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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
File 002
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Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 002. 2000-01-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1053.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-21). Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1053

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 002, 2000-01-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1053.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 21, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript TTT5TTTT1 After 20 years in the historic Sixth Ward, Houston's largest gay church will soon be on the move to a new $2.35 million facility. Page 5 A provocative series of ads has outed Mitchell Gold Co., earned the company accolades from gay groups and done more than just sell furniture—the ads raise gay visibility, too. Page 15 ISSUE 1004 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JANUARY 21, 2000 Mayor stumbles on HIV follow through Nearly two months after announcing an ambitious plan to fight rising HIV infections among blacks, Mayor Lee Brown's initiative lacks funding, public attention by MATTHEW A. HENNIE Nearly two months after Mayor Lee Brown declared a state of emergency over a startling rise in HIV infections in I louston's black community, his ambitious plan to attack the problem is floundering. City health officials are scrambling to pay for the nearly 5- year, $3 million prevention and education effort by tightening other programs, shifting staff and soliciting donations, which means it will hike works, up to a few months, before even the initial aspects of Brown's plan are in place, officials said this week. A summit of black community leaders to enlist support for addressing the problem, which Brown said would be held this month, remains in the planning stages. And Brown, who pledged to use the mayor's office as a bully pulpit by speaking out on HIV prevention during his public appearances, has failed to do so in two major speeches he delivered this month. "There has been no action except lip service. There has certainly been nothing concrete," said Gary Van Ooteghem, chairman of the Ryan White Planning Council. "We are not getting any indication that (Brown] or his team are doing anything. It is a shame." The planning council, which will allocate $17.6 million in federal funds this year for services to people affected by AIDS, criticized Brown in November for failing to act on new statistics that showed 61 percent of new HIV infections in the Houston area in 1999 were among African-Americans, While the planning council received a 14 percent increase in its federal funding—including a nearly sixfold increase, from $177,000 to $937,955, aimed at African-Americans—its money is restricted to helping county residents already infected through services like food banks, drug reimbursements, dental services, counseling and hospice care. The increase in overall federal funding for the planning council this year, up from $15.5 million to $17.6 million, is due in part to the area's increasing HIV infections and the spike in infections in the area's black community, said Patrick Richoux, an HIV services project coordinator for Harris County. State of emergency HIV prevention and education is left to the city's health department and its $5-million-a-year HIV Prevention Program, which led the planning council to call on Brown and County Judge Robert Eckels in November to develop a coordinated response to the new statistics. Eckels, who oversees the Ryan White Planning Council, responded by supporting its call to declare a medical emergency, which allows the planning council to reallocate funds to earmark treatment programs for African-Americans. Besides the additional federal funds the planning council will receive when its fiscal year starts in March, an estimated $250,000 will also be shifted to programs targeting the city's black community. Van Ooteghem said. Brown took action weeks later by announcing his initiative during a press conference with local elected officials, AIDS activists and service providers on World AIDS Day. The mayor's plan targets three groups for intensive HIV prevention efforts: African-American women; gay, bisexual and non-gay identifying black men who have sex with men; Mayor Lee Brown delivered a 45-mmute state of the city address Tuesday, but didn't mention his recent plan to combat HIV infections, an issue he pledged to include in his public appearances. and blacks in jail or prison. The plan proposes community-based education and prevention programs, a media campaign and one-on-one services to change behaviors that put blacks at higher risk for HIV. The first step calls for spending $170,000 through June on a public information campaign with billboards, newspaper and radio advertisements targeting African-Americans, said Mary desVignes-Kendrick, the city's health department > Continued on Page 11 Rice approves DP benefits for gay employees Trustees quietly approved the measure last month, adding to an already tolerant atmosphere for gay students, employees on campus A consensus on Rice University's campus for domestic partner benefits helped lead trustees to approve the measure, said Terry Shepard, vice president for public affairs. by GIP PLASTER For two years, domestic partners of employees at Rice University have been able to get school identification cards, check out books from the school's library and use its gymnasiums, just like married spouses can. Now, Rice's board of trustees has finished what it started. Trustees recently approved a measure that will allow employees to include their established domestic partners on university insurance coverage beginning in July. The move makes Rice the first university in Texas to offer domestic partner benefits and leaves the University of Notre Dame as the only top 20 school in the nation without the benefits, according to Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay rights group. Rice also joins 102 other universities in offering the benefits, according to HRC. "I think it is a natural progression because the much already in place," said Boyd Beckwith, the openly gay director of the university's student center. Beckwith served on an informal committee that pushed >■ Continued on Page 10
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