• y evan1ng N0/1(;8 to•r1Vfrl•Hfl loClll•clYet11s1ng r•t•IChedul•S•J(·A 'llWUetfectoYttJuly1, 1MJ RMpom•bll•ly lrl!ontrou V0<ce" cso.. not uaumt f91PONt­bth ty fo( adven111ng tlt•m1 RUdeB lhould 1•«1 M~rOH voic.e·· 1o any~·~•~ne been the only elected official invited to participate on the tour, supposedly due to a four-people restriction imposed by the GPC, Spear said. However, Greanias did agree at the last minute to accompany the GPC if candi­date Hightower was not present. Spear said that the councilman would not have felt comfortable with the candidate, since this would have meant a virtual endorse­ment. Greanias also clarified with Bagneris prior to the tour that while on the tour he would not address the GPC bloc vote issue. Spear said that it was agreed that Grea­nias would meet the tour at Rascal's and that Hightower would have left the tour by that time. Dale Beverly, spokesman for the GPC since Bagneris was not available for com­ment, said that Hightower was ignorant of the arrangements made with Greanias. Hightower also was expected to dropout of the tour early, Beverly said, because she had a problem with cigarette smoke in the bars. But since the smoke had been light that night, Beverly said that she decided to stay. Beverly also said that Greanias was late arriving at Rascal's, and his tardiness pre­vented the GPC from notifying him of Hightower's presence. "We tried to warn him off before hand," Beverly said, "but he was running late." Consequently, a confrontation did result between Greanias and Bagneris. Spear said that Bagneris told Greanias that "Nikki would like to stay on the tour." Greanias felt that a "promise had not been fulfilled," Spear reported, and that the councilman had been "caught in a very embarrassing bind." As to the language used in the confron­tation, this is still a matter of conjecture. As to the importance of this incident to the community .. .. By monitoring eye changes in high-risk patients, opthalmologist.s may be AIDS able to detect early stages of AIDS, reports UPI. Dr. Alan G. Palestine, a researcher at the National Eye Institute, says four con­ditions may be found in victims' eyes which could indicate a presence of AIDS: retinal cotton wool spots, fluffy spots on the retina, common to high blood pressure patients and people with diabetes; cytome­galovirus retinitis, a retina virus, which can lead to loBB of sight; Kaposi's sarcoma of the eyelid and conjunctiva, which can interfere with lid functioning; and cranial nerve palsies (paralysis), which can cause double vision. "AIDS should be suspected in patients with these symptoms," said Palestine, if the patients fall into one of the high-risk groups, although the symptoms can be related to other diseases as wen. Commentary: Life after the 'The Day After' from page I control. Though we may di smiss much of what was feared during the Middle Ages as so much superstition, it is important to look at how people lived in the face of such a belief, which in substance is identical to our own. Overall, two patterns emerge: people who, abandoning all hope of anything bet­ter, thought and acted only to satisfy per­sonal whim, and people who found an inner strength enabling them to make some real difference in their own and other Shoplifters Rest uring Christmas Contrary to popular opinion, Christmas time is not prime time for shoplifters, reports Security World Magazine. Security expert Peter Berlin says the holiday spirit keeps petty theft to a min­imum. Most pros, says Berlin, perfer to stay away from crowded stores, because all those people make them nervous. people's lives. The age that produced the Wars of Religion and conga lines of self· flagellant.s also bequeathed us Dante and Francis of Assisi. We have the same choice, and the les­sons of the distant past have only been reinforced by the more recent examples of Gandhi and King, among others: effective action can begin only with self-mastery. Easy to say but not necessarily easy to do. Each person's path is different.. and must begin with telling the truth about our per­sonal powerlessness, given prevailing beliefs about ourselves, to make a differ· ence. Either Jive as if you don't make a difference, which is little more than gro­tesquely uncomfortable sleepwalking, or change the prevailing beliefs-they are nothing more than that and are taken on considerably more faith than just about anything else in our oh-so-skeptical and rational culture. Thinking brilliantly, by it.self, probably won't save us; there are those who argue that that is precisely why we find our­selves where we do. One moment's good idea has a way of going sour in the long term. Living brilJiantly, on the other hand, offers real possibilities. Most of us live, most of the ti.me, as if we believe that we and others are indeed objects without any intrinsic value beyond sensory utility-our talking, eat­ing, smoking, drinking and mating habits are adequate evidence. We can enjoy the good things in life without making their possession and protection the object of our existence. We can approach our relation­ships as opportunities to serve our own and other people's higher purposes, rather than as remorselessly predictable melo­dramas. We can create groups and social institutions that empower people rather than suppress them. We can live as if we have a contribution to make to the world, or as if we expect the world to make a contribution to us. I submit that The Day Afrer is the logi­cal conclusion of the latter mentality. Being unconscious is a luxury we can no longer afford. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 25, 1983 AIDS Update: No Longer Gay White Man's Disease B,r Dion B. Sanders V1a Gay Pre .. ANoeiation Wire Service SAN FRANCISCO-Shattering a widely-held belief that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease," previously-unpublicized data compiled by the national Center for Disease Control in Atlanta show that more than a third of all AIDS patients in the United States are from racial and ethnic minorities. Moreover, a doctor's report published in a leading medical journal says that while a significant percentage of black and Hispanic AIDS patients-not counting Haitians-are intravenous drug users, an equally-significant percentage of them are upfront gays. In a telephone interview from Atlanta, Dr. Richard Selik, director of AIDS information at the CDC, reported that as of Oct. 19, out of a total of2513 AIDScases nationwide, only 57.9 percent are white. Blacks (including Haitians), Hispanics, Asians and Native Americans make up a combined 40.9 percent, Selik said, with the remaining 2.2 percent of undetermined ethnic origin. For months, news media reports have repeatedly stated that AIDS patients are primarily gay men, IV drug users, Haitians and hemophiliacs receiving blood transfusions. Gay men account for 71 percent of all AIDS casea nationwide. The belief that AIDS is a "white gay man's disease" items from a long-held perception of the gay community by the general public-especially by minority communities-as being exclusively white, despite the emergence of gay and lesbian people of color into the public eye in recent months. (In San Francisco, this perception has led to charge& by some minority community leaders that public funds being appropriated for AIDS are being taken away from existing health programs for the poor-a disproportionate percentage of whom are black and Hispanic, according to local press reports.) As of Oct. 19, there have been 1048 deaths, for a mortality rate of 41.7 percent nationally, Selik reported. Providing a breakdown of nationwide AIDS figures by ethnic group, Selik reported that blacks make up 21.1 percent, 11with the figure rising to 25.8 percent when Haitians are included. "Hispanics make up 14.1 percent, with Asians and Native Americans combined comprising approximately 1 Percent," Selik said. "The remaining 3.2 percent of AIDS patient.a are of undetermined ethnic origin," he reported. AIDS CASES IN THE U.S. BY RACIAL/ETHNIC ORIGIN AS OF OCTOBER 19, 1983 g,oup White Black (Nor>-Ha1t1an) Haitian Latinos Asians Native American Other Ethnic Origin TOTAL "Lessthan t percent 1456 57.9% 648 21 .1% 117 4.7% ~ 14;1% 3 47 2.2% 2513 100.0% Source Center tor DiSe•e Control. Atlanta. Ga. The proportion of blacks and Hispanics 1415 HUTOWllCO.VINTY CHTEllllAlUllY ID- lU1 1411 Yl•TAGlCLOTHIH IACCUIOJUH FOll•E•IWO•H 1403 SCULPTUllHI fl,,A.VltlAOll lAlllUlllUCTIOI among people with AIDS is striking in that it is nearly double the proportion of blacks and Hispanics in the U.S. population as a whole. Even more striking is the fact that as of Oct. 19, there have been only eight cases of AIDS reported nationally among Asians and only three among Native Americans. No nationwide city-by-city ethnic breakdown was available from the CDC, but according to figures compiled by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, out of a total of 288 cases in the Greater Bay Area as of Oct. 18, 90.3 percent are white, 4.9percentare black, 3.8 percent are Hispanic, and a fraction of 1 percent are Asian or Native American. In sharp contrast, 50 percent of AIDS cases reported in Philadelphia as early as last July are black, according to that city's health department, prompting the creation of an AIDS education program aimed specifically at black gays in that city. Philadelphia, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. all have sizeable black populations, with blacks an overwhelming majority in the nation's capital. Aaked what percentage of the non-white AIDS cases are gay and what percentage are IV drug usera, Selik quoted figures from an article by Dr. Harold Jaffe published in the Aug. '83 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases (Vol.148, p. 339). The article, based on CDC reports of 2000 AIDS cases nationally asoflastJuly, reported that among non-Haitian blacks who had AIDS, 17 percent were upfront gays, 40 percent were IV drug users, and 37 percent were of undetermined risk factors. (A similar breakdown of Haitian AIDS patients by the Jaffe article has been rendered unreliable because of recent CtlllOMllYEllD llAA.OOOM lllDEllGHTI news reports disclosing that many such Haitians were gay, but were unwilling to admit it, because of severe taboos against homosexuality in Haitian society, Selik said.) Amon11 Hispanic AIDS patients, the Jaffe article reported that 11 percent were upfront gays, 33 percent were IV drug users, and 55 percent were of unknown risk factors. The Jaffe article contained no report on Native Americans and Aaians with AIDS, because there were no reported cases among them at the time the article was published, Selik said. Nor did the article contain information on the number of AIDS patients who were women. In the San Francisco area, only three cases of AIDS among IV drug users have been reported so far, according to Pat Norman, coordinator of lesbian/ gay health services for the city. Two are white; the third is black. Norman noted that whereas 71 percent of AIDS cases nationally are gay, the figure rises to 90 percent in the San Francisco area, as there are "only a handful of Haitians," living here. Locally, there have been 96 deaths, for a mortality rate of approximately 35 percent Norman attributed the disparity of the national and local mortality rates to the near-absence of IV and Haitian AIDS cases here. Selik reported that the percentage ethnic breakdown "has been fairly constant for more than a year." Asked why the ethnic data had not previously been published by either the gay or the mainstream media up to now, Selik responded, "Perhapo they (editors) for some reason thought that it wasn't newsworthy." far the .. Uniqiii . lnd unuSual. 1 TIZAVfNUf 2 DRAGON• THE AAT JfACfll 4 EASTTIXASDINEA 5 HfRMANAHllDA I A"IARANCH 10 NOTHINOSACREO 11 ClllATIVIHYElED DESIGNS Nov. 25, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 VOTE November 29, 1983 M E L T EndOISl!ld ON by G.P.C. HISD Board Member Dist. 4 Paid for and authonzed by the Herbert Melton for HI s D Board Member Campaign. located 4101 San Jacinto Street. Houston Texas 77004 William E Teny PhD Campaign Treasurer llnnoundng the lllmost 11.nnual Mr. 6 Miss Ma.:p's Contest TROPHIES 6 PRIZES Thursdap, Decem.,er I, IOpm (Entrp Deadline Nov. JO. Contad Pi'kles at 51,·9669) -a-o- NIGHTLY HllPPY HOUR IOPM TILL ll:JOJIM Natuiallp 1011 Westheime1-Sl8-88SI-DJ Wapne Barton 8 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov 25, 1983 Another Gay Mayor Smaller Cities Felt Impact of Gay Vote By Ernie Potvin By Dion B. Sanders Via GPA Wire Serivce SANTA CRUZ. Calif.-In a unanimous vote, the city council Nov. 15 elected John Laird mayor of this seaside resort town­the first openly gay mayor in its history. The 33-year-old Laird, an administrator for the Santa Cruz County affirmative action program, had been vice mayor for a year In Santa Cruz each year, the city council electa one of its members as mayor on a rotating basis. Following tradition, it was Laird's turn to be chosen. The 7-0 vote marked the first time in six years that the council had elected a mayor unanimously. Council member Mardi Wormhoudt was elected by a 4-3 vote to succeed Laird as vice mayor. Laird was ecstatic over his election. Via Gay PrH• Auocialion Wire Service In November's municipal elections across the country, the impact of the gay vote was felt in several cities. Also noteworthy was the fact that many of the mayoralty winners were liberal women and blacks who sought and received the support of the gay commun­ity. Big city gay political clubs supported and helped reelect mayors Diane Fein­stein in San Francisco and Kathy Whit­mire in Houston. They were also deeply involved in the election of Philadelphia's first black mayor, Wilson Goode. Yet another interesting story was tak­ing place in much smaller cities where young gay political groups were making an impact. In Sacramento, the gay community's six-month-old River City Democratic Club was the city's only political organization to support Anne Rudin for mayor in the primaries where she won a second place runoff spot. They supported her again, along with the local gay press, in the Nov. 8 general election where she narrowly won the city hall race by less than a thousand votes. Her opponent, Ross Relles, did take the opportunity to do some gay-baiting during the last days of the campaign. He pub· Iished a widely distributed flyer which did not receive prior approval from the elec­tion board, and included a brief, edited and misleading list of her backers. It was limited almost exclusively to gay, feminist and environmentalist endorsements. The River City Democratic Club, for example, was listed as the River City Gay and Les­bian Democratic Club, and her only Press endorsement on the list was shown as Mom, Guess What (a gay newspaper. In the Sacramento Bee, the city's major daily, Rudin said, "Ross Relles' list of endorsements is woefully incomplete and purposefully so. They were intended to get knee-jerk reactions from voters." Prior to the issuance of the controversial flyer, Relles was believed to be leading !n the race. Whatever its effect, Anne Rudm would not have won the mayor's seat with­out the strong support she received fTom the gay community. In Charlotte, N .C., a city of 300,000, the small but influential Lambda Political Caucus helped elect Harvey Gantt, that city's first black mayor. The Lambda Cau­cus, which boasts less than 12 members, staged three candidate nights before a larger gay men's social/educational group called Acceptance. Each mayoralty candidate appeared separately to answer questions and state his position on gay :ivil rights. Democrat Harvey Gantt said he would work to add sexual orientation to Char­lotte's nondiscrimination ordinance, while his Republican opponent, Ed Pea­cock, felt it was not needed. Aleo appearing were eight candidates for 11 city council seats. Don King, of the caucus, said it was the best turnout Lambda PoJitical Caucus ever had in their three-year history. Electing a liberal black mayor in a state that has become increasingly conserva­tive in the last 20 years is no easy feat, especially in a city like Charlotte, where whites outnumber blacks by three-to-one. The Lambda Caucus met early with Gantt at a breakfast strategy meeting, they did widespread leafletting for him during both the primary and general elec· tion, and finally they set up a telepho.ne bank to make a thousand calls to potential gay supporters and their friends. Gay Events Get Noted in the Non-Gay Press Gantt, a Democrat, won by 4000 votes out of 80,000 cast. It can be safely assumed that many of them were gay people. He had been the first North Carolina candi­date to take his campaign into a gay disco and discuss gay issues. By Jim Kepner V1a Gay Pre.a Aa.oclation Wire Service In a scattering of local elections which saw pro-gay candidates elected in several cities (and homophobe Kathy MacDonald defeated in Georgia by a 3-2 majority), the N•w York Times ran an Oct. 8 feature: "Increasing Political Influence of Homo­sexual Citizens is Sensed Across U.S." A quarter of the half-page story dealt with Rich Eychaner, Republican cndidate for Iowa's fourth Congressional seat, including Des Moines. Eychaner, chal­lenging a solid Democratic incumbent, calls himself "a qualified person who happens to be gay." He is a Methodist Sunday School teacher, owner of the state's largest mov­ing van company, a baseball team officer, a TV talk show host-and popular in state GOP circles. The Times article, by Dudley Clendinen, traced the close relationship between the gay community and Washington, D.C.'s Mayor Barry, Houston's Mayor Whitmire (reelected) and other office holders in Sacramento, Boston, San Francisco, Phi­ladelphia and Key West, where business­man Richard Heyman this month became the third openly gay mayor to be elected in the U.S., joining mayors of Buncetown, Mo., and Laguna Beach, Calif. The article (cramped by the Times' ref­usal to use the word gay except in quota­tions) discussed how often gay voters support black candidates and spoke of the growing 11rainbow coalition." It noted former gay-baiters who now court gay votes and discuaaed victories and plans of the Human Rights Campaign Fund, the National Aaaociation of Gay and Lesbian Democrats and the National Gay Task Force. Granting that homosexual efforts to assert their political influence proceeds "by fits and starts," the article rounded off on college instructor David Scondras' race for the Boston City Council. Said Scon· dras, "The age of bigotry is eclipsing, and the age of coalition-building is begin· ninJl." .. The gay-baiting ot tlllJ AJJam, M1ss1s· sippi's Democratic gubernatorial candi­date, was labeled "dirty politics" in many newspapers and in Newsweek-and by the son of William Spell, one of the lawyers who charged Bill Allain's sexual activity with at least three black male prostitutes. Allain denied the "damnable" charges, taking a lie detector test-and won elec­tion handily, proving again that gay· baiting is no sure-fire tactic. But gay political clout was nosed out in Massachusetts by a 19-18 Senate vote sending the Gay Rights bill to the state Supreme Court for an opinon-unlikely to be delivered before the legislature adjourns. The only attention this got out­side the state was 10 lines in USA Today (NTh~ ~-uincy, Masa.,Patriot Ledger (Oct. 27) quoted Rep. Gerry Studds saying that being a closet gay is living hell: "I've been in public life 10 years, having to deal with everything from hysteria to irrationality to hatred and plain uglinesa ... having to live most of your adult as a closet gay person necessitates developing a very tough skin, or you'd ... go stark, raving mad." Several paper& picked up bitsofthia interview. San Francisco columnist Herb Ca.en on Oct. 29reportedon DonJackson'sSt.Pria· pus Church, whose slogan is "Sex can des­troy evil." Jackson, who believes oral sex is sacramental, launched the "December '69" drive for gays to occupy underpopu· lated Alpine County, Calif. A St. Priapus Church is expected shortly in Los Angeles. On Nov. 8, Caen reported that the gay­oriented Atlas Savings and Loan now has a straight president-whose wife is named Gaynelle. United Press International on Nov. 5 reported a University of California/Davis study showing that 14 percent of the women surveyed had been sexually harassed, mostly by male faculty members. One-point-one percent of the men surveyed reported having been sexu­ally haraaaed on campus. The study didn't say by whom. Time on Nov. 14 reported a more damning study released at Harvard. The Los Angeles Times reported on Nov. 8 that four prisoners in three days had died in local jail facilities, reportedly by suicide or heart attacks. Three were in on sex charges. Gay news is rare in the newsp!1~r busi­ness sections, but the Secunties and Exchange Commission's action suspend­ing trading of shares of Gay International for 10 days, a San Francisco-based com­pany that publishes the Gay Areas Direc· tory and owns several gay hotels, was reported by the San Francisco Examiner and the Los Angeles Times on Nov.!. The SEC questioned the firm's financial sta­bility and the accuracy of publicly dissem­inated information. Gay International went public in April and took ove~ the San Francisco based telephone directory. Their stock has since climbed from 35¢ to $3. Company officials claimed harass· ment. They own extensive Uta~ and Hawaii real estate and are seeking to acquire property in Idaho an~ California. Edward Guthmann turned m a fine ret­rospective on poet, avant-garde film· maker, incredibly elfin performer and radical fairy James Broughton for the~an Frant',JBCO Chronicle. Novi 6. A third-generation Californian, Broughton at 80 remains vigorous, witty and committed to shocking his audiences, as he had early tried to shock his conservative stepfather. Seven days earlier, Guthmann did a fine piece on gay Russian filmmaker Se~ge Eisenstein, whose documentary Que Viva Mexico, left unedited at some 50 hours, was slashed up by socialist "producer" Upton Sinclair, who objected to the film· maker's erotic treatment of Mexican youth. In Charlotte, as in many eimilarciti~e in the nation, some candidates are afr&Jd to go after gay endorsements, believing it could harm them, but that attitude has already begun to change. There appeared to be a lot of cross-over voting in Charlotte on Nov. 8, for not only did liberal Gantt win, but a good number of the city council seats were won by conservative Repubh- Addres:s_ ________________ _ C11y.~ ________ State __ l1p ____ _ Typeo!Computer, ________ ------ Clip and Mail to: GNIC NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Cl'niitmai ca'T.di, w 'T.ap., '3L(h, CJ i and iweat ihi'T.ti, mo'T.e c'T.itfr.u and beau than we'T. ff 6~0 Jfw.uthcvzr.-Jl'""lu. ~lon. 'J,,.,. ?7006-,29·-'ZQ() f1p:.cn at1i,.nJi.1!J thtu datuul~!I u.im· '"/flm. Df><n 1i!t v/>m on ,,,11,,,,Ja!I c. 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SElECTION 4200 Westheimer-Suite 250 (713) 961-9876 Eurotan Intemattonal Proudly Presents THE FEMALE IMPERSONATOR OF THE YEAR PAGEANT The Biggest Cash Prize Ever $15,000 In Cash! • See 30 of the most beautiful & talented entertainers ever assembled in Houston. • Hosted by Lyle Wagoner of Carol Burnett Show. • This will be the most exciting pageant even A Hollywood.. production crew will be video taping the entire spectacle for television distribution. • Make no other plans for December 15th! • The pageant is sponsored by Eurotan International, serving our community. EUROTAN INTERNATIONAL 3701 Montrose, Houston AlSO IN DALLAS We Tan You Safely, We Wrap Your Body, We Tone Your Muscles Linda "Lulu" Simpson and \ ~ If© IF» ©IF lf'IF{][~ [f{)(Q)[L~ ~ jp)ll'®®®IJ'ilU ~A / Director ·~ Ron Sioux with Robbie Roberts & Tracey Plus Surprise Special Guest Stars Sunday, 5P"t( --­MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL, Bpm Nov. 25, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 Dateline S.F. Of Seducing a Married Man and Gay Discrimination By Randy Alfred COMING OUT: We've all heard scores, or even hundreds, of coming-out stories to be eure, but this one's a little different. Dorr Legg, gay rights pioneer and founder and dean of Los Angeles' One Institute, told this tale of his self-discovery to the Second National Conference on Lesbian and Gay Aging in San Francisco early this summer: "I grew up in a very academic setting and had access from the time I was five to an immense university bookstore, which I roamed through at random and disco­vered many, many interesting phrases. Reports on homosexuality were then mythology and speculation of the wildest sort, but it was fun to read about. "So, by the time I was a late teenager, presumably before World War II, I had read all of the books and found them pretty fascinating. But where were the people? "My family was spending the winter in Florida, and I had quite a bit of spare time. And going back and forth to the library-I wae still reading things-I noticed that this little park that I passed through on the way in beautiful little Orlando seemed to have a special atmosphere about it that I thought, 'Now, there is something going on here, and I shall find out.' "So, on a fateful evening, I noted a gen­tlemen sitting on the benches, and I plopped down beside one of them, who was a man in his middle 40s, probably, and I was a late teenager. And I twisted, and I turned, and I thought, 'I can't. I must. I have to. I will.' "And I turned to him and I said, 'Are you a homosexual?' "And he, after a shocked silence, said, 'Why do you ask?' "I said, 'Because I want to know.' He shyly admitted that that might, indeed, be true, a nd he laughed a little bit nervously, because he thought this is really a new approach . And I said, 'I want you to show me.' "He said, 'You mean that you have never had an experience?' "I said: 'No. I haven't. and I want you to show me.' ' 0 0h, no,' he said. 'Not L I'm a married man' and so on. "Well, although I had read many, many books, I did also know that there were cer­tain techniques of, shall we say, human approach that would be effective in a case like that. And so I managed to break down his resistance, and he did indeed give me my first lesson in what the particular approach to the world was about." You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of America's Major Gay Community Newspapers EARLYBIRDS: Legg went on to tell his enthralled audience of the "remarkably free interracial experience or atmosphere" of Los Angeles in the late 1940s. He88id he and others incorporated the Knights of the Clock ("a nonsense name") as an organi­zation of black and white men who lived together and black and white women who lived together. Since the group also included the par ents and families of some couples, Legg said it should be regarded as the precursor, by some quarter-century, of both Parents and Fri<'nds of Lesbians and Gays and Block and White Men Together DISCRIMINATING: San Francisco'• chapter of BWMT conducted several sur­veys of visible employees in the city's gay and lesbian bars. They found an alarming lack of ethnic-minority bartenders and other employees, except in the severnl eRtabhshments which catered specifically to Third World clientele. One could quibble (and mnny have) with the particular m<>thodologv o' t)le on-sight surv('y or the exad pt.'rt't'ntages involvM_ hut I believe.it is incontrovertible that some discrimina­tion is going on here. In fact, the city's taverns generally seem to be near lily-white in employment. I don't think this problem is limited to gay bars. Just last year, a major hotel had to settle a race-bias lawsuit involving alleged bias in hiring practices at the hotel bar. When BWMT brought its complaint to the Human Rights Commission, then one might have expected the HRC to look into the specific charge-racial discrimination in gay bars-or to consider racial discrimi­nation in bars generally. But, no-c>-<H>! Acting on a recommenda­tion from its Lesbian/ Gay Advisory Com­mittee, the HRC instead widened the investigation to "employment and hirinll practices of lesbian/ gay businesses." Doesn't this unfairly point a finger at our community? Admittedly, racial bias and discrimination exist within the lesbian/ gay community, but is there any reason to believe it is either more prevalent or more virulent amongst us than in the city at large? "We do not believe that to be the case," answers Richard Sevilla, a Human Rights Commissioner and member of the Lesbian / Gay Advisory Committee. "We've been discussing the issue for years. It just so happened we had a complaint on bars. Since we felt the issue was not limited to the bars alone, it would be unfair to look only at the bars." Will the HRC hearings be the first of many, with others to look into racial dis­crimination in other sectors of the city's economy? "I don't know what other kinds of actions or hearings on discrimination this will produce," Sevilla answers. "You hold hearings to find out what actions are needed. You don't know what they will produce beforehand." Might thatnotleavetheimpression that our community is especially prejudiced? "We felt that risk was worth setting an example," Sevilla says. "We can set. an example for the rest of the city, that our community is willing to deal with its racism." Alfred's column originates at the "Sen· tin.el," a San Francisco gay newspaper. <1983 Randy Alfred. all rights reserued. In the Cabaret Appearing thru Nov. 26 ALEXANDRA HAAS & MICHAEL BAILEY Opening Nov. 29 for 2 weeks STEVE & LEANNA Direct from Los Angeles -i=r~~ ..... , 1•1•1t 1:••:l I _Ill ';LL Dinner Mon-Th"" 6-11 fr\ & Sat6-12 reservations requested Shows 9:30, 11 , 12:30 12 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov 25. 1983 Number's 'Zap Clap' Was Exciting, Emotional Evening By Billie Duncan Danny Villa and a glittering cast of dozens took to the stage at Numbers on Monday and Tuesday evening for an astoundingly wonderful and joyous show. Zap Clap Review II was a splendid effort by some entertainers and some just plain entertaining people to raise money for the Montrose Clinic and KS, AIDS Founda­tion. As with any show that is put together from a variety of acts for a limited engage­ment. there was a glitch or two, but the energy in the room was so positive that no one really seemed to care, least of all the performers who went out there and had a rollickingly good time. Yours Truly missed the opening slide show, "State of Independence," and the chorus of ma1e strippers who worked their way out of hospital scrubs to the tune of "He's A Dream." You see, I was back in the wings waiting to go on stage with my guitar to make my own female impression. The incompara­ble team of Montgomery, Plant & Stritch had gotten the dates of the show confused and were not able to appear on Monday. So, when Danny saw me there to cover the story, he asked ifl could get my guitar and fill in. I did. Of course, it would just be too tacky to comment on my own performance, so go ask someone else who was there how I was, Next in line was a very clever and taste­fully done act that featured Craig McGinty as Loretta Lynn and Buddy Thompson as Patsy Cline. The entrances of the two performer& were timed with film clips from Coal Min­er's Daughter, and both Craig and Buddy had done their homework on the look and style of the women whom they were imper­sonating, Almost immediately after, the Montrose Country Cloggero stomped to life with some of their famous country clogging, With their toes a-tappin' and teir heels a­amakin,' they charmed the smiling crowd. Closing out the first act wu a real rouser. The crew from Mias Charlotte's Dance Hall & Saloon performed a good chunk of their own concept of the The Beat Little Whorehouse in Texa.a. It was well­done high camp in glitz drag and featured a whole bevy of moustachioed beauties in satin and garters. Some of the men wre quite good dressed as men, also, and could get arrested if there was a law against impersonating Aggies. Intermission was party time, and when the curtain went up for the second act, the crowd was in an even better mood than they were for the fasL And keeping them in a good mood was Richard Smith as Maude Findley, a role that he does to a tee. Richard was virtually perfect in hie presentation, but how he knows when to start moving his lips for all that talking, I'll never know. Speaking of talking, Richard joined Danny Villa as co-host of the show, and they both did excellent jobs-smooth, humorous and not too much jabber. A1J the strains of "And Then There's Maude" died out, the sound of clickety­clacking became apparent. The Montrose Country Cloggers were back for some more romping and stomping. They were great. The next act was a personal favorite and a very popular number with the crowd. Joe "Lola" Gomez came out swinging, strut­ting, prancing and striding in a pink sequined dress with shoes that unfortu­nately were much too large for moi. Joe was representing the Ripcord. and it was obvious that much of the audience support on Monday was from the Ripcord's man­agement and clientele. With the crowd worked up for more excitement, Rich Campbell (an E /J'sregu· Jar. along with Richard "Maude" Smith) as Cayte Myth took center stage. Rich did a stunning performance of miming a med-ley of Kate Smith's greatest hits, while dressed in a flowing white glittered gown. At the finale's "God Bess America," Rich spun around, loosening some clasps, and the gown collapsed into a spectacu)ar red, white and blue creation. It was an electrifying moment. Who could top something like that? The Patsy Cline lives, along with Loretta Lynn, at the Zap Clap Review answer was simple-Danny Villa. Danny sang "I Am What I Am" from La Cage aux Foiles, and he was, as always, superb. The rest of the cast joined Danny for the finale of the show, "We Are What We Are."- It was an emotional and rousing ending to a very enjoyable presentation. o Duncan's Quick Notes By Billie Duncan There is a special fascination with seeing the development of talent. Every now and then, a club springs up that allows itself to be a proving ground for new acta. The Ale House on West Alabama is that kind of club. Of course, they book some established bands, but they also give the developing groups a chance to get some stage experience. Gaining much-needed experience last weekend was a group called the Inani­mate Objects. They are made up of four young men: J oe Webber on guitar, Ollie Stevens on baas, Ron Obvious on drums and Id Pleasure as lead screamer. Ollie explained how they became a group. "We were cleaning up a Jady's yard and the idea just came to us." Ollie is by far the best member of the band. He has a good grasp of how to hold the music together with his ba88 work and a terrific sense of good ol' knock-kneed boogie, Joe plays simplistic guitar, and I was told that Ron waa having an off-night. That leaves Id, Id is better when he sticks to screaming, gyrating and shouting lyrics, He should never try to hold a note too long. He can't. They do have some interesting origi­nals, I especially liked ''Tent City." To be fair to the band, they were filling in for another group that cancelled, and they didn't have time to get the word out to their following that they were playing that night, so the room was lees than crowded. Certainly if I hear that they are playing somewhere, I will try to drop by to listen to them again. Another band I look forward to hearing again is going to be playing at the Ale House tomorrow (Saturday). They are the tunefully adept and lyrically intriguing Noodles. Some Montroseans will remember lead singer Chris Kincade as the young man who played Max in Bent at Stages. A story on what Chris has been up to since he starred in Bent wiH appear in the VOICE in the near future, One other band of note that graced the Ale House stage recently was Blue Wave. Assistant manager Angela Mullan pointed out, "They're a gay band. I'd like to see them get a fair chance." She said that they would be back soon I suppose now would be a good time to admit that there was a mistake in this space last week. Alexandra Haas and Michael Bailey did not end their stint at Rascal's last Saturday, They will do that this Saturday. I'm sorry I made the error, but I'm delighted that they are still playing at Rascal's. They are really sensational. And talking about sensational, fans of Maryanne Mahoney will be ecstatic to hear that she has reformed Mata Hari and is now back on stage at Bacchus. Maryanne Mahoney has to be one of the moat electrifying performers in the Mont­rose. She is appearing on Wednesdays at the club on Lovett. Another event that's occurring on Wed­nesdays is Roxie Starr's Talent Star Search and the Outlaws. Roxie (Jimmy Emerson) stressed that this is not an amateur night. It is a talent contest. "I'm trying to get dancers, singers, comedians, duet actors-anything," he aaid. 0 Now, I'm trying to discourage drag, but I want to be different from everyone else in town." There is no piano at the Outlaws, but Jimmy said that he can get one over there if someone needs il Jimmy then went on to tell a little story about what had happened at the Copa Sunday nighL It seems that a lot of people had seen the The Day After on television earlier (or at least had heard about it). Mr. Ti If any Jones apparently thought that that was a perfect springboard for a number with more than a twinge of decid­edly black humor. Jimmy explained that the lights flick- Montrose Live ered at the Copa, and a voice came over the sound system saying that there was a nuclear attack. The lights then came up on stage on Mr. Tiffany in a tattered sequin gown. Mr, Tiffany then launched into­can you guess?-"There's Got to be a Morning After." Jimmy was a bit disappointed. He explained, "I thought she'd do "I Will Sur­vive." He also observed that the audience was split in their reactions to the number. "Half the audience loved it. The other half went off." I guess that some people just don't think that the destruction of the world is all that humorous. But onto the living, Hickory will be playing this weekend at Miss Charlotte's. Said Jerry Vann, ''They were here three, four weeks ago. They're so personable on stage and the crowd really enjoyed them, so when we got the chance, we got them back again." The club is still trying to re-book the Bunkhouse Band. Credit should go to Mias Charlotte' a for their entry in the Zap Clap Review II. After the show on Monday, the entire cast and some loyal followers trotted off to Miss Charlotte'• for drinks, dancing and an impromptu encore of parts of the show. Then everyone marched over to the Rip­cord for more merriment. SomeoftheRiir cord regulars were astounded to see real women in the bar, including Zap Clap dancers Jan Branham and Lisa Wil­son. But if anyone minded, he was much too much of a gentleman to say anything. The Inanimate Ob1ects stop jumping around long enough for a photo Gettmg almost as much fan mail as Bill the Cat, it'• the Nt>odb-11 MAYOR KATHY WHITMIRE ENDORSES ANTHONY HALL IN NOV. 29th RUNOFF! Nov. 25. 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Anthony Hall is a proven hard worker clecl"ICCltecl to serving the needs of all Houstonians. iii HALL ~1Uuk~.4 FOR QUALIFIED, EXPERIENCED LEADERSHIP IN CITY COUNCIL, VOTE FOR ANTHONY HALL ON TUES. NOV. 29th. 2713 Main • Houston, Tuxa' 77002 • (71:1) (i!;Q .8002 1'1ud fur h}· tlw Anlh•m.Y ll olll for c·ounu l l "nmnutlt'I', .J F. Mul1llt'ln11 Sr. 'rh•d.-.un·r . ' .• : : ,,~~;:'.,~~ <;. ; ~ :c i~~c.i~5~~1~ot,1.~,,~·~.;;.~~";::~ ...... , . - . : ... ~-~ ~".-:· ~·-.·:·_: .. ,::;:.-::;o _ _._.~~···:-T~ 14 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 25, 1983 HSO Interprets Musical Ideas Flawlessly !!J • GENERAi ~EPAIR • AUTO m ~ Houston Symphony Orchestra. Serg1u ComtSsiona conductor Henryk Szeryng. vH)hnist Program Schubert, Symphony No. 8 ··unfimshed'"; Mahler Symphony No 10. first movement~ Beethoven, Con­certo for V1ol1n By Peter Derksen "Heavenly length," a phrase first used by Robert Schumann on hearing Schubert'• Ninth Symphony, applies equally well to the Eighth, and indeed to Mr. Comissio­na's treatment of this entireprgram. Musi­cal ideas emerged clearly in each composer's individual sense of form , sup­ported by almost flawless orchestral play­mg. Pairing the Schubert Eighth and first movement of Mahler's Tenth is an idea with only superficial justification. Most people think of the two composers as tragi­cally cut down in their prime; playing works left "incomplete" heightens the misconception. After a false start on a third movement, Schubert set the manuscript of the Eighth aside and turned to other works in the few years which then remained to him. His Ninth (performed by the HSO earlier this season) is his only other fully mature sym­phonic work. Whether he would have returned to the Eighth had he lived longer is unanswerable. What counts is that, musically speaking, the symphony can stand on its own as is. Many later compos­ers wrote symphonies with unorthodox numbers of movements, and nobody goes around calling them "unfinished." In contrast, Mahler's Tenth as he left it comprises one full movement and a full draft of the following four, complete except for orchestration. Of course, orches­tration is paramount in Mahler, and the performing versions of the Tenth are only other people's educated guesses. Still, the musical resolution of the first movement's ideas does exist in Mahler's hand, no mat­ter who's selection of instrumentation con­veys it to us. The realizations of his sketches all show a symphony, true to Mahler's aesthetic in his later years: the passage from tension to resignation. We heard only half the story. Thus, it may not be a service to the musi­cal public to perpetuate the romantic myths about Schubert and his music, or to perform single sections of works origi­nally conceived on a different scale. At the least, we deserve a performance of some version of the full Mahler Tenth soon. Given the audience's warm reception of the first movement, the entire symphony should be very well received. The performances themselves left little to criticize. The Schubert was stately, last- '84 Charing Cross Road' is a Gentle, Lovely Experience By Joe L. Watts Chocolate Bayou Theatre Company is cur­rently presenting the Southwest premiere of 84, Charing Cross Road and is offering a quiet lovely piece of fine theater. Based on the book of the same title by Helene Han ff and adapted for the stage by James Roose-Evans, 84, Charing Cross Road concerns the 20.year relationship through the mail between writer Helene Hanff and Frank Doe!, a London book­shop proprietor Helene Hanff came to New York from Philadelphia after winning a playwright­mg_ conte8t .sponsored .by the Theater Gu1ld . She hved in a tiny apartment­su~ portin~ herself with typing jobs and BCnptreadmg for major studios-but her dre~m was_ to become a great playwright, wh~ch required an equally great education which she planned to glean from reading Th~ books _she required, however, were eso­tenc c_lass1cs that were often out of print and difficult to find in New York but an advertisement for a British antiQuarian bookseller solved her problem. She wrote to Marks & Co. in London, located at 84, Channg Cross Road, for the books and th_us began her 2~year correspondence with Frank Doe!. Kathryn Hill in "Charing Cross Road" Although Jiving 3000 miles across the sea. Doel became her literary mentor, supplying Helene with the rare volumes she wanted at reasonable prices. And although they maintained a beautiful literary frien<ll;h ip (both being true loven; of books), the two correspondents never actually meL Frank first addresses Helene as "Madame Hanff," but she quickly writes back, "I hope Madame doesn't mean over there (London) what it means here;" the Madame is dropped and replaced with "Miss." It is 1949 and rationing is still sadly evident in England. Meat and eggs are hard to come by. Helene sends hams and fresh eggs from Denmark to Frank and the employees of Marks & Co. Helene's letters and care packages become very spe­cial to Frank and the bookstore workers. They enjoy the letters immensely and are very appreciative of the food. A scene where Frank has sent a book of Elizabethan love poems to Helene in thanks for a ham is very tender and mov­ing Helene plans many times to travel to London to visit Marks & Co. and meet Frank and the others, but her plans never seem to materialize-if it's not money for her teeth, it's cancellation of some writing assignment (she once wrote Ellery Queen mystery stories for television) or some other expense that leaves her too little money to make the trip. When she is finally able to make the journey to England and to Marks & Co., it's a somewhat sad experience. Frank, after 40 years at 84, Charing Cross Road, has passed away. Deborah Jasien 's bookstore set was excellent; looking like a small, cozy public library. The incidental background music is wonderful. capturing all the right moods and nuances for various scenes. The sound is well executed by Kurt Graben­stein. Diane DeMille is bnght and bubbly as Cecily Farr, a Marks & Co. employee. Sharon Beck performs a nice bit as Max­ine Stuart, HeJene's actress/ friend who goes to London with a μlay and visits Marks & Co .. writing Helene all about it. Harry Booker's Frank Doe! is a relaxed, fine old English gentleman with a whole­some tender touch . Kathryn Hill's Helene is solid and strong in a vE>ry even performance. She is warm and charming with an edge of lone 1ine8s as the woman living in a world of books. ing a half-hour without any of the custom­ary repeats. The orchestra looked very string-heavy, but the balance of sound was exceptional. Mr. Comissiona kept a clear conception of the entire piece, and each measure fit right into place. The Mahler was more problematic. The huge orchestra (without percussion!) is used as a chamber ensemble of shifting population. Unusual instrumental combi· nations and extreme registration, while making for exotic effects, are fiendishly difficult. In particular, the violas, accus­tomed to wallowing in obscurity, did not make the best use of the prominence Mahler J{ivcs them. Beethoven's Violin Concerto is one of his most lovely and noble works, and could not have received better treatment. Mr. Szeryng, celebrating bis50th anniver­sary on the concert stage, subordinated his ego to the demands of the music and played straight from the heart. Unlike most violinists, he has created his own cadenzas in all three movements, showing a different facet of his technique in each one. He and the conductor were on the save wavelength all the time. Combined with perfect orchestral accompaniment, this was Beethoven as I have seldom heard it. Mr. Szeryng returned to the stage for a brief encore, the first movement of Bach's Partita in D, which he played in gratitude to Mr. Comissiona and the orchestra. For once, those to whom being first out of the garage is more important than paying a few moment.s's tribute to the artist.a who they have spent much more time and money (presumably to enjoy) bad their comeuppance. Considering a delightful pre-concert lobby performance by some very talented and astonishingly young violinist.a (I assume they are Suzuki students), we were treated to over 21h hours of music Saturday night. Encore! :D 0 z (i -i c z ~ ze Cooling 5 ! s24es gj ~ * Oil Change and ~ 0 Lube s199s z o * Transmission ~ 5 Service s24es ~ ~ HAPPY ~ ~ THANKSGIVING :::; "f 1411 TAFT-522-2190 ~ • AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • ~ ~ The Christmas ~ .,... Season is here .,... again! Beautiful Virginia Christmas Trees by W~r LANDSCAPING starting this Saturday, Nov 26 comer Holcombe & Greenbrier 10om-1Q:xn .._ Deliveiy Avoiloble ~ 529-0023 & 520-6069 ~ Vi eek er­. Zayne Quality Professional Models • Escorts Houston's Most ... Prestigious, Discreet and Sxclusive Office hours 2pm·2am (713) 526-1389 HOUSTON Reciting their letters to each other from llcro&a the~tatl" di"ide<I betwet"n Helrne·, apartment and jliarks & eo.·. "'"'· HoJent• 11n<f frAok !)ii.re their.i:~li.!ti onshifl with the audienc-e. Tim Tav<'ar has delicately directed with kid glovf'b, creating a gentle, lovely mood ~hat is a very pl"8!48nt experience. 84, \harliz.R Cros1 Rvtxl. Pk')',t1,atJ;ljo<o ~!;;.~.;:,_•3Theaftr~l :-1 Lama~ tliron'11\ ) Personal checks accepted Bless, Oh Lord, These Gifts By Peter Harrison So far as I can tell, we Americans were the first people in the world to set aside a national holiday for giving thanks for the benefits we have received. Perhaps that's because we're so amply supplied with things that no one else has. I was thinking about that the other day, when I realized that even the Russians have re~igerators and indoor plumbing, two thmgs that would confound the supremacist ideas of Richard Nixon and Earl Butz. It only takes a little thought, though, to come up with a myriad of gifts that we Americans should give thanks for in this year of grace. Here's a list of the people and groups I want to remember this Thanksgiving Day. Somehow, sitting down with a turkey on the table makes recalling them all the more appropriate. I will fold my hands, bow my head and pray: "Dear Lord, thanks for the many gifts you have bestowed upon us. You have given us the miraculous gift of Hollywood, that never-never land where even a lowly B-grade movie star can rise above all else to become President of the United States, thereby giving us a view of the future. In years to come, we can expect Tab Hunter in that exalted position of guiding ourdes­tiny, to be fol1owed by such luminaries as the Fonz or perhaps Donny Osmond. "You have graced our President with a sense of humor. Not only can he see the humor of the position of women and their value in taking us away from our caveman values, but his wit is also subtle. "He named a secretary of the interior whose zany charm included stripping the country of its iilterior, and a director of environmental protection who refused to protect the environment. "He has given us a surgeon general who disregards the health of 10 percent of our population, and a secretary of agriculture who lets starving people see pictures of mountains of surplus cheese, in the belief that their hunger pangs will be thus assuaged without having to eat the real thing. 14He has mercifully named John Gavin to be ambassador to Mexico, thereby sav­ing us the embarrassment of having to watch that bad actor on television shows. Allow, oh Lord, our President to see the merit of sending Bob Hope on an official mission to Zambia before that wizened comic can again bring tits and ass to a Christmas special. "And Lord, thank you for NBC, which has brought Freddie Silverman to net­work TV in an effort to show us again what the lowest common denominator of entertainment is. And thank you for alJowing that same network to give us Mr. Smith. We had existed so long without an ape that talks. "And thank you, Lord, for the people of the U.S., a million of whom called that ape on a toll-charge number to hear him read a promo for his show. We worried about the health of Ma Bell, and those calls made her a half-million dollars richer. "Lord, we are most pleased with our First Lady, who, as the secretary of agri­culture works to get rid of food stamps, joins in to take away the people's sinful dope and drugs. Help her, we pray, to get rid of the high-fashion monkey on her back. "We are humble in the examples you have given us of those stricken with great Salary War at NY Times? The big news at the New York Times is staff salaries, reports Variety. Some anonymous prankster posted a list of who-makes-what on the paper's bul­letin board. Management tore it down, but not before reporters got the real scoop. The highest paid: drama critic Frank Rich at $1200 per week. This may not get rave reviews from film critic Janet Maslin-she makes nearly $300 a week less. infirmities who prevail. Thank you for Howard Cosell, who has learned to speak-incessantly-with his foot in his mouth, and for Elizabeth Taylor, who con­tinues to look for a husband, even though she puts on 50 pounds after each marriage. "Thank you for the gay sense of style that allows us fags to worry more about what color hankie to wear in our pockets than if the bar we're going to visit is going to be raided and makes our leaders happ­ier with a Gay Pride celebration attended by eight people in three-piece suits than 10,000 in drag. "Thank you for the invaluable example of all the Semites-Arabs and Jews­whose fratricidal fighting makes our fam­ily quarrels seem less threatening. "Thank you for the invention of the term 'advisors,' which allows us to get into Nov 25, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Commentary more trouble more places faster than ever. "Thank you for the Russians, whose ungodly behavior serves as a great smo­kescreen hiding our own injustices. "Thank you for the institution of Your Own Son's crucifixion, which gives a model for born-again Christians to use on those who don't agree with them. "And finally, Lord, thank you for Jerry Falwell. With Anita Bryant busy selling Your sunglasses, his loud voice is the only one that seems strong enough to unify the gay movement. "For all these many gifts. Lord, we thank You. And Lord, by the way, you needn't be quite so generous in 1984." Harrison lives in New Jersey. His column appears here and in other gay publica· tions. ©1983 Stonewall Features Syndi­cate. Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN 16 M ONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 25, 1983 1110lil..11 ___ _ ------dDb "THE ULTIMATE BAKED POTATO .. SPUDS AREA GIRESBEST FRIEND! 416 Westheimer H ouaton, TX 77006 520-0554 ITALIAN BEEF HOUSE-CHICAGO STYLE SANDWICHES * ITAL/AN BEEF * ITAL/AN MEATBALL * ITAL/AN SAUSAGE *POLISH SAUSAGE * HOTDOGS 2703 MONTROSE AT WESTHEIMER ID 5:30pm, Monday thru Friday. elp America Recycle and Make Money Too! 201! S•lv_e'..;,a;;+--S~P'-'";g ._-4 2011 Silver Sl ffiAVEL CONSULTANTS '.~&W,fl, ~~run, fil'kd'."~, 'lim&,~ ~C0Xlff]Li;~~m 'U'~~[b (C(f~:~'TI'k~~·~ rn&,~ ~©~ru~:tr&,~~ A Full-Service Travel Agency for the Gay Community Houston Phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 N O W SHO W ING catc~~~s Up l)IJNE lllJl)l)IES Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment ~g:e=~(le~h~~~;;{a~~~~n~ ~b:1~=).gp/~~~~ join your colleagues in Houston Also. 10< officials of gay 0<ganizatlons who ore NOT In the gay media but who would like to learn how ta belle< Influence the gay media. local and natlOnal. we'll have a special workshop To Heniy McClurg. vice president GO( Press AssaclatlOn 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 770CJ6 E'f~ ~1;;~i~trat~~~~~~;;rn~~IOnf~~:~:;, the media but would like to attend the WO<kshap on influencing the gay medlO end other events of the confe<ence Name - Address Phone(s)-- 1 am a member of the Gay Press AssaciatlOn I om NOT a member of the Gay Press Assac1atl0n (lfO'TlllW'lglnHoustonb,iplane. tJOf'l0tbJs. letusknOw y01.K t1meol mlYOlondwewtfpidl:yauup at the Oirport Ot depot ) 'Nher'I we r0C0Ne your form. we'll send you a confe<ence schedule and a brochure on the SavO{ Hotel so you con make rese<VatlOns (You do. not have to stay at The SavO{ to attend the confe<ence.) The SavO{ 1s wrth1n walking distance of seve<ol gay clubo AdditlOnally, busses will be available t0< tours ot Montrose nightspots Your registration fee will Include tickets 10< tree and discounted odm1ss10ns to seve<ol clubo Nov 25, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Commentary 'Gay Eagle Gets AIDS from ERA' By Deborah Bell The latest brochure from the Eagle Forum (Phyllis Schlafly's group) reads like joke material. Trying to make a connection betw"".n the Equal Rights Amendment, Gay Rights and AIDS, you would think all homosexuals (and/or all ERA supporters) are. !urking about like crazed vampires waiting to prey upon "innocent" (read ~ere "heteros~xual") victims, wanting to mfect them with AIDS. This is homopho· bia in its most insidious form. It would be very funny if this was not an organized attack. The cover picture in purple is of a closet. An octagon shape (stop sign) is in the cen· ter with wording in the form of a cross, the word "gay" is vertical with the "A" larger than the other letters, and ERAIDS makes up the crossbar. The ERA=GAY=AIDS connection asks: uwhy do homosexuals and lesbians sup­port ERA?" Answer: "Because it will prob· ably put their entire 'gay rights' agenda into the Constitution." The word used in ERA is "sex"-not "women." Of course, it is not pointed out how stupid the ERA would then read by replacing the word sex with women: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of women." w~~~e p%evi~:l~o~:n l~ ::::i~n!~~r;!; aJeo uees the word "sex." Does this mean we have the right to copulate in the voting booth? It goes on to cite, as an example of "proof' of this connection, that NOW tes· tified against a proposed state ERA in Wis­consin because of the addition of a clause that forbid the use of a Wisconsin ERA for "~ual preference." The brochure says this proves that the leading pro--ERA organizations admit the ERA-"gay ~ghts" connection because of the "gay nght.8" and "abortion funding" connec· tions. The interesting thing about this bro· chu ia not that it speaks out against the Equal Rights Amendment, but rather urges readers to write to their Senatore and Congressman to add a clause of spe­cific language which would prevent Con· gress or federal courts to use or construe "gay rights" within the meaning of "sex." Misconstruing the facts does not seem to concern Sch la fly in making her argument. Does the Eagle Forum actually want women to be equal under the law? It looks that way, as long aa they don't love each other. One of the big fears seems to be that ERA would give gays the right to marry. I don't know why they are BO worried about that. The brochure continues with threaten­ing questions about what would happen if the ERA puts "Sex Equality" into the Con· stitution, such as: -Could we legally protect ourselves against AJDS and other diseases carried by gays? -Would police, paramedics, dentists, health persorinel and morticians be per­mitted to take adequate precautions to defend themselves against AIDS and other gay diseases? -Would cities be forced to rent or give the use of public facilities to large gather· And Yet More Food Lust For those who'd never dream of dieting, now there's The Joys of Pigging Out, a trivia guide for confirmed foodaholics, reports Pacific News Service. Among author David Hoffman's find· ings: Den Rather loves fudgsicles, and Gloria Steinem has a weakness for Sara Lee sweets. As for the rest of us, Hoffman says the average American puts away 15poundsof chocolate and 100 scoops of ice cream per year. ings of gays, such as "gay pride" demon­strations and the gay rodeo in Reno (which attracted 55,000 gays)? This brochure both confuses the facts !1nd twists the truth. Time and time again, m all the hearings and debate over the years, it has been established that the ERA would only apply to laws concerning "opposite sex," not same. Gay rights, like the laws concerning abortion, mostproba· bly are already established in the Consti· tution under the right to privacy. AIDS is a horrible disease, and gay men are among the high-risk groups, but no one wants to either get or give this disease. For a copy of this brochure, if you don't mind being on their mailing list, write directly to Eagle Forum, Alton, Ill. 62002. The implication of this brochure is more than insulting. It is "maddening." I hope it makes you as angry as it makes me. We must counter this attack. The Eagle Forum is a right-wing organization which supports Reagan and his administration. Nineteen eighty-four is the year to press for civil rights for gays. We must be involved in the campaigns and work at being delegates to the Democratic National Convention. The ERA has been passed out of a House committee, and a vote is expected by the full House before Thanksgiving. It should pass there and go to the Republican con­trolled Senate. Write today to your repre­sentative and Senators Bentsen and Tower in support of the ERA. NE R~'T'OLJN GR~RGE ~pp~ m4anksgiuing 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 Inventory Liquidation Sale 20°/o to 50°/o Off on Slacks Sport Coats Sport Shirts Dress Shirts Jackets Sweaters Active Wear Ties Now Open Sundays Hours Tuesday-Friday 10 to 6 Saturday 10 to 5:30 Sunday 12 to 6 Located at Fountainview and Westheimer 5 blocks West of the Galleria 18 MONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 25, 1983 Perhaps Tomorrow, While You're at Work By Jeff Bray Ange~. I sit and listen as politicians dis­cuss m cool tones how to avoid destruc­ti<:> n. Their heavy eye lids reveal dull eyes with frustrated vision. They try to give encouragement, but their stooped shoulders and tired, prematurely aged faces reveal confusion on a subject that simply cannot be confused. Fear. I see on television a view of uni­maginable destruction. Buildings fold in and explode. Trees are sucked away in flames. People disappear in a flash. Think o~ it. It is late morning in Hous­ton. Tensions have been building for decades, and over the last few days, the news has been very disturbing. People dis­cuss the situation in restaurants and bars. You even discuss it with your feHow :--'orkers in a rather ho-hum way, fantasiz­mg on what to do should "It" really happen. It is a subject of excitement­something to make the day go faster. Suddenly, the world turns upside down. Warnings flash •m the news, and people become uneasy. Some workers pack away their desks and go home "for the day." You hesitate in your office, wondering whether you should go home or stay. Your parents are a thou~and miles away. They are prob· ably womed. The phone lines are tied up for local calls, and long distance calls are no longer possible. As lunch time comes, you make a date with your usual lunch partner and go out in~ the streets. The streets have a strange !rg~~~~ ~n:.;~~:.:"J'~~ :"J:' o~e': ~~ "Fireball Sale at the Galleria" by Jeff Bray walking briskly with purpose. ' have long been outdated. moneously. Glass and st.eel fly through You feel a deep rooted fear. It is a fear Offices empty; elevators fill with frantic the streets as cars burst into flames and from your childhood-a concern that has passengers; vehicles collide and crash, are swept away. The elegant marble and been with you all your life. But the towers turning the streets into destruction derby glasss facades peel off, while furniture gleam reas~uringly and the big live oak scenes; people are mowed down as cars and people are sucked away in a raging trees rustle m the cool autumn air around careen off into building and sidewalks. • swirl of destruction. the stem looking city hall. There have In the panic, people do irrational things. Your nook in the building is gone. You been crises before, and nothing has ever They claw and grovel to get into base- are gone. The whole inner city disappears happened. men ts and tunnels. Underground garages in a screaming firestorm that spreads You go to a downtown restaurant to eat and shopping centers fill with screaming from Galveston to Conroe. Three or four and find the crowd jittery. People hove; citizens seeking shelter. The sirens wail, new brilliant fireballs form over the area, over a radio on the counter at the door and and the city moves frantically, but there is assuring the total destruction of what had others crowd around the TV screens' at a nowhere to go. minutes before been one of the world's store down the street. Everyone is agi· Then, it no longer matters. most industrious urban areas. The same tated. ~eir is a feeling of electric excite. There is a blinding flash to the sou· scene is taking place simultaneously in :~~-hke before a big parade, or a major ~~~s; ~:;:n7:gs~::~:nt!!::!~~ :e:J ~:;~t n::r? ismna~':e~~. in the western As you bite into your chicken fried steak Texas City go up in a brilliant blue-white The st.eel skeletons of the mighty skys-there is a sud~en rustling noise. Peopl~ bulb of superheated radioactive plasma. crapers begin to tilt and droop as the around the radio begin to tum away and Instantly, the ship channel evaporates. atomic heat softens them. They begin to rush out the door. They are shouting all at Oil tankers and freighters disintegrate at melt like wax figurines in the intense once, an~ cannot be understood, but even their piers, while refineries and cracking nuclear furnace around them. ~di~flir ~:r~ up and leaves, taking the i~~nw1:rld?~~~=:~~U:~~~i~ ~~~~~i di;::~!;YH~!w:nd ;: :i~t ii:~u~~~.J:~~ People around you begin to move. The generating complex disappears. rooms, eating potato chips and sipping restaurant becomes chaos as patrons rush AB the fireball grows, every living crea· beer, watching the destruction of the for the exita. Your friend is lost in the con· ture within a five mile radius is vaporized world? They have shown us Kansas City ~~i~~t af~~ :;uu:k~~!:er:1s!~.u~~:~~ ~:~tl~iea;:11o~ a~f~n ~aS:r:~~t;~: ~s~~;sblo~ a°wr:~n:r~Jo'::'i::Oi:~~ ~~i:hi~ui~ ~i~! s::_4l~· i~'mFe:~~ y~!~ ~: :::S:s ~:;:s:h;:~~:t~=~~~:~s~~ ~ld:~ia8t1~;~:.~~~~a0~n~e;~n~:'; ~:~.with looks of panic stricken upon :'!ec~l':!:v'!~~=cl~·~~~~n~~:.::! _ Until now, you have t>een confused, but everything from Galveston to downtown suddenly there is a deep whining noise. It Houston. The seemingly endless string of grows into a high-pitched wail that comes frantic honking automobiles on the Gulf from everywhere, bouncing off the steel Freeway bursts into flame. and glass towers above, and echoing down Throughout the megalopolis every light, the canyons of downtown and beyond. every motor, every electronic instrument You know that it is not the first Friday of ceases to function asawaveofelectromag· the month, and the sirens are real. netic pulse spreads. Elevators stop, cars You realize now that the impo88ible has stall, lights go out, radios and televisions happened. and that there is very little go blank. time. You find a nitch in a tall building, A blinding hot flash sets fire to trees, where people brush by, screaming and billboards, roofs and countleBS other flam· running in total confusion and panic. You mable objects for a radius of20 miles. Clo· think of your family back home-of the thing bursts into flames, hair singes off, missle silos nearby to them. You father is skin instantly becomes charred. probably trying to get home to your People collapse to the pavement in mother. Your sister is probably trying to agony, or dodge into buildings and under get home from school. Your mother is cars-anywhere for shelter. The shock probably running frantically around the wave spreads from the fireball, which house. rises into the air, sucking millions of tons Commentary friends about what we will do when it happens. It's like The Wizard of Oz on TV. Maybe they'll show it once a year for 20 years. Then our children will get used to the fireball as we grew to accept the flying monkeys. On Ted Koppel's Viewpoint, the officials keep saying, "If we make it through the next ten or fifteen years ... " I don't feel relieved. The audience bristles with unanswered questions. Time is up, and a feminine hygiene commercial comes on. Our homes are still there, our friends begin to leave, everything is back to normal. The moon is full and beautiful. The towers gleam around us. Tomorrow is another day. But the vision of the fireball lingers. In sleep, the fears from childhood-a lifetime of anxiety-haunt us. The moon is gone, the towers are gone, we are gone. The issue is unanswered, unsolved; but the images of the awful consequences are there. Gay or straight, black or white, communist or capitalist-how ironic that the most unify· ing force in the world is also our greatest threat. Think of it. Tensions are high. You will be at your office downtown tomonow .. Bray is a graphics artist at the MONT· ROSE VOICE. SPANISH I FLOWER RESTAURANT g lb '19) © ~ Throughout the city, people get in their of superheated debris with it. Shaped like carsandtrytoescape,totallyjammingthe a masaive mushroom, it dominates the already clogged freeways. Millions run sky, dimming the sun. through the streets to designated shelters, At incredible speed, the shock wave or to find loved ones. Housewives grab rushesout,ascaldingblastofwindtravel· children and run to their cars. Schools are ing over 600 miles per hour. Within scenes of havoc as teachers abandon stu- seconds, the blast hi ta the mighty towers dents and leave for home or try to herd the of the downtown aJl!a. The tops Qf the THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 12-9-83 closed Tuesday 10pm; re-open Wednesday 10am ecreaming youngsters into shelters that great skyscrapen are sheared off uncere- Nov. 25. 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 'The Right Stuff is a Hunk of a Movie Films ~~ ~!4;v:r!:~:!:tation Wire Service "Sounds dangerous," says Scott Glenn as Alan Shepard. "Count me in." When did you last hear dialogue like that in a movie? The Right Stuff wallows in nostalgia for ouch old-movie heroism, pokes gentle fun at it and subtly changes our concept of heroism before it's through. Test pilot Chuck Yeager (Sam Shepard) approaches the X-1 on horseback and cir· cleo it warily. The next day, despite some broken ribs, he climbs in; his wife (Bar­bara Hershey) says "Punch a hole in the sky!" and he becomes the first person to break the sound barrier. Yeager, who never became an astro­naut, io the perfect point of departure from which to observe the birth of America's space program. He would also, by the end of the movie, stand a better chance of being elected president than anyone else whose name is being bandied about. 'Testament' Looks Quietly at Nuclear Madness By Steve Warren You're not likely to see a big-budget film about nuclear holocaust because the peo­ple who have the money are willing to blow up the earth to keep it; so in Testa· ment the world ends with a whimper-a flash oflightfollowed by a gradual decline in a northern California community's standard ofliving.Peopledieoff camera­not hideoualy di11ngured, just tired: "Larry left us today-he just curled up in a ball and died." Lacking makeup and special effect.a for vi8ual impact, producer-director Lynne Littman works on the emotions instead and uses the power of suggestion to such •n -tent that the story might have worked better on radio. Jane Alexander is the eupermadonna who cares for her own children and assorted strays after the bombs fall, far enough away that they do no physical damage to her town. She never runs out of food , candles or toilet paper; and even after the police department collapses, it's weeka before anyone triea to break in and take anything. Maybe Testament will reach some peo­ple for whom the whole truth would have been too much. It's certainly chilling to watch the inexorable diminishing of the local Population and loss of communica­tion with the outside world, the growing realization that things won't get better and the waiting for the end. You '"" Reading tho MONTROSE VOICE Ono of A morica ·s Ma/or Gay Community Newspapers In a ecene just for ua romantics. Alex­ander anawen the queationa of her teen­age daughter about the fact.a of life ahe11 never need to know: "When you loveeome-­one, you want to be aa close to each other aa you can get . .. . When you make love, Wa almoat aa if you were one body. You have a space, and that person fill• it up." (The last part will be wa.sted on nongay men.) Early on, the school play, ''The Pied Piper,'' ends with a line we know to be portentious: uYour children are not dead. They will return. They are just waiting until the world deserves them." But the line that got to me came at the end when, with almost no one, nothing and no hope left, three of the last survivore have a party; and a child about to blow out the candle asks, uWhat'IJ we wish for, mom?" Honey, just wish that someone who can prevent it will see Testament and get the mesaage before nuclear madness takes its toll! · Writer-director Philip Kaufroan ha.s a lot on his mind in The Right Stuff, and he geta all of it on the llCl'een in a film more impressive for ita logistics than any other single aspect. It takes three-and-one­fourth hours to tell the story, and I'd be lying if! said it seemed shorter; but I can't think of anything that should be cut. Working from Tom Wolfe's revisionist history which took a fresh walk on the old astro turf, Kaufroan begins in 1947 with Yeager's historic flight to give perspective to those who can't remember when space travel wasn't routine. He follows the U.S. attempts to close the "space gap" after RuBBia sent Sputnik up in 1957. His mildly mocking manner toward the politicians is balanced by an admiration for the astro­naut. a which does not lose sight of their humanness. This extends to toilet humor and a scene in which two of them have a masturbation race to the anthems of their respective services. Notable among the actors are Dennis Quaid (as Gordon Cooper), who finally goes beyond the good ol' boy shit to give a performance with depth, and Scott Glenn, whose biceps-I'm not into muaclee, but this man doesn't need a shirt, he needa a tw<>-car garage! Ed Harris io good as John Glenn, whose language makes Pat Boone sound profligate. The Right Stuff contains the right songs and the right TV clips (e.g., Bill Dana aa Jose Jimenez the Astronaut) to keep ua pinpointed in time through the l~year span. It takes the right approach to create heroes for a country that's hungry for them but doesn't want to take them too seriously. Judi/~ ::bou</aJ ATTORNEY AT LAW DWI DEBT RE LIEF BANKRUPTCY PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW free Consultation i:ieasonable Fees & Terms Sat. & Evening Appts 303 W Polk at Taft 520-1370 24 t'lours MembPr Greater Montrose Business Guild Texa~ Trial lawyers Association Licensed by the Texas Supreme Court General Pracllceol law ALL A ARD e San Francisco only $329 Round Trip •San Dieao only $270 RouncTTrip e Miami & Ft. Lauderdale Gateways to Key West as little as $229 Round Trip (daily non-stops to Ft. Lauderdale eff. Nov. 1) Certain travel restrictions may apply. Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at 7~15. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. America's famrite way to fly. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I NOV 25, 1983 GPC Bloc Vote Essential for Community Accomplishments From lee Harrington This race will provide the first perfect example of the bottom-line benefits derived from bloc voting. Certainly, peo­ple have the right to vote for whomever they choose. The concept of bloc voting calls on us to think one step further and give up that right for a greater purpose. It makes no difference whether all the candidates are equal or not, and here's why. Friendship with, and statements of sup­po~ from, officeholders are very nice things. to have, but in the final analysis, pohticians must be treated like politicians. The one thing that moves the very best of them eu~ry time is not emotion, is not prayer, ts not even money. It's votes. Every time! All of us concerned are best served to make sure we have a say in the process. Then. once that has taken its course, we are best served to unite in one bloc vote. When people give up a preference for a greater purpose, it is a personal sacrifice, so tho•e of us involved in the GPC need to make certain that we, very graciously, ask others in the community to follow our recommendations, and that we thank them time and time again for doing so. If l do not give up my personal prefer­ence on occasion, and if you do not give up yours, then the candidates know our strength is diluted and that we will not be able to help as much to elect them. They also know, very well, that we can then not demand as much either, especially on con· troversial issues. The bottom line is this: the candidates whom we do fully support. They will owe their greatest allegiance to ':~: t~::P~d'~~1t~rma~et~e~0~~~:~~ them. Even if you lose, the candidates who win treat you and your issues with more respect because they want another shot at that huge vote the next time. Experience has taught me that it really is that simple. The only time that the aforementioned principle does not apply is when the endorsing group does not have a poten· tially large bloc vote. Then, an "all are acceptable" recommendation could be appropriate. If we disagree with the process, then we need to work to change it. In the interim, there is one thing you can count on. If the City of Houston knows, without question, that the enormous gay vote cannot be split, they'll offer us the moon and then give us more than we could ever hope for any other way GPC's Endorsement of Hightower Sparked Warfare From Netl lsbin Participation in the political proce88 involves lobbying as well as electing poli· ticisns. Unfortunately, the GPC has emphasized the electoral aspect with tac· tics that often work to the detriment of the lobbying aspect. The race for City Council Position-at· Large 4 provided an ideal opportunity for the GPC to both educate the gay commun­ity and expand their political influence. Instead, they chose a path that has only increased community division and redured both the credibility and influence oftheGPC. It was clear from the outset of the cam· paign that the leaders in the race were Anthony Hall and Nikki Van Hightower-both friends of the gay com· munity, The bottom line was that the gay community could not lose. Since there are advantagee and disadvantages to both candidates, it makes for a difficult deci· sion for the gay community-but we should welcome the opportunity to have such difficult decisions. In cases like the Position-at-Large 4 race, concepts of unity and the bloc vote have little meaning. While disagreement within the gay community is healthy, internal warfare is not. Instead of the tun­nel vision that divides the community, we need a new approach that allows us to work together when we agree (90 percent of the time) and agree to work separately when we disagree. Instead of becoming a political machine, dependent on blind vot· ing and manipulated by one candidate or another, the GPC could become a political force nurturing a responsible gay electo­rate. Suppose the GPC has opted for a dual endorsement, with a majority and minor­ity recommendation. With a dual en'.dorse­ment, the GPC could seek to educate the gay community, involving everyone in the decision·malcing by presenting both sides and encouraging everyone to exercise their own judgement. Instead of the hick· ering conflict that turns off gay voters, encouraging all members of the gay com­munity to make up their own minds in difficult political races can only increase both gay political involvement and com­munity unity. Furthermore, with a dual endorsement the GPC would have increased their political influence. Instead, the GPC opted for only one endorsemenl The results of their electoral zeal have been terribly destructive. By making this into a "life and death" race, they have alienated many political friends and damaged their future ability to lobby effectively. In order to raise Nikki, the GPC began to tear down Anthony. Despite the fact that Anthony Hall has been a friend for more than 10 years-voting against 21.06 in 1973 in the state legislature, working to secure gay participation in the Demo­cratic Party, and supporting us whenever we have sought his support-he has been accueed of being insincere. Because he has deferred .to the leadership of the gay com· munity (inatead of proceeding on hle own without regard to the wishes of the gay leadership), he has been accused of having to be coerced into taking his pro-gay rights stands. Such accusations are unfair, deceptive and hypocritical. In addition to making an enemy of Hall, the GPC has begun to bully and intimidate both Mayor Whitmire and Council· member Greanias because of their support for Hall. Because they support Hall and because the GPC wants Nikki, the GPC has "staged" confrontations to paint both Whitmire and Greanias in a bad light in order to paint Niklri as the saviour whose election is needed to counter the Whitmire­Greanias- Hall coalition. Once again, the GPC has allowed their electoral zeal to cloud their reasoning and provoke irra· tional behavior. In closing, I would like to summarize why I support Anthony Hall and why I encourage other gay people to support his election. First, I would like to say that I have nothing against Nikki. I think she is an eloquent advocate of our issues and would make an excellent addition to the City Council-but not at the expense of losing Anthony Hall. Idealism is impor· tant, but 10 is loyalty. Anthony Hall has been our friend, he is an experienced and effective member of the City Council and he has the support of our other friends like Kathy Whitmire and George Greanias­as euch, he deserves our continued sup­port. Leland Called on Carpet for Reagan Impeachment Suggestion From D.B. Carter To: &p. Mickey Leland Your recent statements and actions about impeaching the President of L'ie United States have enraged me so much that only your resignation as my representative could properly show me that you have Letters truly repented. I am sure a recall petition is currently being drafted. I have supported you by contributing money to organizations that promote you, attending rallies for you, by voting for you, and by talking others into backing you. Naturally, my embarrassment as my representative trying to impeach Presi· dent Ronald Reagan after I have lent my name, effort and money to you is more than I can express in words. You must be unaware that the vast maj~rity of your supporters in the black, Mexican-American and gay communities are pro-American and in support of our President's foreign policy actions in the recent weeks. There may be organizations within the above groups that have officers that do not believe in the President's foreign pol· icy, but like trade unions, the officers neither represent the attitudes of the mem· bership nor can deliver the votes when a conflict exists .... Some of these groups and/or their offic· ers have very narrow special interests­which is fine-but to support an elected representative that can support their spe­cial interests and yet be totally out of phase with all other aspects of their members' beliefs is not correct. . .. You were supported because of your knowledge of and work in the Civil Rights area .• but not for your expertise in foreign affa1rs, of which you do not obviously have much to offer ... . A written and other well-publicized apology to the President and your suppor­teTS may calm the embarrassment you have caused. (Editor's note; Leland, the Montrose·area representatiue, and several other Con­greHman, signed a letter calling for Pres. Reagan's impeachment ouer the Grenada inuasion. Leland later said he had a mis· understanding of the letter and asked to have his name removed.) HOLIDAY SPECIAL ~@6 GOOGIES •FINE · CLOTH ING • 10am to 9pm 1004 California 522-2822 DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 (713) 523-5006 9' .,..l[)I ... • 8oAPl OF L[GA.~ JAL.1ZAh.)N1NANYA"t:A Lunch & Dinner Specials Each Day Art on exhibit by Tom Liddell ____ serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner ____ ... .. ________ orgJ;~/~ffo ________ .. .. ______ Open Weekdays 7am·11pm ______ ... .. ______ sar.w;e;:;d~,~~:;i~~7;gt~am -------t Sunday Supper Iii !Opm Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat NOV. NOV. 25 26 NOV. NOY. NOY. NOY. 27 28 29 30 1 ~;.:~•11::~;;~.~~~~li!~.:~ ;:mM~r::. ~=:~,,::t8d below, look lor th8 sponlOring Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY-SUNDAY: Gay Academic Union 9th National Conference, "The Challenge of 1984: Together We Can Make a Difference," San Diego mFRIDA Y: Committee for Pub· lie Health Awareness's "Shar­ing Group for the Worried Well," 7·8pm, Montrose Coun­seling Center, 900 Lovett -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park • SUNDAY: 5th Memorial Har­vey Milk/ G<!orge Moscone March, San Francisco -.MONDAY: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 -.MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Montrose Sym­phonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 4600 Main #217, 7:30pm Nov. 30 •THURSDAY: Firot day of Hanukah •THURSDAY: Wihk 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM·90 •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain SelecUid Events in Future Weeks m!N 1 WEEK: Choice's Les· bian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm Dec. 3, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 •IN 1 WEEK: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm Dec.3 •IN 1 WEEK: Lesbian/ Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meets 2:30pm Dec. 6, Spindletop Room, Univ. Center, Univ. Park •IN 2 WEEKS: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets Dec.13 •IN 2 WEEKS: Houston Data Profe08ional• meet 7:30pm Dec. 13, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main •IN 1 WEEK: Greater Mont­rO& e Business Guild meets 7:30pm Dec. 6, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei­mer •IN 2 WEEKS: Lutherans Concerned meets Dec. 13, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •IN IJ WEEKS: Choices meets 12:30pm Dec.18 U N IJ WEEKS: Unitarian/ Universalist Gay Caucus meets Dec.18, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •IN IJ WEEKS: Families & Friends of Gays meets 2pm Dec. 18, Presbyterian Center behind 1st Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main •IN IJ WEEKS: Winter begins at 4:31am, Dec. 22 •IN 4 WEEKS: Chriatmas Dec. 25 ' UN 4 WEEKS: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet ?pm Dec. 27 •IN 4 WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) meets ?pm Dec. 27, Bering Church, 1440 Harold •IN 4 WEEKS: Interact meet­ing, Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm Dec. 28 UN 4 WEEKS: Integrity meets Dec. 29, 4008 Wycliff •IN 8 WEEKS: NOW'a Les­bian Rights Conference, Jan. 20-22, Milwaukee •IN 9 WEEKS: Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference, Jan. 27-29, Houston m!N 11 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday, Feb. 12 •IN 11 WEEKS: Valentine's Day, Feb.14 •IN 12 WEEKS: Washing· ton's birthday, Feb. 20 UN 14 WEEKS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 9IN 16 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 UN 18 WEEKS: April Fool'a Day, April 1 •IN 28 WEEKS: Finlt primary party elections in Texa1 and party precinct conventions, May 5 m!N 24 WEEKS: World's Fair opens in New Orleallll, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 •IN 2/S WEEKS: Tex"" Sena· torial District Party Conven­tions, May 19 •IN 26 WEEKS: Gay Prell8 Association 4th National Con­vention, May 25-28, Loe Angeles UN 26 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 •IN 27 WEEKS: Run-off party elections in Texas, June 2 •IN 29 WEEKS: Texas Demo­cratic Party Convention, June 15-17, tentatively Houston •IN 29 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anni­versary of Stonewall uprising, national sloean "United & More in 184." June t Fi-24 ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ERS We li1tfrMMChweek in th l• directory Monlroae community ~~~t~~.!i!uk,, ~~·~~~Ao'Sf~tf1d' ~ngla aM0NffiOSEVOK:E m.tnbutlonpc>1nt DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES $200 PER MONTH One bedroom Ideal for studenVartist Hardwood floors, ~Pn~~w~~Woodn~r:~/bea~:t/~t~~;: no pets Congenial, quiet area. 861-9474 FLAT FOR LEASE One bedroom ; 700 sq . ft .; dependable, mature adult; only $335+ utilities; deposit $200. 523-9025, Jerry. CONDO FOR RENT ~11:.~~~~~a~~~A~d~:~.hne~·d;,rs8 $350 per month 436-1412 -- ROOMMATE GWM, 27, seeks same to share 2-bedroom, 1-bath apartment $275+ deposit Includes utilities 840-7153 GALLERIA AREA Dramatic 1 bedroom, incredible gourmet kitchen, gorgeous hardwood floors, brass hardware In bath. Galleria area. $650. 871-0602. Lynn. RPAL. MONTROSE/HEIGHTS Close-in, 1 bedroom, hardwood floors, lovely garden area in front. ~i~~ utilities. 871-0602. Lynn HISTORIC HEIGHTS HOME Outstanding opportunity for gracious living In a beautifully restored Victorian Home. In the ~i~~~~b~s8~.~~rJ:~fe;a'~e"s~~~~t~~~ Award, this 4000square foot, 3-story Ho1:1ston Heights Home m~y be u~d res1denh~lly or commercially. Built in 1905, 1t sits on a corner lot with over 13,000 square feet of land, an English rose Q&den, 2nd story deck, enclosed patio, quarters above a 3-car garage, and room for a pool The home has 4 unusually large bedrooms, 2 baths, wrap-around veranda, leaded glass, an updated country kitchen, high ceilings, hardwoods, stenciled walls, roomy formals, foyer, dramatic staircase, sleep porch, 10 tons of air conditioning (zoned), 2 fireplaces and charm beyond description. For further information call 713/861-9996. $239,500 sub1ect to prior sell. AN INTIMATE WESTHEIMER Boutique and/or club space; will divide 1000 to 4000 sq ft. Call 668-6373 GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE (A gay roommate service.) The best business deal you will make this year. 523-3223. EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED OUTSIDE SALES Needed for travel agency. Commission onty. No experience necessary. Call Bruce. 529-8464. AGGRESSIVE SALESPERSON Young company mHtde P«S<>n to promote new envlronmental concept to bars and clubs. Simple operation with superior standards. Hours 9 to 5:30. Call 864-2223. FOR SALE, MISC. FREE CATALOG E~ skin leather gifts for men and women. Christmas delivery. The Buckeye Company, Box 7653, Houston 77270 EROTIC VIDEO CASETTES $25-35. Both formats. VHS. Beta Daniel. 526-9112 HANOVER SHOES Fine quality men's shoes at factory/direct prices Call Hank, 864-8393 (answer service). WILD BILL'S JEANS New and used-worn and torn! Coats, sweaters, slacks. shirts. Lots ~~aj~a~:.9 g~~n~wrfd a~im .. ~~ .. Sonny:· 880-8824 or 880-8844 (Across the street from Salvation Army Thrift Store. 2201-03 Washington.) GARAGE SA~ Men's clo~hes je_ans,_ belts, size 26-30. Designer shirts, Jackets, 36A Shoes 8·8 '~. Exerc1s~ equipment small electronics, linens, more' Cheap! Sunday, December 4, 10am-5pm 529-4904 , 2615 Commonwealth, No. 7 Cash only GAY BARS Nov. 25, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Classified • Galleon-2303R~711 1 e~t OI Tuwn--6»-t121 ~:: 1:::in & Lynn·1 117 F•lrvi9W­=-~:° ~~,,.-52<t5 9uffllk> SPMdw8Y- • L&:ry J-312 TU8m-52&-IG43 • Lo'8'10epot 2327Gr1n1 528-1342 8 M8ry'I 1022W9'th8tm.r 5a-1851 :s~ial P•rk Motel Bv 50 W1ugh Or • Midnite Sun-534 Weslheimer- 526--7511 d tlCO, Shows • Miss Chariottea-911 w Drew-52&-8840 ""'""" eMon1roM Mtn1ng Co---«>5 Pacihe-521-7481 8 N.ght l1r.-1322 Westheimer-528-7151 ~ 8Numbers 2 300 Wn the omer-526-1331 '"'"' • 0tr•cef'a CtL.rb-2700 Albal'l)'-.523-40M • OM on One-1018 W Gray-528-3503 :•=Ouua ws- 1419 Richmond--528-fi03 Elepha nl- 1211 Leelal'ld-659-<ICMO 9Ranch -M20'.4i Main- 52M730 :~-2702t< 1rby-52'-8272 d 1n 1 ng .hve • R1cti'• -2.01SanJacint~781d1tc0 • Ripcord 715Fa.rview 521·2792 8 Ri.ay Butinnt-2700 Albliny 528-.3811 •811-611 HydeParil • Twins-535 Weathetmer-520-0244 lelb11n. '""' e W• Playland-3012 Mitam-521-6988 • Silt)'Salty'•-9'.Z4Jack~916' BEAUMONT- •Mliry'all-25020.,._~9435 8Robert:'•Llfltte-213K.....,,_. 7e5-ellill 8Tl'a'n~W 783-1247 ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS G-w- PreM Awxaabon-P08 lJllO&. WHh11'1910tt OC20033-f202'j387-24JD G9Yfh9'*Nal:IOl'lellobby-POl!l192Waltlongten. OC20013-(202)54&-1I01 Hum9nAigNSCampaigr'IFund-f'OB1381. W-.. W'IQllOl'I, DC 20013-(2ml 541-2025 Larntimlegal o.t--132W43rd. New Y~ NY 1003t-{21 21 9"-9'81 Med~ FUl'ld lor Human A•Dhta IG9Y Pr ... Auoe 11t 10l'l)-P08 33805. Wul'l1rtg lOI\ DC ,...:-::!;.:: ~ eounc.-eo.. 151'.S Sar!FrMC191X!. CA"411S-(415) 115-CJQ N.uorlei~ofG9Y&L-.-Dernou9bc ===~1r:w SE.. WNl'llng1on DC Nlhon .. GayHeeJthEducatoonFoundatoen-«lll:tl Av•t:DS NewYor\.,NY 1001 1-(212)209-tOI:» Nltoon.I ~ R.gtits ~~ C.l1'0. San ~=!fur~~~~s~!wvoB NY ~:·s,c;:i~1001221 -1044(01.1-.ci.New Tu.•Gayll.MbWtT8'*Forc.-POBN<..o.itoti 715201 - (817)387-8211 ~~~~7-~ru1-(MontmM) etturcti of APlacelnthtSun-cloGracitynnBoob. 704 F•lrv1ew-522-7f595 •ubgroup of l/H Inc concert17pmTu• ACi..U-123eWGray-52'-5925 AIDS HottiN-c/O G•y SW1tctloo.rd~ t 1 A/MticanGrtAthedta--t57-MISO Aalro Ra•nboW All••"ce 520-1451 {voice). 520-<J652 (TTY) ::~·:.:~·~~1~·2r!1! cn ... Hot11ne-22&-1505 ~~flf-Ath9at-457-e&e0 Amettean Gay CUNI FOUl'ICUitton-2700 Ma9Qn-524-5791 ~=~~i~ ~7=- ~·& .~.~ 111 Un.tr.r11n CPturch-5210 Finrun-526-1571 MtVice1 1·151mSun ~~-,,-.. --- - m,, :11~~"fing E11:penence !GASE)·~ ~)' & L•b11n Arci'uVM of Tex11 11l~11t.-Ol .11H a;y~~2615wqh.12'77006 ~.,.,~~ i.cf,~-;2122 Nftm;n-;1·2- ~ '_!!!OM G~~-=-~9844 G1y Nu,_. Alhance-880-9'86 Grv-POll1ai C.~ (GPC\ •. PQe 66664 ~~52~·~000 meel.<i«>O Mall'ta217730pm G8Y Pnd9· -V.e.. 113 Committ~ o Maroon ~· HouMof Colet'NI\ 901 W Alabama- Gay Sw•tchbo..rd-P08362c 77253-529-3211 H!~='°"· counseling. rele~-rats. TTY. AIDS ~Morltroee Busi,.._, Gu1td--cont1CI ttvough Montrose V0tee meets 730pm 111 ~':he~l'l•ty room Liberty Bank. 1001 ~~ntiFM1980 ,.,;;;·FM-Away Frtenda­=~~-;; nc:;::-729 Ma nor- ~.;t~f;~;_f~ ::;~~;: .~~=- & • Houaton City Ha1i:...9o1 8-gby -­~~. tyc-iOw~n. 14 Hou8lon Dall Prof 11 meets 1n Eas1 Ftoonl. Hohday IM Central. 4&IO S lllain- 523-Mlttmeet 7 30pn 2ndTues Houle.....~~1Cl1Jb-<:IO M~a 1022 ~~.:~':2ffi:f=P083i40 l!H Inc POii 1I041 . 77222 f594 ·1732 ~~!!;!, aJ';:;:: l'o~ ·~ ::er;:~ Montl09eAttAlhMC1. Gay&Ln.b•anArcht¥el ol Te,11aa . Gay Switchboard Montrose Sy'"fl'hOttic Bend. Montroee Ctoggeirs tiowd mMI 730pfft 111 TPtu,. fV«ied locatoona) 9duc:attot*lonrm730prn3rdTl\ur• ~~~ .. · eureau~Be!Ja.ire ~~~ !:::c=i~~~= tn..,.eot--P08 1CI041. 17222 529-70'4 ,._. 4.lhWecl.~Church,1.UOHMOkl 730pm • t<PFT Radro. FM-90-419 Lovei1 B lvd~ 5--..000 "W1lcle 'l'ISl•n" gayrad101howThur• 730-IOOpm ~~:i,\Foundatton-1001W•lhel mer 1 19J­~ 5 B+cyc.19Cll.Jb-O«V>d682-045fi C..rol ~~;tffi'Alco~i·Al;i;Ort- 1 21 4 t5'~G~~~~·~~ L•bl&M&G8YPeople1n Mechcine-M0-9486 meet 730pm19t5at L•bsenfiltloth8rs tubgroup°'Chotcm meets 1MMd 3r"dSat.630pft'l, 210 Fewvoew apt1 Luth•r • n• Concerned-mHI• • I Grace Luther•n Churctl. 2515 W•ugh- 521-o863 453-1 143meet2nd&4thT...-...-.n•ngs . ,,.etropol11an Community Church o1 !he RHurrect1on ~ MCCA J -1919 Oecatur - 1111-1141 pot-lvdt din,_ 7 30pm 1'1 Sal ~lhfy , Mrvicn 10~m & 715pm Sun & ~ r": .:=::nrs~l:U:q~:_rs 1 c~!d MontroM An All• 521 · 2461 atti l ~• l/H lnc.mMt2ndTl'lu1' M~rc.Crw ic ~b ... Ne811oWnAuOcaa1.on e),lonlroM Cltnec- 104 we1u.mer-526-5s31 open ..... rtighta 6-10pm Montrou Counaehng Center-900 Lowen •203-52SHJJ.17 -'IDS victim supp()f1 910...p mMtl 1530pm Mon Montr'OM s .. ~ he.Tut ~::o~~Moneves BenngChurch MontroseT~b=:Aoch 91.52'-21s.p1ay Sun. 1 0309~ 1 30pm. MecGregot" Pa~ =~r:S~~~~;:i:=m Bo"' ~=~Ni!'~~,~~~~~'~;'tl MwGrMt ... -HouS1on·1~en·s 1 S01tNl1 5ZH802 day. 523-0413 ..... MsA,,women·i-SOnbaillugve-726-9371 ~~~~~:~~1.;:~:. ~~~·Ta~ Jopm Motit;;:;s; 5)-~cBi.nd~-;;:;ti at Senng ~::.~~tt.:.!i!' l~H·l:-527-9fl69 meet 7 JOpm Mar.lrOM"Wl1ch subgrc;,p Neanowrt Auoc ~z~·~-=~,;~:s.m~1,o Pae~ ~;i-O,gt.n"Ua~ !NO w 1 LeabianR19t1taT•Force- POB<M04n n244 Ne.riown Auoc .. tion {Mo,,troee C1¥1C Club)· meet• 11 B.,11'19 Church. 1440 Harolcl- 522-1000 meet 7pm4thT...- New Freedom Chr1St..ar1 Churctl-912 W 11th- 591-1 3"2 MfVi<*10am 5u1'1. 7 JOpm Wed ~~:-~My ~~·l l1tMtr1cu>n-P08 600063 77260· 22 M ONTROSE VOICE I Nov. 25, 1983 0 "My word! . . . That one came just too close for comfort, if you ask me." " Blast! This cinches it! ... II we ever find it again, I'm gonna bolt the sucker on!" " I've had it, Doc! ... I've come all the way from Alabama with this danged thing on my knee!" The Far Side by Gary Larson last of the Mohicans Recreahonal Land Fund Comm1ttM-Mu1tang ~~:~::'·~a.'"',1,..,-Ln'"'"b•"'"'"oo~S-.,up-po.,..rt ~G,.,..ou-p '!:::. 11 Bay Al .. Gays-332·3737 meel Thurl Tex• Bay AtN Gay Youth 332-3737· ft\Mt ... -~ ~~'!i:~;-s~i~~' Founda11on-111s i.=.-:ar 1 1der1---cto Mary"a, 1022 W•lheimer- ~~;E;:i~~~~:,=~~97~;1 ~Ft110w1t11p-w-:-ae-,.--­~=:~=~ ,fej'°"Y -Artl AUOciauon-1001 Wo;n~Att;1nc~39 CONROE Cooroe ,.., .. Lambda Society-Jan at (409) 75&-03S4orRayat(409)756-4087 ConroeAr9aL•biarw-Kathyat(409)756-90e9 :~:. ..: ~·Ec:,:_::::""c:,:Fn===== 01gMy--Rtt.Bo1t218C.Longville.LA706S2 MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS BE GOOD to yourself today. Licensed massage therapist on duty 10am to 10 pm, 7 days a week. By appointment 528- 3147 Randolph Alan RELAX & ENJOY !~~oin~~~~~~~~ls Bt~~~st~:7o.For FULL BODY MASSAGE Tension release, relax and en1oy Very sensual Call for appointment Tom. 7131524-7163 - BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce, 521-2009 TEXESCORT-524-9511 Models, escorts & masseurs_ ''We do care enou~h to send the very best" Major credit cards honored. Monthly medical certificate. Have a real fun time with the right guy for you LICENSED MASTER MASSEUR t-:tot oil full-body muscle manipula- ~°e~ts.~~yor a;~_ °'~~~~271~~nt- HAPPINESS 1$ ••. a handsome, healthy, humorous, happy hunk as your escort or model from ... TexEscort. 524-9511. Major credit cards honored. Security and discretion assured PERSONALS TO FRED LUNA Just as the sun will burn forever, so will my love for you_ Don - NEED A FRIEND GWM, 20. 130 lbs . athletic. outgoing_ Seeks same_ Write 161 -8 c/o Voice AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER ~~!~~~:,t~~ri~. hf~~ri~~~~t t~~~:~ portrait sessions and night photography, etc. Contact Peter. 868-9425, evenings. MEDICAL CENTER 'VOICE' Reader wants to make friends at noon_ Discretion please. Thomas, 792-5717. 630-0966 IWANT~ If 26 and under and want serious relationship, call. Tired of bars 529- 7576 Lee. HOUSTON GAY NUDIST Seeks same_ Send photo. Box 740572 Houston n274 -"LOVERS SEEK "FRIENDS" One: 25, 5'7'', 145, moustache, dark hair_ Other 37, 5'9", 180, beard, fair hair Send confidential photo (must), information on preferences. etc. Box 160-A c/o Voice POLISH GAY MAN 31 , passive, black hair, hairy body, wants friendship with active gay Would like to Immigrate to USA. Will answer all Andrew Hoszowski, UI Warszawska, 15/6, 44-100 Gliwice. Poland CONTACT, FANTASY, FUN Wrestling & more. 500 members nationwide lnfop1xpak $3_ NVWC. 59 w 10th. New York, NY 10011 WANT A THIRD? Attractive GWM, mid-30s, seeks GWM couple for entertainment on ~~~Z'~nJoi~:sis Send reply Box HOUSTON MALE NUOISTS Seeks same Send photo. Mail to Occupant, Box 740572, Houston, TX 77274 --CARPET CLEANING GWMSEEK~ Professional, 42, 5'5", 120, brown­grey hair, blue eyes, letter. photo, phone. Box 161 -A % Voice RESTAURANTS Free estimates, Von Schrader equipment Quality work_ Gene Scaff or Dave Kellie. Best Carpet Cleaners 524-9294 --HAPPY BIRTHDAY RICK May this be the start of the forthcom­ing good years. Yeah, party! GWM 22, 5'11", seeks friendships and rela­tionships, under 35 only, masculine, versatile. Wayne 266-2285. OLDER AND GAY? Why not? The Montrose Counseling Center 1s conducting a workshop on Sat., Dec. 3, from 9-4 for gay men and women over 45 years of age. Dan Fulme:r will lead the group in ~~~;~~ie~3:~d ·~r~v~~t~;~~~~ ces for growth, not just talk $25 reg­istration with limited space. Contact 529-0037 PERSONALS OF HOUSTON Dedicated to the professional man or woman with special lifestyle needs_ Only $10 for 25 words or less will allow you to meet that special someone for the holidays. Soon to ~~0~a~~~~:~~'. 1~9 ~-7~~~~· ~7~i~) 782-3163. Randy Alfred's ' Daiei~ S.F.,' twice a month only in the Voice BUSINESS CARDS $13.-10-1 -­Discount printing CPC. Why pay more? (713)667-3600/664-9465. Now hiring DENTIST Ron Peters, DOS. Exam, X-ray, cleaning $25. Open evenings & Saturday. 523-2211 ---ATTORNEY Jerry Garrett, 4803 Montrose, Suite PRIVATE 11, 526-5237 GAY CLUBS SERVICES, ETC. --.>A TRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law, 52EH911 MOVEMASTERS ---D-ENNIS BRAS Hauling, packing supplies, too. 1925 Westheimer. 521-3155 Moving and Hauling_ 528-4453 or 521-2832. MONTROSE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: • ANNOUNCEMENTS •CARS & BIKES • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FO,. SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • SERVICES •TRAVEL RATE: Up to ~ words in bold, $2. Additional regular words 30¢ each. Minimum cnarg" $3. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Tues<lay for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer, pay the full run in advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid in advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone In classifieds to (713) 529-8490 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. (free or 30¢/word) (free or 3()¢/word) (30¢/word) __ _ (30¢/word) __ _ (30¢/word) Placing a • PERSONALS ? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words In bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Additional words beyond 15 are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? Free Personals can be placed for one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer. To renew requires re-submitting the form. BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a Blind Box Number. The answers to your ad will be sent to u and we will then confidentially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come in. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. Enclose no money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Classifieds to (713) 529-8490 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds. (use additional paper if necessary) bold headline at $2 words at 30¢ each Name ~~~-~~---~~-~ Blind Box at $3 per issue Total Address Run ad weeks Amount enclosed -- (a check a money order, a cash in person a VISA charge a MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card: # ___ exp date Mail or bring to Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 NOV. 25, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 -M-IC~A-TE-x-v1=D"E"O~l~Nv=E~NT~O~RIES =· ..... ~.m .. ~a~~!bl~~0~ol~~tib~:~ra~r';!f 1 ~f :~~~5~~tn.M•nho1ectoth"1g 19eJ lease property condition prior tO e OownbHI Records 2117 R1chmond- lease. Call (713) 669-9355 for ,,,..,_. information or write Box 271394, "•'0<"-'..,."'",'-cuk-.•.g.~.- -=~n~.. ~• •_ ,..~--,.,._=5457 Houston 77277 e Goo; .. ·s-lDI>' C.hfOfnia-524-5555 INEXPENSIVE AUTO SERVICES e Grk11ttym Bo<*s-70' Fau"- s22-7695 Tune-ups, oil change & lube, minor • Heatth SeeketS-w A1.a>a1T111 at s S"-Pher_! repairs, brake jobs, cleanup-inside • House ot Coff• Beans-2520 R1ct1 & out. K&P Automotive_ 285-1811 • Housion Home 1 Garden 2 .. 16 0o1 ~sco·s Hair 011111gn 901 Richmond ::::-=~~Klfby 520-0246- e Houston OuHI HOUH lodging 108 • AMcweableF ... t--38270unl9Yy Avondale-520-97157 :d8,.~9~ BellutySchool-327W•the•mer­: 2~=s Hair 0.Jgn 905 Westhe1mer e Lionel H«.1r O.ign-3220 Y011ltum-52&-44£M :a~~liquehaircare 2528K1ngtton ~~OM Hair 01sign-1004 c.111om111- :~~oic. newspapeJ-3317 Montrose e NeartownG•r9Q*-1901Taft 523-271M ::~:!.~~~ INlll bo•es 1
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