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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
File 012
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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 012. 2000-01-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1063.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-21). Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1063

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 012, 2000-01-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1063.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 21, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 LOCAL NEWS Lack of funding bogs down initiative to combat HIV > Continued from Page 1 director. "Th.it is where the dollars between now .mil [une will go," Kendrick said. "Th.it is what we are moving on the fastest—to get information out thai people can hear and see." But like most of Brown's plan, even funding for the media campaign isn't in place. Much (*f the city's $5 million HIV Prevention Program is already allocated, so health officials are studying it to reallocate some funds, shift staffing or find unused money, Kendrick said. That evaluation should be complete next month, though reallocating existing grants to community-based organizations to target blacks could take weeks or months longer as the proposals move through the health department and city council for approval, she said. Health officials are also coping with a recent $600,000 cut from its nearly $100 million budget as part of city-wide budget trimming to address an expected shortfall in revenues, Kendrick said. "Our wiggle room is lowered quite a bit with this last decrease in our budget," she said. City health officials plan to seek in-kind contributions from media organizations and the community to help fund the public information campaign and other portions of Brown's plan. After the media campaign starts, health officials want to mobilize the community and solicit support from families, churches and business leaders, Kendrick said. Then they want to move to one-on-one and small group interventions with residents of the areas hard- est-hit by the rise in I HV infections to modify behaviors that increase the risk of infection, she said. "Part of the overall plan is to get as much coordination and input from our community members as we cm. The human factor is part of the key factor," Kendrick said. "We are trying to get as many individuals to step up to the plate and say what they can do in their life." But taking weeks, or even a few months, to deliver funding to community-based organizations serving the black community is disappointing for officials and AIDS advocates who had hoped Brown's declaration of an emergency would help put Ihe plan in place more quickly. "I am a little surprised because the mayor wanted to fast-track this and 1 was hoping we would be able to shave some of that time," said City Councilwoman Annise Parker. But Parker praised the approach of city health officials, who want to implement parts of Brown's initiative through existing community-based organizations, rather than creating new groups or arms of the city health department. "I am not at all interested in seeing us support a new proliferation of new agencies. We ought to be working through existing community-based organizations. It is always the tendency of the city to want to bring it in- iiouse, rather than helping existing, experienced organizations move into a new Parker said. A bully pulpit? When Brown announced his plan in early December, he told a packed press conference that educators, media, clergy and business leaders must grasp the importance of good health. I le also called for an open discussion of sexual activity to "counteract the millions of media messages that glorify" unsafe sex. And he pledged to use his office as a bully pulpit, speaking out on HIV prevention and the rise in HIV infections in the city's black community during his speeches and appearances. But in two major addresses this month— his Jan. 3 inaugural address and his annual state of the city on Tuesday—Brown did not mention his declaration of a state of emergency or his plan to combat the new rise in 111V infections. During his 45-minute state of the city address to members of the Greater Houston Partnership, Brown touted the accomplishments of his administration and outlined three challenges for the next several years: air pollution, transportation and providing an adequate water supply. "There were dozens of things i could have talked about. I wanted to brief the community on our successes and the triangle of challenges I mentioned," Brown said after fiis address. But Brown added that he has talked about HIV in the black community during other public appearances, though he didn't cite specific examples. Leaving out any mention of HIV and ihe city's efforts to combat the rise in infections in his recent speeches means Brown missed opportunities to build public support for fighting the problem, Parker said. "We have such a strong division of labor between the city and the county in health care. The city is limited to education and prevention, so having an articulate spokesman for HIV/AIDS, particularly one from the African-American community would be effective," said Parker, who attended Brown's state of the city on Tui Parker said even though the city lias increased funding for HIV programs in recent years, it's still not enough, so it's critical for public officials to find other ways to address the problem. "We know that we aren't going to have the kind of money that folks would like to % see, so we have to have other things that IE don't require tax dollars. One of those things y is public awareness and that is tree. We need ~ to do as much of it as we can," Parker said. Overcoming the stigma A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week suggested that the stigma of homosexuality plays a role in spreading the disease because minorities are less likely than whites to identify themselves as gay or seek AIDS prevention and treatment services. HIV is not often mentioned by leaders in the black community, which sometimes views homosexuality, sex and illegal drug use as taboo topics that shouldn't be discussed, AIDS advocates acknowledge. City Councilwoman Annise Parker said Mayor Lee Brown has missed chances to build public support for his HIV initiative. To help overcome that, Brown and city health officials want to convene a summit of business, political and clergy leaders in the black community to discuss HIV and prevention methods. Brown said in December that the summit would be held this month, but a spokeswoman for the event's chief organizer, City Councilman Jew Don Boney, said it is still in the planning stages. THE PLAZA AT RIVER OAKS APARTMENTS 3231411c" " 713-630-0006 For More Information 1920 W. Gray • 1945 W. Bell 713-528-5277 See the Classified Section It's a jungle out there! 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