Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, June 3, 2005
File 008
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, June 3, 2005 - File 008. 2005-06-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1051/show/1033.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-06-03). Houston Voice, June 3, 2005 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1051/show/1033

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, June 3, 2005 - File 008, 2005-06-03, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1051/show/1033.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, June 3, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date June 3, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JUNE 3, 2005 national news HRC, Task Force pool money to fight Calif, amendment MARRIAGE, continued from Page 1 sonal relation arising out of a civil contract between two persons." The gender-neutral language was used in the California Family Code between 1850 and 1977. The bill, which has 30 sponsors, also states that no priest, minister, or rabbi of any religious denomination, and no official of any non-profit religious institution will be required to carry out any wedding in violation of his or her right to the free exercise of religion. Political observers said that if the bill passes the House it is likely to pass the Senate, before heading to the desk of California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Schwarzenegger has not said whether he would sign the bill. A spokesperson for the governor said that he will have about two weeks to decide, should it be approved by the Senate and sent to his desk in August as expected. "This bill would make a mockery of marriage," said Mathew Staver, president and general counsel for the Liberty Counsel, the legal wing of Rev. Jerry Falwell's ministry. 'Drain marriage of its essence' Staver said that AB 19 would "drain marriage of its essence, objective, and common sense purpose." The purpose of marriage is for procreation and raising children so they are in an environment with gender duality, Staver said, it is an essential role of government to be able to strengthen families. Staver claimed that the people of California voiced opposition to same-sex marriage by adopting Proposition 22, which prohibits recognition of same-sex marriage, in 2000. Gay rights activists, legal scholars and social conservatives disagree over whether Proposition 22 was intended to keep other states from forcing California to recognize same-sex marriages performed elsewhere or whether it was intended to ban all samesex marriages. California has a unique ballot initiative system in which citizens can enact laws through a statewide voter initiative; legislation enacted in this way cannot be changed by the Assembly. Staver said that if AB 19 passes, the Liberty Counsel would sue to overturn it on the grounds that it violates Proposition 22. The constitutionality of Prop 22 itself is also in question. On April 14, Judge Richard Kramer of the San Francisco Superior Court ruled that Prop 22 violated the equal protection clause of the California Constitution and unfairly discriminated against same-sex couples. Last week, California Attorney General Bill Lockyer filed an appeal of the trial court decision in the San Francisco-based 1st District Court of Appeals. Lockyer has said that he supports gay rights and is simply fulfilling his responsibility to uphold state law. If same-sex marriage becomes legal in California through the passage of AB 19, the lawsuits over the constitutionality of state laws against same-sex marriage would probably be set aside, said Barbara Cox, professor at California Western School of Law. According to Staver, the legislature's actions are the least important in the hierarchy of California lawmaking because a ballot measure can override a bill passed by the legislature and the constitution trumps even laws adopted by ballot initiative. Assembly defeated attempt Bills to amend the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriage as well as the recognition of domestic partnerships were defeated in the Senate and Assembly judiciary committees earlier this month. Those bills, if passed into law, would have repealed legal protections for lesbians and gays and their families including benefits they already have under California's domestic partnership laws. Following this defeat, social conservative groups announced a campaign to amend the constitution by ballot initiative to ban same-sex marriage and recognition of domestic partnerships. "It's high time that we the people override the judges and politicians who've been relentlessly attacking marriage," said Randy Thomasson, an initiative organizer. "This vitally important ballot initiative empowers average Californians to stop the insanity of judges and politicians flushing our precious vote on marriage down the drain." Initiative proponents have begun fund- raising, expect to begin circulating petitions in July and to have the measure on the ballot in a June 2006 election. According to Equality California, a statewide gay civil rights group, a coalition of more than 200 religious, labor and civil liberties groups called Equality for All has formed to oppose the proposed constitutional amendment. In news conferences in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego, the group said, that the ballot measure, if passed, would hurt millions of same-sex couples and their families and others by denying them essential legal protections. "The effort to target one category of people — in this case gays and lesbians — for reduced rights has profound implications for all of us," Rabbi Doug Kahn, executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council said. "What Researchers pursue post-HIV vaccine By RYAN LEE ATLANTA — AIDS researchers are optimistic that they may have found a vaccine that would treat people already living with HIV. Participating in a panel discussion at an Emory University conference on HIV vaccine research and drug development late last month, Jean-Marie Andrieu, a virologist at the Institute of Research for Vaccines & Immunotherapies for Cancer & AIDS in Paris, discussed the early successes of a therapeutic vaccine his team developed. The French team has tested its vaccine on mice and monkeys and has begun administering tests to humans. The effects of the vaccine in non-humans is predictive of results when the vaccine is delivered to people, a breakthrough that could shorten the length of time it takes for a vaccine to reach humans, researchers said. "It is much faster to attain results in animals than in humans because with humans, you have to go through human trials and other things that take time," said Genoveffa Franchini, a principal AIDS vaccine researcher at the National Cancer Institute who participated in the May 20 panel. "So with the similarities between non- human primates and humans, different vaccine approaches can now be tried quite effectively," Franchini said. Therapeutic vaccines — as opposed to preventive vaccines that protect HTV-nega- tive people from contracting the virus — have been researched for almost two decades. They offer a potential alternative to the "lifetime of chemo" currentiy available to HIV-positive individuals, said Terje Anderson, executive director of the National Association of People Living With AIDS. "I don't know if I'd say there's a lot of buzz around it in the HIV community, but people are hoping this can offer something new," Anderson said. "Obviously for people living with HIV a preventive vaccine doesn't do anything in terms of our own health, so both kinds of vaccines need to continue being pursued." But the therapeutic vaccines now being tested in humans have not shared similar success in all subjects, Franchini said. The effects last only a limited time with some participants before they must return to traditional drug treatment, the researcher said. "It's important to know that [therapeutic vaccines] cannot be substituted for antiretroviral therapy — the results are seen for months, but need to be sustained more," Franchini said. Human testing of the therapeutic vaccine created by the French research team involved people with HIV being injected with a mixture of HIV taken from their own blood and their own dendritic cells. When foreign pathogens enter a person's body, dendritic cells mark those pathogens so that the immune system can easily recognize them and develop a response to fight the illness. But HIV avoids being marked by dendritic cells and renders the immune system unable to is the next group that is deemed so threatening that their basic rights should be rolled back?" National groups offer funds The National Gay & Lesbian Task Force and the Human Rights Campaign announced that they would donate up to $100,000 each as a fund-raising challenge to raise $1 million by Labor Day to defeat the proposed amendment. If AB 19 passes and becomes law, it is possible that same-sex marriages could begin and then be suspended again if a constitutional amendment banning samesex marriage passes later, Cox said. Cox said that it is also possible that the move to amend the constitution would lose steam after same-sex marriages happen and people realize that they aren't having a damaging effect on society. Cox said that she believes given the option same-sex couples will chose mi*r- riage over domestic partnership, but, she said, it is not clear what AB 19 would do to the existing domestic partner registry California's domestic partnership system extends a broad range of rights and responsibilities to same-sex couples registered as domestic partners. Earlier this year a bill known as AB 205 took effect, expanding the rights granted to domestic partners so that they receive nearly all of the benefits extended to married couples by the state. Jeff Winkler has been with his partner for nearly six years and was married for the brief period during which same-sex marriages were performed in California. Winkler said that he and his partner have created wills and medical power of attorney documents in an attempt to compensate for the lesser legal status of their domestic partnership. Terje Anderson, executive director of the National Association of People With AIDS, said a therapeutic HIV vaccine would offer an alternative to the lifetime of chemo' currently available to people living with HIV. mount a resistance. 80 percent drop in viral load The French researchers discovered that when their mixture of "killed" HTV and dendritic cells were injected, the patients' viral load — or amount of HIV present in their blood system — dropped by an average of 80 percent.
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1284_007.jpg