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Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 001. 1982-06-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/78.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-11). Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/78

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982 - File 001, 1982-06-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/107/show/78.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 85, June 11, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 11, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSIJE #85 T E JUNE 11 1982 The Newspaper v 0 I c E of l•.ontrose TUESDAY, J°uNE 22 ~ - THe ')()(IX AN~UAr... UA~A AwA'Rt> SHouJ ~a{urin8 LivE f NTERTA1tJ M~H'T AND L ARG~ Sc"aN V1Dro TIC~ET~ AVAIL.lt'Bl..E" AT #'s~ A>lt> CITHER. &4R5 $s~ At>VltNCE ~ Jr- AT -rHE" Pot>R. CON\1N(r SU~t>4V 3LJNE ~ 7 ~ - A GA'f "PRIDE" WE;fk SPECIAL. "-ll7H NDNPr- H E"NDRIC"5 IS ~fNE'RAL. A-l>MISStoN' ~'PlS , ~ NUMBERS 2 300 WESTHEIMER 526-6551 ~ Always-A Part Of ... Not Apart From Montrose News/The Nation Man killed in Montrose parking lot A 37-year-old man was shot to death in the parking lot of the 3317 Montrose Building June 5. He was identified as Loren Graves Wilder, 37, an electronics technician employed by Rice University. He lived at 1204 Bartlett. Police said he was shot by one of three men who robbed him in the early morning hours behind the building, on the corner of Hawthrone and Roseland. Severa l persons, including a nurse a nd a former medic who were customers at nearby Grifs Shillelagh Inn, 3416 Rose­land, heard tht" shooting a nd came to his a id. Wilder was dead on arrival, however, at a hospital. Gay Pride Week gets closer as GPW Committee firms plans Photostory by Ed Martinez Leaders of the Gay Pride Week (GPW) 1982 Committee, an organization that has taken charge of coordinating most special Houston gay events during Gay Pride Week, met Sunday, June 6 at Kindred Spir­its, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, to finalize preparations for the June 17 to June 27 holiday. Larry Bagneris, president of the Gay Political Caucus. serves as co-chair of the GPW Committee with John Kirk , a collec tions agent. Bttgrwns o u t linNi plans for a full pag1 advertisement during Gay Pride Wc•ek in the Houston Post, but Haid ~mme difficul­ties had aris~n in gettmg the ad aC"cepted by the general cin·ulation daily news­paper Ont• of the problems that cropped up this year, as last yt•ar. he said, was the attempt by some individuals to copy and se11 GPW Committee T-shirts and buttons for their own profit. Bagneris critized those who worked in competition with the "official" Gay Pride Week products. ~h e copies are of an inferior quality, he sa1~. a nd ~agneris advised people to buy their T-shirts and buttons from estab­lished gay businesses The final public meeting of the group is scheduled f~~ Sunday, June 13, again at Kindred Spmts, 2:30 p.m Research project planned on black gay males A r vt-tt:on·h proje .. .-t on hlack h omosexual men will hE' launched by Leonard Green, a writer and HOC'ial researcher at Atlanta'6 Morehousf' College, it was announced Green snid he plans to administer a sur· vey to randomly selected subjects in New Orleans, Houston, Atlanta, Washininon, D.C., and San Francisco. Green said his research ""'·ill enable June 11, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Mouth No Hill/ GVO debate, says Gary Gary Van Ooteghem has turned down an invitation to debate Ray Hill over GVO's testimony in a pronography trial Gary, as you read m the VOICE a month ago, testified for the prosecution. Ray did so _. for the defense (the French Quarter theater) black homosexua l ma les to associate and assimilate this material from a black pers­pective. He also said he expected the pro­ject to help the community at large to better understand the black homosexual male as well as to promote better identifi­cation among gay black men from differ­ent locations around the country. Sweating in style Paci fic New• Service As a ny fi tness buff will tell you, the prob­lem with exercise bicycles is that pedaling away to nowhere is boring. But a new model on the market is designed to change all that. lt"s called the ''Heart Mate," a nd features a built-in color TV and stereo, a llowing exercisers to tune into stork market reports or the day's soap operas. The bike also has its own computer to take riders through several simulated tripe over hill and dal• while digital dis· play keeps track of how many calories are being burned off. But. even though the two are not on the same political terms. they are on speaking terms. and were seen last week politely d1scuss1ng who-knows-what Van Ooteghem, by the way. informs the MOUTH that Ed (Lou Grant) Asner, a died-in-the-wool Democrat, sent the Van Ooteghem election campaign a S200 contribution Gary was seeking the Republican nomination for Harns County Treasurer, but lost to incumbant Henry Kriegel ·- Dignity the gay Cathohc organization, celebrated its eighth anniversary last Sunday. David Decker president of the local chapter. gives us some background on how D1gn1ty first started He says a group of gay Catholics 1n 1972 or 1973 organized. at first calling themselves Dignity, but later changing the name to Integrity Houston when 1t was discovered they were not properly affiliated with the national organization of Dignity Ther •n 1 974 anotl"er group of gay Catholics were granted a charter from the national group and ttl.us the ·off1c1al D19n1ty chapter was started Meanh1le Integrity Houston stopped bem~ stnctly a religious group and became more of a pol!tlcal group Later they becam ncorporated as a,.. educattOl""al group and ChJngcd nafT'les again this time to nteractt Houstori This was done to av1 1 confus1or wt stil another , .. oup Episcopai, lntegnty Vou see n other c1t1es the local chapter of gay Ep1scopahans are K:1own as I itegnty what-ever--c1ty. but ttiat name was already taken n Houston by t~e "original' Dignity group But. alas. the name ntegr ~/Houston was finally acqutted Juf'e 1 by the gay Ep1scopa1rans In future issues of the VOICE. when we say Integrity Houston, we'll now be referring to the gay Episcopalians. not the educational 1orum now known as lnteracVHouston that used to be a political group known as Integrity/Houston that used to be a rehg1ous group known as Drgnoty Got 1t clear? ·- Black and White Men Together together with the Montrose Sports Association is staging a carnival on "Juneteenth Day." which 1s (for you that don't speak the language) June 19th And remember. for more info on BWMT, MSA or any group m our city, Just call the Gay Switchboard . 529-3211. evenings -·- The final pu blic meetmg of the Gay Pride Week Committee 1s Sunday at Kindred Sprrrts. 2.30 p m Larry Bagnerl1 . John Kirk and the dozens of others who have worked their tails off for this year's 11-day holiday 1nv1te you out • The Crty of Houston VD Buggy wrll be at Mldtowne Spa tonight (Friday), 9pm-1am. for free blood tests-plus tests for gonorrhea and hepatitis-a 4 MONTROSE VOICE I June 11, 1982 220 Avondale , 529-7525 ~ Sex, some booze, 1 Year Ago called key to s~e~ti~~ 21.06 trial long, happy life began ~~~::::: ~~~:Y old age are a good ~uertcof~~t~~t~~~a~i~~i~: it~!~~:a~5d~!~~~ ~~~a:;:~t, a moderaWamount of drinking, Code finally began. That advice comee from William Kerri- June 15, 1981: gan, who will chair an upcoming United Guardian Angels said N~~:~~~nf:~~n~:e~~f:~~~·good for the they may start Houston metaboliem, while a drink now and then ie chapter better than none at all. And, he eaye, "One Curtis Sliwa, the 26-year.-old leader of New shouldnotceasesexualactivityatanyage York's Guardian Angels, said he may still in life." start a~ affiliated group in Houston, despite A UN study has predicted the world's oppo&1llon expretu1ed by Mayor McConn and average life expectancy will rise to 70 Police Chief H.K. Johnson yeare by the year 2025. Being interviewed on a Houston radio talk 'There will be twice as many grandpar-show by long distanCt", Sliwa was asked by a ent.8 as babies," Kerrigan says. "They caller if the group would operate in Montro~e. can't aimp1y be dumped in rocking chairs. a neighborhood where gay people are fre· That's another way of sentencing them to quently attacked by homophobic outsiders death." and whl're police express homophobic views of their own. Sliwa said his group would consider Mon· trose for that reason June 15, 1981 NGTF, GRNL jointly were going after Family Protection Act The National Gay Task Force, a New York· based organization, and the Gay Rights National Lobby, a Washington, D.C. lobby­ing group, announced that they were work· ing together to organize national opposition to the "Family Protection Act" that had been recently introduced into Congress. The proposed new law would have "singled out gays as unworthy and undesirable." June 16, 1981 Testimony concluded in section 21.06 trial Both sides in the constitutionality trial test­ing eection 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code concluded their testimony during the first two days after the trial opened June 15. Judge Jerry Buckmeyer then instructed the defense (Dallas District Attorney Henry Wade) to file tie poet-trial brief by July 15 and the plaintiff (Dallas gay activist Donald F. Baker) to file by July 30. Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contentscopynght 1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm HenryMcCturg putJl•she1ed1tor ent•rf:,~~:,,~.~;;,~,"•d•I~ EdMar11nez Acel Clark or•ph•ts Witham Marberry •d~••lllfld•fKf~ Randy Brown adv•rti•"'fl Oaa~!,';,!~~ck ~!!.';!~~~: Fourraino M•rmNr G•y Pr•• AUOC•lt•0'1 =~•vie•• lnl•mat1onalGayN<>wtAgency. Pe1;1!1cNew1 Syr>d1eat.Of'ffl11t•S•rv/4-es&Wrrters (S.nfr1nc11Co)Chro­kle fNlur ... UnitN F.ature Synd1c1te. Jeffrey W•l1on, R.nc:tyA1tred.Stooeww1111FHlur"Synd1ca1eBr1.1nMcNaught POSTMASTER Send •(jdrfftcorr Ions 103317 Moritrose •l06Hcx11tontx11ooe Sub«T1¢101Jt.1t•111USS49peryearl52tSSUfti).S29•1111 mJl'lth1(2l,..oe1) orSl2SpetwtttkCtell!han21111UM) l¥•tt01Wl~t,.1rrgr•ptel•nt•tlt!•.io.D1S..batoRrvendel' Market•no 66e&thA~ue.NewYorll,00111212J242-69&3 Adv«fll"'f/ d .. dt1rM Each TUftday 600pm tor nue ,....._MChf1a.y ..... r.ng Politician hits warpath claiming lesbian indoctrinating students at college Officials at Cal Sta.te University in Long Beach, Calif., admitted June 8 they are investigating allegations at the urging of a state senator that a woman instructor there attempted to foster "lesbian indottri­nation" on students, reported UPI. The new charges involved part-time instructor Betty Brooks, who refused to comment, the news agency said. An aide to Republican elate Senator OJlie Speraw of Long Beach said the alle­gations were brought to the attention of college officials by the senator, UPI reported. "They showed six slides of closeups of women's genitals. All of these classes, from what we've been able to tell, were slanted very strongly toward advocating lesbianism," aide Jan McKnew was quoted. The elides were part of a clase called "Women and Their Bodies" and was pre­sented between 1979 and 1981, UPI reported. College officials admitted an investiga· tion of Brooks was taking place at the request of the senator but declined to dis­cuss details, UPI said. The allegations and other information were released by the senator's office, UPI said. The quintessential leather man Commentary by Greer Price International Gay New• Arency The fourth International Mr. LeatherCon­teet wae held in Chicago May 7-9, and that remarkable city was all themoreremarka· hie during thoee three daye, due to the nearly 2000 gay men from all over the world present. The fact that every one there wore black leather made it all the more fascinating. To the uninitiated, it was admittedly a bizarre event. The world of leather is ill defined and poorly understood, even among gay men. It has facets that are psychological as well as sexual, and I'd venture to say that most of the men who were there for the first time had little idea of what it was really all about. For those who attended, it was an extraordinary gathering in almol'lt every respect. To begin with. it was a rareoppor· tunity for a special kind of fellowship among gay men, a fraternal event, like a Jodg€" m€'eting or a motorcycle run, but a June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 5 positive one. The feelings of camaraderie, community, and pride were evident throughout the weekend, manifested in a dozen different ways. The major event, of course, was the con· teet it.eelf: a lengthy, well-put-together show that took place on a Saturday night. Twelve hundred people attended, with at least 500 others turned away for lack of seating. Forty·six contestants from throughout North America competed for the title of International Mr. Leather, the man who represents gay leathermen to the world. The extent to which that is true is beside the point. The gathering of men from all over the globe is what makes it so remarkable. Twenty-nine semi-finalists spoke a few words about themselves and paraded around in outfits representing the "tot.al leather image." The winner of this year's contest, Luke Daniel, concluded hie brief but moving speech by removing his left boot and eating it (thus gaining points for both sincerity and originality). The enter· tainment was first-rate and included an all·male dance troup known as the Buffalo Chipe, a fine illusionist (Rich Tutacko), and MC's Herb and Potato, who lent an air of contrast to the proceedings. In a room that was black leather from wall to wall, Herb's gold sequins were something of a relief. But the three days surrounding the con· teet are what people came for, and they were truly unique: from the crowd gathered outside the Gold Coaet to pick up their registration packet.e (which included a bottle of poppers and two packet.e oflub­ricant), to the "eye-opener" brunches eerved each day at 1:00 p.m. The contest's critics maintain that it is a money-making event (which it is), that it is male dominated (which it is), and that it's Chicago-centered event (which it is). But the city of Chicago has never been more attractive and hospitable than it was for thoee three daye, and neither the Eaet Coaet nor the Weet could have garnered such a geographically diverse crowd. The contest is a bJatant celebration of Nancy Kissinger masculinity, as rather narrowly defined by the participants, but a ceJebration non· ethe)et;S. And though no one would think to call it a fund-raising event, weJJ over $1000 was raised for the Gay Righte National Lobby when theeubjectabruptly came up. More importantly, it was one of the ve!'Y few opportunities for gay men to gather m such numbers. Even within the narrow confines of that crowd, it was an amaz· ingly diverse group. As one contestant put it "Any time you get over a thousand gay ~en together, it's bound to be special." And so it was. [t may have concerned only a small percentageofthegay male.popula· tion, but for those who were there, it was a memorable occasion. Watergaters to return to scene of crime, and party The Democrats have nixed the idea of cele­brating the 10th anni vereary of the Water­gate break-in, but Washington lawyer Robert McCandleaa thinks it'e a great excuse for a political party, report.a the New York Times. The June 17th feativity ie to be held at the Watergate Hotel (where elee?), just a few feet from the ei le of the bungled bur­glary. Among the invited guest.a: former Sena· tor Sam Ervin (who conducted the Senate Watergate Hearings), former Watergate proeecutore Archibald Cox and Leon J aworelr:i, and Judge John Sirica (who pre­sided at the Watergate trials). The only Watergate ex-<Xm to be invited i• John Dean, whoee defenee lawyer iuet happens to be the host. to stand trial '"'-flilJfR-~ International Gay New• Aaency The wife of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger will have to stand trial in ~h::r~·u:!iJ he:°i:u:b!:~1~~n:ei:g :~e: ~ ra~~dge Arthur Blake of_ S~perior Court l1~=.!~r denied a motion by Mrs. Kissmger that the assault complaint be thrown out of court because it is "too trivial" to prosecute. Mrs. Kissinger is accused of grabbing a woman by the collar at Newark Interns· tional Airport Feb. 7. The woman, Ellen Kaplan, admitted asking Kissinger: "Is it trut' that you sleep with little boys at the Carlyl• Hotel lin New York City)." The police were not involved in the inci· dent, and the complaint iii equivalent to a miRdemeunor. Ms. Kaplan hKkled K1ssin· ~~~n~"w~~~:~·:~;i~~~~1bc a~~r: .~i~~~ N \\~(. '{ 6 MONTROSE VOICE/June ll, 1982 Scare tactics may backfire on advertisers Paciftc New1 Service The American Council of Science and Health says advertisers are using scare tactica to capita1ize on the public's con­cern about health, and they may come to regret it For instance, the council says 7-Up ads promoting the soft drink as "caffeine free" mi1lead consumera into thinking caffeine is a threat to health. The council also criticizes coffeemakers for selling brands rich in caffeine, while offering decaffeinated coffee as a 0 aafe" alternative to their own products. Council director Elizabeth Whelan pre­dicta thoee ad strategies will backfire and make consumers suspicious and fearful of evenhing that's on the market. From the network that cancelled the Smothers Brothers ... Pacific Newa Service TV columnist Gary Deeb says CBS censors have banned political humor aimed at President Reagan and his wife. Deeb aaya the network scratched a slrit on the ahort·lived Book of Lisl8 program in which comedians Shecky Greene and Cloris Leachman portrayed the Reagans u Adam and Eve. Later, Deeb aays, the network banned a segment of an upcom­ing apecial called Facts which featured a parody of the "Charlie" perfume commer­cial, changing the name to 0 Nancy." The censorship, Deeb says, adds cre­dence tochargee from actor Ed Asner, who claims CBS cnacelled his Lou Grant series for political reasons. Blackmarket in gay porn? By Gavin Young International Gay New• Agency Blatkmarket pornography may be all that will be available ~n in England if police raids and prose<-utions continue. Recent police prosecutions have brou1rht fines of over !20,000 and even pri­son sentences for bookstore managers and staff who have handled gay pornography The enforcement is concentrated on gay and !-!&do-masochistic material, leaving heterosexual pornography untouched. Capital Gay reported recently that gay magazines are considering changes to keep ahead of the law, including omitting nudes, ads for maseeurs, and personal C(lntact ad!-1. If the polkecontinue to pro8e· cute, even Gay Neu.'s, Britian's premiere gay new1'paper. could encounter distribu· tion difficulties unles1' it withdraws its personal contact ads Gold Star, one of the largest distributors of sex magazines, announced that it will stop distributing gay sex magazines. The rag trade Parific New• Service Old clothes have a long history of turning into dust rags. but a New York firm wants to reverse that trend. It's trying to con· vince us that clothes can be made out of Handi Wipes In case you don't know, Handi Wipes are those crinkly disposable deaning rags you can buy at the grocery store. A company called "Han di Wipes Handi· crafts" ii=i now selling patterns for making them into women's dresses. The ~riped patterns will bnghten any wardrobe, the company says, and besjdes ... They make rgere at deaning cloths when you 're done nngthm ~ Home or Business FAST SERVICE STRONG GUARANTEE LOWEST PRICES 988-1331 lntrodu1~~~0 Special Call Now for lnformallon We Understand YourType11> • Letterhead/ Envelopes • Busmess Cards • Party Invitations • Ad5Flyers • Brochures • Layout Service ~a ~~ ~~ ~~ ~> 1. Happy Open Grant Hour Everyday Jat k ?am- at ac son ?pm ?am 528- 8234 The Deep ~~ C.UBiD ~~ Buffet every Sunday, 3pm till 522-4251 RUTH HASTINGS in ••••••••••••• •• • Orel p· if • •• •• . 1a •• •• •• •• •••••••••• • with CRAIG JESSUP and BARRY LLOYD For one night only, Tuesday June 15th, Ruth Hastings and Company bring to us ~heir critically acclaimed performance of the music of Jacques Brei and Edith Piaf. Arrive early for this very special occasion • At Baja's, of course. For dinner reservations, phone 527-9866 Slit~ 402 Lovett 527-9866 J u ne 11, 198 2 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 IS YOUR TIME FOR LUNCH LIMITED??? PLEASE COME TO INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER {in Montrose, near Downtown) 11 (,~~ A GOOD PL~~~ ~2;~2:ii TO ENJOY .,,, • .., .,,T / i VI } , "~HINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" r \ - / J:. I. I f ALL YOU CAN EAT •.• Only $3.75 - __ _ L ~ 1. Pepper Beef 8. Oriental Chicken ·-·"-<• 2. Moo Goo Gai Pan 9. Chop Suey JC;i""·"·"-· - I! I ~:t;-,:.tSo~M i~:~~='=Rice • ., '"'"""A"O•Ac .__lj 5. Sweet & Sour Chicken 12. Wo~ Ton o..... 'i. ....- ,, 6. Fried Wanton 18. Chicken RSi~cuep S oup ' 7. Teryaki Chicken 14. Daily Dessert J, LUNCHEON BUFFET 11AM-2:30PM Monday thru Friday 1f DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY (4-10:30PM) * * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * CHIEF COOK WITH 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE-JUST CAME FROM HONG KONG * *DIFFERENT SELECTED DISHES SERVED EACH DAY* Delicious Food-Reasonable Prices Relaxing Atmosphere-Fast & Courteous Services FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA ORDERS TO GO, Tel: 523-2795 Come September we're going to make a little history ... together azygos It means unmatched. one of a kind . A ma1or new men's fragrance that captures the essence of your lifestyle. The first time the national launch of a ma1or men s fragrance has been conceived for and directed toward our community The first of its kind AZVGOS a fragrance that captures a lifestyle. A way of business whose time has come ... a-zy!go. I azygos azygos will provide co-op advertising to the retailer with an opportunrty to be a part of the most extensive advertising ca"1paign ever done worldwide; including SOON customer referral, at no cost to the retailer Directed to our market. the most aware consumer Available in 3.3 oz cologne and after shave, 3.5 oz. cleans111Q bar. 8 MONTROSE VOICE/June 11, 1982 Husband sues Billie Jean King's ex IntemationaJ Gay Sew• Acency The husband of tennis star Billie Jean King filed a .57.5 milhon lawsuit in Los Angeles against his wife's former lover, Marilyn Barnett, and her attorneys, claiming malicious prosecution. The suit was filed by Larry King, alleg­ing that Barnett wrongly accused him in a 1981 civil suit against the Kings of agree­ing that she could live in the Kings' Malibu beach house and that Billie Jean would support her for the rest of her life, and then repudiating the agreements. King. a sports promoter, said that he and his wife never made such agreements with Barnett and that Barnett knew that when she sued the Kings in a sensational manner last year Barnett lost her lawsuit last December when Judge Julius Title ordered her to leave the beach house. The judge said that Barnett's actions toward the Kings was close to "attempted extortion." The case took on prominence because of the isaues of lesbians in sports, the rights of same-sex lovers, and the legal claims of homosexuals vs. married couples. Convicted gay 'knockout' artist sentenced lntern•tionaJ G•y New• Aaency A gay knockout artist who was said to have made a criminal career of drugging his BU. partners and then robbing them, was sentenced to 10 years and 8 months in prison in San Francisco. Saban Dreas, a 32-year-old Yugosla­vian. was accused of posing as a lonely Greek student, meeting potential marks in gay bars, persuading them to take him Rodney Chapmen, our HOT new bartender, direct from Lafitte's in New Orleans. invites all of you to come on down to meet him. Playgirl Follies This Saturday, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover Laura Lee Love Lana Kane Eydie Mae with guest ...., h. a-,pa~ ne ... c .. ~ , ..., .u ni-=!' 19 : ~'.ff l ::indy .1 oods Happy Hour Saturday m1dnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-Spm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland 659-0040 ho~~~n~~~1:f ::i~~ns~:tl~o~~~:e;· few .,....;-~ .. ·-w•-.. tablets of Lorazapan. a powerful sleeping pill, into his would-be lover's drink. police said Next Dreaa would take cash, jewelry, cars, and anything else of value, police eald. Dreas was want.ed for questioning in eunilar crimes in !'ew York. Chicago, Los Angeles, and Toronto, but he was finally 1topped in San Franci:;co after he allegedly fleeced three gay men during a 4X-hour period last Christmas. Local gay newspapeni published an alert about a Mickey Finn specialist, and a gay man visiting from Chicago saw the alert and told police that a similar confi· dence man was working in his city. Inspector Sam Hamilton obtained mug shots of the suspect, who was identified by his San Francisco victims. Later Dreas was recognized on the street by police and arrested. Through rain, sleet, hail-and nuclear attack You may have heard the postal service is planning special post-nuclear attack change-of·addres~ cards so evacuees can have their mail forwarded. Now word has leaked out the govern· ment printing office is looking for a safe place to print stamps and money after the big blaat, reports the Washington Post. Federal planners are considering 50 cities acr088 the country as a site for a back-up plant for the Treaaury Depart­ment' s Bureau of Printing and Engraving. "We're looking for something that's not listed aa a high-risk area," explained pro­ject coordinator Ken Farrow BED HOUSE SALE! SAVEi SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER K• REG mgs $600.00 s17500 Q ns REG. uee $400.00 $125°0 Other Sizes Avail able 523-8278 Open Thursday & Friday 5:3(}-8pm Saturday 12-6pm We will resume regular hours Monday 'PS·O New in the Heights Merchant's Park Shopping Cen ter lOll N. Shepherd at W. llth 862-3149 Optical Mgr .. C. Evans Beasley iEXAsSTATE OPTICAL ~ Since 1935. TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? * Vegetarian pizza * Starburst deluxe pizza (the worksl ) * Super sandwiches & salads * Fantastic deserts * Imported & domestic beer TRY OUR NEW LASAGNA CALL 523-0800 PLEASE ALLOW 1 HOUR FOR DELIVERY 2111 NORFOLK HOURS: Mon: 11 :30am·1 1pm Tue: sorry, closed We d: 11 :JOam-11 pm Thu: 11 :30am-11 P~ Fr i: 11 :30am·midn19ht Sat: 4pm·midnight Sun: 4pm-10:30pm the WINE SEIJIER 11 30 AM to 2 00 AM 1408 WESTHEIMER 528-3878 Wine Bar and Restaurant Three Blocks west of the Tower Perfect for after the theatre ... Jewelry, Clothing, Gift Items, Furniture, plus much, much more Consignments taken Monday- Friday Hours 11am-6pm Monday- Saturday 1405 California 523-5552 orR GAY BUSINESSES are proud to be A PART OF Our Shipment Arrived Military pants Combat boots Khakis Short & long sleeve military shirts Ladies military pants Timeless Taffeta 1623 WHthelmer 12-6 everyday our expression of self esteem during Gay Pride ·.~eek Friday, June 18 is Gay Pride kick-off day in a 11 of the bars. To show their appreciation for your patronage and to help defray the expenses of Gay Pride Week, many bars will rec­ognize everyone wearing or purchasing a Gay Pride T-shirt either by offering happy hour prices to their people all day or by contributing to Gay Pride a portion of the price of drinks purchased by them. Check with your favorite clubs to learn what their Friday specials will be. And then go visit them on June 18th to kick off a festive Gay Pride Week. In add i tian to Friday's Festi vi ti es, don't fore:et the clelbration at Kindred Spirits on Tuesday, June 15th, and the luau at The Exile on Sunday, June 20th. June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 24-HOUR HOT SHOT Commercial/ Industrial COURTEOUS BONDED DRIVERS AND CARGO INSURANCE FOR YOUR SHIPMENTS fiJee !!l,uicfr flJelive2y fine. dtouJlon ~ /!fexaJ 723 5959 John Day & Company Wednesday, June 16 9-1:30 Terri Ann Melton ~ Watering Hole Tuesday: Steak Night Wodn..day: Country&. Western Night-Live Band Thunday: Pool Tournament-10:00 p.m ME~~~e"Wa~~:H'::'u:~;~~ NEVER A COVER CHARGE 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 Extra parkms on the comer of ML Vernon & Richmond Houston's Friendliest Colllltry & Western Bu StrmlAY: Buffet for the MDA•. KON-SAT: Open 7am. KONDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Muetanp 10 MONTROSE VOICE /June 11, 1982 With Yourself-With Others HOW TO STOP SYSTEMATIC SUICIDE A Full-Day Workshop by LEE M. SILVERSTEIN, M.S.W. Rockville, Conn. Nationally-Known Mental Health Author, Consultant, Lecturer, Therapist, Counselor Saturday, June 26, 1982, 9am-4:30pm Autry House, 6265 S. Main , Houston The Workshop Most people don't commit suicide by iumping from tall buildings, says Lee M. Silverstein. "They do it inch-by-inch by abusing drugs, alcohol or food: by smoking. gambling, over-working, over-spending and not wearing car safety belts. Millions practice such systematic suidide to avoid the problems of living." People do the very best they can thetie days, he says, but they are constantly bombarded with confusion wherever they tum, in work and in personal relationships. As children we learn that when we feel bad, we need to find something to make us feel better. Some of these behaviors, these "bad habits," are destructive and become syste­matic suicide. Every bad habit, however, can be replaced with a positive a ltem a· tive, maintains Silverstein. Meditation, religion, counseling, therapy and self.help groups are all tools that help develop wellness skills. He also offers his own set of six guides for living that help improve the quality of life. These guides, to be developed by each workshop partic­ipant for her his individual situation, include: • Accept responsibility for yourself • Act retiponsibly • Focus on the present • Evaluate the consequence of every alternative • "Do" your plan • Do it over and over. Lee M. Silverstein Practicing what he preaches, Lee M. Silverstei n has himself over· come alcohol, drug abuse and other of the "bad habits" he cites as systematic suicide. He is co-author of two books: "Consider the Alter­native" and "High on Life." He holds a master's degree in social work, is a Certified Reality Therapist, is a consultant in human services at Rockville, Conn., General Hospital and is in constant demand for presenting workshops throughout the United States. Sponsored by Earthplace Houston Center for Learning • Growth • Development Registration Limited to 225 Fee includes box lunch How To Stop Systematic Suicide-June 26, 1982-Fee $48.00 Name Addres~ --------~ City Telephone Profession __ State ____ Zip __ _ ~---- Organization ~- _ Make check payable to Earthplace Houston, 2615 Waugh Or., Suite 260, Houston, TX ""• 16 Six TAAC Credit Hours pending 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Stephanie Parker & Doug Mowery Appeuing June 15-18 Loia Yvonne through June 12, Rick Ellis June 14 Sunday Brunch starts June 20 oerving Lunch Monday-Friday 11:30-2:00 Dinner Monday-Thuroday 6:30-11:00, Friday A Saturday 6:30-12:00 PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal •Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep. confidence self-worth shyness. memory concentra­tion . self-esteem relaxation . habits love emotion OVERCOME: Fear. anxiety guilt. depres ­sion nervousness. drug abuse. alcohol abuse anger. lonel1 ness . weight. STUDENT AND SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977-2485 DISCOUNT FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD 'Gay diseases' reported again on the rise International Gay Newe A&'ency They have already killed more people than Legionnaires Disease and Toxic Shock Syndrome combined, but GRID illnesses (Gay-Related-Immuno-Deficiency ill· nesses) have not yet received major atten­tion from the nation's health authorities. Part of the problem is the "gay" cancer (Kaposi's sarcoma) and pneumocystis pneumonia are linked in many minds with a stigmatized minority. For some, although the causes are not yet known, blame is being placed on sex­ual activity, drug use or other aspects of a gay lifestyle. Author Dan Turner, who has KS, said that he has been advised by his doctor to avoid having sexual relations because it is feared that the cancer may be caused by a virus that is spread through sexual activ­ity. There seems to be a pattern emerging that shows a connection between yeast infections in the body and a later emer· gence of KS. Possibly a one-celled orga­nism is responsible for the problems, although no definitive conclusions have yet been reached. Scientists fear that GRID problems may spread into the non-gay population before they find the solution. New figures show that a growing number of women and bisexual or heterosexual men have come down with one or more of the mysterious diseases. In the 11 months since the first Ameri­can case of KS was reported to federal authorities, the new diseases have struck 335 Americans, killing 136. SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR OUR COMMUNITY BE A PART OF THE 2No ANNUAL Tuesday, June 15th 6 p.m. · 2a.m. Disco Grandma Joins Kindred Spirits in Presenting Raws1yn Ruffin 6:45 Lyra 7 45 Houston Off Broadway B:45 Montrose Symphonic Band 9:30 Gala Revue 10 00 Vickie Eddie & Her Global Review Kika (The Martian Woman) Our Special Guest Ron Sioux Wear a Gay Pride Week T·shirt and get a free drink 25C per drink will go to support Houston Gay Pride Week 1982 5245 Buffalo Speedway (713) 665-9756 June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 11 Only 15 percent of the gay men diag­nosed in 1979 for KS are alive today_ Two­thirds of the reported 1980 victims have died. The worst killer seems to be the pneumo­nia, where the death rate is usually 50 per· cent of those attacked by the disease. "In San Francisco, it's an epidemic (65 gay men) beyond anything that's accepta­ble,'' says Dr. Selma Dritz, assistant direc­tor of the bureau of communicable disease control for San Francisco's Department of Public Health. "It's like nothing we've ever had." It is still unclear whether sexual practi­ces, poppers or other drugs, a history of diseases, or treatment for diseases-or a combination of all these fators-are behind the epidemic. Several sets of lovers and roommates have come down with same GRID disease, leading some researchers to suggest that a virus is involved. Some researchers are optimistic that if a virus is the cause, a solution to the GRID problem could bring a solution to the causes of all cancers. The issue promises to become a major social and political issue, with conserva­tive elements calling for quarantines of hom~sexuals, or worse, and others using the diseases for nonmedical reasons. Congressman Henry Waxman, chair· man of the House Subcommittee on Health and Environment, laat month accused the federal government of being slow to reapond to gay-related diseases_ "There is no doubt in my mind," Waxmen said, "that if the same disease had appeared among Americans of N orwe­gian de.cent, or among tennis players, rather than among gay males, the reaponse of both the government and the medical community would have been different." Houston Grand Opera presents Donald O'Connor Lonette McKee Jacque Trussel Sheryl Wood-. (1l1 read~ tor the gn:t1L-...1 Broady, a~ m1N­cal clav~1c of all: Show 81HJt.., a-\'.omin' 10 Jone'\ I tall! You'll hear all }our old laH>rite \Ong' from the on~inal "'-:ore, indudmg "Bill," "Can'1 Help I mm' Dat \1an," .. Ma~ "' lkhc,e" and the r<>'~erlul "01' '\fan River." ')lw" Boot "'111 lilt your 'ipiril'i Yo-11h the mlO\Katmgcharm of hf eon the old ~1i ~i'i· \1pp1. Don't rrn ...... 1hc boat-order your tid .. ets 10Sho"·/JcHJt10cJa\! · In T11.:~ets ava1labk a1 the Hou,ton Tii.::i...c.: Cen1c.-r m Jont.-... Hall and at all TICh.ETRQ\., outkh. f\.enmg' 31 8 p.m. June 10 through June 19 (1'operlorman1.:e June Joi) \1allnL't....,-Junel2a11p.m.;JuneL',l9 and20at 2:30p.m. D1~oun1 \1aum.-e-Junc 11 at:? p.m. PllO' l CHARGt.~CAI 1.526-1709 12 MONTROSE VOICE/June 11, 1982 Gay man, claimed raped by woman, to face manslaughter charges International Gay Newe Agency A man who claimed he was gay and had to kill a woman in self-defense because she raped him and threatened to !rill him will not have to face a retrial in San Diego for murdering the woman, even though the jury did not formally acquit him. But the California state Supreme Court in a Ho-2 decision ruled that Clifford Stone can still be retried for mam1laugh· ter. Stone was tried a single charge of first· degree murder of Rose McNeil· Muhammad on November 9, 1979. After nine days of deliberation. the jury said it wa · deadlocked, and the judge declared a mistrial. Stone appealed, claiming that he could not be tried again for murder because the jury had informally acquitted him of first· and second-degree murder charges The high court agreed, saying that a retrial would violate Stone's constitu· tional right not to be tried twice for the f\&mecnme. The court decision to let Stone face man· slaughter charges, if not first- and second­degree chargei-, made no reference to the unusual defense put forth by Stone during his 10-week trial. But court documents noted that Stone made two tape-recorded conf~sions in which he said that he was gay and that he had killed the woman in self·defen•e after she raped him. According to the documents, two experts t""tified that the dead woman had a "propensity for sexual aggression." The experts (male professors from Yale and t:SC medical schools) testified that there haa been proof that females can rape men. They both concluded, "based on data on the deceased," that McNeil· Muhammad had indeed raped Stone. Originally Stone was charged with rape, sodomy, and forced oral copulation in addition to murder. But by the time of his trial, all but the murder charge were dropped Brother can you spare $4.50? Pacific Newe Service If you can afford this product, you proba· bly don't need it. A New Mexico artist is selling tin cups, suitable for panhandling, billed as the perfect gift for victims of Reaganomics Jerome Milord, whose cups are sold as the "survival kit of the 80s," says his industry may be the only one to survive Republican economic policies. For $4.50, Mi lord's survival kit includes a cup and a brochure reminding prospec· live panhandlers to "hold your head high. you are following a good old American tradition." Circuses coming in from the rain America's traveling circuses are folding up the big top for good, reports the Chi cago Tribune. The Circus Historical Society says most circuses are following the path of the industry IPader, Ringling Brothers. and renting auditoriums instead of sE>tting up tents at each stop Currently, onJy three major circuses still perform under the big top. and although the society say:-; TV sports events ftnd movies are tutting into attendance, that doesn't mean the circus is dead. Last year. about 12 million people attended circuses. GARGO HOU8E MONTROSE TRAVEL A new shop for Montrose WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 10-DAY EXTRAVAGANZA Depart July 30th Clothes Unusual Imports Items from Far-a-way Places RENO RODEO ca nights> s79900 HONOLULU (4 nights) ALL INCLUSIVE!! SAN FRANCISCO (2 nights) 1802 Park St. Between Westheime r & W. Gray '""";''·'"""""'~ ~~ 2506 RALPH-522-8747 - .... _"'f~S.l. __ 'IJ 529-0334 Houston's turning to the Voice! All over Houston each week, thousands of gay readers now pick the MONTROSE VOICE as their first choice. In fact, the "Newspaper of Montrose" is now one of the largest gay newspapers in the country. This is even more significant when you consider that the VOICE is not nationwide, not statewide. The VOICE is just Houston. The MONTROSE VOICE distributes 7000 copies each week-all in Houston-that get into the hands of an estimated 18,800 readers. In fact, the VOICE's Hous­ton distribution is nearly twice that of our competi­tor. To regular readers of the VOICE, our rapidly exploding new popularity comes as no surprise. After all .. • Because the VOICE is just Houston, readers and advertisers don't get lost or confused by ads from other cities. • The VOICE is a professional news operation. We investigate stories and state sources. News is serious and we're serious about it. • The VOICE has each week page after page of news about gay H_ouston and Houston gay entertain· ment. Our competitor only devotes a few inches each week to similar Houston material. • The VOICE's new sports page provides in depth stones each week on the Montrose Sports Association-including softball, bowling and volley· ball. Our competitor devotes less than half as much space each week to Montrose sports coverage. • The VOICE covers national gay news and presents in-depth national gay features each week, as the VOICE subscribes to all six existing gay news and feature services, including news from the Inter· national Gay News Agency and features from Stonewall Features Syndicate. Our competitor sub· scribes to none of these services. . • The VOICE has award winning cartoonists, including our own Max Angst (who is now syndi· cated nationwide). San Francisco's Gary Larson and Austin's Ben Sargent (winner of the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning). • The VOICE has the experience. Henry McClurg, our publisher, has been producing newspapers in Houston since 1973. • There's no "thumbing" by news and advertising in the VOICE. Most of our readers read each page, page by page. And, most of our readers read the VOICE at home, not hurriedly at the bars. At home they've got the time to read the publication tho­roughly. • The VOICE has earned the respect of its readers. They know if they read it in the VOICE, they can believe it. • The VOICE circulates through over 70 major distribution points. Yes, Houston's turned to the VOICE in record numbers. And as a reader or advertiser, we invite you to tum to us too. We, as the only gay publication just for Houston, would like to be YOUR first choice. And even though we now out-circulate our competi­tor almost two-to-one in Houston, our advertising rates are lower-much lower. New advertisers in the VOICE, who are used to advertising in the other publication, receive two big surprises: • The results they receive with nearly twice the Houston circulation they had been used to, and • Their bill. You see, quite simply, they'd been paying too much for advertising and getting too little actual circula· tion in return. We invite you to turn to us too. RESULTS FROM THE State Muscular Dystrophy Fund Raising Contest MISS Ron Sioux of the Ba r n, Houston, MS Sandra K. Floyd of Kindred Spir its , Houston, ~Bill R olands of Snuffy's, San Antonio. THE BRIAR PATCH WISHES TO THANK ••• Kindred Spiri ts The Drum The Barn June 11, 1982/MO. 'TROSE VOIC E 13 Every Thursday, Friday, Saturday Bob Williams &. the Trail Riders Every Sunday 8-llpm The Dixie Kings 715 Fairview Open Noon-2am 7 Days a Week 521-2792 Saturday morning, join us for breakfast wi th TOMJf,Y LANE Special d rin ~ pr ices on S na p~ s : 50t The Ka~py Ka pers of Keoki Kena a t Top of The Hole , '/l edn esday - Sunda y . 109 Tuam 6 fw Jzed c;/>aez ?lb1101iaf cfJmt C!J>tik We-ek ~ June 26, 8pm, Cullen Auditorium featuring The Montrose Singers The MCCR Choir The Oak Lawn Symphonic Band The Montrose Symphonic Band General admission $3.00 Free shuttle busses from Mary's & Kindred Spirits 14 MONTROSE VOICE/ June 11, 1982 Thursday bowlers bowl their best Thursday B> Billie Duncan There are usually two or three bowlers on Thursday who manag-e to break 200, but n June J, therf" were seven people who has .:.00 game~ Seven. 011e of tht:'m. Steve ~1cConaughy, had three ~oo games 1234, 207. and 202>. Steve IB on .Just :\iarion & Lynn '!11 Tropical Fruit us is Rob Akins, who had two 200 games. including the high game for the night, 235. Their teammate, Butch Irish, is the person who has the high game for the season. Quite a team! Kindred Spints ·Leather & Lace had two team members who bowled over 200 also: Bob Lafield and Rob Conners. Rob wanted to have his first 200 game up in Dallas at the IGBO tourney, but that did not work out. But he commented ... rm just glad I finally did it.' Another person who "finally did it" WB.8 ~ancy Perale:o;, the manager of Stadium Bowl who popped 209 pins for her very 'irst 200 game in her life. As far as the team standings, they have "n.illy gotten updated with For a Few Daddies ~fore again taking over the top spot from Kindred Spirits· Leather & 1.uct., who are back in closl• second ( .,. .ises is chasing both of them. how· ever. and those three teams are within one game of each other Just Marion & Lynn's Tropics} Fruit is back up to fourth place after temporarily dropping to seventh. Of course. all those high g11mes on the 3rd did not hurl. • Monday competition tight The ~SA Monday :-;ight Bowling League has a standings battle gomg that Ls as tight as some of the players by the end of Monday Night trips to the Stadium &wlbar If two teams are within four games of one another, then all it takes is one night of play to switch things around. Well. it ii-i fascinating to note how many teams in each division are within four games of each other In Division A, the top four teams are all withm four games of each other. In Divi· 11on D. the top five team~ are within four MSA So#ball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Saturday, June 5 MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday. June 6 Barn 10 Bnar Patch 6 Twins 11 Ducks Jim's Gym Mary·s 16 Brazos Riv Btm 10 A&K Jewelry 13 Montrose Voice 11 Mary's e Special Blend 9 Chuck's Angels a Armadillo Grph 15 Kindred Spirits o Renegades 14 Royal A's 3 STANDINGS Dirty Sally's Dirty Sally's Jim's Gym 16 Montrose Voice 10 Won Lost Pct Sunday. May 30 Galleon 22 A&K Jewelry Montrose Voice 9 Briar Patch Dirty Sa11y·s 17 Brazos Riv Btm Barn 13 Mary's STANDINGS South D1v1s1on Galleon Jim·s Gym A&K Jewelry Bnar Patch Montrose Voice 6 2 5 3 2 5 2 6 2 6 North D1v1s1on Dirty Sa11y·s Montrose M1n1ng Mary·s Barn Brazos River Btm 9 0 4 2 4 4 3 6 2 5 750 - .625 1 286 3•.; 250 4 250 4 1.000 - 667 3•.; 500 4'h 333 6 286 6 THIS WEEK'S GAMES !A.ll~atLiwyF•eldFromMontroM.go oul RtcnMOnCt. put K•rby. left on Euta.dll.) Saturday. June 12 No games scheduled Sunday, June 13 Brazos River Bottom vs Barn, 8pm Bra.r Patch vs. Jim's Gym, 7pm Montrose Votee vs Galleon, 8pm Dirty Sally's vs Montrose Mining Co , 9pm Renegades Hell Raisers - 1000 - Armadillo Grph Ducks Twms Kindred Spirits Royal A's Chuck's Angels Special Blend 1 4 THIS WEEK'S GAMES .750 .750 600 1\.7 .400 2'h 400 2 ~ .333 3 .250 3 200 31> ~~~~=:::::-,,;~:g~t;! ~~~ri01~ :C~":::~\ Sunday. June 13 Chuck's Angels vs Kindred Spints. 2pm Hell Raisers vs. Renegades. 3pm Twins vs Armadillo Graphics. 4pm Special Blend vs Ducks. 5.pm Chuck's Angels vs. Armadillo Graphics, 6pm Renegades vs Special Blend, 7pm Ducks vs Hell Raisers. 8pm MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES HIGH GAMES Monday, ~~g~ teRIES Charles Oiorkeo 252 Charles Dierkes 615 Gerold Hogen 232 Gerald Hagen 612 St...., McConaughy Steve McCon1ughy 230 592 Photos: P.aroer Bryant STANDINGS Dr111s1onA Oiv1s1on C 1. Barnyard Hoers 1 Slow Hand 2. Daddy's 3_ Eurotan lnt'I 4_ 69ers Division B 2. To Be Determined 3_ Citizen Pain 4. The Hole Div1s1on D 1. Bushwackers 1 Happy Trails 2. Five Easy Pieces 2. Gator-Aid 3. Hole--E Aolers 4. E/J's Protein Suppliments 3. Galleon One 4 Next-T-Last THIS WEEK'S GAMES (All DI',,,_ •I St8d1um Bowl 11200 Brs•m••n) Monday, June 14 Regular competition, 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thursday, June 10 Results next week HIGH GAMES Thur:sday, June 3 Bob Atkins Steve McConaughy Donny Kelley Terry Wolber Nancy Perales Rob Lafield Rob Conners STANDINGS (Through June3) 1. For a Few Daddies More 2. Kindred Spirits' Aces High 3.Chues 235.207 234.207.202 212 210 209 205 202 ... Just Marion & Lynn's Tropical Fruit 5 The Rockettes THIS WEEK'S GAMES tNl~8tStadeurfl8owl. 9200~n) Thur:sday, June 17 Regul1r compet1tlon, 9pm Sports games. In Uiv1s10n B the top six are four games apart. And. in Division C, the top eighl teams are within four games. In fact. there art.> thret· teams tied fur fourth place &toi far as games are conC'erned, with The Holl:' over Black & Blue Balls bv a mere 32 pins. And Black & Blue Ball~ is only over th«.> Cock· Tail~rs by 42 pms Division H insanity features the top four teams within one game of each other. Bushwackers have won 23 games, Five Easy Pieces have 22 1..4~. Hole-E Rollers have 22 and E 1 J'~ Protein Suppliments have 22 also, trailing the Hole-E Rollers by Ill pins Besides the standings war, there was a notable statistic in the high games cata· ~~:r:;~s&::t;:ee.!~?e~ ~0~2~Y~~~;h :~ only one pin away from Gerald hagen 's season high game of 253. Both Charles and Gerald bowl on Div1· sion D's Gator·Aid. which is in second place right now • AU.Stars chosen Last night (Thursday) at the Galleon, the numeK were announced of the member• of the MSA Softball League All· Star teams. Besides the primary tt>am memhers, five other membt•rs were chmwn from eaC'h division. In the North DiviAion. Uirty Sally's dominated the voting, with eight primary team members. The only other team 'A-ith repreMt-ntativeti is the Montrose Mining Company with thr(>e The Miners also have two members of the udditionals. And in the additional list are one player each from The Barn, Brazos River Bottom and Mary's. In the south Division, there is a bit more of a spread-around. The team with the most playt•rs on the primary team is third ranked A&K J•welrv with four. The other two teams that ha~e players on the All· Star primary rotiter are the division lead<•r. Th<· Galleon, and the cellar team. the Montrose Voice. Each has three mt·mbt·rs. As far as the additionals, the Montroet­Voict · hus two players, the Briar Patch two and th~ ( ~alleon om·. And now for the nameli! In the !\iorth Division: pitcher Mike Gonzales O>irty Sally's), catcher I'at Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Monday. June 1" Kindred Spirits (5245 Buffalo Speedway. 665-9756) 1t8•30pm.11ng1eet1m1n111on.S2entry.w1nnertikea11 M1ry·1c1022westhe1mer,528-8851)1t9pm A1nch (6620'~ Mein, 529-9730) 119 pm, singieelim· lnaflon. $2entry.w1nnertakeall ($SO guarantee) Tuesday, June 15 Lampost (2417 Times Blvd ,528-8921) at 8pm, sin· gteehm1nat1on.$2entry.w1nnert1keaU W«inuday,June16 Briar Patch (229-\ W Holcombe. ~9678) at 9pm . 8 inglee1im1nallon. S2entry,$50prize GB I _ (1419 Richmond. 528·8903) at Bpm, single e1tm1nat1on, $2 entry, winner t•k• all plus new pool cue Thursday, June 17 Barn (710 Pac1r1c. 528-9427) at 9pm, double etim1· nation. $2 entry, $25 f1r1t round prize. $15 second round pnze JustManonandLynn"s(817Faint1ew,528-9110)at 8pm E/J'a f1213 Richmond. 527·9071) at 10pm, double ehnunation. S2entry, w•nnertake•JI MSA Tennis STANDINGS 1 Fred Lopez 2. Rich Ryan 3 Ron Landrum 4 John Ryan 5. Lester Vela 6_ David Robicheaux 7 Jon Colbert 8. Michael Green 9 Don "Ainge(' Smith 10. Michael Houston 11. Rich Corder 12. David Garza 13. Charlie Brown 14. Terry Rich 15. Eddie Chavez 16. Daniel Casillas 17 Jim Olson 18. Randy Jierscheck THIS WEEK'S GAMES fCourte.locatedonthenorthsldeol ~• .. OnYe•n~alPark) Sunday, June 13 Regular competition ... :30pm Val·hon (Montro8e Mining Company), first bast-man Dave Pace (Sally's), Sf'<'Ond hnsl'man l>t·n Hailey (Sally's}, third base­man .Jpsee Young (Sally's), and Mike 1..inder •Mining ('o.), ~hortstoop Mike Mor­rison l!-'ally's), and outfielders Jt-rry DeSalt• 1Snllv'sl. llon Dav1dHon (Sally's), Marie .\1an:ht·nn (Sally'B), and Wuym• H:omn"J ~ining Co.) The ad<litionals in the North Division ure: pitrhPr Carl Frieo (Mining Co.), infieldm.i: .Sammy Spaniel (Barn) and Lurry Hradll'y (Mining Co.). and out­fieldt• rs John Summerall (Brazos River Bottom) and Jeff Parker (Mary's). In the South Division: pitcher Ron Ken­nison {A&K Jewelry). catcher Bob fleischer (Montrose Voice), first baseman Sandi Skelton CA&K), second baseman Pete Housos (Voice), third baseman Robert Jam•s (Voice), shortstop Arthur Castillo (Galleon). and outfielders Ken Johnston (A&KJ. Don Kessler (Galleon), Ross Gore (Galleon), and Nie I (A&KJ. The udditionals in the South Division are: pitcher Jaml's Cutler (Voice), infieldt·rs Mike GriRwold CBriar Patch) and Hifhard Martin (Voice), and out fielders Bill Sansom (Briar Patch) and Harry Pirkey <Gnllt'flfl). Th<· All·Stur butboy for both teams i• Bruft' Ft•lgar from .Jim's Gym Thc.·st• will play in a double header against the lfouston Firefighters .June HJ ut l..tvy Fwld as part of the Gay Pride Wet>k tt'iehrationH. The firtn game.• will startat4:00 p.m. and will pil the South Division All·Stars againflt the Firefighters. At the end of the •ocond game, the MSA Women's Softball League will piny their All-Star game. Thi• will be the first year for the WSL and the third for the MSA Softball. • Women's softball activities Not only has the MSA Women's Softball League really gotten the ball rolling on the rcgulur playing field, but their bases are rovert'd aH far SN community activity is Con<'t•rnt>d This f;unday .• Junt:> t:l, there will be sevt>n gumett playc.'Cl to help make up the. gamu that were rained out a couplt> of wttks ai.:-o. Somt· really mterN;ting games are shaping up. Even though the Renegadc!i continut• to romp and stomp on all ('Omer~. bo_th tht• Hell Raisns and Annndillo Graphics arc only one gamt• out ('Heh. And the ~c~ond gom<' of the aftt-rnoon on Sunday will he ht·twN·n tht.• Hent'gadt-s and the Hell Raisen1. Latn, the llell Rais•·rs will face the for­madible Duck!'!, who are only 1 i gameR out of first. And the H.cnegodes go on to meet the ('t•llor occupants, Special ~lend. Thr Women'H Softball is continuing its support of tht· fundraiser1rally the first Saturday of Guy Pride Week put together jointly by the Montro~e Sports Assoc1a· lion and Black and White Men Together. The WSL will have three booths there, and will play their All-Star game at6:30 p.m .. after the game that iH sched~I~ between th• MSA Softball Leugue(wh1ch 1s mostly­- but not exclusively-men) and the Hout-i ton Firt:> Dt•partment softball players. The wom('n 's All-Stars will be choi;:en by each team picking two or three pla):ers each. The players and coaches will dt-"C1de. • Tennis challenges ease up After the maRsive action last week on the MSA Tt'Onis Ladder, this week seemed like a vacation. Explained David Robi­cheaux "There were so many last week. And yo~ can'tchollenge for a week to give people who hove moved up a chance to move again." Only two players were upwardly mobile this past week. Michael Green had.chal- ~~~!~en~f: f~u:~~\ie~~ t~ec~;~:~g~: considered to be a default and Michael took over the number 8 rung on the ladder. Then he challenged number 6 David Robicheaux and lost 6-0, 7-6, with a 5-3 tiebreaker. The only other chaltenge was Don "'Rin­ger" Smith. who challen~ed Michael Houston and swatted hib wav to victorv 6·1 6-" - . TJ.ii;~"Oming wttk shouJd see some chal· u·nges, Jiough, smcP tht! cut-off date for <·hullcnf{ing is Junf' 19 in order to qualify to play Jn the Tt-xns Challenge Cup. The top seven f'ingles playt>rs at that time will lw tht' om·s who represent the MSA Tennis Lc.·aguc.• in the tournt'y. Expc~·l Fred Lopez to be challen~ed by Rich Ryan, and watch out for a dark horse to stir things up. As for the doubles, there will be round­robin play on the 13th to determine who will play in the tourney. As of June9there were six doubles teams expecting to com­pete: Fred Lopez/Bobby Hopkins, David Robicheaux1Larry Elliot, Michael HoustonfMichael Green, J.C. Barrera/ Jon Colbert, David Garza/Don "Ringer" Smith, and Rich Ryan/John Ryan. Besides the ladder activity, the regular Sunday play is doing great, with 27 active members participating and many others showing up part-time Last Sunday Raw a female player at the courts. Dnvid Robicht>aux said that they art• n•ally looking forward to her coming buck and th<'y hope that more womE'n will start coming out to play. Said David, "lt'8 gonna take that first on(' or two to come out and then talk it up. ' • Weekend softball results By Jerry DeSale l'1SA Softball League Saturday, June 5 Born defeats Brier Patch 10-6 The Barn scored 10 runs on IO hits to rock up thPir second win of the season at the expt:>m•e of the Briar Patch. The Barn wns h>d by B Schmidt, S. Paulus. and B Trei, each 2 for 4 on the day Jim's Gym tops River Bottom 16-8 Jim's Gym, led by the hitting of M. Schmidt 3 for ·I and D. Brown and M. Odem1ky, N\ch 2 for 4, d('feated the Brazos River Bottom in the nym 's first of two .camt•s on Saturday. Mery'!>i defeetes A&K Jewelry 10-8 in H~esaw battle In u game that saw the It-ad changt' sev t•ral tinws, Mary's rallied past A&K in the last inning to up their record to 4 and 2 Somt• thought that Mury"s might be easy p1ckinws for A&K since Mary's had another game latc.•r in the evening with the Division lending Sally's team. Dirty Sally'• shuts out Voice 13-0 Dirty Sally's &cored 13 times on IL hits whilt• holding the Voil'e to no runs on 5 hits to roll to thE"ir tH.'Vt'nth straight win of tht•. season. ~ally's continued to display their powtor hitting with homeruns bv M Morrison and Ken "Pearl" Baily. ~ Sally's second victory Saturday at expense of Mary's, 11-3 Dirty Sally'R, fre8h from their victory over the Voice, came back to face thei.r divis1.on rival, Mary's. Sally's continued the display of power hitting with 5 more homeruns, 2 by J. DeSale, one by K. Gray, om• by M. Marchena. and another by Ken Hailey. In all, Sallv's scored 11 runs on 12 hits whilt· Mary's- could manai;re only 3 runs on 9 hill-'. Jim's Gym jumps on Montrose Voice 16-10 Jim's Gym jumped to an early inning lead ovt>r the Voice and held off a late inning rally to win 16·10. The hitting for the Gym was Jed bv Dickie Hoke who wais 3 for 4 on the nig.ht. The victory moves Jim's Gym into a solid position in second place in the South Division and breathing down the Galleon's neC'k. Sunday, June 6: Galleon wallops A&K 22-4 The Galleon resumed their hitting where they left off before the Memorial weekend holiday with another 18 hit attack to defeat A&K 22-4. However, the game was played under official pro~st, by A&K due to a possible illegal substitution made by the Galleon manager, G. Russo. Regardless of the outcome of the protest, June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 15 Act;on fr-o."l last wee end's ;·~•s Gy'1 vs. 3:13 ra~e. ~i 's ~y won it, lQ-9. the G_all('(>n had s('vt-ral hitting staris on the night. loo by R Gore, 3 for 4 with a double and homerun, and B. Col1ake, 3 for 3. Also, _other homeruns were delivered by A. Ca&t11lo, and D. Kei-;~der. Montrose Voice squeaks by Briar Patch 9-8 In Sunday's second game, the Montrose Voice rebounded from their two Saturday <·S to defeat the Patch 9-8. The game :~: J~1~:~!fS i~u~d ~~ ~e eh:!io~aodf ~h! 5th, pushed across their last run which was just enough to hold on for the victory The victory moves the Voice into a dead tie with the Patch for 4th place in the South Division Dirty Sally's easily defeats River Bottom 17-2 Dirty Sally'i;: scored 17 runs on 18 hit.s to ea.i--ily dt•feat the River Bottom and move the Bottom to the bottom of the North Division. Sally's again flexed their mus­cles with homeruns by M. Morrison and M. Marchena. The Rivt>r Bottom managed their 2 runs on only 2 hits. Barn defeats Mary's 13-4 Jn Sunday's finale, the Barn scored their second victory of the weekend at the expense of Mary's. The Barn, in this vic­tory, is beginning to show their power with a 15 hit attack led by D. Duncan 3 for 5, B. Trei 3 for 5 with 2 doubles, and B Schmidt 2 for 3 with a double and a homerun. The victory moves the Barn up to the heels of Mary's and obviously the Barn now has thoughts about San Francisco. 16 MONTROSE VOICE/June II, 1982 -1.-.I t=IAVi:L 522-8227 · · · ..· rn11 NEW FORT YORK HAWAII LAUDERDALE t\ .. $149 $499 $149 - Call for deta1rs Serving the Gay Community Award winning national political cartoonist Ben Sargent, each week in Houston in the Montrose Voice Classified ads in the Montrose Voice bring results. Get yours to us by 6pm Tuesday to be in Friday's Voice ... and you 'II reach thousands in Montrose. SH AMBllCA. RND A fRIBll 11~_ ~1 ~~ ~ wmtBOB DAMRON'S AD RESS BDOK'B2 &llSlllllanlllllJIUCllHISlllUITI m ·CAIAlll ·cmmAll·IUll ·-llllll'lllS se lW'l.•...MM1fMll iU41l5lU11l1:m45:1I4 1 ... ,_ t. 5" ti-'C>VANt& 'fio:ers: #'-s '2- KlNOQfD SPl0T~ -"If lY'.S 13A-J"A '' 1?i4St'A<S ~'~ 1-~UC ~'5 Ct:Jf>!t '-1).0N"TIOSE MIW11'<J C.O#f~~~ lfT "Ole J)O I!_ . Thanks Houston! * More Montrose community news-th an any publication in the world * More national gay news-than any publica­t ion in Texas * More major features s tories-than any gay publication in Texas * More Houston circulation-than the other Houston gay publication (much more!) * And More Houston advertising space­than the other Houston gay publication For More Information about advertising possibilities in the New umber One publication. c:all your Montrose Voice nclvcrl1sing representative, or advertising director Bill ~larberry. al 529-8490. June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE l7 The industry is buzzing over 'E.T.' Summer movie fever about to arrive By John W. Rowberry International Gay News Agency There are two unusual aspects to the rash of 1982 Summer movies about to be released: this year will see the largest number of major motion pictures released during a single season, and the majority of the releases are going to receive major audience and box office attention . Why? It seems the summer of 1982 has by chance become the season when Holly wood, and everyone else involved in film making. has its blockbusters ready for the projection room. But first, the real surprise: Steven Spcil· berg's E.T., destined, if you can believe the advance word from everyone on the inside, to become the blockbuster of all time We'rr talking bigger than Star Wars, bigger than Close Encounters, bigger than Raiders of the Lost Ark. How can that be, you ask? In the few select screenigs E.T. has already had within the movie making superstructure, word has it that even hardened corporate executives are walking out of the film dazed, mouth open in awe, muttering " ( can't believe it, I can't believe it." Every film promoter and publicist is buzzing that E.T. may end up being the movie of the decade. The ultimate film. The defini tive movie experience. And what is E.T. about? E.T. stands for Extra Terrestials. The second big bonanza is going to be, again from the same inside mouths, Pol­tergeist; which is, ironically, a Spielberg production . Here the word is that the spe­cial effects in the film (poltergeists are spirits that move things) are the best yet seen on the screen. Star Trek.· Th,, Wrath of Khan is, besides being the second Star Trek movie, a whole new ball game. Except for the cast (which I'm sure is alright for Trekkies), the movie is every inch a new adventure with a much different approach than the first Trek movie. The word is better. And the ex pee· tations are very high for a film that sounds like, but isn't really, a sequel. Grease Two is a sequal, of sorts, except that Travolta and Olivia are no longer part of the story line. Enter Maxwell Caul­field as the lead, and Caulfield-if you missed him in After Dark or Interview-is one of the most beautiful men on the face of the earth His co-star, Michelle Pfeiffer, looks like Olivia, but then nowadays everyone does. Caulfield plays the cousin of the original Newton-John character. He comes to America from England, meets Michelle and falJs in love. To prove himself, he tries to become a 50s greaser. Watching this pristine beauty trans· formed from the ultimate boy next door to an earthy, if stylized, greaser is the most exciting Hcreen transformation since Lon Chaney became a wolfman. Annie ie the wrap up for the big musi cals, unless you count The Best little Whorehouse in Texas. which will fall into the Summer-Fa11 category. Annie has already h•en hyped toth•skiesand loving it will depend on how much you like mu~i· eala and how long you'll have to wait m line before you get in the theater Tht• Best Little Whorehouse in Texas will bt> an eusier relationship: Dolly Par­ton can do no wrong and Burt Reynolds is a much better light comedy actor than his following wants to admit. The car chaHt•s in Wh<m•hou.w~ are kept to an absolute minimum Not to be ovt·rl<>0ked, however, is 7'ht• Pirate Moc •ie, a Nlightly-modern version of Gilbert und Sullivan's Pirates of Penanze with Christopher Atkin (The Blu.­l. a111xm) and Kristy McNichol. Whil• Pome of the origmal Gilbert Sulhvan songs have been left in (although slightly rewritten), enough new material has been added to almost make this an origmaJ musical. The word is: enchanting. On the real serious side of the summer movies the top of the list is the amazing success of Conan, The Barbarian. Either the pre--release publieity was right-on, or the rather weak dialogue and predictable action of this classic sword and magic story was exactly the right mixture to attract the mainstream. Conan has already made over $10 million and it is set to play across the con try all summer long. Rocky II/is. without a doubt, the best of the Ro<ky films-too bad it didn "t come earlier. The problem may be that audien· <es have had enough (look at the fate of the final in the Omen trilogy). Here the script and the pacing of the movie are all meshed into an action film with some reason for being besides bloody faces. Stallone has learned a great deal from Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull-and the fight scenes in Rocky Ill are cinematic works of art. Megaforce. if you haven't already guessed, is about a state of the art private policeforce-for-hire set in the very near future. This group, lead by Barry Bostwick and Michael Beck, uses equipment that is straight out of the Twilight Zone design school. Still, for aJI its adventure and super machismo, Megaforce has a sense of humor There is no humor in The Road Warrior. the retitled Mad Max IJ, a sequel to one of the darkest and most haunting of the new nihilist films. Mad Max Il. or The Road Warrior, is a savage futuristic film filled with as many images of black leather and chain as a Kenneth Anger film, or a night in a leather bar. But for all it's brutality. Michael Sarrazin & Tom Skerri tt in "Fightin_g_ Back." Kristy r.;cNichol with Christopher Atkins in "The Pirate Movie." Sean Connerv in "Wrong is Right." Movies The Road Warrior is both even-handed and a cut above what you usually get when you mix violence with gasoline. Two similar films are bound to cause some confusion. The Dino De Laurentiis version of a group of citizens tired of being vandalized by street punks is called Fight ­ing Back and stars Tom Skerritt and Patti LuPone (straight from Evita). The other similar fiJm is cal1ed Vigilante and stare Robert ForeRter and Fred Williamson. Other than that, they are as different as night and day. Shghtly more gory is the new fil~ by George A Rom~ro, the much touted ~1rec­tor of the original Night of the Lwmg Dead; his entry. Creeps how, has an origi­nal screenplay by the master of the sus­pen• eful printed word. Stephen King (The Shining}. Guaranteed to get your hands up in front of your eyes The final Summer creepie mo\de is the all new ver~iun of The Thing, whiched is based on the original novel and not the well-know James Arness version availa· hie any Saturday night on the late show, Light and romantic? Or just light? Try Hanh· Pank.,·. a mixture of silliness, Gilda· Radner and Gene Wiider. There is international intrigue, murder (yes, Virgi· nia, even murder can be funny), transcon· tentinal chases-you know the formula Wrong 1s Right has Sean Connery play­ing a TV exec who will go anywhere and do an'.'t-1.hing to get the great, Jate, breaking hot-spot new~ on the air. Anywhere .and anvthing turn ~ome rather heavy weight soCial romment.JoO (like the madness ofthe Oval Offic-e, the madness of the Arab oil magnatf>s, and the madness of the arms race) into often biting satire. Al Pacinc. just might make a comeback after his absurd stint in Cruising with his hght·hearted. but sincere. role in Author. Author. As a playwright with scene prob­lems and a married man \\rith mistress problems, Pacino plays off Dyan Cannon (as th actress on her way to the great bedroom sC'f'ne) and Tuesday Weld as the wife on the way out the door. At last, Pacino plays a character that is only nor­mally crazy! Young Doctors in lol'e promises to do for hospitals and daytime soap operas what Airplane did for control towers and disaster movies. An unmitigated dark satire, Young Doctors is set in a hospital you will have to see to believe. Noone dies (except of a broken heart) and no one bleeds (even in surgery). The only compli· cations are the lusts of the characters . .. rather, the staff .. . and lust is epidemic. The unexpe<'ted big event of this summer may weJI be Kenny Rogers' big screen debut in Six Pack, a routine for· mula plot about a race car driver and six teenage hellions that stands to pick up tremendous audience appeal over Rogers' powerful sCTeen presence. His TV movies have been rating blockbusters, and not by coincidence. Rogers. regardless of how you feel about country, western, or race cars-is a charming and wholesome aJl­American type with just enough of a father image to inspire confidence and just enough sex appeal to keep him firmly in the running It's easy to dismiss movies likeSlx Paek or Cannonball Run as being so much red neck hoopla. Still, don't overlook what can he the most telling traits of all: honet;ty, warmth. and charm. And after summer is over. what is there to look forward to? Try Summer Lm·ers. yet another film by Randal Kleiser about the loss of innocen« on an exotic island. Yes, the director of The Blue Law'JOn is back with another adolescent "discovery" movie, this time a young boy and two girls on a Greek island during .. an unforgetta· ble summer that would change their lives.' Or maybe Fast Walking, a prison pi~ ture from the guard's Point of view. Or. Crosstalk, an Australian thriller about a computer involved in a murder. But if all else fails. take comfort in the fact that 20th Century Fox will re-release the original Star \Vars, but only for three weeks-so get in line now. * *GRANT STREET* * STATION * This Sunday, $1 dt1nks, 75t beer & potJO party ";;'.'~~:,';',e rock & roll, * * * " Automatic" ** * 2377 Grant al Fairview 528-8342 A PeopJe Pia ;e * ********** WE BUY *Gold *Silver SERVING MONTROSE * Jewelry 1--..;;;;;;....lll'-_.;;"---+-..--.._, *Gems Custom Jewelry & Rings Designed to Reflect Your Lifestyle' -----G--Y-R--O- -G--Y-R--O-S-- ---~ SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 JUNE SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85 -with this ad Open 11am-10pm everyday (till midnight Friday 8' Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~-----------------------· COMPANY "B" Army/Naey surplus from around the world r Lost Our Lease Sale Check out our Camping Gear ~~ \ 5366 WESTHEIMER l OAM·6:30PM MON.-SAT. ~A (TILL 7PM THURS.) HOUSTON 77058 96S·97S3 \ ~~Ethiopian CuisinE A touch of E~~~~np~:n l~~~cy and Fine 428 Weothelmer 526-2895 Featuring Harrar's Club Oancmg, 10 to 2. Mnced Music Rog- Muolc ... ry F~doy end S.turdoy night i~~Jn~,1~~~~~1 Wednffdoy Happy Hour 10pm-2orn OPEN for lunch and dinner June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 19 Neighborhood Montrose address not just a number but a way of life Photostory by Ed Martinez Newcflmers to Houston are faced with a bewildering range of choices. One of the most perplexing is where to hve. There are so many different types of housing available, in such a wide latitude of prices, locations, and lifestyles that it truly boggles the mind. Even when the specific location is pin pointed, there are still many choices to make. In Montrose, which is still a large neigh· borhood, there are many types and styles of dwellings to consider. One of these is the large apartment complex, and while obvi­osly desirable, it too poses certain draw­backs. Nevertheless, such complexes are plainly attracting thousands of new resi­dents flocking to Houston each month. One such complex is named, simply, 1400 Richmond, This large apartment community, num­bering in the hundreds of units, features apartments on three levels, thus qualify­ing as garden, rather than high rise, apartments. Handsome balconies over­look inner courtyards that provide off street parking as well as pools and green spaces for lolling about in good weather, of which Houston has an abundance. There are many apartment complexes in Houston that can match these features, however. Were 1400 Richmond no more than this, it would hardly offer any partic­ular advantages over competing apart­ment communities. The special attitude that sets thet;e apartments apart is some­thing else, something more subtle and dif­ficult to isolate. That something is what makes 1400 Richmond much more than just an address. Call it ambience, flavor, or just plain pizazz, 1400 Richmond has it. One of the things that gives these apart­ments their uniqueness is the convivial air that competing lifestyles enjoy. In a neighborhood heavily populated by gay people, almost any large apartment house in Montrose will have some gay people living there. At 1400 Richmond, however, there is a large percentage of tenants who are gay. At the same time, the community is so large that there is also a large number of non-gay people in residence. The beauty of the place, however, is that everyone seems to coexist so well and with such an absence of friction. In a city long noted for conservatism in its attitudes, such tolerance and permissiveness comes as somewhat of a shock. Closer inspection, however, reveals what more and more Americans have finally come to accept: gay people do not wear horns, are not child molesters, are not hopeless social misfits, :~i~h~s ~~d a~:ry u~~:f~:bl~r~~:e::~e 1400 Richmond is living proof of the changing mores in even the most conser­vative of American cities. While Houston may not necessarily qualify as extremely conservative. it does have a history of reactionary attitudes and politics. All that seems to be changing, however, if this large and very friendly apartment com­munity is typical . And it does seem to be typical of more and more complexes in the inner city. Houston in general, and Montrose in particular, are living proof that "the times they are a-changing," hopefully for the better, at least as far as social awareness and better understanding and tolerance of different lifestyles and attitudes are con­cerned. WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..•••• 20 MONTROSE VOICE/June ll, 1982 ·• ------------------------I ! -- ! We're doing our part . . . I FREE RESUMES : 50 COPIES PRINTED FREE! I That's right .. . Absolutely Free' \\'hat's the catch~ There's really only one. · In order to take advantage of this limited time offer, you must be curr~ntly unemployed and acti\ely seeking employment~ Bnng us. a clean, rnmera-ready copy of )O~r r:sume. (along with a copy of this ad) and we'll pnnt :JO copies on qua lity paper absolutely FREE! Why are we doi!1g thi'i? Because we feel private indus­try must do more 1f we expect the goyernment to do less. This offer is valid through the month of June and wi_ll be honored for the first 150 applicants presenting this coupon. Qualit) i' the difference at Spe~dv Printing Service Be1laire ~tore 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667-7417 fhc Communit~ ·, Quality Prmter &: ~tati onn • ()fft'r luni1N.I 10 2 pagt·\; pkN· no .1rtboard .... ------------------------- The Montrose Voice 7000 COPIES distributed each week In Houston through 105 DISTRIBUTION POINTS resulting in an estimated readership of 18.800 TWT 4000 COPIES d1st11buted each week in Houston through 80 DISTRIBUTION POINTS resulting •n an estimated readership of t0.9""' Just thought you'd like to know Figurw are• •ti-led by ~onlrose Vo.ce lot" aw9faQe w9911 tnrou;h May UM! TWT .:! 10 lum11h .a:ume distnbutlon lgure. Wt w ~ting W•"• used 1tle flVlll• 2 I u "'9 pau-(l •l.Jm&l•"'OJ ~ipatt•deducttngaveragereturnsot300mpftfQfMQI, Ask Yourself Where can you find over 18.000 discriminating shoppers whose unparalleled tas tes drive them to nothing but the best? the readers of the Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE To advertise your business in the Montrose Voice, call 529-8490. Ask for William Marberry. Fi~,.. art· u .. omau-d by M•lf!U'l)W VoiN ,..._arc.• ... June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Art The landscapes and seascapes of Robert Schuhsler Photoetory by Ed Martinez When the western world exploded into World War I, an era came to an end. The world as people in Europe and America knew it was unalterably changed, never again to return to its former shape. Society, politics, morals and basic atti­tudes toward human behavior itself were radically reshaped into a new order which we are still attempting to define some six decades later. Art reflected this metamorphosis, mir­roring J)Prhaps most accurately what peo­ple only dimly understood at the time. The abstract expressionists, the French impressionists, surrealists, cubists and pointillists all screamed stridently that the sky was not only falling, it might never again recover its former height. The emphasis was on the abstract, and repres­entational art was attacked as out of tune with times. As radical as it seemed at the time, the wave of abstract expressionism has aged and has now assumed the posi­tion of respectability and tradition in art that representational art once occupied. Realism in art, ironically, is now ridi­culed and patronized by the art establish· ment as abstract expreSBionism was in the 20s. As the French are fond of saying, "The more things change, the more they remain the same." This phenomenon in the world of art is brilliantly outlined in a recent issue of Newsweek, entitled "Life Imitates Art." So once agam we return to the trend among artists for portraying things as they actually appear-not photorealism, but rather lining things and human forms in easily recognizable symbols. Not to the extent that they repress or inhibit the artists' ability to express their own crea­tivity, but merely enough that the laity can at least know what it is that they are looking at when they visit an art exhibit without having to rely on an "expert" to explain it to them. Regardless of the con­tempt this arouses among art history majors and cultural snobs this can only be an improvement in the world of art. A Houston artist in the vanguard of this newly developing trend is Robert Schuhsler, a native, who has lived and worked in this city since birth. Educated at the University of Houston, Schuhsler has achieved wide acclaim for his work in spite of, or rather pe~h_aps b~ause of, a la<'k of formal art trammg. Tius does not mean that he is not a disciplined and trained artist; it merely removes him from the worshipers of the latest styles and fashions in art emanating from ga11eries and art criti<'s in places like New York. Robert Schueler, like another Housto­nian, Dick Turner, teaches as well as pro­duces art. He takes students on locations around t~e U.S. to train them in the artis­tic techniques he ha~ mastered. ~e ~lso teaches classes in vanous art associations here in Houston. Recently Schuhsler's work has come to the attention of M. Grumbacher Co., a New York art supply company, who has arranged with Schuhsler to .make. films_ to be used in training students m major cities across the U.S. Robert Schuhsler paints things, not peo­ple. "I'm not a people painter," he admits with a grin. His studio, a stunning con­dominium in mid·Montrose that he con· verted from an old garage, features soaring greenhouse windows that look out on decks and fountains filled with lush greenery. The light that 1~ admitted by this arrangement makes his home a per· feet setting for his work. . . Robert Schuheler paints strong, vmle scenes of the sea, smashing at rocky coa~- ~i~::~r!e~~~~~fi1::~s~~j:~~o;:~1~nrl~; and upright landscapes that t~st out from the canvas. His texture 18 v~ned and inviting. Schuholer works rapidly, and can finish as many as one canvas per day. He usually work• in acryl!c, although he teaches both acrylic and 011 pamting. Hie Un f ini shed work in proeress, a crylic on canvas, Robert Schuhs l er in his studio "Untitled," acrylic on canva~ canvases seem confident and self-assured. They obviously impress his clients, for the paintings sell promptly and at prices that exclude thoe on a budget. The work of Robert SchuhsJer is in tune with the national temper, helping to restore representational art to a place it once occupied proudly in the art world, expressing perhaps an unvoiced need in the world for a return to a reality that has been masked for so long by preu.nse and superficiality. Schuhsler's work does it with style and a distinctively local accent, reasserting Houston's claim to an impor tant place in the cultural world. Is that perfectly clear? If you've ever wondered whether your local elected representatives are thinking straight, consider Washington, D.C., where, according to a report in the Wa.ahington Poat, City Council came up with the following gem: "It is not the intention of the council to revive the statute or part thereof which wu previously repealed unless such inten­tion to revive the previously repealed eta· tute is specifically included in the language of the •tatute repealing the pr~ vioua repealer." That, believe it or not, wa.a intended to clarify a new law regulating the conduct of Preeidential inaugurations. Wine is it Purists may tum up their noses, but wine marketing is entering the soda-pop era, reports the l<Js Angele• TiTM•. Not only ia it being sold in cano and plastic bottlee, there are now plane for wine vending machines. Wayne Downey, bead of California'• Geyser Peak Winery, oayo, while there are legal problem.a, "Our attorney1 are wor k­ing on it." The moot likely place for wine machine., he say•, ie a "controlled envir· onment" like a oporta irtadium. 22 MONTROSE VOICE/June 11, 1982 'Prufrock's Montage' opens tonight By Billie l>uncan '!'ht· v.orld prem1t•re OJ Kt·ith '.\kGr<.'J,!'Or's l.. th p1.iy l'rufrock s Jfonta}.!P, tnkt·s place tomght .June I I ut ChocoL.Ht• Harnu Tht•ater. l"J?.a Lame. l~h~ play •s a t.ume<ly that 1s hased in I ru' oek s T1vt•rn, which was a wt•ll k ov.n ui •fjpctJ hang-out n rht• .,,Js loc .. ~ a i Westhe1 .. 1er ~l't·or ·ng to l\kGregor, the plav 1s v. 1t ten as 1f the bar still ex sL-.; t!'Xiay ard ('ofl cerns ,1 rmer customt•r of tht· h~tr wh1 n·tum8 with h1!oi ~ '"e (wh 1s tending« t-u . t-ss 'lleetmi: -.d wmd:-- u,:> u:--. g his return h 1 t the bar us il sett -:lJ.: ''or h1.s Qlerror1i'S and r .s w1sh·tht•\ ·¥. t·rl's. McGreg r 1s 1 nier member of th• Pr1frotk s group himself. -d hns designed the 8el 1.1s a n"-Lreahon of he er Otner former customl'r:-; havt• Ioant'd the thl-ater pnsonal mf'morahilia and rum t Jre t nt used to be 10 the actual place. Among thl• former Prufrockians who havt• lent •tss1stanct> 1s J>orothy ~<·hwarz, who was the owner of Prurrock's Cimd of thl' Hound~ thlc_., which wa!'i in tht• next blu<·k The pl.:1y ts ~irectt. .O hy Leonard T Wagner, the nrtistu director or< 'hocolah' Hayou ThPatt>r, and t will run tt-rough .July 10. A personal observation: Prufrock's Memories By Billie Uuncan Alj the metaphors of Ts_ Elliofs 'Love. song of J Alfn-d Prufrock" managed to come to life ln the bar that bore its name from 1969 to 147H when it finally was con sumed by flames to gather dust unt it became n pet shop. How titting. The first time I wt·nt in Prufrock's I didn't know when bar closing time wa:;. I didn't know what the different brand!i of beer were I had no idea what to order 10 the wuy of wme. I found the place bt'Cause I had b<·cn ouunde of it once while a friend of mine went in to see if a friend ofheni was there. I remembered where it was That was exceedingly important, because there was no sign at that time outside of the old vine-covered house on Westheimer that formed the shelter for the minds and activities that were the bar If 8Clmeone didn't lead you by the hand, the pla(:e was impo~sible to find I walked pa.at the overstuffed chairs and so(as in the front room to the small room that had part of the bar and room for two chess tablet;. The main chess and bridge room wali through a large open doorway Edith Pia( was singing on the jukebox. "What would you like?" "Oh, I'll have a glass of wine." "What kind'!" "Gh. Well. uh ... I'm not sure. I guess I'll have what I usually have." "What do you usually have? .. "Vh .. " Th~ questions were getting tougher. "Pink." "Pink?" •·Yeah." You said it. Go with it. "Pink." "Okay." He poured me a glass of Ah· anca Rose. .. That will be 80¢." I handed over a hard-earned dollar and got 20¢ change. I kept it. I seriously didn't know that tipping W8b part of the trip. When my terror at being in a bar all on my own subsided a bit. I looked around. No one seemed to notice that I was there. Soon a guy who did not seem to notice that I was th.ere walked up to the bar and ordered a beer (55¢). "Hi. How you doing." ""Fine.·• •·1 see you like Alianca." "It's what I alwaysorderhere."Thecon· venation went on. Ultimately, we got around to dicussing the relative merits or Emily Dickinoon and Lawrence Ferlingh· etti. I wu the Dickinson (an. Soon another guy who did not seem to /Scene from "Prufrock's Montage.• Keith it:cGregor, playwright 1 Dorothy Schwarz, for mer owner of Prufrock' s 1 & producer Leonard T. Wagner. Montrose Live notice that I was there walked up and entered the conversation "You're both full of shit. There is no great Am<·rican pof'l and if there were one it sure wouldn't be Ferlinghetti or Emily for-Christ's-tmke DickinRon." I lhoughl of my other favorite poet "\\'hat uhout Edgar Allen Poe?" They hoth )(Hlkd al mt' ns if I had losl my mind "Poe'!~!·· "Yf'ah." Don't mc·ss with the poet aftt>r whom l numl·d my tf·ddy hl·ur. "Yeah, Poe. Okay, so hii:o rhythms might drive somt• so-l'H11l-<l modnn pO(•ts up the wall, hut ht• had tt gn·at !WnSP of sound in his Vt'rtws und he told a storv And he knew what he wanted to say l'K'f<Jn• h<· started out. not like most• ft he writns now who ju!-'t wnle whatever comes Lu mind and don't curt' anything about rhythm, sound!-'. images, stories. All tht>V do is writ<• sentam·e8 und hreuk tht•m inio shorter lines on the pag(• and call it poetry. ' "Would you like nnothl'r glass of wine?" 'I'd lovt> om·. J)o they have something that's not so J.1weef!" I didn't win the· argument, but I won acc<·ptnn<·e. I provc•d that I knew how to argue. Intdlectual argument wus the basis of the pick-up game at Pru frock's. Hut the pick-up game was not the only game that was play<-d at Prufrock's Tht>re was the martial nrt.-;1 Eastern phi losophy game that was played by many. induding Doulo(, who decided he was ready to move to n greall·r plane in 1977 and calmly blew his brains out. Ther(• wus the luve and marriage game that was played by Don and Debbie who got married and bouitht a restaurant nC'ross the slrl'f't. They are now split and df)n 'l havt> thP n·stnurant There was the spy game that was played by Richard who dn·w heautiful pictun-'8 and tried to recover from having worked undercover for the govt•rnment and was found shot to clt•nth with a stolen polic<· revol\.'(•r, IL wM <·oll<·d a Huicide. There wa• th<• drug game played by just about c_•vt•ryonr. induding St<·ve who wus found dead ma servic<• station men 't; room with a needle still in h1s arm in 1974 Tht•r(' was th1• pool hustlt•r gnme that was phtyNI to pt•rfe<·tion by Leo who was only tall enough to tll't" ovt·r the edge or thl1 tu hie. hut who Cw hen he ot·t his mind to it) could heat any comer. Of course, that was aflt'r the pool table repla<·t'CI tht• chess and bridJCe tables in tht" middle room in 1976, and the t'hess and card games were moved to the front pon·h and back room. Pru frocks wt-nt through as many changes as the pt•ople who inhabited it. In the years m which I was associated with Prufrock's (as a customer, bartender, entertainer, manager), one of the ~ost fre­quent comments I ht>ard was, "This place has sure changed. I used to come here, but this isn't the Prufrock's I knew." Well a bar is people~ and thedenizensof Prufro~·k's shifted with the vagaries of time-although some of them W£'re well on their way to making n cart-er on a barstool and would have been happily content to grow old_ in that ~levated po~ition Spending time m one bar gives a person a chance to Bet' wht're the bums on the str('('t get their start Like Milo Milo was one of the brightest mmds m the early J>:rufrock's, hut he was already worrying his friends with his drinking by 1973, when I took off for the safety of San Francisco after my divorce When I returned in 1976 to help Dorothy (Schwarz, the owner) change the club to "country1 ~estern" and put in live music, Dorothy picked me up at the station, bought me lunch and took me to the bar. AB we walked down the drive from her ~~~~:o space in the back, we passed an Dorothy •aid, "Hello, Milo," and kept walking I wae stunned "That was Milo?" m:~~!· We don't let him in the bar a ny- But by then Milo was content to sit out in front o( Dr Butler's office on the comer und drink out of thl1 c·ommunal bottlt> with his stn·N frit•nds , likt_. Captain Jim, who munagt·d at orw point to captun• tht• hNtrt of a ril'h widow-hut It \\:as lt·mporar~ Milo didn't slt•t·p on tht> stn·t•t , how<·n·r !'o. II <• had a two·hrdroom station wagou ahandont'<I in tht· allt·.v ht.•hind tht· har that ht• sh<lrt'CI with anothn wino, who got c·oldl'r than usual om• night and nt•n•r nwdt· it up 111 tht• mornrng again. 01w J.{U.V \v ho l-lhoulcln 't havt• gottt•n up in t lw morning ont• day was poor David who hough t half int<•n•st in tht• bar just a littlt· wh1Jp hl'fon· it hur nt'<I down without a st itt·h of insuran<·t• ( >n ;tncl on. Th<· mt•morit•s dinJ,t likt• tlw sm1·1l of' smokt.• tha t stav('(I around months afh:r l'rufrntk's hc.ul d 0 nsNI fort•\·t•r So now this Kt•Hh pt·rson has wrillt·n a play that ha:-; tht· :lUdant:\' to ust· Pru frrn·k·s as a ,..t'ltinf,:" for a man with nH·mo nt•:-< who is gmng throuf,:"h <·hanJn·s I hopt• ifs J.{(H1d . I ha\·t· tht· frt·linJ.: I'll st•<• a lot of p<·oplt· I ust'CI to know on opt•mng n iJ.{h t • Duncan's quick notes ( ' loggt•rs Nt•uring Goal Th(• Mon trost· ( 'oun t r.v ( ' loggl'rs are cktt·rminNi to ra 1:->t• t·nough mont·y to ta kt• tht•ir talt.'nls to Ht•no for thP Cuy H.oclt•o , und it looks like t h(•y mig h t ht• J.!Pll111g d ose Th(•y h a v(' hN•n ra i:-;i ng mnnt•y ma in ly t h rough l>l' rformam·l's a t various dubs, hut this wt•t•kt•nd tht•y with be hav ing a garagP sa lt• a l 190f) Waugh Drivt•. Stomi> on ovt•r a nd havt• a look Theotricul Opportunity for Mon· trose Musieiani, C'hoculate Huyou Tht·utn is looking for an ell'C'tr ic bass p lay<•r and a drummer to play for (i rrl from (iolcfr11 <:a lt' that o pt• ns on .June::!(). You must h1• avui lablt• for M• vt•ral wt•eks on Sunday, Monday and T ut>sclay mghts C:OJ.('l't ·(·Ill Spirited Fundraist•r Next Wt•ek . On t lw l i1th !Tm·sdayl, l\ indn·cl Spirits wi ll host a Cay Prid<• \h•t·k fundraiser that will fratun· a wide \'arit•ty of t•ntertainnwnt. Tht•rt• will ht· livt• music pr0\1dt>CI h:; Huwslyn Huffin CMs. Ga:;: Pridt• 19H:!l. l..vra i:tnd tht• Montrose Symphonit· Hanel ht·adt'<I hy Paradt· Marsiutl Andv Mills !Jouston Off Hroaclway \1,.-ill pn·st·nt its improvisntional show,joint·d h.\ tht•music of ,John Day and Compan:; And to top it all off. thl're w111lw lw a "gula n·vut•' with Vickit• Eddie. Kika and xpt•ticil J.{Ul':->t Hon S ioux <Miss Cay Hodt•o from 'l't•xns). Stunning P erforma nce by P e ter Alkn If you h<l\l' not dt•tidt'tl to go st•t• Pdn Allt•n, talk to somt•ont• who has. You just might find _rnurst·lf calling for tit"kt·L"' irnnwd1uh•I\ Pt·lt·r Allt·n 1s not just a 1wrformt•r. lit· 1s an 1·nnl. Pidun• him in a whill' polyt•sh•r Peter Allen June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 23 and rhtn:->tone outfit that looks likt· a sonet_v surgi(·al suit worn by a maniacal joJ.!gl'r who twit." songs and ttolls vu·tousl\ humorous slorit·s Mix th;:H up with a tt•nder H'llSl' of humanity and a mad\ ari('lv of high kit·ks Add tht' fal·t that his ('hans.ma and t·nt•rgy fillt•d t·nry nm·k in the Tmn·rThentl'ron opt·nmJ.! night, us the audi(•ncr not only ('Hil<'d for ont.• t•nt·on· afh-r anotht•r, but wt•r<• ('Ollstantly dri\'{'n to jump to tht·ir ll't'l in appn'<·tation of an incnadibll' talt·nt. Evt·n if you know nothing ahout tht• man·s award-winning songwrilinJ.! abili ta·s. just tlw show is l'nough to turn you into u fan 1 lis last pl'rformam·t• 1s this Sunda\ Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose fFn dayJune 111hrOUQhlhursd.ly.J..me11) •PIANO Lois Yvonne 9Pm Fnday and Saturday, and Ste­phanie Parker & Doug Mowery 9pm Tuesday. Wednesday and Thursday at Rascals. 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Mickey Rankin 8 30pm Friday_ Tom Williams 8 30pm Saturday, Monday. Wednesday ano Thursday. Greg Davis 5 15pm Saturday and 8 30pm Sunday. Kenton Parton 5 15pm Sunday. and Virgil Dixon 5 15pm weekdays at Keyboard.J012Milam, 528-6988 Richard Askin and Dana Rogers 10pm nightly (except Monday and Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar). 2631 Richmond.528·2259 Ruth HHtlngs 9pm mghtly (except Sunday and Mon­day). Llonshare 9pm Sunday and Monday at Ba1a·s 402 Lovett.527·9866 LH Laforge 8 30pm mghtly (except Sunday) with Vikk• Ford Friday and Alexandra Haas Wednesday at Arno's. 4002Montrose. 528-2993 Terffa Mauney 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Monday) and Austin Mann noon Sunday at Bacchus 523Lovett.523-3396 • ORGAN Keokl Kona 5pm Fnday and Saturday. Jpm Sunday ;~:~~~2~~escl a y and Thursday at the Hole, 109 • COUNTRY I COUNTRY1ROCK Bob Wllllams and the Trail Riders 9pm Friday. Satur day and Thursday at Happy Trails. 715 Fa1rv1ew. 521· 2792. and 9pm Wednesday at E/ J's. 1213 Westhe•mer 527-9071 Ab I the Rebt>I Outl•ws 930pm Fndayand Saturday and 8·30pm Thursday at the Exile. 1011 Be41, 659 0453: and 8 l()pm Sunday at Brazos R111er Bonom 2400Brazos 528·9192 Aylng Blind B•nd nightly (e11cep1 Monday and Tues­day) at Miu Chat1ones 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mustang Sand 9 30pm F nday. Saturday Wednesday and Thursday at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 and W•tl'l the MontroH Cloggers 9pm Tuedsday at Numbers 2 300 Westheimer. 526-6551 L"9pmFr1day1nd lrishFolk 9pmWednesdayatthe Parlour. 2402Manoell 529-8069 Suu n Christian 5pm Friday: Lyra/Kat Graham & Linda Aum Rhyme 5pm Monday. Wednesday and Thursday. ano RawsJyn Ruffin Spm Tuesday at Kt0dred $p1r1ts. 5245 BuffafO Speedway. 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Dixte Kings 4pm Saturday and 2pm Sunaay at Happy Traits 715Fa1rv1ew 521-2792 DynHly Spm Friday ano Saturday and 6pm Sunaay at Just Manon & Lynn's 817 Fa1N1ew 528-91 to Mala Harl 9pm Friday and Saturday at Lampost 2417 Times Blvd 52&892• John Day & Co. 8pm Sunday at £J's, 12·1 R1Ch­mond. 527-9071 Robert CebaHot Group 9pm Sunday and w•th Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday. Wednesoay and Ttlurs· dayatLasBnsas 614W Gray 528-9959 Paul English 4pm daily {except weekends) at Arno's 4002Montrose. 528-2993 Kirk Whalum rughtly (except Sunday) at Codys. 3400 Montrose. 522·9747 Rumors 9.30pm mghtly (except Sunday and Mon­day): and Mickey Mosley Band 9 30pm Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers. 907 Westhe1mer. 527-0595 • ROCK & ROLL Automatie .lpm Sul'l'day at Grant Slreet Statton, 91 t Fa1rv1ew.528-&-M2 • NU WAVE The Jitters and The Burning Hearts 10 30pm Fnday and Saturday al Omn'- 1540 Westhe1mer. 528-4230 • IMPRESSIONISTS Two Tona o· Fun Fnday evening and Tiffany Jonn Donna Day Naomi S.ms & Hot Chocolate Sunday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond 528-2259 Little Bobby Jerry Harper Tracey and guest Sunday evemng at Eiule. 1011Bell,659-0453 Playg•rt Folhes with Laura Lff Love Lana K•n• Eydie MH and guest 10.30pm SalurOay at Pink Ele­phant. 1218Leeland. 659-0040 the Galleon 522-7616 2303 Richmond Open 2pm-2am 24 MONTROSE VOICE/Ju ne 11, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JUNE JUNE 11 12 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 13 14 15 16 17 Selected Events through 7 Days rAFRIDA Y: lnteracUHouston's Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midnight, 3405 Mulberry rAFRIDA Y: Lambda Alanon meetlng at Fint Unitarian Churrh , 5210 Fannin -.SUNDAY: Gay Pride Week Committee Jut public meeting 2:30pm, Kindred Spints, 6245 Buf­falo Speedway -.SUNDAY: MSA'a Softball League gamee, 6pm Levy Field, off Richmond at East.side MIONDA Y: Flag Day MIONDA Y: Montrooe Sports Bowling League gam .. 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain •TUESDAY: Montrooe Sports Volleyball League gamee 7o30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taf\ •TUESDA Y: Gay Pnde Week benefit at Kindred Spirito, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, June 15 •WEDN ESDAY: 2nd annual convention of International Aaooc:iabon of Black & White Men Toa-ether opena in Wuhing­ton. D.C., lubng to June 19 •WEDNESDA Y: Gay Political Caucua meeting, 4600 Main, 7o30pm, June 16 • THURSDAY: Gay Pride Week Opening night ceremonies at Mary'1, 1022 Westheimer, June 17 •THURSDA Y: CHE "Be a SPort" party benefittmg Montrose SPortl AHociation at Miu Char· lottea,911 WDrew •THURSDA Y: WiUk 'n Stein gay radio 1how l()pm·midnight on KPIT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks U N I WEEK: Gay Pride Wttk· Salute to Gay Buaine..ee, June 18 • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week Montroee Sports .Auociation vs. Houaton Fire Dept. aoftball gameo, 4pm. June 19, Levy Field, Eastoide off Richmond U N 1 WEEK : Gay Pride Week: Montrose Sports Association and Black and White Men Together'• joint Juneteenth Carnival June 19, Cherryhunt Park • IN 1 WEEK: Father'a Day. June 20 • IN 1 WEEK: 6th annual San Franciaco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival opens June 21 , luting through June 26 • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week Gay Pride Forum. June 21 UN 1 WEEK: Summer begins. June 21 U N 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week National Day of Remembrance, 1st Unitarian Church, 5210 Fan· nin, June 22 U N 1 WEEK: "The Best of the Diana Awarda" Spm, June 22, Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer, to benefit Montrose Clinic and GPC •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Bringing Men and Women Together Day, J une 23, with 2nd annual Gay and Leebian Artists Show, 7·llpm, Houeton Guest House, 106 Avondale •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week· Gay Youth Day, June 24 •IN 1 WEEK : Gay Pride Week float committee meet.a 7pm, June 24, Kindred Spirito, 5245 Buffalo Speedway U N 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Hiepanic Caucua Day, June 25 U N 2 WEEK S: MSA aponso111 Texas Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennis Center •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week· Fred Paez Memorial Concert, Cullen Auditonum, U of H, June 26, with Montrooe Symphonic Band, Oak.lawn Symphonic Band of Dallas. MCCR Chou- and Mon­troee Singera •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week Parade down Weatheimer and rally at Spotta Park, June 27 U N 3 WEEKS: The Lone Star Classic 1982 gay aoftball tourna ment in Houston July 3-4 U N 3 WEEKS: Independence Day, July 4 •IN 3 WEEKS: Mustang' a Recreational Land Fund Commit­tee organizational meeting 8o30pm, July 4, the Barn, 710 Pacific Murphy's ManorsyKurtErichsen 1viontrose Classified BUS•NESSl1W"'IERS W• 1tfr .. ffl:t'I~ .-. tru1orect0fy '.!I) alitle'ss n!lbliaru-!S Mt"v•n(JUdlltnbutionpoiritstorthe hspaper 'bl cunent display .:ivenisers. ICI alJHoutton gayb.ars & pi1vateelubs!ortnetienef1tofout-ot ~~:n:_:111tdld>non-prol11c;ommuru1y • lndiail1t1MontroMYolced1SlributtCH1polnt1 o..csi1neslorne•liuue1Tues6pmJune1$ f01"issue•86tot>e>re1eaMdFneven•nv.Jun918 - 6pm June22.l?r 871' rll 1Md F e~,. ~ ,ng J1.1ne 25 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES HOUSE FOR SALE. Binz area Brick houe w1th 3 bedrooms. W B fire· place. central A C • large rooms with high ceilings OWNER FINANCED 522-6054. 665-5207. agent MEM()HIAl !:.r-IEhiERO Be.11ut1IU11 y fUfl ,,.,_ ne•guest house $275 2 roomJ~I~ U75 2 cearoomspu1ctepoStt&1i1thl•esSJ.O.•(,t. car peted dr:apn pane ..,g1Moreda.861 3C) Wanted to rent. lease o r buy 2 or J bedroom apartment or house by 7fll82 Call 529-2289 & leave name & number for Fred Roommates of America Room­mates make sense--soc1ally. eco· nom1cally and emotionally Service provided by profess ional consul­tants. Member National Association of Roommate Referral Agencies 526-8002 Dallas (214) 458-7227 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED SPANISH TRANSLATOR VOLUNTEER needed to help g•y liberation in Latin America. Pocas horas. Paz Y Llberaclon, 219 Mar­shall, #115, Houston, TX 77006, or call eYenlngs 523-9061. P( _ E 0 F ERS WAN ~ 0 Women .,., ,...... Good ulary .,, j beMhtl Aoe•19to35Beaparto1Hous·n1 ! u111~1 (713) 2"u 'RQ1 HPO :>r CS.ta 1 udav Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles 1 0Cper regu1 1rw ord ~ 1 5CPERA L .. CAPITAl WORD m 6-pc:nnt type .. 1how11 here (If uamg tew,..ordl1n lh•s11zeor•l cefllen ngon111ne 0>mpu1e a180Ca hne.U11ngma• unumlrevutar words )r 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS IO. ne) 25¢ per regular word or 4()(: PER ALL CAPITAL WOAD in 8-point type. as shown here (It using few words in this size or 1f centenng on a line. compute at $1 .50 a line. using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a lone.) 40c per regular word or 60c PER ALL CAPITAL WORD rn 10-po int type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or 11 centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as 30C per regular word or 45c PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8-polnt words In this size or if cen­bold type, .. shown here. (If using terlng on a line, compute at ~enwawl~~=~ ~:::u~::~~'~.C:O"!e1~~:, $2.00 a line, using maximum using maximum s regular words or 4 regular words or 3 ALL 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) CAPITAL WORDS lo a line.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6. 8 or 10 point). Simply rompute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line THERE IS A MINIMUM charl(e of $3 per classified ad, BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra Run the ~ame clast;1fit•d 4 u·eeks m a rou· and deduct I 5%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information . WRITE OUT your ad on a pla111 sheet of paper. Include your name, address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice. :J.117 Montrose #.106, Hvus ton. TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill Part-t1meclerkatpriva temen'sclub3 or 4n1ghtsper week Must bedependa­ble & bondable Call Steve. 522-6054 Support the Montrose Clinic GAY BARS (A. H tor> Thern G1 Id member ind• ;ll+on p1aced1nth11d1rectory1l theirrequest ~.~~~~.s .~~~,~.~~;!~! s21-=-9866 w•th restau· See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 • ·.BARN 710P•c•hc 528-9427 country See our ad elsewhere this issue :z~~~l ~!~~ry R BOTTOM 2400 Brms ~~:IAR PATCH o1.-"'"94 W Hol omti. 66 See our ad elsewhere this issue e ::;HASE 1416 R timoid !lO 1 ~ l•sc..'.> ;2;;•CKEN r.ooP SJS WHlheuier 2s. ~ .1;':r.i~"6J R1:timon:t "2S-.o..2!.9 CllSCl LOVE 19125 Sneph«CI 52Hl170 Tremendous circulation in Montrose- the Voice e THE DEEP 2212ConverM ·521-3751 See our ad elsewhere this issue :s~tf:1~~T DRUM 17 2 Westrieuncw 528 e ADIRTVSALlV'S 22Q Avond1le· 529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue e E/J'• 1213fhchmond 527-9071 See our ad elsewhere this issue e 4EX1LE 101 1Bell ~~04~COUnt'°! Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with 105 distribution loca­ttons • GALLEON ·2303 R1chmof"1d ·522·7616 See our ad elsewhere this issue : Gt· y ~i?v 5j~-~~~A TIONAL (G e 11 -1 • 19 e G..R..A.N. ,T STREET STATION 911 Fa1r .. •ew See our ad elsewhere this issue • HOLE HOUSE 109 1uam 528·9066 See our ad elsewhere th is issue Attend Montrose Sports Association events • KINDRED SPIRITS 524!'1 Bullato 1 ... 11 ~ 665-979.8 pred0mmant1y )etb•ltt See our ad elsewhere this issue :~M POST 1• 1r T1met Bl11d 521MJ921 In- See our ad elsewhere this issue e LAZYJ ·12 T·'8m ·°528-93·0 ~e\~.A11o~:;_~ J.~~ K 1735 Weslhe•mer- 5:1'0· • .>.MARV'S 1022 WesthfUmer 528-8&51 see our ad elsewhere this issue Pul1 tizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston rn the Montrose Voice • MIDN•;.; UN 34 w .. 1ne.me1 ~16-7519 • r::ss c~~LOnE'S 9'1 w Drew -Sza. See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~N TRQSE M I N I NC.CO 805Pacil ~ .. • NUMBERS 2 300 WHthe1""ner ·5"9-655, ~ our ad elsewhere this issue : ,~.IN~ .~~EPHANT 1218 L .. l1nd 659-0040 See our ad elsewhere this issue e RANt,H 156..":l MJ"1 8-67..0 • RASCALS .:TC Kirby '"24·6 12 w•l h ret taur1nt.11vcentertatnmen1 Seo our ad elsewhere th is issue ORGANIZATIONS :, ~~~LA Chonn J)9rl ol (MonlrOM) Church ACLli-1236 W GrW(--524-5925 ~e:l~A~~,;,~1~~~.E~;JS;::h;1:~= ~9-8528 clvbnigtuweci Support the Montrose Clinic ASTROR•1nbowAll1ance~ TTY) ~::~~ne~~~~17Me0~C::~t Mc;.'h~~;-~~ :b7;!~o~;~,~~-:-,,..-,.-,,-.,..-,..-.-.. ., ~~~A~kTEMENlaoeln~ iMonlrOM)CHURCHOFCHRIST 520-KWeal­~: e' -717-9288 wontup terv•cff 1230pm CHURCH0FCHA1sr1AN°FAIT~ ~~~-:::~~;.c~!u!zom;~"X Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ~~z.~~~~~~~~~~~\~~; J:a,•ru.!-c~~·t'9~~ ~~~or MSA ~~5~fJo~;=~~~~~28-~~ al Bruo. River ~:.~1UN1Tv COFFEEHOUSE-pro1-ct of CONG-AYTZCHAYIM-m .. 11 at MCCA. 1919 Decatur--522-1340, 688-8997 M~IC• &.ocltl 8pm 2nd&4thfndaya CciNR6fAREAG.Yw0men~ COuRiOFT-HESiNGL-ESTAA=m~ Ei.pNint,1218LMland-&S9-0CMO CR-1S1S-H~f: ---2_!~'-~- -- Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice DATA 'PAOFES$1DNALS--mMt1 11 Lii Ou1nt1 MotOf" Inn. 4015 So\.lthwe" Fwy.-522-7809, 523-~mMl•ng2ndTuesdly1 ~:~~f~:~,'~;,!2~12222Pr~ 01ANA -f:OUNDATION-2700 Muon-524. ~::~fE.~.:~~;::;~~~~~rt ~~ 01aN1TY--=m;.1t;.c;thohc St~ 1103eo1SO¥et·5~9289.s2s-1e.a" meet•nv• 7pm~~~rOI~ Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with 105 distribution locations FAMILY& FA"IENOS-of G-1y1· 464-6e6.i FIRST ilNITARIAN-Chureti .•. SiiO f9nn1;;::-526- 1571wo11h1pMni1ce11151mSun ~r::f~a';~~iFM1980A~A;y ~~1:11A~~~~~~1ring E•1>9r~= GAY ARCHIVES ot T .. u pr01ect ol lnter1Ct 11182 MONT RO >E VOICE HOUSTON Max Attend Montrose Sports Association events ~~~~JH!!~~~ue~ : A~~-1-;_;::;:2;1 Hotel.JJ01South'#Hlfwy.Hou1ton GAYHISPANICCAUCUS: ~2i22"N9Wm1n 112- 521--0037rMet13rd lhursdly1 GAYITAUANGrOY-p--=526-~ g~-~~~•~1~~~i~c/o GAY POLITICAL CAUCUS (GPC)~ Main ;~521~~1~,::~!' ~~~~1~~~ 730pm3rdWtdnetc11ys. ·rn.e.s1olthe0.1n1 Awlrd.-· 8pm_ June 22. Numbers 2. XIO, West­he1mer, lo benelll GPC & MontroH ChnlC Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice HOu1ton ArH GA y & LESBIAN ENGINEERS .\ ~~·n~~;.- ·52fl-73H muts 7pm "th HOUSTON--c-oMMUNITY-c~ ~uMAN .Rt""GHTsleA-GuE-523- HousToN MOTORCYCLE CLUB-c/o M.:ry~. 1022w .. 1ne.m1r--52&-18$1 HOUSTON TAVERN GUILD m•mblrs 1ncklO. Blrn. Ottty S.11y·1. Exile. MM)t'I, MldM• Sun INTEGRITYIHOUsTON(to~I ~~J=~"·i~~;::i~~=:-in-s~ 1~~~~,~~~~~;~~ :~·ur,,'.~~~,:;'.~~I~~~ 730om3rdThurWliYI iiPFTRid~~telvd~52&- 4000 'W1fde'n S1ein"91yrld101how 10pm- ~~~·~~T_!t~~ - --- LAMBDA ALANON-mMll at 111 Un1tao1n ~~~-5210F1nn1n-S21·Q772 m .. 11ngFn LES8iAN_S_& GAY PEOPLE in Med•c•ne Ms: 4760meet1ng730pm1stSlturd1y1 LuTHeAANs-cc;~-cERNE~ LutMl-1n Church. 2515 Wauoh-521.QNJ. "53- '~:!.m':;~~~· 3~,.~n1:l~o~=110~-::"L~f~: er1n1CoocernedlorG1yf>9op11.July29-Aug 1 ~!.iJ:~~~~T ~ff ~~R)~~~·~~. ~~~~~~~·.~t;e ~!~~ ro~~~ ~"7iS:m30rn 5:1 1 ~~= member1h1p Inquirers cius 7.30pm Moo Alanonmeet1ng8pmMon .AlcohohcsAnonym­ou1 mMhnQ 8pm Mon & Thu!'1 . MCCR Ch0tr G1y Pude Wlflk Fred Peez Memori1I Concert Culltw1Aud•tonum. Uo1H.June28 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 MONTROSE CIVIC Club (NHrtown)-meets It S.ing Church. 1440 H1wlhorne-522-IOOO meet1ng730pmlourthTtJffday1 MONTROSE CLINIC- ICM WeslhenNr-528- ~ ~u! 1~ ~11 ~j~:'~ At;~°::' =1~ua.'n~"an~'G~' 2. 300 WHlhe•mer. to ~c:~~~?UNSEUNGC.Oter IOOlo .... 11 ~~TROSE PATROL..:...520 wff\he11M1"-521- MONTAOSE SINGERS-meetJ 11 MCCR. 19-19 o.catur-528-QMO Gey Pridao Week Frid Paez :n~al Concert Cullen Audttonum. U ol H MONTROSE SPORTS ASSOCIATION (MSAI 622-3304 -a. 1 Sport' p.1rtyJune 17 at Miss Ch11lot1e1.911W Drew. sponsored by CHE Montrose $portl BOWUNG-pllYI 11 S11d1um Bowl. 8200 Br1esma1n-960-1511, 981-1523 "8m111Mon &Thurt.• .... nmg1 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice ~=r:.,~~fls~~~~:!=.:J.~ ~~!:'~~I ~.!'![~'}J,;ull'!:•?r;*lt Hou11onF1reDep1 i.em.LooeSt1rClluteJuly 3-".pllf0tl1Juty24-Aug 1.GaySonbllllWortd s.r.trnS.n Fr4nalCOAug 31-Sept 4 ~trOM Sports WOMEN'S SOFTBALL-728· Montrou Sports TENNIS-524-2151 Tu11 CupJune2t11tMemon1tTenn11Center Montrou Sports VOl.LEYBALL NC).:ii"JO g1ma 730pm Tues. Gregory-LmcolnlChool. 1101T1lltourn1mtw11Aug 1"11FondeAec1"M· t!onatC.nter MONTROSE SYMPHONIC bllnd-mMIS 11 Ber· ~b~3~H~;:~f:~£~"!;~~ MUSTANGS (soc11I club)-mMtl at the 81m 710 P1c1!1c-528·9"27 club night Triurs Rec,.11ion1I Lllnd Fund Comm•lt" org1n1.r:1 t!Qnl/meetioga.30pm.July" OPERATION oocuMENTATION Pf'OJect ol GPC RECREATIONAL Lind Fund Comm111 .. - pro,ect ol Must1ng Oub ~;~: Unrt. G1ytLnb11n &.-Won- Group--52"· TEXAS BAY AREA -G1yS-3J2.3737 m9.t1/lg Thu .. ..,.,,.ng Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with 105 distribution locations "!!::!~:,¥~Yne:~r1x...:~12J1 con- TEx>.saAvTAsi<·FOR-cE-529-701". 522- 1659 st1teconlerenceinHou11onSept 3-5 TEXA5-Hl.JMANR1GHTsfOUrwi11.0n::151s Maryl1nd-526-Q139 ~~~~S--clo Miry'&. 1022 Wathei- UNIT.i.R1AN1UN1"VERSAL1STG1y C.ucu1---Clo 1st Uni11r11n Chur<:h. 5210 F1nn1n-520-9767 528-5842meet.ng3rdSunat1ernoons WES LA YA-N -FELLOwSHIP:--a&.-::8899- ~0rl© h1u11 ff-1-v~ LJ~.-.E ~i tf.2!kfffel June 11, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 25 Dateline S.F. Unofficial SF Gay Pride Parade lineup By Randy Alfred • Disabled Senior Left-Handed Native American Leebian Jewish Moth­ers on Mopeds. • Physicians for Human Right.a Motor Club: Tetracyclin'. • California Fruit Advisory Board. • Coalition for Hunan Ritee. • Macho Anonymous, • Frienda of Trolls. • M.D.A.: Mini-Dykes of America. • Law Enforcement Groupies Auociation. • Punks for Gay Rights. • Eleanor Roosevelt Lesbian Democratic Club. • Republican Faeries. • Club Demoratic Baths: "United We Kneel". • Joffrey Danceni Married Gay Republican Club. • Devo Demo Club. • Lesbian Fathers Union. • The Six Caucuaes of Parents and Friends of Lesbiane and Gaya: Moth· ere of Leebiana, Fathers of Lesbians, Friend.a of Lesbians, Mothers of Gays, Fathers of Gaye, Friends of Gays. • C 60 plus (Cloneo Over 60). • Lesbians Over 6'2". • Gaye Under 5'6": "Such Little Men, So Many Times". • Gays Over 80. • Lellbian and Gay Dead. • Gays Reincarnated A. Straights. • Lesbians Against Luat. • Stop the Cruiay Moving. • Can't Stop the Cruiey Moving, • No On Brunch Committee. • Lesbians in Leather. • Sissies in Suede. • Buy Sexual: Hookers and Hustlers A.aeociation. • Colonel Sande.rs Bluegraae Youth Sun Tan Studio. • Going Through the Lotions: Lubricant Shop. • Amyl Anonymous. . • Princess Diana Chapter, Future Queen of Amenca. • Clone. for Diversity. • Society of the Friends of Dorothy Oed by iu Grand Toto). • Alice B. Toeclips Bicycle Club Oed by its Spoke1penon). • Urban Hikers: Trails of the City. • Trisexual Center. • Lebanese Lesbian Libertarian Librarians for Libertiniam. • Pendleton Lumberjill Society. • Alligators for Gay Rights • Trash the Teddies Association. • Parente of Clones, • Gays Against Laughter (P.-C.). • Parade Monitors Civilian Review Board. • Temple B'nai Amyl Sisterhood. • Catholic and Jewish Men Together (CJMT). • Sisters of Chaos. • Gay Sufi Surfer Society. • Chakra the Month Club. • Indignity: Pope Paul VI Memorial Metal-Studded Hair-Shirt Penance Society. • Blasphemy: Gay Atheists. • Apathy: Gay Agnoetica. • Born Again Gays • Unborn Gays. • Unconceived Gaye. • Inconceivable Gays • Sir Alexander Fleming Memorial Monument Committee (Gono Caucus). • Sturn und Drang: Claseical Music SIM Bar. • T.O.T.: Teena Over Thirty. • Committee to Abolish Virgules/Slashes. • Friends of the Ampersand. • Anti-Disco League. • Non-Gay Lesbians. • Non-Lesbian Gays. • Clones for Daya. Tour de Force: Silver Star Studios has published a helpful, enlighten· ing, and amusing Gay San Fra~isco Map-Guide. It's pocket size and color-coded, and it includes the standard tourist stuff as well as info on bars, baths, restaurants and hotels for the gay and lesbian visitor. Quite useful It even has a Patty Hearst tour, covering four historic spots in the history of the Symbionese Liberation Army Available postpaid, $4, from Silver Star Studios, Box667, Dept. P,S.F., CA 94101. Cruise Control: New corollaries of Murphy's Law ("Whatever can go wrong, will.") are alwaye in order. I offer th~ following;. Alfred's Axiom No. l: If you are cruising someone who is in a group of two or more people, he will ignore you, and someone else from the same group will cruise you Alfred's Axiom No. 2: If you are cruising two people at the same time, they will ignore you and go home with each other Signing Off: I'm in full agreement with those signs on ~an Francisco's hilly streets that read. "'Large Trucks Not Advisable." Have you ever tried advising large trucks? I have enough trouble getting little pickups to take my augge~tions .. C1982 Randy Allred. al lights rese:rved 26 MONTROSE VOICE/June 11, 1982 ''I say it every time .• 1Watch your head, Frank! Watch your head!' ... But do you listen? Bonk!" Gary Larson 1!~1 " I warn you, Randy! It's MY turn this time .. I'll start making weird noises again!" " This is it, Corti ... We head straight at each other and the fint one to veer off is ' chicken!' " Attend Montrose Sports Association events PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ~~~V~f'~~·,+,"~· )~·b/ "Jc;,~ '81~~·J.r~~.!~ lloof.t-tous1onTX/7U06EdolOfrewrvesrightto :::1:i.~0;~·7~~~l~~~:f~~n:Kp~:~~l:'r:~I~~ be9•in1n901 meC1asa1heda Relax and en1oy the BodyWorks massage Gift cert1f1cates_ Call B1H, 526-2470 ALONE? NO LONGER! Our beauti­ful people (men or women) will accompany you while you en1oy Houston more TexEscort 751- 9000 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice Going on a trip soon? Is there gay life m Belleview, Nebraska? Walla Walla. Washington? The Gay Switchboard of Houston will be glad to tell you about all of the hotspots in these and other wild vacation resorts such as Kalispell, Montana and Wil­cox. Arizona The Gay Switchboard 1S open daily from 6pm to midnight 529·3211 There·s more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice BODY MASSAGE Your place or m1ne Aftemoof"I or evenmgs, Bruce. 521-2009 PRIVATE GAY CLUBS ~u~.~OUSTON eatns -.t..<.... hn n See our ad elsewhere this ·ssue Support the Montrose Clinic ::.AE~;.:~~1~u~r;R 1 "'1Hler 320- Lou• .. See our ad elsewhere this issue ::~D TOW N E SPA HOO Fan1 n 5V·231i See our ad elsewhere this issue RESTAURANTS .... •BAJA'S 4( Jrtll ,. see our ad elsewhere this issue ~-''iSfR•E TC.J 'J;..2Westhe1,,.,.. 526- • c..:t.API T-'Pt.:C 813R•chmond !22·236 WCATUR CAFE 109 w -'l.11Mm• a- • GAE EK itANO- 30i Tuam 522· 7040 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529·3211 • GY RO GYROS t;a.,dw1ch ShOP· !&36 W•the1,,.._r ft28·46~5 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~~h'!.~~I·u~z~~op1an Cu111ne 428 See our ad elsewhere this issue • ~C:G ;~ro=~ e~::::~:·~~~~ ~~;s • HC.0SEOF PIES Jl12Kirby 528-3816 • INTERNATIONAL Club AHlaurant 24:JI W•f\elmef ~23-27'15 See our ad elsewhere this issue e JAi.iE ~Ar.ON 224 Wesltlt11m« !>. $-;?M... • M-'.RC.U.OS ic.c·· .. rn 1$21 Wetlheimet "-ZH9M · ~LR& tJQJWntflelfNf' ~-1823 •RASCALS 270JK1rby s .. 4-6;.o .. Set our ad elsewhere this issue e RAI 5 BRASS R JBBING 914 W lb; "29-)627 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice e SPUO·U-l1KE 416 Wet.lh .. mer 520-CJ54 •STAR PIZZA 2111 Norfolk 5.c-OSOO See our ad elsewhere this issue e STEAK N EGG 4231 Monirose- s2S:-a~ j21~MS Coll" Shop -1525 We!The1mer -529· eWINESELLEA 1408Westneimer-52&-3878 See our ad elsewhere this issue SERVICES LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING . Or. Nanette Bruckner, psychologlat, 523-2180. Quality wallpaper hanging & painting. Call 447-6109 Attorney at Law General practice_ John P Barmch. 523-5006. Evenings 528-5566 REMODELING/IMPROVEMENTS Full carpentry mcludmg French doors cabinets kitchens, bathrooms Excellent workmanship expe1 enced. references. 529-3869 CLASSICAL PIANO, SINGING. Pro­fessional teac- 'ler 723-3254 ATCO PHICoftlrol 1 31 See our ad elsewhere this issue BH. QUICK Deh~ J' 9 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~ F "l~E"lj:.i E2~~~A't->E lllneas c.en•r ~I ~;;1AC.~AFTl'u111.:are 2 10._e .. ng10"\ !>;tS-Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with 105 distribution locations ::~dal:o~9v:, T HCH SL ...,.jg1~ t HOUSTON TRAVEL l: ~ult.anti 820-4227 See our ad elsewhere this issue :~ri~.~!~~79?ru1v Schoo• 3," EDWARDJONES bookkeeper 266-6511 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~~~ES 0. KRISTIAN PhD hypnolog1•1 -977 See our ad elsewhere this issue ~2~~k~KALL Mail 8oxe$ 31-7 Montrose- ~2L7~g,:os Hair Design· 906 Weslhe1mer - See our ad elsewhere this issue :4~0NEL Hair De11g11 -30!'20 Yoakum-~526- ~~~J:zAO:'E HAIR Design -4311 M()(lltose-- Attend Montrose Sports Association events •,~? NTROSE TRAVEL -L508 Raiprt- 522- See our ad elsewhere this issue ~MO~~~~~E VOIC,E """''Dllper MOVING, HAULING. Movemasters, 521-3155. ~~:I~~ l~eF .... , Al _v .... fM' ~~S,:1L'.)~:~17EL h•or nr• Hi.26 C.I PH'f' Pulit1zer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ~:E7EDY PRINTING "'-J Beuaire J•vd See our ad elsewhere this ssue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice J.E. STAHL•" &heat 376-&:".. See our ad elsewhere this issue ~:VELTECH1r velagencv '5r19K1fby- 52'"L See our ad elsewhere this issue WORDCRAFT l'f'P"1!tl1.,Q '.i22-42SI See our ad elsewhere this issue llext wee'' in the VO!Cc : GAY :PRIDE ;fo~K l':ets under way. 1iatch for ~ur extensive cover-al'"e. Dear Dorothy Friends, not lovers. Why? Dear Dorothy. In looking for frit'nds as wt•ll as lovnA. I seem only _to. be attractt-'d to pt>rso.ns of_ tnmil~r mtt•.reslR. The relationships don t hu1t long und I flt>t'm to have more fricndRhipH (thun love~s). Am 1 miMsintc out on NDmcthmg? [)~(°;~~~:;~::;·to. get along u:ll~ pl'rsons similar ''!"terf•st.~ or per suasions, that ul {me. This seems to he ansu·ering your needs-at if·ast vou haL'f! plent.v of friends, ·'0 why qu1bbl•1 Dear Dorothy, My friends make fun of ffil' They all know who I wont as Mr W_onderful and the-n they see me with somoone- who doesn't even come rlm1e to my ideal. I ~~m to. be attracted only to oppOFntes of myKt'lf. Am I wrong') Dorothy Say!i- Opposi/f'.<; oftl'n attract. There is defuutely nothing u·runR with tasting life on thp way to Mr. Per feet. If u·e all u·aited for that to happen there u·ould be a lot of lonely gays out thne. Also, u..·e would miss uut on meeting some very u..·onderful men along the u·ay. Whatever turns you on should be pursued. Life is too short to limit our horizons Both of you. go out thne and l{etthem! SHOPS & STORES • ALL·. TAR Ac II New, ·1 Ro r )28-&4< :2~~~~~TGL•TTERSg1tt5- 4;.25Montrme :~~~ARDALLENfk>rtSI- 1848Westheimer Support the Montrose Clinic :~ICISLEpetshop--io11$WFwy See our ad elsewhere this issue • ASYLUM Adult 80okstore 1201 Richmond :asr:.LL PAR_K_ AdU11 BookSI018· 1830 w Al• ~!~!!,~-a ~g~~~S us.d clothmg 1625 See our ad elsewhere this issue :::.~I~ ~ROTHERS used ,1oth1ng- 1210 See our ad elsewhere this issue •THE SEO HOUSE -211S Norfolk- 52)-8;{78 See our ad elsewhere this issue Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 • R JE RIS 16185 ~l'le;herd !:._. 1127 • BL lM TOWN BLl-"iMS !Jowers .)21() S · '°' -·1- ~26-e110 ~u~~1~~~g~--~·~~::~81c ~~e'oo: F ne • CARGO HOUSE 1802 Park '!>2i-03J4 See our ad elsewhere this issue •6~~NE l)ANCEWEAR 4~04 Mo"'llrose ~ _. ~;.~::,N~ B ~111tary wear tl36~ See our ad elsewhere this issue Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice :98:J~B~A ~ )':.( he M.t11llc c :>1P11ng ~WNBEATAcCOJd1 ., TR hmoncf 5,~ e 0RAMATKAgtlts J224Yoakur.t 8-!4' e FACETSa!!ts 1412Westrieun 623-1412 Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with 105 d1stribut1on locations ~~~~;81 o:~~iJ'RENCE p•int 1m ~~:::.::~:~.":.::::: ::: e ~R01N0Et.l FRANCS- ,016-Peden .5~ e K1R8vNewstart0- 3115+<1rt1y 520-024$ Attend Montrose Sports Association events :2~:2V' l-Hthef C>'oodl 91.i! Westheune ~.~!n!'o~; T~E •esate botlt.qu9- 1405 See our ad elsewhere this issue -• c PTl(.JNS IJOWera 1~ Ve)e •t 1~h 86&­e PlANT "10USE 81 .. We1lhe1rne1 .'6·r • Q- LEA ER 408 Westhe1 er ~7 11044 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent. exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice e ~~D RACK rnu&1c ,09 S o.tt.ptlerd eTHE_f:1~UGHCUT ew$1ry S20Wtnlhe1rn9f See our ad elsewhere this issue • Ii;~ FAN A:jV g ts 1401 Wnltl•rner e ;~ WAREHO\.ISE 202~ Weslhe1me1 e 1~ ... l~~OCKER c trung J1t We ="'ie1 . .. -. )ZAt:. News 1 2W Al•tl•n'lll • E.(A' ~~~9N&Arr • IOflow"rs 21 1'; •TIMELESS TAFFETA ;Sed CIO!h g ~ w.~·· ...... , s~ See our ad elsewhere tti1s issue • - Al.HY.. RE 1 21 w Gray 26·8T&O There's more Montrose sports coverage m the Voice ~~=ES CHIC_.,......, S20 Wnlh.,rn9f J6- e TREVMA.N g1ll1 "° Westh .. m... L.23- J .. f!I :~~JACK io'"h-,g 1212 Wntfteimer :,:i~~LIMER h.LA MARKE" 1733 Support the Montrose Clinic • WILOE & STEIN book atcwe S..'O W.Sllet­' nel' 529- JI~ gay June II, 1982/MONTROSE VOICE 27 Fortunes ByTycbo For Friday •~emng, June 11. through Friday evening, June 18. 1982 ARIES-Pa.s.s111,4! thruu>!h your ~'J.!" thi.s u et'k: th(' .\loon. from Tue.i;da_\ nwrrunl(. Jwu· /,), to Thur ... day nwrnm;.:. June Ii A week of self· l·xammation and undl•rstandmg. l..c:K)k at the things you ordinarily do with littlt' thought. and Sl-'t" how you rnn improve them. A good time for ),(l'ltin~ rid of empty habill-i and liven int{ up dull routint<~ TAURUS-In :'o'UUr /Jlj,fn all tn-f·k.- i·t·nu .... Entt•rmg your ~ign: the Moon, Thur ... day moming .• }um· Ii. This wet>k you're a siren The kind that!'>mgs on the rivt-rhank, not tht· loud, nnisy kmd. It"s time to turn vour attentton to someClnt.· who"::; lx>t-n cold to y,)U 1n th(· past. and light thei; fire with your vivaciousnt•ss. You'll be hard tv resist GEMINI -In your MJln 1h1 ... tt't'f•k: th~·."'un and .\frrcury. A fint' week lO travel, or to make trawl plan!'> Ust· your 1maginallon. Go sumeplac.·e you\t> nt.'v('r ~n lwfon•. Takt• alonJ{ svml'lm~ who·s as fascmatmg as vour dt·stination CANCER-You ma\ foe• t·aught ht·l\i.t'("n vour mtu1tin• sidt- and y ur ~1nalyt1eal one>. Tht· obvmus unswt•r 1s to recombmt> tlu· lwo ~nd ~t> your· st·lf. Ht· bt·autifully androgynous-soft yd hard: firm, but y1C'ldm)? VIAGO~t·alou~y rnd rt~t·ntrm·nt rloud tht• scent•. Hont·~t.v md mte1:­r1tv uft'" ..." 'lt·Kl lut111n. Who sdoin),( "hat to\\h1 m. rndwhos1~the mddle • uhody'tq:mnj(toft'f•Jn.\~~oc:untilthm,:g rt- ut ntheopen I•· t•e LIBRA-Jn yuurs1)..?1 th1lju.1•t·k Ma~. :-.arurn a~d P.u.. u.' 1u rt•st1l Ult· ne allmg tht·shots this wt·t·k t>til. 1 the,.1Lbirdseat. \\h1't.•vn1t1s that }OU want V tt'll somcthinJ;? tu JM rn the mood lo h.sten. But don t bt· " shy washy ahout 1t. ~peak U'"l~ H(• firm' Tht•\' I low lL SCORPIO--/OJ vour s1J(11 thi. .. Wf'f"k Juprlt'r Ever Mn tt>mptt-d to ans" t't .i i~·som,J ad? This might bt· thl time to tr; 1t You might w unt to pruc:..n_• somt· nf th.at st'CTt'<'\' you n• knc•wn for wht•n vou do it. Don't tell t'\-t•rvcmt• ahout vour nt·w vt-nlurt· SAGITTARIUS-In yuur -"lJ.:n thts U'f't-k: { ran us and .\"1·ptunt" You'n· lu<"ky Pit•rrt' thto man in tht• middlt•, hut its not a lot of fun. Frit-nds will mst ~-ou in tht· roil• of nlt.'diator or rt'fl'rti.', turmng to you for kttn ad\lt't' and sound judJ.("l'ml'nt. l.istl'n lo both s1dt·:-; C'art'fully and don't he afraid to an.\" whut \-"OU know CAPRICORN-Ht't·n putting off that t•xt•rc1st• program? Gt·t to it~ Or. for our male rcadl'r:;, how ahout J,{roWIOJ.:" a muust~l<·ht• or sha\-"ing oft your l>t.·ard"! Changinl( your appt·arniwt· for tht• hcttl'r 1s what this wt·t•k offors and if you do it, you"ll do it AOUARIUS-lt·at•tnJ.: your s11-:11 lfus U'f'1·J..· the .\loon. Saturday aflt r· noon. ·summl'r's alm<•st ht-n· and tht• tmw 1s ri.:ht for dancin}! in tht> strt't't.-- Your kind (1f ent'r~y th1!-> \\t't•k finds its outlet 1n t{ood timt'~. If you syn<·hronizt• it just ri).:ht, you'll find somt'<1nt• f;pec:ial to shart- tht·m with PISCES -Pa.o.; ... m,f( throuRh your slJ,!n this u t•t·k: th~ .\loon, from Satur­day aftf'fno•m t11 Tut·sda_,. nwrnin~. Fmdmg yourself undt•r the spell of somt·ont< with unusual or s1>t'cial charm" Shakt· your hf'ad and ask •·who am p•· (/ut·stion tht· motlH·~ and nt'(-ds of th1!-> person IJE.fort· you let your!«1·lf ht'Comt• tolall:'i· t·nehnntt-d -o,..EWAl..LFEATL~C:!iVNI"""' A
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