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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
File 013
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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 013. 2000-01-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-21). Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1064

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 013, 2000-01-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1064.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 21, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 NEWS JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Xij^Spf'U&M Provider dedicated to serving the HIV community Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Patricia Salvato, MD Medical Director For more information call 17131349-9750 Our Reputation is built on OUR MEMBERS! Fimness Voted #f in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 MONTH BY MONTH NO CONTRACT! Ed Kinser BSMI, CRS Director: Kinetic Sports Monday to Friday 5 am - 10 pm Saturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm Health Briefs Drug giants set to merge, capturing almost one-fifth of market LONDON (AP)—British pharmaceutical heavyweights Glaxo Wellcome PLC and SmithKline Beecham PLC announced Jan. 17 that they have agreed to merge, forming the world's largest drugmaker. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission and the European Union must still approve the merger. The new group is headquartered in London but will likely run from the U.S., and would have a 7.5 percent share of the global pharmaceutical market. Glaxo's strength lies in its top anti-migraine drug, Imirrex, and in treatments for asthma and viral infections, including HIV. SmithKline's top products include the antibiotic Augmentin, and the antidepressant Paxil, as well as a strong vaccine business. The merger would eclipse the just- announced takeover by Pfizer Inc. of U.S. drugmaker Warner-Lambert Co. If that deal goes forward, the combined group would have 6.5 percent of the global market. SmithKline Beecham is set to be purchased by British rival pharmaceutical company Glaxo Wellcome in a deal that would create the world's largest drugmaker. Difficulty in taking HIV cocktail may be main blame for failure CHICAGO (AP)—When drug cocktails fail to keep HIV in check, the most likely reason is failure to take drugs properly and not that the virus has become drug-resistant, two recent studies published Jan. 12 suggest. Antiviral drug cocktails suppress HIV in 60 percent to 90 percent of patients, researchers noted in the journal of the American Medical Association. But an estimated 30 percent to 60 percent of those patients end up being considered treatment failures, either because the drugs never knock the virus down or because it rebounds. The new studies looked at 58 HIV patients in France and in 26 U.S. patients where the virus rebounded. The 1998 French study looked for signs of genetic mutation associated with drug resistance, but found more evidence to place blame on the failure to take medicine properly and on the inadequate potency of drugs in the body. "We need to help the patient be well-adherent to the treatment," said Dr. Francoise Brun-Vezinet, virology director at Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris and head of the French study. She cautioned that drug resistance may play a bigger role in patients who have had longer treatment with antiviral drugs. New drug may cure common cold and hundreds of viral infections EXTON, Pa. (AP)—A new drug called Pleconaril has shown effectiveness against viral infections like meningitis, polio and the common cold, and may be in drugstores .is early as next year. The drug has been effective in blocking 169 different viruses, the largest single family of viruses that affect humans. It is part of a new generation of drugs designed to work against specific physical characteristics of the targeted virus, and developers tested 1,500 different versions of Pleconaril before settling on one. The drug fits neatly into a groove on the surface of the virus, gumming up the machinery it needs to infect the body's cells. "Pleconaril... provides a lot of hope for the eventual design of drugs for virtually every viral infection," said Dr. Catherine Laughlin, chief of virology at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious I diseases. Two large studies are due out in the spring from Pleconaril manufacturer ViroPharma that will determine whether the drug works well enough to win FDA approval. Clinton to ask for $1 billion more to fund biomedical research WASHINGTON—President Clinton will propose an additional $1 billion for biomedical research as part of his fiscal 2001 budget, Reuters news service reported. White House chief of staff John Podesta also told ABC's "This Week" that he would meet drug company leaders on Jan. 20 to build support for providing prescription drug benefits to the elderly through the Medicare. The industry opposed the idea last summer but has shifted to support it. "We're going to make a major investment again in the National Institutes of Health," Podesta said, as well as proposing "the largest increase" for the National Science Foundation. With the additional $1 billion, NIH would have $19 billion for biomedical research. In the past year, the White House said, researchers supported by NIH discovered "a simple, affordable drug to prevent transmission of HIV to infants." AIDS funding announced for UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke and Boston CHAPEL HILL, N.C (AP)—The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University will receive $21 million in renewed federal grants to help treat AIDS pahents in the state and to participate in experimental treatments. UNC-Chapel Hill will receive $12.5 million over the next five years, while Duke will receive $8.5 million, the two schools announced at a Jan. 12 news conference. The focus on much of the grant money will be on African-Americans with AIDS. Also, the Boston area will get nearly $12.5 million in federal funding for services to people infected with HIV. A host of state, federal and local officials announced the grant, which was $1.8 million higher than the same grant last year. —From staff and wire reports
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