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Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 022. 1982-06-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/99.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-11). Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/99

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 022, 1982-06-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/99.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 11, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 21 MontroseArt Unfinished work in progress, acrylic on canvas. The landscapes and seascapes of Robert Schuhsler Photostory by Ed Martinez When the western world exploded into World War I, an era came to an end. The world as people in Europe and America knew it was unalterably changed, never again to return to its former shape. Society, politics, morals and basic attitudes toward human behavior itself were radically reshaped into a new order which we are still attempting to define some six decades later. Art reflected this metamorphosis, mirroring perhaps most accurately what people only dimly understood at the time. The abstract expressionists, the French impressionists, surrealists, cubists and pointillists all screamed stridently that the sky was not only falling, it might never again recover its former height. The emphasis was on the abstract, and representational art was attacked as out of tune with times. As radical as it seemed at the time, the wave of abstract expressionism has aged and has now assumed the position of respectability and tradition in art that representational art once occupied. Realism in art, ironically, is now ridiculed and patronized by the art establishment as abstract expressionism was in the 20s. As the French are fond of saying, "The more things change, the more they remain the same." This phenomenon in the world of art is brilliantly outlined in a recent issue of Newsweek, entitled "Life Imitates Art." So once again we return to the trend among artists for portraying things as they actually appear—not photorealism, but rather lining things and human forms in easily recognizable symbols. Not to the extent that they repress or inhibit the artists' ability to express their own creativity, but merely enough that the laity can at least know what it is that they are looking at when they visit an art exhibit without having to rely on an "expert" to explain it to them. Regardless of the contempt this arouses among art history majors and cultural snobs thiB can only be an improvement in the world of art. A Houston artist in the vanguard of this newly developing trend is Robert Schuhsler, a native, who has lived and worked in this city since birth. Educated at the University of Houston, Schuhsler has achieved wide acclaim for his work in spite of, or rather perhaps because of, a lack of formal art training. This does not mean that he is not a disciplined and trained artist; it merely removes him from the worshipers of the latest styles and fashions in art emanating from galleries and art critics in places like New York. Robert Schusler, like another Housto- nian, Dick Turner, teaches as well as produces art. He takes students on locations around the U.S. to train them in the artistic techniques he has mastered. He also teaches classes in various art associations here in Houston. Recently Schuhsler's work has come to the attention of M. Grumbacher Co., a New York art supply company, who has arranged with Schuhsler to make films to be used in training students in major cities across the U.S. Robert Schuhsler paints things, not people. "I'm not a people painter," he admits with a grin. His studio, a stunning condominium in mid-Montrose that he converted from an old garage, features soaring greenhouse windows that look out on decks and fountains filled with lush greenery. The light that is admitted by this arrangement makes his home a perfect setting for his work. Robert Schuhsler paints strong, virile scenes of the sea, smashing at rocky coastlines; piercing glimpses into forests primaeval where solitary birds wing silently; and upright landscapes that thrust out from the canvas. His texture is varied and inviting. Schuhsler works rapidly, and can finish as many as one canvas per day. He usually works in acrylic, although he teaches both acrylic and oil painting. His Robert Schuhsler in his studio canvases seem confident and self-assured. They obviously impress his clients, forthe paintings sell promptly and at prices that exclude those on a budget. The work of Robert Schuhsler is in tune with the national temper, helping to restore representational art to a place it once occupied proudly in the art world, expressing perhaps an unvoiced need in the world for a return to a reality that has been masked for so long by pretense and superficiality. Schuhsler's work does it with style and a distinctively local accent, reasserting Houston's claim to an important place in the cultural world. Is that perfectly clear? If you've ever wondered whether your local elected representatives are thinking straight, consider Washington, D.C, where, according to a report in the Washington Post, City Council came up with the following gem: "It is not the intention of the council to revive the statute or part thereof which was previously repealed unless such intention to revive the previously repealed statute is specifically included in the language of the statute repealing the previous repealer." That, believe it or not, was intended to clarify a new law regulating the conduct of Presidential inaugurations. Wine is it -Untitled," acrylic on canvas Purista may turn up their noses, but wine marketing is entering the soda-pop era, reports the Los Angeles Times. Not only is it being sold in cans and plastic bottles, there are now plans for wine vending machines. Wayne Downey, head of California's Geyser Peak Winery, sayB, while there are legal problems, "Our attorneys are working on it." The most likely place for wine machines, he says, is a "controlled environment" like a sports stadium.
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