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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
File 006
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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 006. 2000-01-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1057.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-21). Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1057

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 006, 2000-01-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1057.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 21, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 LOCAL NEWS INSIDE NEWS Around the Notion 6 President colls for hole crime protection 6 Two AIDS hospice officials face charges 6 Ohio Gov. removes 'sexual orientation' from bias ban 6 Three women sue magazine for lesbian' photo . 6 Students threatened, beaten for being gay .. 6 High court to hear Scouts challenge 7 Health Briefs 12 Drug giants set Io merge 12 Difficulty in taking cocktail may be main blame 12 New drug may cure common cold 12 Clinton to ask for Si billion for research ... 12 AIDS funding announced for three schools . 12 VOICES & ECHOES Abel: Muzzling Rocker only treats the symptoms. 8 Alveon Straight couples wiB suffer from MARGE. 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Gold & bold 15 Movement and music 15 Out in Print: 'friends S Family' 16 Bestsellers 16 Eating Out: Dipping into Ihe cool saute 17 Lesbian author and her e publishing 20 COMMUNITY PFLAG to launch metro-wide campaign 21 Community Calendar 22 Occasions 23 MyStars! 27 CLASSIFIEDS 24 CARMART 25 DIRECTORY 26 Issue 1004 liMIMMil voice AH material in Houston Voice is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Houston voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers. photographers, writers and cartoonists pub lished herein is neither inferred or implied. The appearance of names or pictorial representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its leturn. The editor reserves the right to accept. reject 01 edit any submission. All rights revert to authors upon publication. Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-52&-8490 Resurrection MCC is set to purchase Evangelistic Temple on West 11th for $2.35 million, allowing the city's largest gay church to expand its offerings and move from its tight quarters on Decatur Street. Gay church to leave cramped quarters by KAY DAYUS After 20 years in the historic Sixth Ward, Houston's largest gay church, Resurrection MCC, is on the move to more grand quarters. Since beginning its ministry in 1972, the church has been housed in tight quarters at 1909 Decatur St. And it has grown from humble beginnings, first gathering in an apartment, then a rented bicycle shop on Waugh Drive and next a former printing shop. The church moved to its first traditional church building on Decatur Street in 1979. Having long ago outgrown that location, church members will soon pack up and move to a much larger facility at 2025 West 11th St. Church officials hope to close on the $2.35 million sale, home of the Evangelistic Temple since 1955, in mid-March. Because of its ever-growing congregation and cramped quarters, the church has been looking for a new home for nearly two years, said Rev. ]. Dwayne Johnson, Resurrection MCC's pastor. The church's current quarters, which seat about 430 people, is usually outstripped as weekly attendance has spiked to about 500, Johnson said. And the facility serves a larger constituency of over 2,500 people, he said. Space constraints have in the past pushed Resurrection MCC's special services, like its Christmas Eve and Easter celebrations, to other facilities. The Evangelistic Temple has much to offer, Johnson said, including seating for 1,575 people. It also boasts offices, meeting rooms, two chapels, a full-immersion baptismal facility, a large gymnasium, classrooms, a full commercial kitchen and even a bridal dressing room. "For the first time it will be possible to have a variety of ministries happening at the same time," Johnson said. With the additional space, Johnson hopes to expand the church's personal counseling, family and education programs. The extra space also allows for expansion of the church's bookstore to double in size. It also means that the church can finally fully organize and catalogue its extensive gay and lesbian archive and library of over 10,000 volumes. "Not many people are aware that Resurrection is the custodian of the largest GLBT archives in the state of Texas," Johnson said. The archives includes a complete, 26-year archive of the Houston Voice and other gay publications, biographies and fiction, as well as gay and lesbian psychological studies. The new church will be paid for through donations from the congregation and community, and from the sale of the current facility, Johnson said. The Sixth Ward building, built in 1926 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, went on the market in August 1998, though it hasn't been sold yet. "We've had lots of nibbles, but we're still looking for a bite," Johnson said. "When we began this task in 1997, we had no idea it would take this long. We have since learned that other churches have taken as much as 10 years to find their new facility." Church officials hope to close on the sale of the new property soon enough to hold its Pride celebrations there in June, he said. Resurrection MCC Congregational tours Jan. 29, Feb. 5 2025 W. 11th St. 713-861-9149 www.mccr-hou.com Women, gays most vulnerable to hate crimes, former cop says Society and government should escalate the battle against everyday bias-related incidents, not just the headline-making crimes, speakers at a city-sponsored conference in Houston said Thursday. "Hate must be exposed. It must be denounced," Mayor Lee Brown said in his opening remarks. "In the face of hatred, apathy will be seen as acceptance by haters, the public and, worse, the victims." The conference, hosted by the city and the U.S. Justice Department, featured a full day of speeches and panel discussions dissecting hate-inspired violence. In a morning address, the sister of East Texas dragging victim James Byrd Jr. drew a standing ovation after her emotional plea for a change in not just laws, but attitudes. "I tried desperately to put his death in perspective. That was very difficult. In fact, it was impossible," Mary Verrett told an audience of about 400, including many high school students. "I could not make sense of his death." Verrett, of Houston, and others called upon Texas to pass laws that would increase penalties for crimes found to involve bias. An attempt at such legislation failed last spring. All three of the white men convicted for dragging Byrd to death in 1998 outside of Jasper, Texas, were convicted of capital murder only because prosecutors proved a second felony—kidnapping—occurred during the slaying. A hate-related murder in Texas is not automatically grounds for a capital case. Billy Johnston, a former Boston policeman who regularly speaks about hate crimes, said the two most vulnerable groups today are gays and women, because many people still think it is acceptable to mistreat them. "Gays are the toughest group to deal with" in training new police officers because cadets often aren't interested in protecting them, Johnston said. Annise Parker, a longtime local gay activist recently elected to her second term as an at-large councilmember, recounted an incident in which a carload of young men chased her and her companion through Houston. Parker also supported hate crime legislation, if for no other reason than symbolism. "You don't stop this behavior with laws, but it may send a signal of community outrage," Parker said. -The Associated Press
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