Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
File 001
File size: 12.44 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 001. 2000-01-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1052.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-21). Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1052

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000 - File 001, 2000-01-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1081/show/1052.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1004, January 21, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 21, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript After 20 years in the historic Sixth Ward, Houston's largest gay church will soon be on the move to a new $2.35 million facility. Page 5 A provocative series of ads has outed Mitchell Gold Co., earned the company accolades from gay groups and done more than just sell furni­ture- the ads raise gay visibility, too. Page 15 L----'-----' ISSUE 1004 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE . AND YOUR STYLE . JANUARY 21 I 2000 Mayor stumbles on HIV follow through Nearly two months after announcing an ambitious plan to f ight rising HIV infections among blacks, Mayor Lee Brown's initiative lacks funding, public attention by M,\TII llW A I IF:-\:\'IE :\'mrly two months after Mayor l l'l' Brown dl'd,m'<:l il stall' of l'mrrgl'ncy O\'l'r il startling n~· in I !IV inft'Ctions in I lou<>ton's bl.Kk community, his ambillous pl.in to attack thl• probfl•m IS noundenng. City he.11th offin.ils arc scrambling to PJY for the nl•.irly 5- ) e:ir, $1 million pre\'l'nhon and rd um hon l'ffort by tightl'n­mg otlwr pmgr.ims, shifting staff ,ind solinting don.1tions, whKh ml'.rns 1t will t.lkl' Wl't'ks, up to ,1 fl'W months, b\'forc l'n:n thl' inillal aspl'Cls of Brown's plan an• in pl.in•, offk1.ils s.iid this Wl'l'k. A summit of black community leaders to enlist support for .iddrt•ssing the problem, which Brown said would bl' hl'ld thb month, rl'm.iins in thl' pl.inning stages. And Brown, who pledgl'd to use thl• mayor's officl' .1s a bully pulpit by spl'.iking out on HIV pn•n·nhon during his public .1ppl'ilr1rnces, h.is failed to do so in two mJjor spl'l'Ch­rs he dl'li\'l'rl•d this month. "Thrrl' has been no action l'\n•pt lip Sl'rvicl'. Therl' has cl'r­ta1nly bl'l'n nothmg concrete," ~1d Gary Van Ooll'ghcm, ch.imn,rn of the Ryan White PJ,rnnmg Council. "We arl' not gl•tting any indic.1tion th.it [Brown] or his team are doing .rnything It 1s a shame." The planning council. which will alloc,1te $17.6 million in fl·drr,11 funds this year for 'en·JCes to people affected by AIDS, cntir1zl•d Brown in Non·mber for !Ji ling to act on new st,1tist1cs th,1t shmn·d 61 pl·rcent of new I !IV infl'Ctions in thl' I louston .lrl'<I 111 1999 Wl're among African-Americans. Whill• thl• pl.inning council rl'Cl'l\'l'd a 14 ~wrcl'nt mcre.ise in its fl'dl•r,11 fundmg-including a nL'.1rly sixfold 111cm1Sl', from $177,000 to $937,955, a1ml'd at African-Americans-its money is restricted to helping county residents already infl'cll'Cl through :;cnices hkc food banks, drug reimburse­ments, dental ~f\1Cl's, counseling ilnd hospice care. The incrl'asl' in O\erall federal fundmg for the plannmg council this year, up from $15.5 milhon to $17.6 million, is due 111 part to the ilrl'a's mcreasmg I !IV infections and the spike 111 mk'Chons in the art•a's bl.1Ck community, ~1d PatrJCk Richoll\, an I !IV services proJC'd coordinator for Hams County. State of emergency ~ I !IV prevention ,1nd education 1s left to the city's health J: dl'partment and its $5-million·a-ycar I !IV Pre,·ention ~ Program, which led the planning council to cJll on Brown ~ and County Judge Robert Eckels 111 '\lo\·embcr to de\'elop a ~ coordin.ited response to the new statistics. ::;: Eckels, who O\'l'fscl's the Ryan White Planning Council, responded by supporting its call to dl'Clarc a medical emer­gency, which allows thl' planning council to reallocate funds to earmark tre.itment programs for Afric.in-Americans. Besides the additional federal funds the planning council will rl'CCi\·e when its fiscal war st.iris in March, an estimated $250,000 will also be shifted to programs t.irgcting the city's bl;ick community, V;in Ooteghem s.iid. Brown took action week..~ later by announcing his initiati\'e during a press confen:ncc with local l'lected officials, AIDS ;ictivists and sen·ice pro,·idl'rs on World AIDS Day. The mayor's plan t;irgcts three groups for intensive HIV prl'vention efforts: African-Americ,1n women; gay, bisexual and non-gay identifymg bl;ick men who h,we sex with men; Mayor Lee Brown delivered a 45-minute state of the city address Tuesday, but didn't mention his recent plan to combat HIV infec­tions, an issue he pledged to include in his pubfic appearances. and blacks m iail or pnson. The plan propo!>t:'s cornmuruty-based education and pre­\' enhon programs, a media campaign and one-on-one Sl'T\ ic­es to change bcha\'ll1rs that put black.sat higher risk for HIV The first sit p calls for spending $170,000 through June on a pub! c information campaign \\ ith billboards, new!:>paper and radio ad\-crhsements targeting Afncan-Americans, ~id Mary dcs\'ignes-Kendrick, the city's health departml'nt :;..- Continued on Page 11 Rice approves DP benefits for gay employees A consensus on Rice University's campus for domestic partner benefits helped lead trustees to approve the measure, said Terry Shepard, vice president for public affairs. Trustees quietly approved the measure last month, adding to an already tolerant atmosphere for gay students, employees on campus bv (,IP PLASTER For two years, domestic partnl·rs of l'mployces at Rice Uni\'ersity ha\'l' bl'l'n ,1ble to gl'I school idt•ntihcahon cards, check out books from the school's librJrV and use its gvmnJsiums, iust hkt· m.uried ;.pou'l's can.' :-\ow, RKe's bo.ud of trustees h.1' f1111slwd I\ hat 11 started. Trustees recent!) .ippro\ ed a meaSUTl' th.1t will allow l'mplo)"l't's to include thl'lr established domestic p.irtners on uniwrslly in>urance co\•eragc beginning in July. Thl• mO\·e makes RJCe the first unl\WS1ty m Texas to offl'r domestic partner bcndib and leaves tne Cniver:-.ity of :\'otre Daml' as the onh top 20 ~chool in the nation without the benefits, according to Human Rights Campaign, the n.1t1on's l.irge't gay right' group RJCL' also Joins 102 othl'r Uni\ ers1til's m offl'nng the benl'fits, according to HRC "I thmk 11 i~ a natural progression because there 1s so much already in place," said Bo}d Beckwith, the open!\ gay director of the uni\ ers11\ 's. tudent center Beckwith served on an mfonnal wmm11tee that pushed ,... Continued on Page 10 2 JANUARY 21 , 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE GRAND OPENING 50°/o OFF ( ( Leather Leather is where it's at. Experience the luxury that sets you apart from the crowd, (especially if you like what you see at Roche Bobois, Cantoni and other chi chi stores) what a moving experience! Cutting edge designs at prices you can afford. ) ) Sue Goldstein I he Underground Shopper, Dallas, Texas 300 World Class Leathers 2 to 4 Week Delivery 1721 Post Oak Blvd. at San Felipe 713-355-9393 HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 21 , 2000 The first and only · dinicaDy proven to treat ha" km in men. PROPECIA IS a Medical breakthrough-the first pill that effectively treats male p.ittem hair ICtSs on the vertex (at top of head) and antenor mid-scalp area. By al measures. the clinical results of PROPECIA tn me!' are rnpressive:' • 83% ma1nta1ned their hair based on hair count (vs. 2811b with placebo). • 66llb had VISlbfe regrowth as rated by 1ndeperdent dermatologists (vs. 7llb wrth placebo). • 8C1lb were rated as 1mpr011ed by dinical doctoo (vs. 4711b Mth placebo) • Mos! men reported an increase in the amount of har, a decrease in hair loss. and improvement m appearance •Based on vertex studies at 24 months of men 18 to 4 l with rruld to moderate hair loss. Soentists have recently d&overed that men with male pattern harr los> have an increased II.WI of DHT 111 therr scalps. PROPECIA blocks the formatJon of DHT and. 111 thlS way, appea15 to interrupt a key factor m the development of mhented male p.ittern hair los> m men Importantly, PROPECIA helps grow natural hair- not Just peach fuzz-and IS as convement to take a<; a v1lilm1n: one pill a day Only a doctor can determine 1f PROPECIA IS nght for you. PROPECIA IS for men only. Further, women who are or may potentially be pregnant must not use PROPECIA and should not handle crushed or broken tablets because of the nsk of a specific kind of birth defect. (See accompanying Patient Information for detail\.) PROPECIA lilblets are coated and Wiii prevent contact wrth the active ingredient dunng normal handling. tjMERCK You may need to take PROPECIA daily for tree months or more to see VISlble results. PROPECIA may not reg!OW aD your hall And d you stop USlll& tlus product, you will gradually lose the hair you have gamed. There IS not suffioent evide!lce that PROPECIA works for recessior at the temporal areas. H you haven t seen <esults after t2 months of USI g PROPECIA, f~rther treatment IS W1l kely to be of benefit Like all prescnp!Jon p;odLds, PROPECIA may cause side effects. A very small rumber of men expenenced certa1r stde effects. s:Jch as. 1ess desire for sex. d1ffirulty 1r aci'tevmg an erection, and a decrease 1n the amount of semen. Each of t'ese side effects occurred m less than 2% of men. These Side effects were rellffilble and \\1!11t away ~ men who stopped taking PROPECIA So start blkla1 to your ffdor. And stop thmktng further !la11 loss IS inevitable CALL 1-888-806-3725 Sii our website at www propeoa.com today to receive detailed product mfc ..,. ~ :tud ng d1mca1 "before and after" photographs. Please read the next page for add"t110nal mforma!IOn aboln PROPECIA. (filklSteride) Helping make hair loss history~ 3 4 Propec1ae· (finasteride) Tablets Patient Information about PROPECIA' IPro-pee-shai Genenc ~ame· finastende tfin·AS-tur-evedl PROPECIA"" is for use by MEN ONLY. Pluse read ibis~ lllfar'I YoU ltlrt tat PROPECJA Also. Hd N w:fuded with PROP£C1A t:seh time yOU :'tMW YoW" fitffCtllllOOn iust .. UM ""'°'*" ttas changed Rtmemllef: 1hil leafta does• take tM place of careful discuswns wilt! VOW' YauMll'fOUl'dKIDrstlOUidMtUAf'ROPEtt.\~ygu t1i. yOUl'~ .... at~dl4 t0191- Wba1 Is PROPEUA _.lo<! PROPECIA IS used lor tbe treatment of male pattern ha liDSS on the vertex and !he antenor mad sea p area WPRObPEtCiIaA o_s l,o_r .o,s,a, b _y ME_N O•N L Y and should NOT b1 used by-or c~ ren Ma'8 - ,_loss IS a - condi-., whodl men llrj)enentt dwnng ol !Ila hu oo di• 1<1lp Often. tll!s rm;l:s • 1 recldinQ haOlino aml/vl balding oo 1111 lap o1 llul - ...,_ changn typ.eal!y begm gredual!y ., me11 11111eir2lls Doctors beieft mate pattern ha11 loss 1:1 due to hertdil'y and IS dependent an bormonal effects Ooc:on refer to lh11 type ol ha loss IS andtogenetlC alopocia -·d--es: For 11-do<tots studied ... , 1100""" 1ged 1810 41willlmild10 moderate omoun1> of ongomg "'"lass Al"""·-., llCOMng PROPECIA or placlllo (a pdl "'""-no medica!IOnJ woro g...,, a modic•ted shal!ljlOG INeutrogona T/Gai-" ShampJOJ Of lllat men, 1ppt0Xima181y 1200 willl h•• loss a1 1!11 lap of 1111 h11d wero audoed tor 1n lddmonaJ 12 months In genen~ men who tool PROPECIA mall'lbmed or increased the numtltr of Y1SJbl1 sc1tp hattS ind nabeld emprovemem"' thtlf hair., the first y11r. wtth th• tfftct ma1nt1 ned m the second ye1r Hair counts 11"1 .rien who did no! take PROPECIA continued to dtcruse lnootSIUdy. _,..,,.,. q""lltlOnod on Ille grawlll of bodyhtot PllOPEOAll<lnolllJPNflD111Kthtil'll placn­hnlhescalp. WiU PtmPfCIA ww\ tor-7 For most men. PROP£CIA 111cre11es the nwnber oi 1e1lp ha rs. helping 10 fill 11'1 thin ar blkhng .,11s of lht scalp Men Ul:og PROPEClA noted a slowing of htor loss dumg two ye1rs of USI Although rnutts wil vary, g1ne,.Ry you ,,;ii not bl -10 grow back II ol !Ila ht• you have km. Thef111,.,. suffitienl ovidenct 11111 PRllPECIA WO<I• •lb• naonent rd recedlfl9 badine WI lht lemooraf llN on both Iida DI the ti.ad Male pettem hlw mu occurs gradually over tint On 1vwr1ge, heltttrf ha• fJDWS ontv about haH an WKh Heh month. Therefore. ir will take llme ID lff any lfftct You - - to tab PROPECIA ddv lot lllrH - or"'°" blforl you se11 beotfit from Uling PROPECIA PROPECIA can onty won_, 1111 !0ng ttrm I you,.....,. talong .. 111'.t d"'V hos not -1td tor you 11 twolvt - hrnl>ertru=- IS ur.:hty to bl at blnlfit H you - 111"'9 PROPECIA. you ,,;ii lety Ion""' ht< you have gffltdwilhn l2""'""1saf stlJIJpongtr111mtn1. You shoulddoKlmllliswilh.,..,,_ - - I INa Pl!Of£CIA' ~~~~~~~~ FolowyourcfoCID(s- • Take one tablet by mouth uch day • You maytah PftOPECIAwilll or "'"'11o<a foocl • If you forget to t1k1 PflOPEClA. do om tah 1n extra tlbltt. Jusi bh Int ntxt t1bllt 11 usutl PROPECIA will mz1 WO<l fa•r or bitter I you talo • mor1 dlan onco 1 day JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE W1lo - liQI lah PllOPECIA' • PROPECIA s for the b'Htment ot male pattem ha loss m ,_.EN ONLY and shoutd not be taken by women >rttuldrtn • Anyone alttt'g c to 1nv of ltle ~redients A wara1119 about PROPECIA aad pr91nancy • Wo.nen who lfl or IMY potentially be pr19nant - must not UH PROPECIA -should 1t01 h1ndl1 crushed Of brobn tahlltl flf PROPECIA "a waaaaa who 11 pregnant with a m11l1at.by111$orias dMI active ingrtchent 1a PROPECIA. tither~ sw•llow1ng If ....... All\ it""' C.UM .-....1ibn of .... 1. Nby'1 se• .... If. Won:uNI who II~ COMH lnlO con 1K1 widt ... ICtlY'I ...,ectienl in PROPEC1A. 1 doctor shouN be CORlutt.d PROPECIA Wblell ire cNWd ind will prevent contKt witll 1be Ktt'lt ingndieat kl .. llOl'Mll Mndl1nt. proYNIH ll:ilt tN tablltl ire IMlt ~- or a.shed Wllat "'Ibo poutbl1 .... lllKU of PRO PE CIA' I.JU d prncnp110n products. PROPEOA may cause- otloe11Incinical1111dios. lid1 othlcts lnJm PROPECIA were r.nc:onwnon and did not 1ft1Ct most mtfl A trn1 numblr ol men txpentnCtd cert111 Hxutl side tffects 'Thesl men reported nn1 or mote ol lhe folowing less dnart for au. diff t.fty" ~ a11 encDcJn; ind. a decrease m lhe amount of semen. Each of these Sid• effects occurred ,. less lhan 244 of men Then IJde .nects wtnl eway,. men who l!Opped lltilg PROPECIA. They Ibo disappeared on - men wtio contonued !along PROPECIA. In -al .ise. Ille totlowlng htw bltn rel)0!10d infrequon!!y aHer!l'I' "'"'°"' mlud!ntJ rasll. rtthing. llMts incl swoling ,. Ille ips Ind face; problems willl oiacuratlon; breast !endameu incl anlarg""'nt incl lllllCU!ar pa111. TtlJ your doctDr promplly 1bolO-. or any-........ 1-olfaC~ • PROPEaA c .. 1fttce 1 blocwl test callM PSA 1Proat.te-Specilc "'9bgnl for dt11ereeni"I of prostate c1nctr ti JM Mwe a PSA llSI ...... J011 Mo.Id tall ywr tlO(tot dl1t YM .,, takint PROPECIA.. Slorogo 1ed llaodtoag Keep PROPECIA l'I d1e ongm1! conurner ind keep the container closed Stott ii .n 1 dry place 1t room temperature PROPEClA tablets 1r1 coated and will prttHI com.ct with the 1ct1v11ngr1d11rn dunng .orm1I handling, provided dl1t dtt tablets are not broken or crust.id Do not gfvt your PROPECIA tablets to anyone else It h11 been prtscribtd onty for you KHp PROPECIA and an medit1ttons OUI ol the r11ch of chitdrtn THIS l£AflET PROVIDES A SUMMAllY OF INFllRMAllDN ABOllT PROPECIA IF AFTER READING THIS LEAFLET YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR ARE NOT SURE ABOllT ANYTHING, ASK YOUR DOCTOR 1~7J15,--,.......,f'nolly.UIA.M T07•PMclEn Propec1a· t1 "T-o1 MERCI a CO Inc -•-otM£11U&CO,loc (finasteride) Tablets -~tel ... .,..,. .. ..lohftlofl. Joimon .c. o~ 1,.u·-r:1,..,.. - • ... 0 MERCK & CO., INC., W• tehouse Station. NJ 111889 USA -""""°" "14SlfiKBDJ)-PRP-CON Come visit us in our new location (Jan. 30) at 1311 Holman across from HCC-Downtown Campus For more info ••• 713-528-6756 or maranatha@ev1.net WE'RE MAKING A MOVE. •• we Wiii be sharmg the home of Central Congregational Church at 1311 Holman (nght across from the HCC-Downtown campus) on January 30, 2000 Worship time 6 30pm • Bible Study 5:30pm Offices are located at 117 Tuam January 23 - Last Service at 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 Bible Study at 9:30pm continuing next Sunday, January 30th Part 2 of an 8 part sermon • series on the truth about homosexuality and the Bible "What Does the Bible Say About Homosexuality" HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 NEWS INSIDE Around the Nation .•..•• . .•. . ••...• . •. 6 President calls for hate crime protection .•.. 6 Two AIDS hospice officials face charges . . • • 6 Ohio Gov. removes 'sexual orientation' from bias ban • .. .. .. .. • ...... .. . 6 Three women sue magazine for 'lesbian' photo 6 Students threatened, beoten for being gay •• 6 High court to heor Scouts challenge .•..• . . 7 z Heolth Briefs ...................... 12 g LOCAL NEWS 5 Drug giants setto merge ............ . 12 ~ "'*'~lliliil Difficulty in taking cocktw1 may be main blome 12 ~ •w~gmayrurerommooro~ ..•.... 12 f ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~11~d Resurrection MCC is set to purchase Evangelistic Temple on West 11th for $2.35 million, allowing the city's largest gay church to expand its o erings Ointon to ask for Sl billion for research ... 12 and move from its tight quarters on Decatur Street. AIDS funding announced for three schools . 12 VOICES & ECHOES Abel. Muzzling Rocker only treols the symptoms . 8 Alveor. Straighl couples .,,;JI suffer from MARGE . 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Gold & bold ...................... 15 Movement and music ................ 15 Out in Print: 'Fnends & Family' .•.•..... 16 Bestsellers .............. .. ........ 16 Eating Out: Dipping into the cool soute .... 17 Lesbian author and her e·publishing . . .. 20 COMMUNITY PFLAG to launch metro·wide campaign 21 Community Calendar • . • . . . . • . • . . 22 Occasions .. . .. .. . .. . . . . .. .. . .. 23 My Stars! • .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. . .. 27 CLASSIFIEDS .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . .. ..24 CARMART ••.......•.••........... 25 DIRECTORY •• . •.....•.. . ......•••. 26 Issue 1004 lW~n~~I AQ material 1ri Houston Voice Is protected by federal copyright law and may not be repro· duted w1th0ut the wntten consent of Houston Voice. Tho sexual orientation of adven1sers. ph<Mgraphers, wnters and cartoonists pub· fished herein is neither Inferred or 1mpl1ed The appearance of names or piGtortal repre· ser1tation does not necessarily indicate the sexual onen1at1on or that person or persons Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take respons1b11oty for its return. The editor reserves the right to accept, reJeCt or edit any submission All rights revert to authors upon publication. Guidelines for freelance contributors arc available upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 Gay church to leave cramped quarters byKAYDAYUS After 20 years in the histonc Sixth Ward, Houston's largest gay church, Resurrection MCC. is on the move to more grand quarters. Since beginrung its mirustry in 1972, the church has been housed in tight quarters at 1909 Decatur St. And it has grown from hum­ble beginnings, first gathering in an apart­ment, then a rented bicycle shop on Waugh Orin:? and next a fonner printing shop. The church moved to its first traditional church building on Decatur Street in 1979. Having long ago outgrown that location, church members will soon pack up and move to a much larger facility at 2025 West 11th St. Church officials hope to close on the $2.15 million sale, home of the Evangelistic Temple smce 1955, m mid-March. &>cause of its c\'er-growing congregation and cramped quarters, the church has been looking for a new home for nearly two years, said Re\'. J. Dwayne Johnson, Resum>ction MCC's pastor. The church's current quarters, which seat about 410 people, is usually outstripped as weekly attendance has spiked to about 500, John~on s.11d. And the facility serws a larger conshtumcy of over 2,500 people, he :;;ud. Space constraints ha\'e in the past pushed Resurrection MCC's special scr\'ic­es, like its Christmas Eve and Easter cefe­braltons, to other facihties. The E\'angefisbc Temple has much to offer, Johnson said, including seating for 1,575 peo­ple. It also boasts offices, meeting rooms, l\\·o chapels, a full-immersion baptismal faality. a large gymnasium, classrooms, a full commer­cial kitchen and e\'en a bndal dressmg room. "For the first time it will be possible to ha\'e a variety of ministries happening at the same time," Johnson said. With the additional space, Johnson hopes to expand the church's personal counsel­ing, family and education programs. The extra space also allows for expansion of the church's bookstore to double in size. It also means that the church can finalh· fully orgamze and catalogue its extensiv~ gay and lesbian archive and library of over 10,000 \'Ofumes. " 1ot m.:my people are aware that Resurrection is the custodian of the largest GI.BT archin's m the state of Texas," Johnson said. The archives includes a complete, 20-year arch1w of the lfo11ston Vozcr and other gay publications, biographies and fiction, as well as gay and k~bian psychological ~tudiL"' The new church will be paid for through donations from the congregation and com­muntt\', and from the sale of the current facilit\", John~on ~id . The Sixth Ward building. built tn 1926 and listed on the \:anonal Register of Hi,tonc Places. went on the market in Au~u't 19%, though it hasn't been sold yet. "\\'e'\e had lots of ntbbles, but we're still looking for a bite," Johnson s11d "\\'hen we began this task in 1997, we had no idea II would take this long. \\'e ha\·e since learned that other churches han:> taken as much as 10 years to find their new faciltt\:" Church officiab hope to do~ on the ~le of the new property soon enough to hold 1b Pride celebrations there m June, he said. Resurrection MCC Congregational tours Jan. 29, Feb. 5 2025 W 11th St. 713·861-9149 www.mccr·hou.com Women, gays most vulnerable to hate crimes, former cop says Society and gm·emment should escalate the battle .igainst e\'eryday bias-related mci­dcnb, not just the headline-making crimes, ~peakcrs Jt a city·sponsored conference in 1 louston ~1d Thursdav. "I late must be e~posed . It must be dcnounct'<I," Mayor Lee Brown said in his opening remarks~ "In the face of hatred, apa­thy will be seen as acceptance by haters, the public and, wor~. the victims." The conference, hosted by the city and the U.S. Justice Department, featured a full day of ~peechcs Jnd panel discussions dissechng hate·inspired \'iolence. In a mornmg address, the sister of East Texas dragging victim James Byrd Jr. drew a standing O\'ation after her emotional plea for a change m not just laws, but attitudes. "l tned desperately to put his death in perspechve That was very difficult. In fact, it was impossible," Mary Verrett told an audience of about 400, including many high school students. "I could not make sense of his death." Verrett, of I louston, and others called upon Texas to pass laws that would increase penalties for crimes found to invoh·e bias. An attempt at such leg1~fation failed last spring. All three of the white men com·1Ctcd for dragging Byrd to death in 1998 outside of Jasper, Texas, were con\'icted of capital murder only because prosecutors pro\'ed a second felony-kidnapping-occurred during the slaying. A hate-related murder in Texas is not automatically grounds for a capital case. Billy Johnston, a fonner &k.ton policeman ,, ho rt'gtllarly speaks about taate cnme,. said the I\' o most vulnerable groups toda} are gar and women, because many people shll think it is acceptable to mbtreat them. "Gays are the tou~hest group to deal with" tn tratning new police officers bt>cause cadeb often aren't interested m protlX'ting them, John,;ton ~1d. Anntse Parker, a longtime local ga} acti\'bt re(ently elected to her second term as an at-large counc1lmember, recounted an incident in which a carload of young men chased her and her com· panion through Houston. Parker abo supported hate cnme legisla­tion, if for no other reason than s\'mbohsm •You don't stop this behanor \,·ith law~. but it may send a signal of communtty out­rage," Parker sud. -The Assocrnled Pres 6 WC /a/ie /wide wi ce/e&rali/;lf/ OWJl dive'}tJt'fJI ... &:TRO. 'GEST IDEAS have always been the simplest ones. The ones that grow from \~sion. At Chase Texas, it is our vision to manage diversity as we would any other strategic resource. \·Ve have made diversity an integral component of our culture because we know tliat bringing collective experiences and skills to the table enables us to do things that none of us could do alone. A simple idea that inspires great rewards. QCHASE The right relationship is everything.rM Member FDIC NEWS JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Around the Nation President marks MLK Day with call for hate crime protection WAS! 11:\GTON (AP)-Prcsidcnt Clinton marked Martin Luther King jr.'s birthday on Jan 15 by urging Congress lo step up civil rights enforcement and expand the frdt•r.il hate rnmcs law to include those motivated by bias on the basis of sexual orientation, gmdl'r nnd d1sab1hty "There arc still too many bamers and examples of too many Americans facing d1scnminahon m their daily lives," even though the country is doing better in trt'ating all citizens equally, the president said in his weekly radm address. A move to expand the law died last year because of opposition from Republicans m Congress. Two AIDS hospice officials accused of stealing federal grants NEW ORLEA\iS (AP)-Two former administrators of a New Orleans AIDS hospKe have been actused of spending federal grant money on trips to a French Quarll•r bar and a .\11ss1ss1ppi casino. Former Execuhve Director Sherman David Kiviaho, 38, wa.s booked Dec 29 for the theft of more than $500 and for forgery. An arrest warrant has also bC'\'n 1ssut>d for Carlos Anderson, 36, the n•nter's ex-operations manager. Investigators dl'tl'r· mmed that $1,000 m cash was billed at the bar to a corporate American Express c.ird and similar charges were run up at a casino. "'I hey were shopping sprees," ~id Kym Whitfirld, a Cl'nt\'r client advocate, eshmating that as much as $200,000 had been missprnt. Ohio Gov. removes 'sexual orientation' from disaimination policy Cl F\ U i\ND (AP}-Gov. Bob Taft removed "sexual onentahon" from a policy banning employment bias in OhJO government last year. Taft's executive order was issued at the end of August and declares his adminis­tration's goal to "ensure that all Ohio citi,(cns have equal employment opportunity" in state ~>bs. Taft spokesman Scott \1ilburn said the governor intentionally deleted the sexual orirntation language because he didn't want to favor any group. HWe'rc not going to go down a laun· dry list of groups," ~1lburn said. "ls he going to list spc­af1c groups' That's really a Pandora's box." Offiaals . Mlh gay righls groups responded that Taft's revision is ~ setback "It rolls back years of state policy," said Jeff ~ RedllL'd, cwc.itive director of lhl' Stonewall s ( ommumty Center m Columbus. Ohm's two pnor gov· :<! .__ __. _,_ ___ ..-1....1 ernors, Democrat Richard Celeste and Republican (..corge Vomo\'1ch, included a spcafic reference to scxu· al onenlallon in their non-chscnminahon orders Celeste first issued tt> order m 1984 and Voinm1rh continued II, but allm'ed 11 to lapse at the end of his second term so that his successor could establish his own policies. Ohio Gov. Bob Taft angered gay rights groups when he removed sexual orientation from an employment bias ban. Three women sue magazine for photo that alleges they're lesbians 1\1 \\ YORK (AP)-Three young women have sued lJllma magazine for $60 million, ,1lll'ging that the bilingual glossy used a group photograph of them without their pcrm1s­s1on to 1llustral\' an article on gay 1 sues The photo, in the maga71ne's November 1999 1ssLJc, shows the three-two sisters and their cousin with their heads together and smil· mg broadly over the article's title, "My Child ls Gay. Qul' lfago? (What do I do')" The women are Peggy Castillo, 24, her sister Jennifer, 18, and tht•ir cousin Jamie C.1stillo, 21. Die lawsuit, hied Jan. 11, also names the photographer as ii drft'ndant and chargl'S that lhl• m.igazme's u~e of the picture defamed and libeled them and viol.ited their nvil rights by u~mg their likenesses for commerre. The suit ch.irgl'S that the accompilnymg article by Le1l.i Cobo-Hanlon caused the community m which !ht• women live "to brl1LVC that thl• plaintiffs were homosexual and that the plaintiffs were now revealing thcir sexual orienta­tion to the public at large by virtue of the appearance of these photographs." N.J. student beaten, Mich. students threatened for being gay EL\1\\'(X)[) PARK, N.j. (AP)-A 16-year-old high schcx1I student was alkgedly beaten b) a classmate because he was gay, and school ofhaals did not rl·port the incident to police. The victim went to polke headquarters and told offJCers he was beiltt•n neilr the school gymnasium around 1:..10 p.m., when a freshman tackled him and punched him rcpe.1tedly m the face and body until teachers were able to sq1arate them The youngl'r boy had thrc.it­ened his gay dassmate earlier in the week, accord mg to the police rrport. Prinn pal Michael :'\azzaro dl'Clined comment on why he did not call polJCl'. \lc.inwhile, in I lolland. Mich., a 15-yt•ar-old boy .1lready serving a four· month smtcnce in a juvemlr detention faality has pleaded no rnntcst to charges of ethnic inhm1datwn. Prosecutors say the boy compiled a hit list th.:st targeteJ minority students at M.1cat,1w.1 1!.1y School. The youth reportedly told hlS fnends that he wantl•d to "chop up" blacks and threatened to harm Mexicans, Asians and gays. 'lhc boy has a long rl.'Cord of thn•ats and inhm1d.ition, among them a thre.it last yt'ar that, "Maybe I'll just haVl' a 1wrvous brl•ak­down and bring a shotgun and a black trmch coat and kill everyone.'' I le latl'r apolog11.cd and police closed that case as an unfounded threat. J'rom staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 21, 1999 NEWS 7 High court to hear Scouts' appeal of gay ruling WASI llNGTON-The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Jan. 14 to decide whether the Boy Scouts of America can exclude gay men as troop leaders. The justices :;aid they will review a ruling in which New Jersey's highest court :;aid the organi.ration unlawfully ousted a young man, James Dale, after learning he is gay. A decision is expected by July. The state court ruled last summer that the Boy Scouts' denial of membership to gay boys and leaders violated a New Jersey law banning discrimination in pub­lic accommodations. L.1 . wyers for the Boy Scouts told the 1usticcs that the state court's ruling "endangers impor­tant constitutional principles of frcedom of spetxh and freedom of as..'-Ociation." At stake, they said, arc "con.~titutional rights at the heart of our fn.-c society- the freedom of a private, voluntary, non-<ommen:ial organi­z. 1tion to create and interpret its own moral code, and to choose leaders and define mem­bership criteria accordingly." But lawyers for Dale said there is "no evi­dence" to support the Boy Scouts' con­tention "that preventing it from discriminat­ing against its gay members would in any way alter or burden the messages, purposes and values that bring Scouting's diverse members together" "The [Supreme Court] now has a chance to hear that scouting 1s about honesty, com­munity service, self-reliance and respect for EDITOR others-not discrimination," said Evan Wolfson, a senior attorney with the Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund who argued Dale's case. "We are confident that, once the justices examine the facts, they will agree with the unanimous New Jersey Supreme Court that Boy Scouts do not come together to promote bigotry and anti-gay bias," Wolfson :;aid in a press statement. "Thus, their First Amendment rights were not violated by civil rights law." Dale, now '19, was in the Boy Scoub for 12 years. I le earned more than 30 merit badges, became an Eagle Scout, and was a member of the prestigiou.~ Order of the Arrow. The Boy Scout5 removed Dale after learning of a 1990 newspaper article about Dale's volunteer activities that said he is gay ~ According to the Boy Scoub, being gay ~ meant Dale had violated the group\ oath to be I< "morally straight." < "We don't feel that the homosexual lifestyle ~ is being morally straight. So that would be the concern that we would have. And we don't profess to judge them or what they do; we just don't think it ought to be part of Scouting," Paul M. likalsky Jr., director of finance and marketing for the Great Salt Lake Council of the BSA, told the ~rel News. likalsky said he was pleased the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear the Boy Scouts' appeal, but he IS concerned the court could decide against the group. Join the nation's fastest growing lesbian and gay newspaper company. Houston Voice is a newspaper m the expanding WindowMedia chain, offering exciting and challenging opportunities that extend far beyond one newspaper and one city. Houston's weekly lesbian and gay newspaper seeks an aggressive, experienced, professional journalist with management background for position of editor. Applicants should be well-versed in newspaper operation, work well under deadlines and thrive in a team environ­ment. Excellent writing, copy-editing and communication skills. Proficiency with Macintosh OS, MSWord and QuarkXpress preferred. Competitive salary and benefits. Houston Voice and WindowMedia are equal opportunity employers. Please send (no phone calls) writing samples, resume and cover letter for consideration to: EDITOR Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 by e-mail editor@houstonvoice.com or fax 713-529-9531 James Dale, a scoutmaster ousted after talking about being gay in a newspaper interview, will now see his victory in the New Jersey Supreme Court tested in the nation's highest court. "We have some concerns, though, because if [the Supreme Court] doesn't rule in our favor, it would be a seriou.~ blow to all youth agen­cies across America," likalsky said. -from staff and win> rq}()rfs Council okays protection for transsexuals BOULDER, Colo. (AP)-The City Council has tentativelv voted to include transsexuab among the groups protect­ed by its anti-discrimination ordinance. The council will hold a public hearing and take a second vote on the amend­ment Feb. 1. It wa,,. apprO\ ed unani­mouslv on the first vote. The' propo,.ed amendment would allow employers to require a "reasonably consistent gender presc'ntation" from their workers. It abo would mandate "reasonable accommodation" to shower lo.:ker rooms for people m the midst of a gender change. "I think if th...y had any qu~tions or concerns, wl' would haV<.• heard them last night," ;;aid c.amien Atilano, director of the Office of Human Righti;. "We're inter­preting tlus as something ~itivc." The Human Rights Ordinance, drafted in 1972. alre;idy bars dL<;Crimination in housing. emplO\mcnt and public acrom­modatioru- on the basis of sex, race, reli­gitm and !>l'Xual orientation. The follow­ing year the Council added gays to the list. If you are seriously ill, money shouldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. M. Bryan Freeman Fuda & ~Cler.I Allvoci As one of the oldest vioticol settlement brokers, we have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. * One quICk, simple appl1cahon * Campet1tive b1ddmg process among multiple fundi:-g sources * Any size policy * No cost or obligahon ot any hme * All policy types considered, including some less than two years old Return yoir completed .wplication and recewe atrttvideo~ * HIV and other serious illnesses * Qualify up to 900 Tcells Exercises for * Yo~r settlement moy be tax.free People with HIV * Confidentiolity, now ond olways by People With HIV. 800-777-8878 _ ~BENEFITS -...1AMERICA Celebrating 10 years as your advocate. www.benefitsamerica.com Member Violo :al A•socoohon of Ameroco Benelii. Ameroco NA. Inc 8 STAFF Associate Publisher M ke Fleming m keOhoustonvo1ce com Editor Matthew A Henme ed1torcthounor:vo1ce com Production Bethany Bartran Grapl'oc Des gner M ke Swenson Grap c Designer Contributors Ro h ker "~ eldt. Kay Y Dayus, Trayce 01skm, Ear Dittman. D l Groover. Robert B Henderson G p Plaster, Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. Ko'"' Thompson. Terry Sullivan Advert1s1ng Sales llochard B >iayes Ken Burd Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Classofoeds & Directory Carolyn A Roberts C..rolyn Whote National Advertising Representative Rivendell Marltetong Company, Inc 111 141 i.863 A Vv'indowMedia Publication Pubhsh-.rs Ch C•an R ck t :.asser rn IMatlonal ~!paper Cuild MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER flOUSTON GAY & LESBAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Estob shed 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 L,'lVl!tt B vd Suite 200 Houston Texas 17006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 719-8490 Fax (713) 529 9531 C tents copyroght 1999 Off"oce hours: 9 a ,, to S 30 p m weekdays VOICES AND ECHOES JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT Muzzling Rocker only treats the symptoms by Cl>:DY ABl:L John Rocker. I hs name recognition has reached far be} ond ba eball fans and he st,1r m the n~wspaper-in sections other than sports- v. eek after week Under different circ1.<mstances, 1t would be a PR dream. But given his bigotry­reveahng rem.irks, it's close to becoming a ntghtmJre. The AtlantJ Braves pitcher from ~1acon, Ga, h.is to be at least a bit surprised. Cert.i·nlv this can't be the first time he's m.idc c.ircless, cutting srntlments. I l1s head must be 5w1rling, since this isn't how it usu­ally happens for him. After ,111, he's tall, well-built, bo}'IShly hJndsomc, .ithletic .ind followed by a boat­load of fons. Guys love 'em, girls love 'em, isn't he the p1Cture of Amenca' ThJt's all the managers have ever cared about, so what's so different now1 \\hat's different is that he was cutting and carclC5' in public, revealing the tarnish that's showing up a bit too often on our shiny all-American golden boys. Doc-sn't he know his remarks Jre sup· po~ to be limited to those cardully-craft­ed mes.sages th.it emanate from the Bra\'l's' m.m;igcmcnt off1cc, message.s designed to bu•ld ,md rcinforcl a very specific image that attrJcts people ready to spend, spend, spend lntuv1cw after intcrHcw repeated the theme "Rocker's got to learn to rnntrol \\hat he Scl} s .ind apologize " Perhaps IT'Jn\ shJrL'<l h.:s \ 1ews, but had the man­' 1crs or good-scrsc to not offend tlckct-buy­us so op~nl} In other \\Ords, he CJn believe and feel whJtC'\Cr he v.anls, what m.1tter~ ts whJt he S..1)S ;ind how 11 impact:. the baseball brand That's v.hcre the PC police coml' up short: Control the outward expH·ssion, work on the symptoms. But what about what's inside? Is the offensiveness of his words blinding us to their origin? Is teach· ing him to merely watch what he says enough? He should absolutely be rcpnm.mded for his offensive statements, and the public outcry was definitely \'alid But let's not stop there Saying "I sounded like a redneck and I'm sorry" doesn't change much, 1f anything. Even 1f he learns to control his tongue, his heart rcmJins the same. And therein lies thl• limitation of legislation. As we SE·ck proll'Ction through the I late C nm es Prevention Act or l:mployment Non-Discrimination Act, do we re.illy believe th.it their pass<1gc would guarantee Teaching Rocker to control his tongue only does the Braves' PR work for them, leaving the underlying prejudice untouched. our equal ty? We know better, don't we? There are thousands of comp.mies with policies to prolt'Ct their employl'CS from being fired on the basts of scxu.11 orwnta­tion, many even offering doml>slk pMtner benefits. And still, gay and Iesb1.1n l'mploy· ccs stay h1ddrn "just in CJSC" They li\'e whJt we all know. If someonL w.ints to d1s­cnmmate, they w1ll-regardlcss. Of course Wt' need mclus1\'C Ieg1slJt1on. The debate ends our mv1s1b1hty Jnd expos­e our neighbors to the truth about us, remo\ mg man\' of the intern.ii b.1mcrs propped up by myth and stereotype. WC' need to be leg.illy 111d.idcd 111 the sys· tern, the code that sets up societal st,m dards, 1f we arc to have a ov1I society But laws arc not the great equahzcr-1ust ,1sk women and people of color. Thl'y've bC"en at this for some time now Getting in there, speaking up .ind speak­ing out, refusing to b.ick down whC'n ,1 Rockl•r runs his mouth-those Ml' the things that nudge us closl'r to lreedom ,111d full equality. Reminding our neighbors .ind colll',1gucs th,1t when john Rocker msults "queers with AllJS" and Andrew Young and II.ink Aaron Jrc st ent on the issue, we won't be Re.,undmg them that 11 \\JS you ,md I, the talks who .he and work beside them every d.1y, who Rocker stcn•otypcd ,md slandered. We cannot afford to hide bchmd the future promise of protection, w.11tmg m the shadows "until I know it's safe," co-consptr· .1tors ma workplace "Don't Ask, Don't Tl'I,." WHY OMlD ATHLETES $110\IWt!T ~ l~IEW$ w:f; A fedcr,11 law won't rl•store ,1 \'OIC'l' Wl''n• long left sill•nt. It m;iy slrt·ngthcn the \'oc,11 chords of those already whispering, but let's gt•t rl•al Millions of gays .upn't going to spontaneously burst into the "1 lalleluph Chorus" or publicly. proudlv proclaim "Free ,11 last!" lhcrc will still be work to be done, including some ins1dl' us. m SrtJPID '1JJSj JOHN ROCKER'S OFACE 0 JOlft'.S Off H~ ROCKER\ ~ l 1kcw1se, laws, in and ot thrmselvcs, won't dismantle the bastions of bigotry so deeply emlx.'<ldcd m the hrarts of Rocker and his llUtctly cheering admirers. EducJhon and IL>gtsl.ihon arc not either-or proposition<>, but cntical components of a long·IL•rm str;itcgy. Pohhcal correctness and a good pubhc rda­hons tcJm can change overt behavmr. But 1f we want trul freedom, we mu~t accept respons1b11itv for attammg 1t We must do more than s1lmcc s~·mptoms .md t.ime ton0 ues. We must go to thl• source of the probkm, touchmg hearts and changmg mmd by h\ 1rg .ird telling the truth .ibout our h\cs Cmdv l Alxl, former cxt'Cutm.· ifmdor f //11. Georgia Equalttv Pro1cct, can L't' nwfzcd at Cll"iil/LAbcl r wl C0/11 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT Straight couples will suffer from marriage gentrification by MICHAELALVl:AR I don't blame straight people for trying to keep us from getting married. We're gomg to tear down their hallowed institu­tion, and they know it. Well, parts of it, anyway. We'll do to mar­riage what we've done to other dilapidated institutions-fix it up, increase the proper· ty value and make it a place everyone wants to live in. If gay people move into marriage like we move into run-down, in-town neigh· borhoods, straight people can expect all the problems created by urban gentrifica­tion. Namely, that some of them will be forced out Urban gentrification tends to displace rehrt't~. households on fixed income and familil~ who simply can't afford the rising rents and proper!)' taxes. The ~1me thing will happen with mar­riage gentnfication. There will be \'1Chms: couples who haw fixed intelil'<tual inrnml'S (and won't be able to afford thens­ing level of thinking), families who don't fl':-Pl'l.·t dm:rsity and couples who buckle at the difficulty of propping up lovek'Ss mar­riages in the face of loving ones. It's fair to take into consideration dis· placed straight couples before allowing gay marriage Where will these people go once the institution is refurbished? A cheaper part of town, no doubt, but we have to make provisions. That's why I'm proposing that gay activists back down from their demands of full equality under the law and back a more modest approach. amely, creating a government incenti\·e program that slow­ly introduces gay marriage while softening the blow to straight couples who'll be uprooted by the beautification process. The plan: Get rid of DOM.A (the Defense of Marriage Act) and replace it with MARGE (Marriage Gentrification Enactment). Modeled after President Clinton's "empowerment zones," we'd identify 20 marriage-distressed communi­ties-" MARGE zones"-and make their gay residents eligible for marriage. These newly married gay couples would also recei\·e federal grants and tax­exempt bonds to finance swecpmg rev1tal- 1zation and marnage-creahon programs. This would have a dramatic effect in mar-ented and creative enough to re\·erse the blight and moral decay that straight peo­ple have brought to marriage? Hard to say, really. We're not exactly strangers to the blight and moral decay thing Still, if we can make neighborhoods walkable, we can make marriages li\·able. Marriage 1s a once-grand neighborhood in need of renovation And who better to do 1t than us? You don't want a tract-hous­ing specialist. You want somebody who's going to do with air, light and color what Madonna did with tits, clothes and dyes. Across America, low-marriage n~igh­borhoods could be reclaimed by identify­ing them as MARGE zones. Armed with engineering studies, architectural plans and full-length make-up mirrors, we could actually end up rehabilitating what thnce-marned, abortion-paying. 00~1,\­author Bob Barr thinks we'll destrov. Urban and marriage gentnflcahon 5hare the same goals-safe, well-lit streets (though I must say the current lighting ma) be too harsh for the gay sen­sibilit\ ·), more constructive beha\·ior (marrying out of lo,·e, not out of expecta­tion), pre-en·ahon of beauty (fighting for character rather than sprawl) and a cul­ture of service to others (children to some, three-ways to others), The only problem 1 see with \1ARGE IS HOMER (Homosexual Egos in the way of Mamage Residency), a loud-mouth, self­sabotagmg gay actimt off-shoot that 1s sure to develop in response. Usually. when a good idea like ~1ARGE meets a bad organization like HOMER, our civil rights prospecb are sure to suffer M1drael Ah"11r Ira::. mwr renol'11led am1· tiring in hi..' /1fe, with l11e pos,;ible exceptum OJ IIL' rrp11tat1on, whidz z,; ,;tl11 under con'tntc lion. )ou am reach him at mikeah'f.'llr@aol.com riage-poor arl'as, which tend to haw an Let us know what you think astronomical number of divorces, unwed Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) mothers and dateless gay men. or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Part of the program would also invoh·e "'A Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions a ~+aside for the covenant-challenged MEE!~~f?') U must include a name and phone number for verification. those straight couples who can't or won't ~/ Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, stay in an institution where Jo,·e and com- ~ Houston, TX 77006 mitment are the only criteria for residence fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com Cm MARGF work? Are gay people tal- THIS YEAR A fresh approach for restoring the skin you ore born with I will set out to do something great for myself. MUSCLE MECHAN ICSSM Avoiloble NOW for men and women. SPECTACULAR RESULTS! • improve skin tone, clarity, elasticity • effectively treats fine lines, wrinkles, sun damage, acne scarring and hyperpigmentation ASK ABOUT OUR TRANSDERMAL HAIR REMOVAL PROCESS 3843 N. Braeswood 713-669-0466 TRANSDERMAL HAIR RESTORATION All natural transdermal skin and transdermal lace technology 1 System ... $650 • 2 Systems ... $1200 reg. $990 each. Offer valid ONLY January 1·Febr11ary1, 2000 WE SERVICE AND REPAIR All TYPES OF HAIR SYSTEMS, WHILE YOU WAIT. FULL SERVICE, $30 10 LOCAL NEWS JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE University quietly approves domestic partner benefits ,- Continued from Page 1 for more than ii yeilr to get the uni\ ers1ty to move aheild with the benefits. "It wils a mattf.'r of thf.' committee both educilhng the umvers1ty about the situa­tion and working" 1th the ildm1mstrntmn to get the benefits apnrovPd " he said. Attracting job applicants The new benefits t only help those already employed by the umvers1ty, but they could help attract job applicants Lynn Huffer, chi11rwomiln of the com­mittee on which Beckwith served, ~aid her offer of a 1ob ill Rice a year ago ll'ft her in il d1fhcult situation bec.iusc hl•r p.irtncr IS il gr.iduate student at Yale university in 0.ew 11,JVen, Conn I fer partner could get benefits from Yale, but they could only be used when she was at Yale, leaving her to choosl' bct\\een benefits that would not .ipply when she was in 1 louston writing her dis­scrtiltion or no benefits .11 all. I fer partner chose to m.lke do without the benefib. "This w.1s an issue for me when I w.is first h1red," said 11 uffer, who holds ,11mnt professor posit10n with thl• French Studies depolrtment and the Program for the Study of Women and Gender. "It made the decision to take the 1ob at Rice more difficult." To address the lack of benefits, lluffer almost 1mmed1ately created the informal comm tlL tc ry to persuade the univer­sity to offer domestic partner benefits. Beckw1th's partner has benefits through his employer, but Beckwith said the availability of benefits could have helped his partner during the time he was looking for a 1ob m Houston. The benefits also help demonstrate a commitment to diversity by the school, Beckwith said. "It 1s nice to know that now we truly Ciln get the best caliber people," he said Beckwith, one of three people who met with Rice president Malcolm Gillis on the issue, said Gillis plilyed a key role in get· ting the benefits approved by trustees. "Onn.' he rcali1ed how the lack of ben­dits impacts employees and potential l'mployees, the president was 1nstrumcn­t. 1l 1n getting the benefits," Beckwith said. Why now? Th t la ·d of trustees of the private, 3,30\J-student university unanimously .ipproved the benefits during its December ml·ehng, <1fter considering a number of f.ictors, said Kyle Cwanaugh, associate VJCe president for human resources. The factors included trustee support for RJCe's 1990 policy on nondiscrimination, and the fact that the university's nepotism policy already includes domestic p<irtncrs in its definition of relatives, he said CavanJugh said the upheaval in the U.S. Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment I People r7 PlanetOut.com www.planetout.am I AOL Keyt.oo!: PlanetOut engage -t enjoy he.11th care system has madl• insurance bendits an increasingly important foctor in recruiting and retaining employel'S. The informal committee chaired by Huffer played a role in the university's decision, but there is no one reason why the university made the decbion now to offer the benefits, said Terry Shepard, vice president for public affairs. "I don't think there is an answer to 'why now?"' Shepard said. "There wasn't a triggering factor." There was a consensus on campus that the benefits were needed, he s,1id. Employt·es can sign up for the benf.'fits during the university's normal enroll­ment period for health bendits in April. The benefits arc effective July 1. The university's benefits committee had recommended the benefits in 1995, but they were not approved. The raculty Council, the Staff Advisory Council, the Student Association and the Graduate Student Association had all previously endorsed the now-approved benefits Who receives the benefits? university students have been able to purchase benefits for their domestic partners for more than a year. Undergraduates and graduate students can choose to be covered under a plan that is available through the universlly, but not affiliated with the school. Approvill for the studl•nt bendib came more quickly because there was no impact on the school's budget, officials said Faculty and staff will be required to pay a portion of the insurance cost for their domestic partners, but the costs will bl• the same as those incurred by marril'd employees who put their spou~es on the university plan. University officials predict the cost to the school for providing the benefits will be very low. Their research, which is consistent with research conducted by gay and lesbian groups, found that very few employel'S are likely to take advantage of the bcndits. Benefits will be available to the estab­lished domestic partners of both gay and non-gay university employees, but the university has yet to define "established " Cavanaugh said the university will likely follow the model established by other schools like Duke and Stanford. The definition could include four points, hf' said a minimum age; demonstrated financial independence, like 1omt check­ing accounts and jointly owned property; the fact that the partner is the l'mployee's sole partner; and the couple's intention to remain partners. "We expect to follow what arc incre.1s­ingly becoming standard practices around the country, so our standard should be the same as other universities," Cavanaugh said. For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Bulintss /;u11rance • Workrrs Compenrn1;on Group lltaltll • Ufe lnsurancr Ii much morr 6575 W. l .oop Sout/1, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 Paving the Way in Y2K I have an opponent and we are kicking off Da11lwrg Campaign 2000. I appreciate and look forward to yollr con ti1111ed support. Please call (713) 52-Debra and sig11 llf' to volunteer. I need your help! 713.520.8068 District 512.463.0504 Capitol HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 LOCAL NEWS 11 Lack of funding bogs down initiative to combat HIV .- Continued from Page 1 d1rrctor "fh,1t is wlll'l'C' the dull.irs bct11·l't'n ntm .md Jww \\'111 go," Krndnck s.1id. "I h.11 b wh.1t 1w are mm·mg on the fa~test- -to gl'l mfonn;ition out that prople can hear .ind Sl'l'" But hkc most of Brown's plcln, e1·l•n fund­mg tor thl' media camp;i1gn isn't m place. Muth of thC'clty's $5 million 111\ PrC'vention ProgrJm 1s cJ!rt•.idv .11loccJtcd, so hmlth oft•­c1als are studyirg 1t to l'C'allocatc some funds, shift st.J!fing or fmd unu~ed morlt'V, Kendntk s.11d. That e\alu.1t on shou.:d Ix complde m•xt month, thoug1' l'C'il' 0t.1tm~ exL~tmg grants to commup·ty-bJscd org.im7.cJtroPs to t.irgl't blcJcks tould !JM~ WL'C'ks or wonth~ k'Pger JS the propos;ils rnove through the hl .ilth dl•part­mmt .ind city wunnl for .ipprc\ .ii, she s.ud. I le.11th oltK1.1ls .ire Jlso rnp11•i; with ,1 retent $000,000 cut from its ne~rlv $100 m1l­hon budget as part of c1tr-\\ 1de budgrt tr 1m­mmg to addr~ an expedcd shortf.ill m rc1•­muC's, Kmdmk said. ''Our wiggle room is lm1 ero:l qu1tl' cl bit 111th this I.1st decrease m our budget," she s.ud. City health offinals pl;in to seek m-kmd contnbut1ons from media orga1111.ahons and the community to help fund the public mt1>r· mat1011 c.1mpaign .rnd other portions ot Brown·~ pl.in Aflt•r the mcdi.1 c.1mp.11gn st.1rts, lw.1lth olfin,1b w.int to mobihtl' the community .ind sohnt support from fomihes, churchL'~ .ind bw.i1ws:, ll\ldl•rs, Kl'Jldrick said. Then thl')' w.mt to mo\'e to ont'-on-one and small group mtt•rwntions with rt>s1dents of the .m'.1s h.ml­l'l't- h1t by thl' rist• in I !IV infections to modify lx·h.w1or~ th.it 111crt'.N' thl' risk of inh"tion, slw s.1id. "P.irt of tht• ol'er.111 plan is to gl'l ,1s murh coordin.1tion ,111J 111put from our rnmmunity memlx•r., as we c.111. Thl' human factor is p.1rt of the kl'Y factor," Kendrick said. "We .lrt' try­ing to );l't as m.rny md1\'idu.ib to sll'p up to the pl.1tt• and s.1y wh.1t they can do in tht·ir life." But taking weeks, or t·1·l·n a few months, to dl'i1wr fundmg to rnmmunity-b.ised org.rni- 1,1llons !'l'n·mg the bl.ick community is d1s­. ipp01nting for offic1.ils and AIDS .idl'ocates who had hopt•d Brown's dtx-Jar.ition of .in l'ml·rgt·1iry would lwlp put the pl.in 111 pl.Kl' mort• quickly "I ,1m ,1 httll• surpnsed lx'l',lU!'l' tht• m.1yo1 wanted to fast· track this and I was hoping \\'C 1n>uld be .1bll' to shal'e some of that time," s.1id Cit\• CouncilwomcJn Annise P.irl..er But l'.ukl'r pr.11st•d the .1pproach of city hl'alth otf1ci.ils, \\'ho want to impll•ment parts of Brown's imt1cJhve through t•xisting cowmunitv-bascd orgamzations, rather th.in crL.ltmg new groups or .inns of the oty health d(pJrtment. "I ,1m not at all interested m seeing us suprort a new prohferat10n of ne\1 agrnc1e . \\t• ought to be workmg th.rough ex1stmg commurnty-bJscd orgamz.itions. It is JI\, ,1} s the tendency of the ot) to want to bnng 1t m­house, rather thJn helpmg ex1stmg, expen­enced ori;.11111.cJhons mo1 e mto a ne\' a~ea." Parker 5,11d. A bully pulpit? \\ hrn Brown .innouncld his plan m early Decm•ber, he told a p.ilked prl>ss conference th,1t educators, medt.1, clergy and bus1m>ss ll•ad1•rs must grasp the importance of good hl•alth. He also c,11led for an open d1scu s1or of sexual act111tv to "counteract the m'lhons of medi,1 messages thJt glonf\•" uns.1fe sex i\nd he pledged to use his oificc clS ,1 bull\ pulpit, speJkmg out on I !IV pre1·entlon .ind thl' nsc in I !IV 111fect1ons m the city's black wmmumty durmg his spcl'Clws and appear­, UKlS. But in two m.i1or addrl'ssl's this month­his ).in. :1 in.1ugural addrl'ss and his .innu.il st,1tl' of the city on Tut•sday-Brown did not mention his declaration of .i state of l'ml'r­gl'llC)' or his plan to combat the new rist• m I !IV infections. Dunng his .t'>-minute state of thl• city ,1ddrl'SS to members of the Gm1tl'r 1 louston P.irh1l'r$h1p, Brown touted thl• .iccomplish­ml ·nb of his administration and outlined thrl't' d1.1lll'llgt» tor the nl'xt sc1·cr,1l )"l'Jrs: .1ir pollution, tran~port.ition <ind prol'iding ,111 ,1dl·quatl' w.itt•r supply. "Tht•rt' were dozens of things I could hJ1·c talked .ibc>ut. I wanlt'd to brief the commu­mty on our succL'sscs and the tri.mgle of ch.1lknges I mmhoned,'' Brown s.1id ,1fter his addn'Ss. But Brown added th.it he has t.ilked about I llV in tht• bl.ick commurnty dunng other public .ippe.irances, though hl' didn't citt• sf'l'i. ifir ex,1mpll•s. I c,1\'ing out .inv mention of 111\' and the city's dforts to comb.it the rise m rnftx·tions It's a jungle out there! LET STERLING MCCALL TOYOTA'S Diana The Huntress BE YOUR SAFARI GUIDE For start to finish easy car buying, phone me at 713-398-7827 or begin your fun -filled Journey by emailing me at dhuntress@sterlingmcca lltoyota .com "I'll protect you and hunt down the best deal!'' m hi' recent speech6 means Brown missed opportunitil'S to ruild public sUpfOrt for fightmg till' probkm, Parker :..1id. "\\'e h.i1·c such a 'trong dins1on of l.1bor bctwl·cn tht' city .ind the county 111 hcJlth (are Theoty b hm1tcd tl'educcJhon cJnd pre­vention, so h.11 mg Jn .1rt1cul.ite spokesman for HI\ I AIDS, p.irt1cul.irly one from the /\fncan-Amencan rnmmumt\, would be cffccti1·e," o;,11d Parker, who attendcd Bro11 n's 'tatt• of thr ot1 on T uesdJ\ P Jrkl'r sJ1d e1 en though the aty has mcreJscd funding for HI\ programs 111 recent ye.ll's, 1t ~sh I not enough, so it's cnt ILal for public officials to find other \\ .1\ s to address the problem "\\e knO\\ thJt 11 e Jrrn t gcmg to h.11e thr kmd of mone} that folks would hke to S('(', so 11 r hm e to lia1 c ot"icr thmgs that don't rC'qrnre tax dol .us On( ct tho'ie thmgs ~ LS fllh lC J\\clrcnes.o; ard thJt I'< free \\e need to do as much of It as \\e can," Parker sJ1d Overcoming the stigma A rt port from the Center~ for U1scaSl Control cJnd Prewnt10n la t \\ l!l'k suggested that the stigma of homosexuaht) pla} s a role m sprc;idmg the d1se.l!'e bccau~e mmontie' arc lcs.' hkelv than 11 hite' to idl•ntif\ them­selves as ga\ or seek AIDS prt•1ention aPd treJtment serl'ices. 1 llV is not oltl•n mentioned by ll',1dcrs m tht• black communit\', which somct1ml'S \'il'\\'S homosl'\uality; sc\ and 11lt>gal drug u$t' as taboo topJCs that shouldn't be d1s­cussl'd, AIDS adwl<'ates .ickno11 ledge City Councilwoman Annise Porker said Mayor Lee Brown hos missed chances to build pubfic support for his HIV initiative. To help mertome thcJt, Brmrn and city health officials\\ ant to com enc a summit of bus.nc s, political and clergy leaders m the black commumtr to d1>C1Js~ HI\ and pre- 1 entmn method:;. Bro\\ n said m Dec ember that the summit would be held th1~ month, but a ~pokcs- 11 om.in for thC' e\ent's chief orgamzl'r, City Councilman Jew Don Bom•1• said 11 1s ~t•ll m the plannmg stages. ' THE PLAZA AT RIVER OAKS ~ 1920 W. Gray • 1945 W. Bell 713-528-5277 SEE THE CL~rFIED SECTIO~ Selling your life •i nsurance • IS a Whet' y0<.;e gay iving"' ~ V ord I"' "9 selng yo;,t llelllSU'once s.~•yo begi o'oc~•o':Jce consvllollOO "o ro.pressure 'lO-OOigot;or> c W<l"roen ? Shouldn't this option be discussed l.tPked Voolico Bene' II~ P'O!.'d 10 be lhe ~gov owned oncfoperoledvt0'icaltlrol:erw•hokX..i office n HQv;on After al we be~ "pr"VoO --g you l"e pcnonol ol•e~ l()ll YOI. de5erJe o."ld ge !Q vov 1~e mo; r.ioney "' lf'e "al Call 1 •800-275·3090 today! decision 37C Krbv ::lll e S le 036 ~ous or- 'X 7'098 713 !28 6777 &-ma il•'"tiotmo com R~lste-ed in Tnos Membfl ol Notional Vio6col Associolion LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS 12 Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pam Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Our Reputation is built on OUR MEMBERS! /§)Fl~ \e)XO~ Voted #1 in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 ONTH BY MONTH NO CONTRACT! Monda} to Frida} 5 am - 10 pm Saturda} & Sunda} 8 am - 8 pm NEWS JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Health Briefs Drug giants set to merge, capturing almost one-fifth of market LONOO (AP)-British pharmaceutical heavyweights Glaxo Wellcome PLC and SmithK!me Beecham PLC announcl'<l Jan. 17 that they have agreed to merge, forming the world's large;t drugmaker. The US. fed('ral Trade Commission and the European Union must still approve the merger. The new group is headquarterl'<l in London but will likely run from the U.5., and would have a 7 5 percent ~hare of the global pharmaceutical market Glaxo's strength lies in its top anti-migraine drug. Imitrex, and in treatm('nts for asthma ._ .ind viral infections, including HIV. ~ Sm1thK.lme's top products include the antibi- g ot1c Augmentin, and the antidepressant :i Paxil, as well as a strong vaccine business The merger would eclipse the just· announced takeover by Pfizer Inc. of U.S. drugmaker Warner-Lambert Co. If that deal goes forward, the combined group would h;ive 6.5 pt'rcent of thr global market. SmithKline Beecham is set to be purchased by British rival pharmaceutical company Glaxo Wellcome in a deal that would create the world's largest drugmaker. Difficulty in taking HIV cocktail may be main blame for failure CHICAGO (AP) When drug cocktails fail to keep I llV m check, the most likely rlw;on is fail­ure to take drugs properly and not that the virus has lx'Come drug-resL-;tant, tvvo recenl stud1l'S publL~hed Jan. 12 suggest. Antiviral drug cocktails suppress I !IV in 60 percent to 90 percent of patients, researchers noted in the /011rrwl of tire American Mcd1cal A5sodat1on. But ,m cshm.1tl'<l 30 percent to 60 percent of th(k,(' paticnl!. end up being considered treatment failun..-s, either bt.'Cause the drugs never knock the \irus down or because it rebound~. The new studies lookl'd al 58 I I IV patients in France and in 26 US. pahents where the virus reb{)undcd. The 1998 Fremh study looked for signs of genetic mutation assooated with drug resistance, but found mon• evi­dence to place blame on the failure to take medicim• properly and on the inadl•qu.ite potl'n· cy of drugs in the body. "We need to help the patient be well-adherent to the treatment," said Dr Francoise Brun-Vezinet, virology director at Claude Bernard 1 lospital in Pam and head of the French study. She cautioned that drug resistance may play a bigger role in pat1enb who have had longer treatment \\1th anhviral drugs. New drug may a.re common cold and hundreds of viral infections 0001\, Pa. (AP)-A new drug called Plcconaril has shown effectiveness against viral infcc­ltons hke meningitis, polio and the common cold, and may be in drugstores as early as next year The drug has been effective 111blocking169 different' UUSl">, the largest single family of Viruses that affect humans. It IS part of a new generahon of drugs designed to work .igamst spcof1c phySJcal characteristics of the targeted \11\L~, and developers tested 1,500 differenl \'ersions of Pleconaril before setL:ng on one. The drug fits neatly mto a groove on the surface of tl1e virus gumming up the machinery 1! needs to infect the body's cells. "Plcconaril .. pmv1dcs a lot of hope for the eventual de. 1gn of drugs for virtually every viral infoction," said Dr C'athenne Laughhn, chief of Virology at the l'\ational Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiSl'ases. 1 wo large studies arc due out in the spring from l'lccon,1ril manuf.icturl•r Virol'harma that \\1ll detennme whether the dmg works well enough to wm FDA approval. Clinton to ask for $1 billion more to fund biomedical research WASHl:\'GTO'.'J-Pres1dcnl Clinton will propose an ,1dd1honal $1 b1 hon for biomed1c.il research as part of his ft. .. cal 2001 budget, Reuters news sen1Cl' reported. White I louse chid of staff John Podesta also told ABC's 'This Werk" that he would meet drug company lead­ers on Jan. 20 to build support for prov1dmg prescnpt1on drug benefits to the elderly through the Medicare The industry opposed the idea last summer but has shifted to sup­port 11. "We're gomg to make a major investment ag.un m lhe National Institutes of I lealth," Podesta said, as well as proposing "the largest increase" for the l\atmnal Science Foundation Wilh the additional $1 billion, Niii would have $19 billion for bioml'<l1cal research. In the past year, the \.\'h1te I louse said, researchers supported by NII I discovered "a simple, affordable drug to prevent transmission of I llV to infant. " AIDS funding announced for UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke and Boston CHAPEL HILL, NC. (AP}-Thc University of North Carolin.1 at Chapd Hill .ind Dukl• University will receive $21 million in rencwl'<l foderal grants to help treat AIDS pahents in the state and to participate m experimental treatml·nts. UNC-Chapel Ifill will l'C(e1vr $125 million over the next five years, while Duke will fl'(L•ive $85 million, the two schools ,mnounred at a Jan. 12 news conference. The focus on much of the grant money will be on African-Americans with AIDS. AL~, the Boston area will get ne,1rly $12.5 million m fl'<leral funding for services to people infected with HN. A host of state, fl'<leral .ind local ofhci.1ls announced the grant, which was $1 8 million higher than the same grant last year. -From staff and wire rrporls HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 some SUSTIVA is the first HIV drug approved to be taken once-a-day as part of your combination therapy. , 1rr lOO fT'lg cap ul tog,.thcr or c d , w th or w1thoL• food: high ~ ~ Mears shourd be avoided. Your doctor May suggest ta1<1nr, SUSTIVA t bee!' m to reduce r>y s de ef"ects you may cxpcncr-ce SUSTIVA, an NNRTI', must be used in combination with other HIV drugs. SUSTIVA is tough on HIV. 'du the amourit of VI s 1 you blood c' numbe e s SUSTNA can even be u erl n yo;,mg drcn. l year> of age or older fh 1s based on rc-:; ts <rofT'I cortro cd tr-a at 24 wcel<S Presently. there are 'lO ~ Its <rorr contro ed cl n1 tnats ng tCfTTl cff('Cls of SUSI . SUSTIVA has manageable side effects. Most srde effects are M Id to Cdn be fTlaf) ~ed. Tre W't sidC' effects associated witt Su5 TN A therapy have been nervou· system symptoms (drzz nC'Ss. trouble sleeping. drows r-ess, trouble coriceritrating and/or aonorrnal dreams) and rash. These us1J~lly subside wrth1n the first two to four weeks of t .:+merit In a small l"umber of pat1er-ts, rasr may be senous. Taking SUS flVA at bedtifT'le rnay help make nervo1Js system symptoms less notteeable ·N~RTI non riuc eosiae 'e'Jerse transcnptaSC' 1nhibrtor For"""' inlomuoon on SUSTIVA.al I~ or ••srt our weC.ilo at hnpllwwwsusuvuom For mort iUonNtion on !he updmd DHHS G.;dollnes. a PDF lied lhe fUido!ints n available 11 hapJ wwwhi""'-"'l 13 just did! Once Da ily SUSTl1'~ efavirenz Pre nar-cy srou d be ::NO ace! r- wol"lff '1: seen 1r pnmatr dosed witr SlJST"VA Bar- c w1tr otrer Me' hods of contr cept OI" before We know t t copingwitt ,_.IV s d e'IOJ!t Your ~ doesl"t h -;ve to be Ask )'Cl. doctor about SUST VA For rno.-e rrportf• orMation see the r-cxt page for Patient 'oM? • j)f' about c;us flVA. FOR HIV Finally, a once daily medication to treat HIV. SUSTIVA. It's about time. www.sustiva.com SUSTIVA • and~ Strilur1l LC£O ~ ndernris d o.A:ir1I ~ ~ ~ c 1m OuFbnl Ptwmaceu11a1> c~ DuPont Pharma.:euucab 14 Once Daily SUSTt"•A efavirenz SUSTIVA™ (efavirenz) capsules Patient Information about SUSTIVA · E vah) f r HIV (Human lnvnunodefiClency Virus Infection Gener c r.:ime efav renz (eh- ~Alh h rehnz} Please read tins ntormalion before you start tak ng SUSTvA. Read I aga n eacr. time you refill your prescr pt on in case lllere is any new informat1c: Don' treat this leal!et as your only source of informal on about SUSTIVA. ~ d scuss SUSTIVA" th your doctor v.tien ye;. start talGng your med c ne and al MfY V1S You should rem::" under a doctor's care when usmg SUSTIVA. You shoo d not change oi stop t '"IOUI f ISi ta ng •o your doctOI What is SUSTIVA? a medlcme ;;sOO to help treat HIV the YllUS t11at causes AIDS (acqu1ted immune deficiency syr. ""T A IS a type ol HIV drug called a "f!OIHU:feoside reverse transcriplase inhibitor• (NNRTIJ How does SUSTIVA work? rf lowenng the amount of HIV in the blood (cal ed 'Ylral load"} SUSTIVA lllJSI be laKei " v anti-HIV med anes Wilen ta! en with olller anti-HIV med1cmes. SUSTIVA has tiee.~ s/lo'l.n to reduce v ral load and increase the rumber of C04 cells (a type of immune cell m blood) SUSTIVA '!lay not have these "--·- - "?Vrry patient Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SUSTIVA IS not a cure for I IV 'i\I People taking SUSTIVA may still develop other infections • " 11 HIV Because u v. ry important ttiat you rema n under the care of your doctor Does SUSTIVA reduce the risk of passing HIV to others? 3S not bee!l stm he 11sk of passing HIV to others Cont nue to practice sate Sell .. uu ~ OI share d rty needles How should I take SUSTIVA? • The dcse ot SUSTIVA for adults IS 600 mg (lllree 200 mg (2j)Sll es. laken together) once a day by mouth The dose of SUSTIVA IOI ch dren rr.ay be lower (see Can children take SUSTIVA?J • Take SUSTVA at Ille same lire each day You should take SUSTIVA al bedt me dufng Ille flrsl few weeks or d _~side effects such as dlZZlness or trouble concentrat ng (see What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA?J • Swal 1JN SUSTIVA with wale!. JUICe rr. K or soda You may take SUSTIVA with or w Ille;;! meats t-t.wer. SUSTIVA should not be taker w th a high fa! meat • Do not miss a ~ose a! SUSTIVA H you forget 10 take SUST VA. take lhe missed dose ''ght away do mlSS a dose do not double the next dose Carry on with your regular dosing schedule need he p in planning the best times to take your med ane. ask yOllr doctoi or pharmaast the exact amount of SUSTIVA your doclOI presa bes Never change the dose on your own :DI stop h s med ane unless you doctor tells you to stop your SUSTIVA supply starts to run low gel more frorr. your doctor or pharrmcy ThlS IS very ¢:tant because 'tie ~ t cf': YllUS ~ you b ood may ease the med c ne ,, stopped for even a "• mo T .., may deve p resistance to SUSTIVA and become tiarller to treat Who should not take SUSTIVA? Do lake SJSTIVA f you are a erg c to SUST A any of ts gred ts 'SUSTIVA"' and Jl>e SUNBURST LOGO ore tradenwl<s of Oul'Onl Pharmaceuticals Co1r4>any Copyright 1999 Oul'Onl Pharmaceuticals Company -ni. brand:; Isled are the regiSlered tradomar1<s of lllGlr .._ """""' onc1 are na1 ~ of DuPont Pllarrnac:eu!Jc Company JANUARY 21 , 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? Talk to y11ur d1 ' "r qht away yc,J • Are preg, 1a,il or wa1 ' 10 bl..u. .. , p1!l!Jfld11I • Are breast-feeding • Have problems w th your 1ver, or have had hepatitis • Start or change any rned1ane • Have side effects while taking SUSTIVA (efav1renz) • Have a history ol mental 1tlr.: • 11 abuse What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? Many patents have dlZZ n~ NS ness. tro_bfe concentrating. and/or unusual dreams a 1e11 homs alter start ng •reatrnem w tr :su;:i 11VA These leehngs may be less noticeable 11 you ta e SJSTIVA at bedt me They a so tend to go away after you ve tak.en the med cme 1or a le11 weeks Rarely pahents •3ve more serious s de ellects th.al may affect mood or ab1hty •o th nk clearly Theses de effects occur more Olten in pal ents wt~ a h1slory ol menta 11 ness or substance abuse Teti y r doctOI promptly If any of these• de effects continue or 11 they bother you There 1s the poss1bli1ty that tllese symptOll'S may be more severe f SUST VA s used wi'" alcohol or 'T100d alte11ng (street) drugs You d avo d driving or operating rnach . ery If you are hav1rg these ~Ide effects One of the 'llOSt common side effects 1s rash These ra~hes usually go away without any change 1r lreatmenl In a small number of patients, rash may be se11ous II you develop a rash, call your doctor prornplly Other common side effects include tiredness. upset slomach. vomiting and diarrhea. However. lh1s 1s not a complete hst of side effects reported w11~ SUSTIVA when taken with otMr anti-HIV drugs Do not rely on this leaflet alone lor inforTiat1on about side effects Your doctor car. discuss a more complete hS: of side effects with you Please contact 1our docto· immediately before stopping SUSTIVA because of side effects Tell your ::a thcare prov der II you not ce any s de effects wtule taking SUSTIVA What about birth control, pregnancy, or breast-feeding? "W d '101 become pregnant while tak ng SUSTIVA. Birth defects have been seen m animals treated wilh SUSTIVA. II 1s "lll known wllethel th s could happen m humans You should use a condom or diaphragm m add1t1on to other methods ol birth control wtule tak ng SUSTIVA Inform your doctor 1mmedia!ely 1f you are pregnant If you wan! to become pregnant. talk to your doctOI Do nol take SUSTIVA you are ~. ·f g Talk t~ yr d y1 breast-feeding your baby Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? SL.STIVA 1y ie the elf >I J1 icluding ones for HIV) Your doctoi may change ywr medicines or cnange their du= F11. 1.. .. 1eason. 11 1s very important lo: • Let all your doctors and phanmclsls know lhat you lake SUSTIVA • Teti your doclors and pharmacists about all medicines you take This includes those you buy over-the-counter and herbal or natural remedies Bring aft your rned1c1nes when you see a doctor. or 111.'.lke a hst of their names. how much you take, and hew often you take them This will give your doctor a complele picture of the '!led1C1nes you use Then he or she can decide the best approach for your s tuat1on The follow ng medicmes may cause senous and l1le-lhreaten ng side effects when laken w th SUSTIVA. You should not lake any of these med anes wtnfe taking SUSTIVA •• • H1smanal® (astemlZOle} • Proputsid® (asapnde) • Versed® (midazotam) • Halaon® (tnazolam) • Ergot rned1cat1011S (IOI example W1graine® and Cafergot®) The fol ow ng medianes may need lo be changed or have lhe11 dose changed wtierl laken with SUSTIVA • • • C11x1van® (1nd1navu) • Fortovase® (saqu1nav1r} • B1ax1r'® (cl • '1' How should I keep SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA IS 0 100 mg and 200 mg caf)Sl.les Keep SiJSTIVA at room temperature (77°F: m Ille bottle given to y by your pharmacist The temperature can range from 59° 86 F Keep SUSTIVA a.. ot the reach of ch dr~ How can I learn more about SUSTIVA? Ta k to your doctor •other hea '"tare prov der f you have Qt. t s about ether SUS11VA OI HIV For add onaJ nf mat you can YlS IL'le SL.STIVA webs at http JVMW sust va ri This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use it for any other condition or give it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. tt you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. ~ DuPont Pharmaceuticals W mington. OE 19880 Issued September 1998 The Mitchell Gold Co.'s ads aren't just sel ling furniture- they're raising gay visibility, too by DAVID GOLDMAN The campaign began with a pink page that teased "We're coming out September 15th." It went on to show a nearly naked male "overnight guest" sprawled luxuriously across a sleeper sofa. In its most ground-breaking ad, two handsome, stylish men (gay fathers?) pose proudly beside a little girl (their daughter?). furniture executive Mitchell Gold anticipated complaints when his namesake company kicked off its brash new ad effort last summer. Imagine his sur­prise, then, when its supporters far outnumbered detractors. Gold, who 1s openly gay, calls the ad with "the kid" "one of the things I'm proudest of." It debuted in the New York Times in October. "We got an incredible response that following week. I got over 100 e-mails from people saying things like, 'Bravo for running the ad. My brother is gay, and he and his partner have a child, and I real­ly appreciate your sending out a strong signal that you approve of this kind of family."' Goreographer Maril Morris lirings 'l'~o'-liahd by aitlcs as his •eatest work­to tlie Bayou Oty 11111 week. In reply to a woman who did criticize the ad, Gold discussed the urgent need for adoptive par­ents and suggested that the role the girl plays in the unwritten story of the ad might be that of an orphan whose life would be vastly enhanced by her two gay dads. His reward was the rare experience of helping open a mind "She e-mailed me back and said, 'I've never thought of it that way. You've given me a whole new thing to think about."' Mitchell Gold has been giving people new things to think about, talk about and lounge upon since 1989 when he and his life partner, Bob Williams, cre­ated the Mitchell Gold Co. And now the new campaign-which runs in Met Home, House & Garden, the Advocate, £/le Decor, Home, House Bea11tif11/, the New York Tn11es, Wallpaper and American Homestyle-has earned the company an advertising award nomination from GLAAD. In less than 10 years, the company's success attracted a corporate suitor with a juicy buy-out ~ Continued on page 18 movement Moms on!.' of AmeI't! a's prcemment living 1- rMy choreographers brmgs ~ e ny to l louston next week for thn: o( Sf'L'C· r mt>vement and music with his !P Allegro." 1 h two-dol.Cn dancl'r , ,1 30-Dw ber d1orus, four voc:il soloisb and a large' orchl'~tra, this-wm k prom1sl'~ to be one of the mo~t 1mportant dance events of the season. ""'' ~ '--~~~~~~~~ A nearly naked 'overnight guest' is part of a new, gay-themed ad campaign of the Mitchell Gold Co. Partners Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams with Lulu. 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU Out n Print BOOK NEWS Unremarkable people making remarkable change by DL GROOVER The inspiration and hopefulness which comes from the true stones in Dan Woog's FRJEl'IDS & FAMILY make this book an ideal read, or gift, any tune of the year. From the author of "Jocks: True Stories of America's Gay Male Athletes" and "School's Out: The Impact of Gay and Lesbian Is.sues_ on America's Schools," this book is a compila­tion of 35 es.says and profiles of unremarkable people who have accomplis.hed some pretty remarkable changes in their bves, schools, churches, synagogues, legislatures and com­muruties with their constant battles for us. Woog won't win any literary prizes for the quality of his writing which teeters between unremarkable and overblown. You certainly won't curl up with this book's lan­guage as you might with a fine wordsmith like Vidal or Bucklev, but at least the prose won't put you to sleep because the people and their stories are so in~pinng. ~\'oog has cho~en his subjects we.II, ~vith a good editor's inclusiveness and ms1ght Just like us, heterosexuals are everywhere and cover a wide territory of age, race, sOC1al statu~. profe..•.s10n and smarts. There b a famung couple in Waterville, Iowa, Jean and George Huffoy, whose loving acceptance of their two gay children and their church's intolerance has spurred them mto an acttv1sm unheard of in such a rural commu- • ............. . • •• •• •• •• •• • • The lnterners ~ : Funnest ~ - •Dating · •• Senice •• •• The prose won't put you to sleep because the people and their stories are so inspiring. nity. They've resigned from the family church that George's great-great-grandfather found­ed, they speak out forcefully for acceptanc~ to numerous Iowa groups inside and .outside church affiliations, and they lend their open­hearted down-home sensibility to gay youths who just need to talk. "Nothing is more important than your kids," says Jean. Or Karen and Bob Gros.5, who had io deal with their daughter's transition from Jennifer to Jeff and thereby started Cleveland's first transgender support group They ~lso pres­sured PFLAG into becoming more inclusive. Even those leading the vanguard still learn day by day "It gets very confusing." says Bob. "That's why we're trying to educate e\·eryone, gay and straight." "No child 1s doing this to hurt you," explains Karen. "You have to understand that it's not a choice, unless the choice 1s between • • • • • • • • • • • • • • "Fun" - The Adv1cat1 • "CHI Siter - YahH • "Best 1nllne matchmaker" •• - HX Magazine • •• •• •• •• •• •• •• • • •• •• •• ™•• •• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• being happy or dying." There's also a story of a North Carolina grandmother, a friend of Jesse Helms, no less, who with other mothers and grandmothers who, had lost family members to AIDS, dcod­ed she "just wasn't going to accept" the prLj­udice against gays, or Helms' bigotry. She formed Mothers Against Jesse In CongrL-ss . As we know, their group, struggling uphill every day, didn't succeed in his ouster, but thcv're gearing up for future battles and con­tin~ e to speak up for us all One of my favorite stories 1s thJt of Steven Cozza from Petaluma, Calif. In two years sincl' he began his public campaign, he has become one of the most prominent advocates for overturning the anti-gay policy of the Boy Scouts. I le' s also 14 years old. Staunch, righteous, a firm believer in moral rectitude like the Eagle Scout he IS, Coua nc\'ertheless believes that a Boy Scout should not discriminate . "I low can the Boy Scoub of America say th.it gay people don't ha\'e family \'illues?" he asks. 'Tm just doing what I can to change them." So he speaks out for mclus1\'cness as he tnes to gather one milhon signatures on his pebtion fie has st.irted a web-.1te, garnered awards from di\'ersc institutions hke the Amencan Civil Ubertics Limon .ind the :-\ew York Police Department and has had to endure "mean words" hurled at him. But he kl'(!ps on speaking out. And he's not gay . 'Tm not, but it dOL."><;fl't really matter,'' he says. With all th~ sterling examples of profiles in straight courage compiled by Woog, it's a tea5e for a new year that could indeed be full of good tidings to all. They can only help. Friends & Family by Dan Woog Consortium. 256 pages, S1395 JANUARY 21, 2000 •HOUSTON VOICE What your neighbors are reading ... Men on Men 2000 ed. by David Bergman, $12.95 2 Whole Lesbian Sex Book by Fehce Newman, $21.95 3 Cybersocket 2000 by Gaynet Directories, $9.95 4 The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia H1ghsm1th, $13 5 Don't Get Me Started by Kate Clinton, $14 6 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 7 Welcome to World, Baby Girl! by Fannie Flagg, $7 50 8 Best Little Boy in the World Grows Up by Andrew Tobias, $12 9 Outfoxed by Rita \.lae Brown, $24 10 The Hours bv :'vlich.iel Cunningham $11 Crossroads Market BOOKSTORE & CAFE- 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 legends-Men of Falcon Bruno Cmunder, $.\2.95 2 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by john Patrick, $11.95 3 Steven Underhill-Jeff by Bruno (,mundcr, 517 <J'i 4 The Book of Lies by Felice 1'1cano, $24 95 c; Sensual Men by Bruno Cm under $29 95 6 Cybersocket 2000 by Caynct Directories, $9 95 7 Tea by St.icey D'I r;i,mo, $21.4S 8 Out of the Shadows b) Sue I Imes, $6.99 9 Outfoxed by R1l.i \1.ie Brown, $24 10 No Place Like Home by Christopher Camngton, $27 50 LOBO ~~.,~· 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 17 Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEWS Dipping into the cool saute by TRAYCE DISKIN Upon entering the lobby of the REMING­TON GRILL in Riwr Oaks, guesb are gn.'t.'ted by a wall·siZl·d p.1inhng of several well dressed men sitting .uound a table. RenderL'<l in bnlhant, wet reds and deep navy blacks, this SCL·nc could be .i wrC'kly club gathering of the good ol' boys, or a post Depression-era busi­ness ml·cling rcpll'tl' with cigars and scotch. Either way, the canvas perfectly fits Remington Grill. S1mil.u paintings adorn inside walls, providing a contrast benveen the vibr,mt paint against the dark wr10d w,11ls ,ind furniture. We SC"ttll'<l in with some Pino! Gng10 ($7 ,1 gl.iss), .ind thl'n tm>d to imagine the place with more customers than us. It was an t>arly lunch on a weekday, but I've Sl'l'n other tiny neighborhood establishments p.icked during thl' saml' time. ThL• bread basket impressed me, not so much bl•c,iusc It was more than your run-of­the- m1ll basket, but instead because of the d1vl'r>e selection of thin breads, including some g<xxl <>ncs with creamy smoked moz· z,1rella, sun-dm•d tomatoes and parmesan b.ikt>d right If\. The rosemary bread was less earth-shattenni;, but 1ust .J> fre,h, as was the more tr.1d1tmnal sourdough. With such mnovah<>n in the bread, I was surpns(-d the menu offerings weren't more adventurous. The grilled strak, beef and chicken options seeml'<l hke sohd chrncrs, but hardly anything seemed to stray from cl.1ss1c ~nllcu1sme Remington Grill 1919 Briar Oaks Lane 713-403-2631 Food: b:>.,_r~t; Service: t).'J S> bJ t;; Value: S> 't=r ~> Scene: <t> ~ t OK, 1f you really must Fme for most ' Worth the drive, so live a [11tle As good as 11 gets We started with the most unusual item-a plate of Avocado Fries ($6.25). These thick slices of avocado are breaded in thick bits of toa.,ty batter, deep-fried and served with a Bourbon navored ketchup. While thert.'s ~1mething wonderful about the creamy texture that oozl'S fmm the batter after a bite, the hm­e't driblet of sauce mupowered the avocado. On my !;ffond bite (okay, maybe my fifth), I went for the control group and tried the fnes without ~iuce. Shll, a beautiful, navorless goo. After such a striking sauce in the Bourbon ketchup, I was surprised to find no dipping L options for the Jumbo Lump Crab Quesadillas (SIO). The~ consisted of L shredded crab pieces and bits of roasted rnm, yellow and red bell pepper, and the slightest hint of melted 1ack cheese, Although I loved the absence of the typical gloppy cheese of quesadillas, the ingredients did haw a difficult time staying together betweL•n the finl'ly toasted tortillas. The min­gling of fresh vegetables and seafrxxl, and only a silky hint of cheese transformed this dish into an incredibly navorful ch01ce. The Oyster Stew ($7.25) b a bit of a mts· nomer, with only four small oysters noatmg in the salmon colon.'<1 base. Change its name to somt·thing like "Creamy Oyster B1:-que," howcvl'r, and you have a nch, delicious :.oup that isn't O\ erly fishy or salt\. I oyally sticking by the seafood, I ordered Cr,ib C.ikes ($16), and was surprised to find this plural-sound mg item deli\ ered w1tn only 0ne nufty, lonely crab cake on a bed of wilted 'Ptn.idi. Thl' thickness of the patty turned the t·dges goldL'n brown, while allowing the ins1dl' to rc•main a clump of fresh meat that tastrd gn_·,it. Thl' S.iut('ed Snapper (516) was a bit too b.ue on top, but tis own slightly brmy na\or emerged easily and hearhly. On the bottom, the' s.1ut~ lrnt a rc~pectable, 1f uneventful, bite of garlic, pepper and lemon. The cnhre fillet would benefit from a baste m this sautc The fingerling potatoe. ,. were attractive m their fl.it, oblong shapes, but a bit dry and ~iltv. Again, we would h.we appr~1ated a d1p­pmg component, even the bourb<>n ketchup. The semce at Remington Grill was helpful .ind attl'nt1ve, 1f a bit cold. The formality st'l'med to breed a certain amount of stuffi· rwss. If you are looking for a dining experi­enrl' both elegant and impressive, there still S('l•ms to be stl m.1ny other neighborh0<xl chmces l'qually .is classy. But if you don't mind !'pending time in the River Oaks scene, you'll find a more than reliable meal here. ... ..................... : ( f ~i I \ f : : \ ( ( . ' : ' ....................... PAGERS .222. ··R··· R•·· •• ITEE Premier ~~w~c~~L?~~~~~o~ PAGING & WIRELESS Free phone small pnnt - Original Phone pnce $99.95 & $69.95. Your cost after in-store instant rebate 1s $49.45 +tax. Your cost after $50 mad-in rebate is Free+ tax (4.12) Credit his­tory and a 1-year agreement required. Hurry, offer ends soon! Free pager small pnnt- New activations only. $9.95 for activation. 1-year agreement required. Offer ends 1 /31 /99 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE movement and music _.Continued from page 15 i l.rndcl s or Jlono, "I: Allegro, ti l'rnseroso rd 11 Moderato," a p.1storal oratono in two acts b.iscd Or' .. 'legoncal poems by Milton. This work, v.h1Lt1 trans1Jtl'5 "The Social \fan, The Plns1\e M.in and the Moderate Man," 1s ta1 lor m.ide for \1oms's broad mus1ca and movelT'Lnl sens h1I hes. l'rem1ert'd in '988 "L'Allcgro" \\Js the h"St work th.1t M ms ucated \\ h1le ht w dance d1rcdor ~t Belgmm's leading opera house Whrn Morns .md fi:-; company IT'adl tht MO\L from L\\ York to Belgium, thl tin\ troupe WJS tr~nsformtd trcm J group ot .1 d le'l u p d danters to comp.in~ \\1th large budget, nd its own studios, rnstumHs, l1t>h11n,, .md set Jts1gncl'S Morn, kne\\ hL had •ut the Jckpot when th dm tor o the operJ house S.! d to h.m fh1rk of the b1ggl t tning you want to do. then do 11 ' Morris had been form1'lg ''L Allegro' m h s mind for years he created m.mv s1grnf1t.int works for the Belgians, but 'L Alll>gm" \\as his most endlinng. fh1s expansive p1L'Ct uhh.7.t.'< Milton's kxt Jnd the pocTT15, wnttcn more than 100 yeJr~ bctore tlic .1ccompJnying musK, 11lustr.ik .1 late ru;.. mcL hued VIC\\ of the uni\ crsc M ton's ll xi 1s a flashback to J lime \\hen music, art Jnd aRh1tccturc wen• so.mng to new heights ''The Soc1JI 1.m" cn1oys hfc v..th Jbun­dJncc, taking us into fields to witness loVl'rs d.mcmg "The Pensive :>.fan" depicts a mort' wntcmplahve sort, one wlio denvrs plc:isurc from solitude fhc 2.'i dJnters porlr<iy :>.I !ton's 1m.iginary thar cttrs, not m 'iter.. forlT' but rather m J complex ~rrs ot movement, .!II d1ste1ctly d f. tercnt m rrythm and tone Whefe the mus1c.1I text speaks of birth, Morris's style reflects an l'arlh} fl'rhhl\ Wren quiet moments by the hrc arc oftercd, J.incers ingeniously inter­twine to form hmrth .ind fume As 1f d.inre Jnd poctrv "eren't enough for "I' Allegro," Morns allows Handel's bnght baroqJl' score to overlay thL cntm• perform anCL Morns has J!v..iys ullliZL'C! musical forms to llk<;p1rc his dances. "For \1orns, tht mu,1c must prClcdc the H'ry cenuphon of (his, d.mu.•," 'Klid bmgr.1- pher Jo.ir Awet.llJ, who oddf\ croui;h, \HOk her \\Ork .ibout Moms while he \\.IS sll m rr1d-cJ·cer ~\lh• l the hst of composers he uses range trori lht l'ith te'ltury to Bob \\11 5 and The rexas Pl.!} boys, the rnJslcrs of lhL b.-?roquc pcnod, l IJndlc chief .imong them, seem best ~J11l'C! lo for Moms Much of Handc1's IT'USl was based on d.ince rh) thms popular m the 16th Jnd 17th centuries, \\ hich transl.:ites wdl for \1oms fht entire voice of the 18th untury music.ii mmd 1s here-sorrow depicted m subtly gives way to the bl.1nng of roy,11 trumpets that are imitative of I landcl's ITlilJC'Sl1c "Royal Fireworks" musK. Structure, muSJc.il and othcrv.1sc, 1s .it the con· of \!orris's \'IS1on, as he shifts the focus of dJncc from the cc1l.ng to .1 more mid-body Special Guest Speaker Reverend Jimmy Creech Rev. Jimmy Creech has been working d" gently to change the laws wrthm the United Methodist Church that d1scrimmate against Lesbians/Gays/81sexual/Transgenders. After performing a same sex holy union ceremony for two men, the Methodrst Church Jury found Creech gu11ty of violating the rules of the church and withdrew his credentials of ordmat1011 Come hear Rev Jimmy Creech's remarkable story of faith, hope, and renewal, and how his mm1stncs cont !lue Sunday, February 6, 2000 9am & 1 lam services All programs are free and open to the community! Resurrection MCC 713-861-9149 1919 Decatur St., Houston, Texas 77007 www.mccr-hou.com ccnk red st\ le, rooted on krr.1 hrlT' , \\hill mary choreogr.iprcrs scem mtent on u.,,mg J :iccrs as muc building blocks, m "I' Allegro" 'vlorns L'> guided by musical .ind poetic m( SJges. Visually he uses trt hum.in form to create complex mo\ mg p.itterns rather th.m st.ihc sh.ipt . "L' Allegro" 1s one of the IT'OSI colorful of \lorns\ \\Orks-in ,1dd1hon to 1ls 48 duffon silk (()stumcs, 11 ut hzes 21 smms and drops for 5a'nery, offering a visual, musical and ballchc feast L' Allegro Jan. 27-29 Jones Hall 713-227-4SPA ,.... Continued from page 15 offer-$11 mil hon with earn-<iut provis10ns for .1 m.ix1mum price of $l2 m1ll1on. In the dc.11 (,old .md Wilhams \\ere retJmcd to run the company for h\'l' yrars. Houston Voice intcr\'1nved Gold at the I cnox Square Storl•house in Atlant.i, which fcature5 his slipcovered upholsterl'd furniture ma spcnal concept shop 'iu,ce<>s m furniture IT'anufactunng h,1s g1\cn Gold .\nd Williams thl' frel'dom to fl\ c openly as g.iy ml'n m ,m industry noted for its st.iund~ f.imily wnscn .1t1sm. It allows them to promote wnn•pts they feL. 1mpcrt.int (their new f.ictory fcaturt"S J d.iy-cart center for workers' kids) and to support CJuscs they hold dear (thcy Jre donors to Human Rights CJmpa1gn and sponsors of the national gay and 1l'sb1an fV ncwsm.igazinl' "In the Life.") "The ~11tchell Cold Co. IS our oldest .ind largl'SI corporate sponsor," said \1organ Grenwald, executive di~l'Ctor of "In the !Jfc" '1l1e comp.my h.1s been .1 corpor.1tl' under· writer of 'In tht· l.ife' sincl' 1997. rh.11 support has bcl•n \·1t.1l to our ability to bnng p<>Slll\'l' and .1ffirming im.igl's of the g.1y ,md ll•<hi,m community to ll'il'\'ision nation.illy." Ce[e,6rating 25 Years in t!U Community Saturna!Js at 7:JOpm 1307-:Jf ')afe • 713-880-2872 Crad Duren, M.D. Internal medical practice offering discreet confidental care to the community, includ111g HIV/AIDS diagnostics & therapeutics Healthcare from the Heart Anonymous 'Iesting and Counseling flfiljor Credit u1rds Acee pted • l'erso11al chech Am·pted lus11rance with Q11ahjicat1011 • Medicare HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 21, 2000 .. rhat show rcJchcs out to the hinterlands, to kids who arc in high school and going through sexual orientation turmoil," Gold said "I rl'ml'mbcr when I was in high school I ,1lmost h,1d a nervous breakdown. I w.rnll'd to commit suicide, bl'Causc I thought I was thl' onlv one who was like this." Cold, -18, ~\'Js born in Trenton, '.j., and graduated from Long bl.ind l.ini\'crs1ty, though hl' took six years. "I was not a grl«1t student," hl' rl'called I le was working at Bloomingdall''s whl'n he cJml' out, cmboldmcd by .1 g.1y boss and other l'mployl'l's. ,\fll·r that, "I flourished Js a hum.in being." ,\ dozen years ago, Gold and Williams (art director at Se\-cntcen m.1gJZine) met in a New York bar and have bl'l'n together since In 1989, the gay quest for elegancl' and comfort IL•d the men to launch their comp.1· ny with a line of upholstered dining chairs. "If you sit in a regular wooden dining chair, by the time you get to dessert at a dinner party, you want to get up and sit in the den." But in an upholstered chair, "you can sit down at 8 and at 12 o'clock you can still be at the t.ible drinking." Gold w,1s the new company's pres1dl'nt .ind CFO, while Williams was its executive vice president .ind director of design and product development. Their first factory had 23 employees; Gold is proud that 17 ;ire still on his payroll. A s ideli ne-slipcovers for dining chairs-then turned into big business, lead­ing Gold and Williams to introduce wash­able replacement slipcovers for sofas and chairs, ,1s well as original upholstered Inexpensive Small Business Networks OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 - working rclallonship, but you can only do that with 'omcbody in whom you have \W)' high confidcncL', because thcr<''s a lot of monl'\ in\'ol\'ed. Whenen·r 1w do ha~c an arguml'nt, we rcmcmbl'r that we h.we .rn obligallon to our employl'es." Another resident oi the Gold-\\illiams hou'-l'hold romes to the fum1tun· factory l'\l'I') worl..day· their English bulldog Lulu. ThL' dtlh that Gold ,1dmits n-,,cmble. "a snort· mg bttle pig" is a big hit with thL' kid:. in d.11· care. She's the star of man}' company .ids and 1s C\ en featum:l on the cover of the annual n·port of the Rowe Furruture Corp., I\ h1ch al'qlllrl'd the \titchdl Gold Co. in J99s. The Mitchell Gold Co. 'came out' with a provocative series of newspaper ads. "\\'l' sold m1· name!" Gold said ma mod; lamL•nt. 'Tm' thinking of changing m1 n,1ml', bL•caus<' I don't own my namL' any· mor,·. I'm thinl..ing ol changing 1t to Otis." Kidding aside, Gold is dclighll'd with his nt.'1\' corpor,1te parent. "In the world t>f mergers .ind marriages, this is as good as 1t gets. They don't interfere. The kt us do wh.itcvl'r ad\wtbing we want, hmn·\·,·r we Sl'l' fit to build the brand " pil'ct's designed with lift-off covers. Again, the pair's passion for casual elegance directed them "We lo\'l'd the idea that our dogs could come up on the sofa, and if 1t got dirty, we'd wash it. It's a much less stressful way of li\1ng." Tod.iy the company's Taylorsville, NC., headquarters encompasses nearly 400,000 square feet of manufacturing space. Gold is especially proud that it includes a daycare center for the children of his nearly 500 employees, plus a gym, indoor track and hcalth·rnnscious cafc. The daycare center even prompted J letter from a local minis­ter, who praised the gay-run company's commitment to family values. The compa· ny offers benefits to workers' domestic Quality Systems Competitive Prices Old Fashioned Service Sharp1 Speedy Repairs partners and includes sexual orientation in its non-discrimination policy. Though Gold notes that Vfilliams' oificc "is at the opposite end [of the factorv] from mine," he said he and Williams ha\·e found hving and working together to bl• a grL'at experience "l couldn't imagine not being in business together 1 couldn't imagine not working together every day," Gold !'did. The company's sales this year are expeckd to reach $75 million, and Gold acknowledgL'<l that the stress of runrung the operation can creep into non-Qffice hours. The partners han~ an agreement that either has the authority to "tune out" work-related conversation at home if 1t threatens to kill the mood. "We have as perfect as you can get in a Gold said when he and \\'ilhams came South in 19~7, "it occum'<l to me that I wa.~ :-.:orthem, )ewt.~h and ga}; and had a big pmb­ll'm." Ill- was ddightl>d, then, to fmd thm n,,ghbors cordial and mclusivc. The men now h\·t.' m a lakefront home m Hickorr "Of the things I'm most proud of, one of them is that we have, on a grassroots le\·el, presented ourselves to the non-gay com· munity in a \·cry posih\'L', profl•ss10nal sense without being pretentious We're JUst oursl'i\'es," Gold said. Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 •Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net • www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Lesbian author takes advantage of e-publishing First-time novelist Sharon Bowers established her audience on the Web before her work hit the shelves by A\1A'.\DA KYLE WILLIA\.15 "Lucifer Rising," the new no\'el by first-time novelist and native Southerner Sharon Bowers, marks the beginning of a promising career m fictmn for Bowers and a fascinating new trend in publishing. The book was first born into print on the Internet. It stayed there for months, estabhshing itself and its writer in the on-hne commumty. Bowers says she rl'Ceived thousands of e-mails from readers during the months "Lucifer" was a Internet-only pubhshed book. Bowers' pubhsher, justice House Publishing, 1s a small house with big ideas about ho\\ to tap mto the talent avail­able on the Internet. justice House seeks out the books that have made a splash, like• Lucifer," and writers who already h.n e a reader base "(t', a new technology ma wa\', a new way of approach­ing pub! shmg," Bowers says. "It's takmg writers who are established m a new forum hke the web .ind movmg them mto a traditional prmt lorrn n By doing so, Bowers :xiys justice f lou!>C 1s satLsfymg the needs and demands of a pre-existing audience "The reader base is saying, Tm hred of walking around with a four-inch spiral notebook where l printed out your 400 page novel '" justice House ndes to the rescue with "on demand" print capability. They claim they can put books on shelves within days justice House also maintains a heavy Internet presence (www.justicehouse.com), which showcases new writers and logs about 100,000 hits a month. In Bowers' case, the idea has meant success for both writer and publisher By the time "Lucifer Rismg" was available in print, Bowers' audience was established and faithful. The book debuted in the ''Top 100" at Amazon.com. As for the book il.;elf, "Lucifer Rising" 1s not a life-changing read. but it is a fun romp, a sort of fist-fight from beginning to end. Remember liking the bad guys in "Pulp Fiction"? You may ha\'e a sin1ilar experience with Bowers' main character, Jude Lucien, who is working a deep cover assignment for the Drug Enforcement Administration in Miami and hoping to won be free of the dark tangle of drug dealers, killers and duplicitous agents that populate her fictional world. On the frrst page of "Lucifer," Jude crushes the larynx of one opponent and puts a bullet m the head of another while he beg.~ for mercy. She seems to do this without ever really getting her heart rate up. Beautiful. disturbt'Cl and sexually ob~>Ssed, Jude Lucien, though not yet fully developed by the author, is already a memorable ch<1racttr. And Bowers ha~ carefully peppered her with redeeming qualities Lucien is capable of great love, passion and e\'en ten­deme-. s. The author shows this with l.uoen's lo\·e mtert'!'>t, a reporter named l JZ Gardener. In fact, the book starb out read­ing like action/adventure and quickly turns into a love story. t\ point of tension 1s not in the action scenes where Jude grb banged up ;md shoots her way out, it's m the dance done by the lo\'ers from their first nearly electric meeting through ups and downs, betrayals and misunderstandings. Bowers teases the reader with Liz and Jude gethng closer and closer to actually touching until you find yourself wish­ing they'd just do it and get it O\'er with. The author is unapologetic. "l knew what l wanted to do," sayd Bowers, who runs a bookstore in Greenville, S.C. "l knew l was working within genre expectations. What I wanted to do was to blend genres, blend the mystery and thriller thing with the romance novel." That she did, and the result leaves lots of room for sexual innuendo and sex. Bowers puts out with "Lucifer," and so do her characters. Like most first-time authors, Bowers tends to tell more than she shows ~enes that could be emotionally stunning lean instead toward melodrama. The drama-rich backdrop of Miami couldn't be a better set­ting for a story of sex, drugs and hot women, but the author misses opportunity after opportunity to show us the seedy underbelly of the city, to drop the reader into the scene, the bil­lowing heat, the smells, the traffic. But Bowers has the budding talent and natural instincts to take us there next time. She's working on the sequel to "Lucifer." "Past The Point" is scheduled to be ;wailable m the fall of this year. The ch<1racters m "Lucifer" .ire "sleek," dn•o.s 1mpecc<1bly, are witty, lethal, do things "expertly.'' smolder with sl'xu;il­ity ;ind han• eyes th<1t <1re piercing, eyes that glitter, eyes that are colors like jade .ind indigo. But bn't that really what we want? Sex, murder, beauhful people m great clothes? It's romantic ficllon. Sit b,1ck, strap yourself in, and enjoy the nde It's a promising bt•ginnmg to a potentially powerful series. "Wh,1t I wanted to do was just write <tbout good looking women m fost cars," Bowers s<1ys with il smile. SHAKESPEARE'S J~er Blnes and Senieri-Ois WRITTEN AND PERFORMED BY ROB NASH JANUARY 20 - 30 THURSDAYS 8PM $18 FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 8PM $20 SUNDAYS 6PM $18 $15 STUDENTS ALL PERFORMANCES TICKETS: 713.426.2626 3722 WASHINGTON AVENUE BETWEEN YALE & WAUGH/HEIGHTS ADAPTED BY Joe Calarco DIRECTED BY ~ RobBundy THROUGH FEBRUARY 13 "What could be more dangerous than that first forbidden kiss of literature's most famous lovers? The first forbidden kiss of two schoolboys." Joe Calarco Generously underwritten by Schopf & Weiss community JANUARY 21 , 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE COMMUNITY CALENDAR OCCASIONS • CLASSIFIEDS • CARMART BUSINESS DIRECTORY • MY STARS PFLAG to launch metro-wide awareness campaign b) ROBFRT B. 1 IFt\'DERSO'.'J I I.ill' hurts. Safe ~hcxik Cncond1bonal low. fho~e catch-phrases will be captured m large lrtter~ on billboards acros~ metro I louston as part of a )'l'Jr·long, $100,000 publicity campaign by PFLAG's 1 louston chapter, offic1.1b announCl'J this week. The three signs will rot.ite in high-\·isi­bihty are.is st,1rtmg in mid-~1.irch with lhl' short phrilses so motorists c,rn re.id thl' signs as they pJsS. "It .111 dC'pl'!lds on loc.1tion, becau>l' \w're looking for kxahons where pL'ople can S<'e them. We'1l' looking for m.ijor frel'w.1y h:.i­tions, ,1nythmg when• thl'rl' is a lot of com­mull'r tr,1ffir. The signs will be on \'myl so thl'}' may bl• mowd to other an'<h," SJid Cindi .\1urph); FI J\G-1 louston's \'ice prL>sidrnt. The nrw r.impi!ign mirrors J similar effort m 1996, which garnered the local group n,1t10n.1I n'Cogmllon. Sl'n:ral !'Fl.AG chapter~ .1noss the country borrowed those signs to USl' m their own camp.11gns, \1urphy said. Th.11 campaign also inspired the Bergl·n County, N.j. chapter of PFIJ\G to under­t. 1ke 1t' $-lO,O<lO, month-long effort with two b1llbo.mls. I he group started raising monry .1 )'l'.U .1go, the billboards \wnt up e.1rlit>r this month, according to the (l l.1ckl•n . .ick) Rl'ro rd "Our go.ii 1s to plant a seed, to raise some consnousness, to st.ut a discussion," said Lilli.in Fpsll'In, who founded the Bergen Count) ch.ipll'r after reJhzing how much support families of lesbians and gar need it they' re gomg to get past queshonmg and blaming them~cl\'es, and mO\ e on to ,1ccepting thl•ir children. "h·en if we gt•! soml' angry letters, at least we'll hJ\'e started a public dialogue," s.11d Fpstein, whose daughtl'r b lesb1Jn. "l'eopli.' nt'l•d to rl'Jlizt• that gay pl'<lple aren't some littll' fringt• group. They're all around us, tlwy'rt• normal, and it's no big dml." Thl' 12-by·-IB-foot billboards will cost nL'.U· ly $20,lXlO 1wr month to rent, Epstein told the newsp.1per. Although loc,11 PFIAG membl'rs haw spokl'!l in ~hools .md participated m m.irchl'S, tlw billbo.ird campaign is the chap­ll'r's first brgl'-SC,1ll' ,1d\'ocacy project. l'rl.AG-Houston rl'Cl'ntly signl•d a con­tract with ,m outdoor ad\'l'rtbing firm to bl'gin the L\1mp.1ign, though the group is still raising lunds, \1urphy said "Our plan 1s to h,1\'e thesl' billboards up for a ye.ir to gl'l \'1Slb1hty for PHAG, 50 pl'O· pit• know about us," Murphy said. "The [~ay and lesbian! community was owrwhelm­mgly supporti\'l' .ind gc;wrous in 1996." Tlw group has solicited donations from contributors to tht• 1996 effort, and are m.ik· 111g presentations to loc.il org.101zations Pf LAG-Houston will unveil a year-long, $100,000 bill· board campaign in March to raise awareness of the group. about the billboard camp.ugn to raise funds, Murphy said. Organ11ers hope the campaign ra1>es the group's profill' and lets others know that it's a primarily heterose\ual group serving the gay community, Murphr s.iid. "It is also a place where parenb can come for hl'lp. If they don't nl't><l hl'lp, PF! AG nl'l'ds them to help us with ad\'ocacy. It's a pl.ice for ~xual mmont s to get help to be able to come out' to thelf fam1lv and fnends. \\'e can he! I,,~ ·1th thJt,w she ~1d . PFLAG 27 I() Albar.y, Suite 304 Houston, Texas 77006 713-807 7878 www.pflaghouston.org 22 COMMUNITY JANUARY 21, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE community calendar saturday, jan. 22 Free H'V testing by the- Montrose ChrMC at Rascat's. 9 p.m. 10 2 a.m. 713·831).3000 After Hours KPFT 90.1FM.12 a.m. to 3 •.m. 713-526·5738 Q-Pattol wa ks the streets ot 8 45 p.m 713 528 SAFE Visual Arts Alliance 10 am. 281 58l 8408 Dognity mau at 7·30 pm. for gay Cathohcs 713-8802872 St- Stephen"• Eposcopal Churc" Rosary at 8 a.m 1805 W Alabama. 713-528-6665 Houston lesbian and Gay drop- n hours from noon to 4 p.m. 803 H.awthorne Montrose Wr ter·i ProJett J to 4 JO pm. 2 pm. 113 524 3818. sunday, jan. 23 Houston Area Teen Coahtmn of Homosexuals (H.A.IC.HJ. 113 942-7002 Raonbow Roder~ A bocyde dub for women 113 869· 1686 Church of the Xll Apostles Ang ocan Rote Old Catholoc Church Hoty Communion 10: 30 a.m at 239 Westheuner 7131665-7903. St. Stephen's Episcopal Olurch Holy Rite Eucharist I at 7 45 am. Hofy Rite Euch.arJS"t 11 at 8.55 am Education hour •t 10 am .. Choral Eucharist at 11 am. 1805 W. Alabama. 713 528-6665 Maranath.a Fellowship Metropolitan Church •preachmg the Go<pel· Soble study at 9·30 pm 713-528-6756. Resurrection MCC Senmes at 9 a.m and 11 a.m. 713-861 9149 Grace Lutheran Church Sunday school for all ages at 9 lO • m. Sennce ot 10:30 am 713 528-3269 First Urvtar Ml Universahst Church ServtCf'S at 9:30 a.m and 11 lOa m Community Gospef Service at 1, a.m. 7 p.m Sunday School for children. 4105 Lolloan. Ill 880-9135 or www convnun1tygospel Of9 Houston M SSIOn Chwch. Se,Vlte at 10:'30 am 713-1)19 8225. Covenant Baptist Church. Service at 1 JO p.m education hour at 3 p m 713-668 8830 Bering Memorial Umted Methodl.St Church Services at 8: 30 am, lO:'iO a rn. Sunday school at 9 40 am. 713-526- 1017 ResurrtttK>n MCC Handbell Olotr rehears.al at 1 30 pm. 713-861 9149 Th<> Women's Group. 10:4Sa m 713-529 8571. Unrtanan FelloW\hip of GaMston County 401 Church St m Gahreston Semce at 10:30 am. 409 765-8330. f.,th and Hope Fellowship Servoce at 11 a rn. 713·520- 7841 First Conqrf'g.it1onal Church (Memorial) Semce at 11 a m. 713-463-9543 or fee houston.org Church of Kindred Sp1~1ts (Beaumont) Service at 7 p.m. 409-835-4165 Unitanan Felfowstup of Holl\ton. Adult forum at 10 a.m SerV1Ce at 11 a.m.. and noon. Open Circle Family Support at 12:30 p.m. 1504 Wirt. 713-686-5876. Interfaith Won:hip Cele'brat1on. 7 p.m 2S 1 S Waugh Or. 713 528-3601 Thoreau Un1t.uian Urnttrs.ahst Cong,egatron: Adult discus· s1on at 9 45 am.; service ilt 11 a.m. 3~'i G'eenbnar. Stafford. 281 277-8882 wwwneosoft com/-thoreau monday, jan. 24 G.ay Fathen.lfathen First suppor1 group. 8 p_m. 713-861· 6181 - (alenddr/Compute, workshop for Pricie Week. 7 p.m. 713 529-1223 Bering Suppon Netwofk Gnef and Divorce Groups at 7 p.m. 713-516-1017 Frost Eye Cl1rvc. Free eye e.xams for people with HIV 713· 830-3000. AIDS CaregovNs' Support Gro.,p. 6 p.m. 713-732-4100. HIV testing. Free from AVES from 1 p.m. to 6: 1 S p.m 71 l · 626-2837 FrontRunners. 6:30 p.rn. 713 522-8021 Kolbe Proiect Eucharost at 7 30 p.m. 713-861 -1800. Integrity How:ton. for gay and lesbian Ep1scopahans. 7:30 p.m., Autry House. 6265 Maon. More ltght Presbyttrklns. Meeting. 1110 Lovett. 9:30 pm. 281 -444 &61 X309 81.ack lesbt.ln and Gay Coal1t1on•s wee-Uy mttt1ng at 7 p.m. 803 Hawthorne Houston lesbtan and Gay Communtty drop·m houn from 6 to 9 p.m.; 803 Hawthorne 713-524 3818. tuesday, jan. 25 Frtt HIV ten1ng at Oub Houston at 8:30 p.m. to m1dnt9ht the- MonttOie' 01ntc, 713·830-3000. Helping CrOiS Dress.eon Anonymous. 1 p.m., 239 Westheomer 713-495-8009 G.ty ~n HIV+ Plychotherapy. ·The Survivor's Circle• <erf'· mony iind celebtat10n. Montrose Coun\ehng Center ilt 410 pm 113-529-0037 Youth-Rap. 6.30 p.m. 113·822 8511. Aftercare Group Treatmf'nt. Montros~ Couniehng Center at 6 p rn. 713·529-0037 AIDS Alliance of the Boy Ate~. 7 p.m. 713-488-4492 PROTECT An HIV·neg.at1ve suppon group at 7 p.m 7'l· 526-1017 Womf'n Survivors of Chddhood Abuse. Montrose THE GUIDE TO GAY NITELIFE IN THE DEEP SOUTH AVAILABLE AT LOCATIONS ALL OVER HOUSTON Counsclong Center •t 6 30 p.m. 713-529-0037. Bering Support Network Lunch Bun<h Gang at 11 a.m. 713-526-1017 G.ay Men's Process Group. 7 p.m. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 711· 526-8390. Men's Network. 01scussson group for social, educational development of gay ar\d buexua! men. 7 pm. Montrose Counsehng Center 713-529-0037 Morei on Relat1on~1ps D1scuu1on group. 1 p.m. 415 W Gray. 713861-9149. L-.mbda Skating Club skates at 8 p.m. at the Tradewmds. 71 J.523-9620. Gay & 81 Mdle Suppcrt Group support group forming. Sponsorod by AVES 713-626-2837 Houston lesbian and Gay Community Center drop·1n houn 6 to 9 p.m., Lesbian Coming Out Group meets at 7;30 p.m 803 Hdwthorne. 713·528· '18 wednesday, jan. 26 F'ee ., V - .• ting at ... t mas StrePt 1t 9 a m to 1 p.m. 2015 Thonws Street and mobile unit p.,rked at P.wfic and Crocker 9 p.m. to midnight. 713-793-4026. 81Net Houston. 7·30 p.m. Social meeting at Cafe Toopees. 1830 W Alabama. 713·467-4380 Women's Network. 1 pm. MOfltrose Counseling Center, 701 Rochmond 713-529-0037 HIV survivor support group. 7 p.m. 713 782-4050. Mind/Body Connection: Alternatrve Approaches 7 p.m. 1415 W Gray. 713-524 2374 Proie<t· Caesa• 7 p.m. AFH, 3203 Weslayan. 713-623-6796. Out Skate Roll•,.katong Cub, 8 to 10 p.m. at 8075 Cook Road. 281-933-5818. Houston lesbian and Gay Community Center drop··m houn6to9pm 803Hawthorne 713-5243818 thursday, jan. 27 Fref' HIV tt sting .it Toyz 9 p.IT'. t fTI dnight and Cousin's 8 p.m. to midnight. By the Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Art labs. The Art league at 1 p.m. 713 225·9411 Gay Men'i Chorus of Houston. Open rehearsal at 7 p.m, 713-521 7464 HIV+ Men Psychotherapy. MontrOSf' Counseling Center, 1·1s pm 113·5290031 Relapie Prevention. Montrose Counseling Center, 2 p.m. 713 529-0037 Afterure Group Treatment. Montroi~ Coumeling Center, 6 p.m. 713-529-0037 Women's Therapy Group. Montrose Counseling Cente,, 5·30 pm. 713-529-0037. Center for the Heahng of Ramm. 7·30 p.m 713-738 RACE FrontRunners at 6:30 p.m 713-522 8011 . HIV Art Ceurse Program. 1to4 pm. Patrick Palmer at 713 526-1118. Wo~n·s Clinic Montrose Clinic, 713-830-3000. fa1tli and Hope Fellowship. Bible study 7 p.m. 713-520- 7847 Commurnty Gospel. Choir practice. 6:30 p.m.; service at 1 30 p.m. 713·880.9235 or www.commun1tygospcl.org HIV/AIDS Support Group, 2:30 at f.amlly Service Cel"lter. 71J·861-4849. Women's HIV/AIDS Support Group, 4 30 p.m. Family Service Center. 713-247-3810 HIV/AIDS Support Group, 7 p.m. Family Service Center in Conroe. 888·247-3810. Houston lesbian .and Gdy Community Center drop m hours 6 to 9 p.m 713-524 3818 friday, jan. 28 F HIV testing by th· M<"'ltro Clinic at Mela's at 10 p.m. ti 1 a.m. and R1ch·s 10 p.m. to 1 a .m. 713·830-3000. Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (H.A.T.C.H ). 713-942·7002. Aftercare Group Trecltment. Montrose Counseling (f'nter at 6 p.m. 713-529-0037. Frost Eye Clinic Frtt eye exams for people with HIV, 713· 8303000. lesbian Avengers Cafe Toopees. 1830 W. Alabama at 7 pm 0-Patrol walks the streets at 8·45 p.m. 713-528 SAFE. Kolbe Pro1ect. Park Plaza Hosp1t.at v1s1tclt1on. 713-861 1800. Positive Art Workshop. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Patm.k Palmer at 713-526 1118 lesbian and Gay Voices. KPFT 90.1 FM, 7 p.m. 713-526· 5738. Mov1t' Time at the Kolb<- PrOJf'Ct. 7:30 p.m. 713·S22·8182. life Begins at 40. Pot luck dinner 6:30 p.m. 1440 Harold 713-526·1017. M1shpachat Ahz1m Shdbbat Services. 8 p.m. 713·748·7079. Co-df'pendenh Anonymous. 7;30 p.m, at MCCR 713·861 · 9149 Houston lesbian and Gay Community Center drop.fn hoors 6 to 9 p.m. 713-524 3818 Hf'ahng Eucharist at Christ Church Cathedral. 7 p.m. 1117 Texas. 713-222-2593. Poetry & Prose Night Potluck. 7 p. m. First Umversahst Church, 5200 Fannon. 113.526.5200. To list .Jn event call Carolyn Roberts .Jf 713·519·8490, fax at 71] Sl9·9SJ1, or e·mJ'1 ed1torOhoustonvo1c~ . com Deadfme- is Fr1day dt 5 p.m Native T.A.N. 713.669.9966 Ready willing and very able ... to give highly skilled, professional insurance service in your neighborhood. She's an expert in planning all your insurance- auto. life, home and business. And she may save you money. too. Come 1n and meet her and take advantage of her broad insurance experience. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Katy Freeway @TC jester • Houston.Texas 77007 713-961-9455 fax:713-850-0856 HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 21 , 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU Occasions Birtl1days CCCC member John P motored ma birthday on Jan. 19. Local artist James Pruess paints a prt•tty birthday portrait on Jan. 21 Yes, Str, ha pp} birthday, ~ir. D.1ddy Bob I louton of Black I lawk Leather will celebrate his birthday on Jan. 21. Super ~exy Oiances' bartender R.1d will toast her birthday on Jan. 2.2. 1 lappy birthday to Broadway grc,1t Chita Rivera on Jan 23. The one ;ind only l loyd celebr.ites his birthd.iy on )an. 24. Tun, .i !...a. "!\:lumsy" to friends, celebrates his birthday on Jan. 2t>. The He>uston Vo1ceWt'lro111cs your spcc111/ occasions. Smd c-n111il tu croln'ts@J1011stonroicc.ro111. Far 713-529-9531. Mazl: Ocazsions, I lv11sto11 Voice. 500 lJ.JVClt Bfod., S111tc 200, Ha11ston, Tews 77f'()6. Please include a telrpho11e 1111m­bt: r SO OCCllSltlnS Ctlll re tJ('r!fied 1111d CClllSldt:rt.'d far pub/icnlicm. Local fund-rciser and all around fabulous guy fun Sorgini sings happy birthday on J111. 22. Casey is 18 months old. She is 111 inside only kitty and is 5tter· boxed traited. She loves to play with toys mid other cats, or cudcle in yoiw lap. If you would like to adopt Casey, e-mail 1111pr@houstonlnlnme.org or call 713-433-6421. ~l~DAEWOO Affordable Luxury! Introducing Daewoo. You'll be Surprised At How Much You Can Get For Your Money! Our Cars Come Well Equipped With Features Others May Consider Options. Each Of Our Amazingly Reliable And Comfor1able Cars Is So Well Built We Cover Them ForThe First 3Years or NEW 2000 DAEWOO LEGANZA 36,000 Miles1 on All Regularly Scheduled Maintenance (Even Oil and Wiper Blades) At Absolutely No Cost To You! You Also get Daewoo Priority Assistance (24 Hour Roadside Assistance) For the First 3 years or 36,000 Miles Should You Need lt.11 Arr. Pou"r Windows er l .odts, ABS. Krylm Entry. Alnrm er Fog Iighu $7999 $13,995 1500050 1 Only OOOOl2 1 0nty S.• Pree I 1 S 665 S 1 R9bate Daewoo ... Styled In Italy ... Engineered In Germany ... Research & Development Done In England ... Provides An Exceptional Value For Your Car Buying Dollar . .... ll:zC: ... Ell:z SC> .. T ... WEST E9 .... EWC>C> ... lftlm .... ll:zC: ... Ell:z .:....-.&WC>C> ........ •e» .. T ... wm•T FW''V' - --LLFC..A'T ---s •·•S .. C»A'T .. ·----w ....... _9'W_p .. rd ... c:: ..... •cm ... llC) (20 .. )933-9000 (20 .. )4.4.5-&4.4.0 23 24 Classifieds Announcements HEY EL\ IS! Happy ArmvcTS.11) ll=k) Ju for h::..r r fnend hip. suppon .md m p1ra11on I lmc ye u.-"<IZY ".Jb bu 'lou hi lr.llhcr ----- Ga) DAR C.a) DAR (Drcam-Affmn Re tore) (n). d 'IC\\ "cllncss com­numt y """ fomung for persons 18 10 29 y~ old who nre m1cr ested m making hc:!J1hy c"l>nOL-c­uons Come share your exp..TI enccs m a sale pl;x.-c 10 dn.":lm. affmn and restore GayDAR b.:g1ns on '.1onday, January 24 al 7 p m .JI Benng :\kmonal Umted Chur.h. 1440 Harold For more 1nfonna11on. 1.":l!I Russ Robmt."11 a1 711 ~261017 x'.?11 The PFLAG/HATCH .S.:holar­sh1p Found:luon's 1hnner and eel· cbra11on will be held on Fnday. March I :11 the Warwick Hotel The evenmg "'II mdudc a social hour wuh a silent aUC11on, fol lo"'ed by dinner and prescn1:111ons by smnc of the scholarship re1.ip1- en1s The fund r:usmg goal for the mtllcnmum year 1s SI 00.()(lO For more mfor111:111on '1bou1 the Foumlallon and the scholarship program S<.'C ""'W pflaghouston org/scholarsh1p htm no:-.;'T FORGET TO \'OTE! The Royal. So•crc1gn. ;md lmpl.-nal Coun mv11cs you all to vtlle for your lavonte Q!ldtdatc for Emperor XVI and Empn:ss X\ I A valid II> how1ng you li\c H..ims County or .i sunoundmg county '\(Xl l.ovc"ll Blvd IO am 10 6 p 111 Janu.11)' 22, 2fXXJ \l.\Ri\~ 1\THA :\ICC ~1ARA AHi.\ l+Ll O\liSIUP ~1CC "'111111: sharing the hornc of the Central Congregational Church. I 111 Holman (nghl ocmss from H(( Downto"'n c:unpus) On January 20. lheir worship Inn: is 6 10 p m and Bible Study al 5 10 p m Their offices "''II b.: a1 117 Tuam For more mformauon, c.ill 71' ~7 6756 HOUSTON LEATHER ALLIA:'>iCE ~ for 2!XXJ • l.L':llher Educ:11ton • S0<.ial • Fundr:us-mg Club• Sow Fonmng • ~kmbcrsh1ps and Associate ~1emb.:rsh1ps Sow Av:u!Jblc • For mfonna11on. send a SASE 10 llousion Leather Alh:ut<e •PO Box 667-..00 • Houston. TX • 772fh.7l00 Place To Play? If you pby bas.vacous11~ gunar. bra.'>• or kcyboonls. a gay Chnsuan pr:usc and "'orsluP 1cam OL-eds you Call 7 n 686 7715 PWA CO.\LITIO"' The P\\ A Coah on 11<."<."ds lhe fol lo" mg u,m, dishc • s1hcrnan: • pol 'l'allS ' sh<.'CIS 'lOl'e's • fumt lure • =11 appliances • We .ire J\at Jblc for pi<k up Call \\1' in or Tcny JI 71 ' 522 '5428 ,\DOl'I' I'.l<TER~1\TIO"i,\l.LY Farm ly lo f'am• y Ade pllon Scnmxs '' ,1 social service agency m panncrsh1p w11h m n-profi1 mtcmal 0"'11 .1gcnc1c.,. We ollcr fn.'C "Ori.shops each month on how lo adopt from Chin:t. India,, Russia. Ukr.iine, Romanta. Bulg:ui:i. B1•livt:t. Ecuador, Peru. Hondura.•. Columh1:t. Vietnam. Korea. and Guatemala Single men,, wo1ren. arid couples from otg\-"i 25 to 57 arc chg1ble 10 a<lopl Call 711 219-1.tn or email F:un2t:un@aol com for infonna­uon on our ncxl won hop Employment Hmng dn_,;rs d;i>S A or B lor a gay O\\ncd trucking co 28 I lW 9'162 or Pager 7 ll 642.6708. HOllSE'.\1AN WANTED Clean hou • Y. .rd " rl. • Cooking• 'd:ly a "'wl" 4 5 hours a day • S7 '\O per hour • Hard "orkcr • Hc1gh1s area • M.uk 711 '54'i 9504 CARTER & COOLEY Busy Heights area dch needs counter help Apply m person • 11~ \\ I 9TH SU\."ci or ~.ill Doug at 711 864 ll'\4 \\indow'.\lcdia \\mdow .\kd1a. the pub!tsh<.'11 of the Southern \o"c (Atlanta), Houston Voice O lou,lon) I mpa<.I '>~"' CS~w Orlc:ut'l anJ t:d1pse magazine " exp.:nrncmg un· prc1."Ctk:n1ed growth "uh mnht· nous plans for lhc fulun: Talenlcd. h:ud· worJ..mg. cn:atm: and dcd1 catcd md1vtdual nn: ~'Ollstantl) in demand a• opponun111cs nnse w11hm our pubhcauon area'i S.ilcs. Ad1mms1rat1on. C1rcubl10n/ I>is1nbu11on. Ed11onal. [)csign/ Produ1.11on If you arc mten.'Slcd m a can.. ... , p;llh "'1th a growing org;i. mzauon. please submit your n."iunic 10- \\ mdow Mcdt:1. Ann Human Resources Dcpl , I 09'\ 7.onohle R<>atl # ICXl. Atlanta. Ga. 1m06 ENTERTAINERS WANTED The BL.Vil s.,i. .. ·, • 11ST & Sca,.all • G:ihcston • Quality Bands • P1antSIS • Thcatncal Groups • Coll Richard or \\aync al 409 7~ sn1 or 7B 9:!3 94+1 C'i1y Cuts • W19 ~ \lonuosc • Loolmg for SlylL'il • Call D..'llntS al 711 )20 ()(,X'l'i WAIT STAFF W:u1 Staff needed. Evcmngs 4 pm 6 mghl!; • Mon <;ai • Apply m Person • Josephine's Italian Ristcrante • 1'09 C<1rohne @ Dallas • Behuid the Four Seasons u • • .,,'l 7SQ 9-r'" RESLRRECTIO"I \1CC J • ·E:'.':a.' 1~ ...:ckint J L.hrcc tor of Adm111"1rn11on and .\et.· ountmg Plca.'e conlacl u' al 7U.861 9149 for JOO dc'SCnp11on ,J apphcallon RESURRECTION MCC hpcncnced mu· 1cally degreed md"1dual 10 Jm:CI and ad· numsrcr the 1nusic anJ \\or.hip program of Re.um.'Cllon MCC­Hou, lon. Texas. Full lime • Contact us at 713.861 9149 or mccr@ncosof1com for an :ipphcauon 1'1ghlmgale Emplo) 1nen1 Services (Div1>1on of NAJ)C) ts a non prof· II 0<gan11.a11on that provides Job S<.'Ckmg sk1lh training and pk1ce· menl u."1..iancc for per.on' w11h HIV For more infonrouon call 7119811541 EROS 1207 Hmr ton nc ·' ,·.; en~1c OOUll<JUC SUpL'f store IS no" llCCCpllng llflph C.Jlrons for ~1.11c sales stafl • Ful~l':ut umc. excellent opportum- 1 y • Appl) m p.;rson. 1207 Spencer H1ghwa). South Houston, TX. IOA:0-1 to 2P\1. ~1onday through fod:i). 711 'l+t.6010 B.\SIC BROTHERS :\o' ,;,:cpi,ng applic;i11ons for '.1anagemenl po 11ions and fulVpan-11111e Re1a1I emplo)11icn1 Pnor rc1a1J!,ales cxpcncn<.'C and tomputcr knowledge a plus • Come JOm our team and enJOY one of the 11\:sl hcncfit packages .iround • Apply M r. IO:lm-.tpm, 1212 Wes1he11ner • :>.o phone .:alls please :\11DTO\\'NE SPA Allsh1ftsand1·· '''"" f.~i·pcr hour .1100 Fannin ,\pply m per­son only Home Impromnents BOOGIE & MARCELA Home Repair Scmci.: • 40 'rears c'pencnce • Call u' fur all your rcpmrn<.-..-d' • 7118566188 Moving Services American Mover.. Visit us on the "'ch • www amen· c:mmovmorg • 2412 A Taft • Houston. Texas. 77006 • Sow Stalcl'1dc • TxDOT# 00~28 20UC• 711 ~221717 Licensed Massage Paul Ru1k-dge • RMT #0127& I • 7 da)' Flc.x1blc hours 711 '920444 Tim of L.A. Stress Reducuon • 1 days ~ "eek • 71'-508 7 96 \1ass.1ge Therapy a1 us finest • Swedish. Deep !issue. Spons. Rcllc.xology • llon·1 sculc for less • In/Out, Hotel • 7 Days • Jett #016074 (:-./at1onally Cen11ied) 711524 5865 You Need Therapy! Ma,s:igc thernp) now availahle at '.1uscle ~1echamc' flCT\onal 1rnmmg & "cllnc" s1ud10 • spons ni.1"age. 1hcrapcu1tc ma"age. rclaxalion therapy Call no" for your appoint mcm• .\1usclc Mechanics 711. 52' 5.' "I(' Pets Th< H11111cless Pel Placement League 1$ a H
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1004.pdf