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Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982
File 018
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Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 018. 1982-06-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/95.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-11). Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/95

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 018, 1982-06-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/95.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 11, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 17 Movies The industry is buzzing over 'E.T.' Summer movie fever about to arrive By John W. Rowberry International Gay News Agency There are two unusual aspects to the rash of 1982 Summer movies about to be released: this year will see the largest number of major motion pictures released during a single season, and the majority of the releases are going to receive major audience and box office attention. Why? It seems the summer of 1982 has by chance become the season when Hollywood, and everyone else involved in filmmaking, has its blockbusters ready for the projection room. But first, the real surprise: Steven Speil- berg's E. T, destined, if you can believe the advance word from everyone on the inside, to become the blockbuster of all time. We're talking bigger than Star Wars. bigger than Close Encounters, bigger than Raiders of the Lost Ark. How can that be, you ask? In the few select screenigs E.T. has already had within the movie making superstructure, word has it that even hardened corporate executives are walking out of the film dazed, mouth open in awe, muttering "I can't believe it, I can't believe it." Every film promoter and publicist is buzzing that E.T. may end up being the movie of the decade. The ultimate film. The definitive movie experience. And what is E. T. about? E. T. stands for Extra Terrestials. The second big bonanza is going to be, again from the same inside mouths, Poltergeist; which is, ironically, a Spielberg production. Here the word is that the special effects in the film (poltergeists are spirits that move things) are the best yet seen on the screen. Star Trek: The WrathofKhan is, besides being the second Star Trek movie, a whole new ball game. Except for the cast (which I'm sure is alright for Trekkies), the movie is every inch a new adventure with a much different approach than the first Trek movie. The word is better. And the expectations are very high for a film that sounds like, but isn't really, a sequal. Grease Two is a sequal, of sorts, except that Travolta and Olivia are no longer part ofthe story line. Enter Maxwell Caul- field as the lead, and Caulfield—if you missed him in After Dark or Interview—is one of the most beautiful men on the face of the earth. His co-star, Michelle Pfeiffer, looks like Olivia, but then nowadays everyone does. Caulfield plays the cousin ofthe original Newton-John character. He comes to America from England, meets Michelle and falls in love. To prove himself, he tries to become a 50s greaser. Watching this pristine beauty transformed from the ultimate boy next door to an earthy, if stylized, greaser is the most exciting screen transformation since Lon Chaney became a wolfman. Annie is the wrap up for the big musicals, unless you count The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, which wil! fall into the Summer-Fall category. Annie has already been hyped to the skies and loving it will depend on how much you like musicals and how long you'll have to wait in line before you get in the theater. The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas will be an easier relationship: Dolly Far ton can do no wrong and Burt Reynolds is a much better light comedy actor than his following wants to admit. The car chases in Whorehouse are kept to an absolute minimum. Not to be overlooked, however, is The Pirate Movie, a slightly-modern version of Gilbert and Sullivan's Pirates of Penanzv with Christopher Atkin [The Blue Lagoon) and Kristy McNichol. While some of the original Gilbert/Sullivan songs have been left in (although slightly rewritten), enough new material has been added to almost make this an original musical. The word is: enchanting. On the real serious side ofthe summer movies the top of the list is the amazing success of Conan, The Barbarian. Either the pre-release publicity was right-on, or the rather weak dialogue and predictable action of this classic sword and magic story was exactly the right mixture to attract the mainstream. Conan has already made over $10 million and it is set to play across the contry all summer long. Rocky ///is, without a doubt, the best of the Rocky films—too bad it didn't come earlier. The problem may be that audiences have had enough (look at the fate ofthe final in the Omen trilogy). Here the script and the pacing ofthe movie are all meshed into an action film with some reason for being besides bloody faces. Stallone has learned a great deal from Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull—and the fight scenes in Rocky III are cinematic works of art. Megaforce. if you haven't already- guessed, is about a state of the art private policeforce-for-hire set in the very near future. This group, lead by Barry Bostwick and Michael Beck, uses equipment that is straight out of the Twilight Zone design school. Still, for all its adventure and super machismo, Megaforce has a sense of humor. There is no humor in The Road Warrior, the retitled Mad Max II, a sequel to one of the darkest and most haunting ofthe new nihilist films. Mad Max II, or The Road Warrior, is a savage futuristic film filled with as many images of black leather and chain as a Kenneth Anger film, or a night in a leather bar. But for all it's brutality. Michael Sarrazin & Tom Skerritt in "Fighting Back." 3_ni% $B& Kristy McNichol with Christopher Atkins in "The Pirate Movie." Sean Connerv in "Wrong is Right. The Road Warrior is both even-handed and a cut above what you usually get when you mix violence with gasoline. Two similar films are bound to cause some confusion. The Dino De Laurentiis version of a group of citizens tired of being vandalized by street punks is called Fighting Back and stars Tom Skerritt and Patti LuPone (straight from Evita). The other similar film is called Vigilante and stars Robert Forester and Fred Williamson. Other than that, they are as different as night and day. Slightly more gory is the new film by George A. Romero, the much touted director of the original Night of the Living Dead; his entry, Creepshow, has an original screenplay by the master of the sus- penseful printed word, Stephen King (The Shining). Guaranteed to get your hands up in front of your eyes. The final Summer creepie movie is the all new version of The Thing, whiched is based on the original novel and not the well—know James Amess version available any Saturday night on the late show. Light and romantic? Or just light? Try Hanky Panky, a mixture of silliness, Gilda Radner and Gene Wilder. There is international intrigue, murder (yes, Virginia, even murder can be funny), transcon- tentinal chases—you know the formula. Wrong is Right has Sean Connery playing a TV exec who will go anywhere and do anything to get the great, late, breaking hot-spot news on the air. Anywhere and anything turn some rather heavy weight social comments (like the madness ofthe Oval Office, the madness of the Arab oil magnates, and the madness of the arms race) into often biting satire. Al Pacinc just might make a comeback after his absurd stint in Cruising with his light-hearted, but sincere, role in Author, Author. As a playwright with scene problems and a married man with mistress problems. Pacino plays off Dyan Cannon (as the actress on her way to the great bedroom scene) and Tuesday Weld as the wife on the way out the door. At last, Pacino plays a character that is only normally crazy! Young Doctors in Love promises to do for hospitals and daytime soap operas what Airplane did for control towers and disaster movies. An unmitigated dark satire. Young Doctors is set in a hospital you will have to see to believe. No one dies (except of a broken heart) and no one bleeds (even in surgery). The only complications are the lusts ofthe characters ... rather, the staff ... and lust is epidemic. The unexpected big event of this summer may well be Kenny Rogers' big screen debut in Six Pack, a routine formula plot about a race car driver and six teenage hellions that stands to pick up tremendous audience appeal over Rogers' powerful screen presence. His TV movies have been rating blockbusters, and not by coincidence. Rogers, regardless of how you feel about country, western, or race cars—is a charming and wholesome ail- American type with just enough of a father image to inspire confidence and just enough sex appeal to keep him firmly in the running. It's easy to dismiss movies like Six Pack or Cannonball Run as being so much redneck hoopla. Still, don't overlook what can be the most telling traits of all: honesty, warmth, and charm. And after summer is over, what is there to look forward to? Try Summer Lovers, yet another film by Randal Kleiser about the loss of innocence on an exotic island. Yes, the director of The Blue Lagoon is back with another adolescent "discovery" movie, this time a young boy and two girls on a Greek island during "an unforgettable summer that would change their lives." Or maybe Fast Walking, a prison picture from the guard's point of view. Or, Crosstalk, an Australian thriller about a computer involved in a murder. But if all else fails, take comfort in the fact that 20th Century Fox will re-release the original Star Wars, but only for three weeks—so get in line now.
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