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Women Who Run
Part 1
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Gregory, Elizabeth [host]; Aguilar, Melissa [panelist]; Honig, Caryn [panelist]; Moldovanyi, Eva [moderator]; MacInnis, Roberta [panelist]. Women Who Run - Part 1. 2007. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/living/item/15/show/13.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gregory, Elizabeth [host]; Aguilar, Melissa [panelist]; Honig, Caryn [panelist]; Moldovanyi, Eva [moderator]; MacInnis, Roberta [panelist]. (2007). Women Who Run - Part 1. University of Houston Women’s Studies Living Archives Recordings. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/living/item/15/show/13

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gregory, Elizabeth [host]; Aguilar, Melissa [panelist]; Honig, Caryn [panelist]; Moldovanyi, Eva [moderator]; MacInnis, Roberta [panelist], Women Who Run - Part 1, 2007, University of Houston Women’s Studies Living Archives Recordings, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/living/item/15/show/13.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Women Who Run
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Gregory, Elizabeth [host]
  • Aguilar, Melissa [panelist]
  • Honig, Caryn [panelist]
  • Moldovanyi, Eva [moderator]
  • MacInnis, Roberta [panelist]
Date 2007
Description Two part video of a panel interview consisting of three women who run (Melissa Aguilar, Caryn Honig, Eva Moldovanyi) and one moderator and fellow runner (Roberta MacInnis). The panelists take questions from the moderator, such as how they got into running, getting hooked on running, time and energy to train, good and bad experiences, preparing for a marathon, problems while running, best races, people's perception of female marathon runners, encouraging women who might want to start running, and learning experiences from continuing to run. The panelists then take questions from the audience, and McInnis and audience members add their own commentary.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas
  • Running for women
  • Running
  • Runners, Long-distance
  • Runners (Sports)--United States
  • Marathon running
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Gregory, Elizabeth
  • Aguilar, Melissa
  • Honig, Caryn
  • Moldovanyi, Eva
  • MacInnis, Roberta
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • interviews
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b4555844~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Access File Run Time 01:01:32; 00:17:15
Co-creator
  • Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program
  • The Friends of Women's Studies
Item Description
Title Part 1
File name 2011_17_045a.m4v
Transcript Women and Running Elizabeth Gregory:Well, I’m Elizabeth Gregory, and the director of Women’s Studies Program at the University of Houston, and welcome to the third in this year’s Living Archives Program, prior to the Baha’i women’s stories and Katrina survivor stories. And the next one is perhaps going to be on Women in the Military, though if you have suggestions for other topics, the Living Archives aims to look at issues in women’s lives in Houston and covers all sorts of territory. So, either for this year or for a coming year if you have an idea please let us know on an important aspect of women’s lives, like running, which is extremely important in many women’s lives. It was important in my life for a period. [chuckle] [laughter from some] EG: Now I’ve repressed it. [chuckles] [loud laughter from all] EG: The Living Archives is sponsored by the Friends of Women’s Studies which is a community group that supports the Women’s Studies program and the Women’s Archive at UH, and in addition sponsors programs like the Living Archives in the community and also the Table Talk Lunch which if you haven’t attended is our 10th annual is coming up next month and you might’ve received an invitation on your way in and hope you’ll be able to join us for that, if you’re free on the 7th of March. And the Living Archives panels here, are filmed to become part of the Archive in the M.D. Anderson Library at U of H in the Women’s Archive, and augment the papers of Houston area women’s organizations that are collected there. So if you are ever working on issues to do with women we have many, many interesting panels as well as the papers of individuals and organizations there ready for you to read. And if you are interested in joining the Friends, there’s material there too, just background on what’s going on. But for today I would like to introduce the Panel which will be speaking on Women Who Run. [shuffling papers] And, just pointed out, I should make sure – just clear this up that it’s not about Politics. [chuckles] [laughter from all] EG: Marathons. So I’ll start down at that end, with Melissa Aguilar, who oversees the daily production of the Houston Chronicle’s “Features” coverage. She’s the assistant managing editor for Features. And the Features coverage was judged among the top 10 by the American Association of Features and Sunday Editors of 2005. And in her 23 years at the Chronicle she’s launched a career, launched a weekly entertainment guide called Preview, Ultimate Houston, the Chronicles Best of Guide and La Vibra, a weekly Spanish entertainment guide. She is a single mother with two children. She’s completed 3 marathons and this year will ride in her 6th MS150 which is a 180 mile bike ride that raises funds for the Multiple Sclerosis Society. And she’s a Magna Cum Laude graduate of UT Austin. And Karen Honeg comes from… well she went to college in Denver I don’t know where…, [chuckles] is that where you come from? Karen Honeg: Brooklyn. New York. EG: Brooklyn [laughter from all] EG: I’m from Philadelphia. [chuckles] Everyone comes from somewhere else, practically. She majored in Mass Communications and Speech Communications, and she also has a degree in Nutrition and Dietetics. And she’s a registered and licensed dietitian and owns the Healthy Weigh, a private practice of nutritional counseling and before that she worked for 5 years as a nutrition and exercise coordinator at Texas Children’s Hospital wellness center. And her specialties include weight management, sports nutrition and eating disorders. And she organizes and develops a yearly eating disorder’s conference in Houston. And she also writes for a monthly running magazine and is a speaker for the Women’s Fund. And she’s also an adjunct professor at U of H and she’s working on a Master’s degree in Counseling at the University of St. Thomas, but she’s also, on the side [chuckle] KH: [chuckles] EG: which is sort of the issue here KH: [chuckles] EG: how that works. She is a – she was– she’s an athlete. She was a state and nationally ranked junior tennis player. She was a scholarship player at the University of Denver, became a collegiate All-American tennis player. She was the University of Denver female athlete of the year in 1987. On the Silver Anniversary Team for Women’s Athletics 2000 and inducted into U [of] Denver Hall of Fame in 2004. Congratulations. [chuckles, wows] EG: She hung up her rackets and became an avid runner and tri-athlete since college and she’s completed over 26 marathons, numerous triathlons, one FULL Ironman triathalon and one 50 indurance running race [chuckles]. [mumurs from audience] EG: And she’s married and has two children 11 and 10 which is another form of race. [chuckles] [loud laughter from all] EG: And Ava Maldavani has 30 years experience as an exploration and production geologist, working currently at Conoco-Phillips, and she went to Welsley. Panelist: Hmmm EG: It’s a connection. Ava Maldavani: It is a connection. EG: And she also went to University of Michigan, and she got a PhD from the Washington University in St. Louis in Geology. And she’s been an athlete since high school also. Softball, volleyball, even basketball, note that she is 5’2 [laughter from all] EG: [chuckle] but, we’ve had basketball stars here who are not terribly tall. Kim, remember, Kim? [brief pause and sutters] AM: [laughter] EG: [laughs] Oh no. AM: Yeah, yeah, you read it. EG: I’m shocked. But she stopped in 1986. She has, at that point she started running to counter weight gain. And she was first running less than two miles, but she quickly got hooked. So she’s continued to run and didn’t succeed in her first marathon, but has since then run more than 20. And in addition has run three 50Ks. Audience member Oh my God. [mumbling] EG: And all the rest of it they’ll tell you about in a minute. So, in addition I want to introduce our moderator Roberta McKinnis, who writes the Running Notebooks for the Chronicle and also has been running for 25 years and she has participated in marathons and please join me in welcoming our panel. [clapping from all] Roberta McKinnis: Well I guess I’d like to start with each of you personally describing how you got into running and then how you got into marathon running because there are a lot of runners who never go more than a mile their entire career. So I guess we can just start with Ava. [inaudible comment] AM: Well I did used to be a smoker for 10 years of my life and one day decided that was it, put it out and immediately started gaining weight, so as a way to counter that I started – I got back into exercising and running was something that allowed me to – I mean it kept me healthy and it also gave me the opportunity to be outdoors which is the main thing I love is just the sense of freedom, put on a pair of shoes a pair of shorts, a jog bra and a top and you’re off and running. So it started really in earnest in 1986 and I built up from the 2 miles, then plateau’d at around a 5 mile level. And I was always afraid of marathons, but at the same time I was always intrigued. As a student at Welsley, the Boston Marathon was right by our campus and since I was a freshman I’d go out and see these guys running and few women in those days, so I had this in the back of my head, but I never really felt that I could achieve it. And I tried once prematurely. I didn’t train properly, which is a big – I think a key to success in running. Whatever level you choose to run at, proper training is very important. So after that first failure, I was traumatized. I knew I could never do it and through my best friend, who convinced me that “Yes it was achievable if you did it the right way.” I was able to complete the training and I ran a very successful marathon and I’ve been hooked ever since. KH: I as you heard, I was a junior tennis player traveling around the country and tennis really did control my life. I didn’t date, I didn’t have a normal teenage life and I started running just to escape kind of the pressure of tennis. I found that that was one way I could really relieve some pressure. I didn’t have to do it great. I didn’t have to be the best. I didn’t have to win. I could just go out and run. So I ran through college and I ran my first marathon when I was a junior in college. I went to Philadelphia and ran the Philadelphia marathon, really no training. I didn’t even – I was so tiny I didn’t wear a bra, but I went into a store and I said, “ I think I need one of those running… bras.” [chuckle] [laughter from all] KH: you know those things. I told them I’m about to do a marathon. At that time we didn’t have Goo, we didn’t have any of the power bars, it was Gatorade. And my parents went out and they handed me oranges. So I was hooked after that. I did go through ups and downs in terms of, I did develop an eating disorder and an exercise compulsion and did survive that and got lots of treatment for that. So the running became a part of the exercise compulsion but I was able to recover from that and now I do run healthily, in an healthy way and I see some of my running buddies, it’s a big part of my social life. I’ve run 26 marathons and a few ultras. And it really is a joy, a joy for me now. I truly love running it’s a part of my life. MA: And I was on the high school track team at Madison High School here in Houston. And after that I just always ran. That was my form of exercise. I was running through the streets of Bellaire, sprained my ankle, had to go through physical training and I was – I ran, you know 3-6 miles a day, but I was working with the physical therapist and she was getting ready for the marathon. I said, “Ohh I wish I could run a marathon!” And she said, “Well do you run?” I said, “Yes.” And she said, “How long have you been running?” I said, “Since high school.” And she said, “How far?” And she said, “Pfft. You could run a marathon.[chuckles]” And that was the first time I thought, “Hey, I can run a marathon!” That was in the year 2000. So I ran it that year, then I got into biking, but now I’m back into running more, but it just – the idea that someone told me, “You CAN run a marathon.” That did it for me. One cautionary tale, you know, runners are out in the sun a lot plus they’re people who like to do other things outdoors. And I’ve had two bouts of skin cancer, so wear sunscreen. [mumbling from audience] RM: Okay, you’ve all three mentioned something. I think, now Melissa was the only one who didn’t use the term hooked. [chuckles from panelists] RM: So I maybe would like you to get into more detail about how running 26.2 miles with all its attached problems and discomforts, which we can get into later, you can get hooked on that. You know, obviously it’s a very difficult thing to do and it can be very painful. What was in it that made you want to do it a second time let alone 26 times. AM: There is a magical moment – well first of all when you line up at the start there is so much electricity in the air. I mean, everybody should go to the start of a marathon, whether you’re going to run it or not, because you’ll feel it. It gets into your body. And at the other end of the race there’s a magical moment when you cross the finish line and you’ve gone from this initial electrified moment and that carries you through the first – I don’t know - third of the race, then you get into the middle and you begin to realize, “What am I doing? How am I here? How am I ever going to finish?” and then you get into the final third and you begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel. But when you cross the finish line there is such a sense of accomplishment and it – it [stutters], I can’t put words to it other than to tell you that I still get goosebumps. I still get tears in my eyes, I still go [gasp, gasp] trouble breathing when I get through it, and I think I crave that. I love that sense of accomplishment. I love what I learn about my soul every time I complete a race. It’s addictive. And then when I’m through I want to go to the beginning again. [chuckles from all] AM: Within a day. [louder laughter from all] KH: Right. Right. In the medical field, we have a term for the hooked or the addiction. It’s called obsessive compulsive disorder. [loud laughter from all and clapping] KH: so I’d have to say most runners have OCD. Audience: [more chuckles] KH: but everything Ava said is absolutely true. There’s such an adrenaline rush. And each time - I always said I would finish my first marathon and that was 20 something years ago and now you know, I set different goals. Now I want to hit every state. I want to be part of the 50 state club. I did the 50 miler. So I certainly want to do – now I’m a 100 miler. I did the ironman. So it’s always “What can I do next? What can I achieve next?” because when you do cross the finish line it is such a sense of achievement. And, you know if you’ve been told in your life, “ Well you can’t do this, you can’t do that.” When you do cross the line, you’re like, “I can do this. I can do anything.” MA: I started really late. I didn’t run my first marathon ‘til I was 40, so there was an extra sense of accomplishment, I think in that. And for me the training is such a good time because I – I’ve – that’s where I work out all my problems, just running, just kind of mindlessly around memorial park a million times [chuckles] and you know, I think I could run that loop with my eyes closed, but it is that feeling that – of something you just have to do. You don’t even think about it, you just get up and do it. RM: Which leads me to my next question. Where do you find – because you’re all obviously very busy people, with a lot of things going on – where do you find the time and energy to train for a marathon which we’re looking at you know, as some people are familiar with this – 40 miles per week at the absolute minimum and depending on what you’re trying to accomplish can go on up to professional level which of course we’re not at of 100 miles or more a week. AM: [Sigh] Every day has a section cut out for training. It, it – that’s just the way my life is. Usually I end up sacrificing sleep because I do have a job [chuckles] [Chuckles from some] AM: That I have to keep in order to pay for my running gear [chuckles] [laughter from audience] AM: and for my race registration. But no, seriously for me everyday starts with a set amount of time specifically designated to some form of training and I’m absolutely unbearable if I can’t complete the training. You don’t’ want to be near me. So, how do I find the time. I make sure that it’s there. [brief pause] I just cut out on other things. Fortunately I don’t have – I don’t have – it’s not fortunate – I don’t have the added responsibility of children which I’m sure makes it even harder to carve out the time. KH: I do have a business, a full time job and I teach at U of H and do I go to night school. I have one more class and I’ll be finished with my Master’s. And so training is in the morning. It’s the only time I can do it. We have a wonderful group and Clara’s here she’s our leader, she’s right there. She’s there every single day that we’re supposed to be there and I’ll often miss and I’ll just run around my house. I also am very fortunate, I have a husband who’s a runner and he shares the burden – not the burden – the responsibility! [chuckling that develops into loud laughter from all] KH: sorry! [laughs] AM: I’m putting back words in your mouth, sorry! KH: Oh my God, that sounds so bad. [laughing] He shares the WONDERFUL responsibility [more laughter from all] KH: of my lovely, beautiful children so I’m very fortunate that I have a very understanding husband and he helps out a lot. We actually – he’ll go at 5 in the morning and I’ll leave at 6. And we balance it that way ‘cause he’s a very fast runner. So… NEXT!! [laughter from all] MA: Yeah, next! [chuckles] I kind of sneak the time in. Sometimes I have to split it and run in the morning and run in the evening because it’s hard to get that big a chunk of time. But, you know, if I get up really early I can run before I take my son’s carpool if not then I go into work a little late. I’m lucky that I have a pretty flexible work schedule. So, you know, I just – I really kind of cheat and sneak it in when I can and you know, the weekends are when I get in my long runs, but during the week it’s just what I can get in. RM: Y’all three of you addressed the time but how about the energy? AM: You know [stutters & pause] I don’t know how to answer to that. I have, fortunately this endless source of energy [chuckles from some] AM: And one thing – no, let me add – the running energizes me. MA: Yeah. I think that’s… AM: It just plugs it right back in. It’s like getting a jolt from the wall or something. I don’t know I can’t explain it but I do have an endless source of energy, fortunately. KH: And running is a high. I mean, it certainly, you know gives you endorphins and it does serve as a natural high and I think it’s also very soothing mentally and emotionally and it’s – I think it’s just something you have to find the energy for. And usually once you’re up and going the energy will come, but I - just don’t have as much energy as you do. [laughs] MA: [chuckles] KH: I’m tired. [laughs] I’m tired a lot. MA: I find that even - I can never sleep the night before the marathon. AM: [chuckles] No! MA: But if you just lie there and tell yourself, “I’m resting and that’s all I need.” And sure enough that is all you need. So somehow the energy just comes from within. [brief pause] RM: Okay. Um… MA: Luna bars. That’s a good too! [laughter from all] RM: Okay, how about just some, uh… I don’t know, try to get more specific or keep it general. You kind of, I guess, addressed on it getting nervous before a marathon. MA: I am the most nervous person. I don’t know what that’s about. You know, you think you’ve done this. Well I’ve only done it 3 times, but even the MS150 it’s like [gasp] you know, “what do you think’s going to happen? Come on!” but it’s just – you know, gets you going. KH: You know, I’m certainly not going to win the marathon so that’s not even an option, so I don’t know why I’m so nervous. I’m so nervous. I have – I mean I’m in the Port-a-potty. I have a great story, I’ll tell it real quickly. Before the Ironman I sat in the Port-a-potty for probably 2 hours, that’s how nervous – sorry [laughter from all] KH: I’m so sorry. [laughter from all] KH: There’s a lot of runners so you know we talk about this. But, my husband who was also doing the Ironman – he had to get my towel out, he had to get my bike all fixed up. He had to do EVERYTHING because I was nowhere to be found. I get that nervous. MA: Yeah. KH: Yeah. It just – It’s the runner’s – what is it called, I don’t know – just runner’s nerves. AM: Well, I’m [sigh] just as nervous for a 5K as a 10K as my 20th marathon. KH: True. AM: I mean, every single one has some obstacle that is going to come my way. I think you build up expectations. You know, every time that you decide you’re going to enter a race you’re do set a goal - you either want to go faster, or you want to make it without walking or you want to – I don’t know – whatever variation on the theme that you’ve set up for yourself so internally you don’t want – you wouldn’t like to fail. And I think that for me that is where the nerves come from. I know, you know that if something does happen and I have to walk it, I can [stutters] I can make it to the finish line but I don’t want to be disappointed in myself and I think it’s the nerves of – what if the unexpected happens? [brief pause]I don’t spend the hours in the Port-a-can, but… [chuckles from all] AM: but, KH: You’re missing out. [chuckles] AM: I get very nervous and it’s every race, it’s the same thing. RM: Okay, well everyone who’s ever done a marathon knows that even if you’ve done one before that very often there are reasons to be nervous cause it can get very ugly out there for whatever reasons. So maybe you’re like to share some of your worst experiences Panelist: Hmm. [chuckle] RM: And we’ll end with the best [chuckle] ones and what you did to get through that. [brief pause] AM: You want to go first? MA: The toes are always the bad for me. Panelist: YES. MA: I always lose my toenails. I just – you know, I tape them, - they’re just going to be a bloody mess no matter what, so I’ve just kind of come to grips with that. And I met the guys from the Dynamo soccer team, we were doing a fashion shoot at the Chronicle with them and we brought flip flops for them to wear and I noticed, none of them had any toenails so I didn’t feel so bad after that. [laughter from all] AM: [chuckles] Gosh! I think running a marathon is so much like childbirth. You forget the hard times. Panelist: right Panelist: and you just remember the AM: You’re nodding like “I know what it’s like.” [laughter from all] AM: I’m trying to remember, you know, gosh, in all the marathons I’ve run I know there’ve been awful times where I felt like – well you and I, remember the one that we ran together [laughs] Panelist: Yeah. [chuckles] AM: Yeah, right that was pretty bad. [laughter from all] AM: But, you just keep – kind of forget that remember the finishing. So, give me a moment and I’ll think of a bad time. [chuckles] A bad time. [brief pause] well there’s different things that can come your way when you’re actually doing a race. And you can group them into external things you can’t control like the weather, topography you can’t control it but you can certainly choose your races. If you think you don’t like hills you probably don’t want to go and run a race – KH: San Francisco. AM: San Francisco. [chuckles from group] AM: Naw, that’s not too hilly. [laughter from all] AM: I think they make it flat don’t they? [sarcastically] Anyway, you have weather, you have physical topography issues, and then you have your preparation and I find – to me what makes it truly worse if you’re not fully prepared or weather throws you a curve. I’ve had the first marathon that I semi-trained for where I failed, was in St. Louis and I hadn’t trained properly so it’s a good thing the weather did what it did because it saved me from total disaster. But I ended up in a snowstorm and you know, it just wasn’t fun. There was this much slush on the ground and the ice was hitting my face and I didn’t’ have the right clothing. I was a student and those were the early days of Polar Guard when it cost $300 to get a running suit. Panelist: [chuckle] AM: So those are things you can’t control and they do make a race nasty. I feel like if you’re ill prepared though [short pause] maybe that’s when the internal struggle is the worst. KH: Well there’s one more part of it that I’d like to add. AM: Please. KH: Just natural circumstances. If you don’t feel so well or your have a cold, AM: Yeah. KH: Of you have a muscle aches, so – you know, things that are our of your control, cause every time you run you feel differently and you never know what race day is going to present, how you’re going to feel on race day. Did you eat something that was off for you. You know, you just never know on race day how you’re going to feel. AM: Yeah. KH: That’s life. RM: Okay, you talked about preparation. What about maybe you can go into some of the nuts and bolts about how you prepare for a marathon. When you start training how much you run. How many more miles you add. All that. How does one go about running 26.2 miles in one piece. AM: Well I’m in a constant state of running/training and I try to run 40 miles a week. That’s my minimum, even when I’m not immediately facing a marathon. I start to ramp up the mileage about 4 months before the race. Now if you’re starting from scratch and you’ve not run more than 3 miles and you think you’d like to run a marathon, that’s okay, but you should give yourself more time. You should give yourself at least a year to get a solid running base because one of the quickest ways to get injured – and you know the twig that snaps, once you get injured [swipes hands together] that’s the end of your season. I mean you can come back and try a year later, but once you cross this very fine line and you do get injured, that marathon is not going to work for you. So – I forget where I was heading, sorry [chuckles] – so yeah, I was saying if you’re starting from scratch make sure you have a solid running base because you want to avoid that injury. In my case, since I do have a year long running/training program for myself, about 4 months before a race I start ramping up the mileage and what the means is I still – I stay around the 40 to 50 mile range per week but I shift the mileage of the runs and my once a week usually on a Saturday because it’s when you have more time, I’ll start doing increasingly longer runs. So if the standard base is a 10 mile distance, I’ll start 12, 15, 18. I’ll hover around the 18 for a couple of weeks and I’ll jump up to 21, then I’ll come back down to about 16 and then about 3 weeks before the marathon is when I do my longest training run and I try to do 24 miles. That has worked very well for me and then the remaining 3 weeks before the race you bring it back down gently. But I still, except for the last week before the marathon I still keep the 40 mile total distributed more evenly right before the race. KH: Well I do about the same. I join a group so we have a coach and we all meet at one location every Saturday so we keep out weekly mileage probably 5 or 6 miles and one day of track each day – one day of track and then the long run on the weekends and we typically do at least two 20+ milers and then we start to come down. So to me the most important thing is having my group of runners to run with because it’s also very social and we have the support, but basically it’s the same training program. We start ours about 6 months before. I believe we start in August to get ready for the January marathon. Six months of really marathon training. It’s very similar. MA: Well yours sounds a lot more fun than mine. Mines just real solitary, you know, when I can get it in, but I would love to try and - Panelist: Well join our group! Come and hang out. RM: Join our group! [laughter from all] MA: [chuckle] But one of the things that actually Roberta told me about this year that I hadn’t thought about was, figure out what you’re going to wear early. The first year that I ran I shaved and all that stuff, so this year I would figure it out and for my long runs I would wear that so I know and there would be no problems. And that was just real helpful cause I didn’t have to worry about my clothes this time. KH: You gotta look good. [chuckles] KH: It’s the most important thing. [chuckles from all] MA: Absolutely [laughs] KH: No matter how you feel. [more laughter from all] MA: Yeah, I know. KH: You have to look good. MA: I look at those pictures and never buy them. Never. [laughs] KH: Oh, I always buy ‘em. [laughs] [laughter from panel] AM: One more thing I’d like to add – we talk about the physical part of training, but I find that the mental preparation is just as important if not more so. Cause your legs can usually get buy. I mean they’ll carry you, but you have to be mentally strong to do any kind of endurance running of fast walking if you prefer walking. So what does that entail? You need to [coughs] think about possible scenarios. Things that could happen to you on race day or things that could happen to you in training and try and think through how you’re – how are you going to convince yourself. You brain, about two-thirds of the way through a race is going to say, “Look, this is not fun.” [chuckles from some] AM: And your body may try to follow and believe it. But if you’ve prepared for that, if you’ve anticipated for when your body starts to turn on you, I find that that is a key to success or it has been in my case to anticipate problems, anticipate what you’re going to do. Is it a matter of food? Is it a matter of just trying to think of something positive. Sometimes all it is – one time I was running a race and my cat had just died and I started talking to this little kitty cat in heaven and the next thing I know I was finishing and I had had a great race. So it can be anything. It doesn’t always have to be some techno running thing that gets you to the finish line. KH: Absolutely. I totally agree with that. MA: One little mental trick that this guy I used to run with told me is that when you’re just feeling like you can’t keep going you just say, “Yes!” And sometimes I do that. [chuckles] KH: I think of – I work with eating disorder patients and I have some severe cases and unfortunately we had our first death this year in our clinic, but I think of my patients and what they’re going through – ‘I can do this,’ gosh what they’re going through, ‘I certainly can make it. One more mile. One more mile.’ I do think about my patients when I run. RM: What kind of problems do run into out there? And Melissa mentioned her toe nails. What other problems? AM: That was a good pun. Do you run into. [laughter] RM: Sorry. I didn’t mean to. KH: GI problems sometimes. Bonking meaning blood sugar, plunges and you just have to be prepared. Get Gatorade, get Goo, get whatever you can. Toe nails of course. Chaffing, or __[33:36]_____, if you haven’t put enough bodyguard on. AM: Cramping. KH: Cramping. Yeah. AM: If you don’t have the right electrolyte balance. It’s very important to keep your sodium and potassium just right otherwise your heart can go haywire and your muscles, your muscles can just lock up completely. MA: And do you – how often to you drink the Powerade. Do you do it every time, do you drink it every other time? KH: I do – well you know, it’s very individual. Fluid intake and fluid needs are very individual. Actually, Houston marathon has spread out their water to prevent hyponatremia. RM: Mm hmm. KH: Which is when you drink too much water and your sodium levels take a plunge. It’s called hyponatremia. Typically, personally it works for me to do every station. Water and then a little bit of the Gatorade. And as it gets later into the race more Gatorade, more sugar. And it’s very individual. You have to play with that prior to the race of course and practice your long runs with Gatorade and Goo or Blocks or whatever works for you. RM: Mm hmm. AM: I usually do my first Gatorade at about mile 8. KH: Wow. AM: And I tend to alternate. Not all marathons will have a water station or a Gatorade station every mile. I think we’re – I haven’t run Houston in a while. Do they still do it every mile? KH: Nooo! Every two miles. AM: No, they don’t. [mumbling in audience] AM: Yeah, so you have to pay attention before you start running, before you – be aware of your particular of the race that you’re running so that you can plan when you’re gonna take the substance. One thing I do for sodium, I carry around little salt packets in my shorts pocket. And when I start having negative thoughts, that either means I need some sugar or I need some salt and more often than not I’ll go for the salt and it revives me. You know it’s not the whole packet. [laughter from all] AM: Just a little bit. [laughter from all] AM: Just a little bit. RM: That’s the trick. [brief pause] Just getting away a little bit from the details. What do you learn about yourself when you do have – I didn’t mean it like that. What do you learn about yourself when you start having problems? It can be good or negative. [pause] AM: What do you learn about yourself? KH: I always learn that I can – no, that I can reach my goals or that I can achieve what I’m set out to achieve. That I can do it. MA: Yeah. I have to go for that problem-solving thing and just be resourceful and figure out some way around it. You know the year I was chaffing, I think I ran the last two miles like that. [laughs] You just do what you gotta do. [laughs] RM: Have any of you never finished a race? KH: Hmm. MA: Yes. KH: One. AM: If you don’t count the first one. I didn’t finish another one. Very public and very embarrassing one, but it was probably the best thing to happen to me because it taught me a lot about what I had been doing wrong. It was Boston 2004 and it was 85 degrees at the start of the race. [mumbling from all] AM: [knocks on table] And you know you fly North because you want cool weather. [laughter from all] AM: 85 degrees and I might as well have been running here. [brief pause]For stupid reasons, I had to be the first person to line up and there I was. [laughter from some] AM: Sitting in the beating sun and I couldn’t drink water because then I would have had to gotten out of the corral and there would have been lines at the Port-a-Cans and so I wasn’t drinking. I was dehydrated before I even took a first step. KH: Oh. AM: And took myself out of the race at mile 13. That was the year people got IVs on their way to Boston and walked their way to the finish. It taught me a lot about what to do with fluid intake. It taught me a lot about, well what are you going to sacrifice. Are you going to keep yourself hydrated and warm or cool or are you going to be stupid [laughter from some] AM: just because you think this is the race you’re going to win. I don’t know what I was thinking, but it made me a much better runner [chuckles]. RM: I think that is maybe what I was after a little bit AM: Absolutely, it made me a better runner. RM: Take something from your failures as well. AM: Oh absolutely, more so than KH: Right. AM: You get cocky if you have too many good races. [chuckles] At least I find I do. [laughter from some] KH: The one that I did drop out of was very humbling. It was in San Francisco. AM: Sorry, it’s very hilly. KH: It is so HILLY!! [loud laughter from all] KH: [comment inaudible because of laughter] That’s not why I dropped out. I really felt awful from the beginning. I think – it wound up I did have the flu. But I thought, I can do this. I’ve flown all this way. I have my family here. My friends, I’ve got to do it. But I wound up dropping out at mile 10. But you know, I’ll go back and try again, but it was a very humbling experience. [brief pause] But you learn to survive and there’s always another marathon as it were, killing yourself over that’s absolutely nuts. MA: Well I’ve only really done three so I can’t really. [chuckles] [chuckles from all] MA: Maybe on 20. You know. [chuckles] [brief pause] RM: What - okay we’ve talked about the bad times. How about your best race ever? Panelist: Ooo! RM: And why was it your best race ever and you can have more than one. And could you tell us about that? KH: I’ll start. This year was one of my best ever. I paced – I’ve never done this before – paced a friend who was trying to qualify for Boston and so I was responsible for getting her in to qualify and so each mile it was, you know [chuckle], on edge trying to keep our pace and we did it. And when we crossed the line I felt [claps] just so wonderful that she had qualified. She had made her dream come true. I think she would have done it on her own, but just to be there for that experience was really gratifying, and she’s going to Boston. Then another one was doing the Ironman was quite a thrill. Finishing an Ironman is just an unbelievable experience. It’s wonderful. Audience member: Remind us what an Ironman is? AM: Mm Hmm. [chuckles] KH: Ohh. It’s just this little… [chuckle] [laughter from many] KH: It’s a – gosh, a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike and then a marathon. Audience member: In that order? AM: In that order. KH: Yeah. It was truly amazing. MA: Was it Hawaii? KH: I did San Francisco. MA: San Francisco. KH: Yeah. MA: I think my best race was my first, just to know that I could do it. And since then just to have that knowledge helps me when I go out there. [brief pause] AM: sigh. I do two kinds of marathons. One where I’m there for myself and competing with myself trying to improve on my time. And then there are others where I’ve done running with a friend and time is not an issue. We’re just there to have fun. So – I’m going to mention two favorites. One is New York 2004. I carried a camera. Took 60 pictures from start to finish. [chuckles from some] AM: while my friend wasn’t quite as happy as I was [chuckles] [loud laughter from all] AM: But that was fun. I mean we stopped on the 59th Street bridge and we took pictures of each other and there’s Manhattan in the background. [loud laughter from some] AM: You have to do New York [laughter from some] AM: And then the other which is a time favorite. I turned 50 this year and I was absolutely convinced that things would get slow and I would probably not be running very much anymore. And I ran my best ever marathon. Audience: Wow! [gasps & murmuring from all] AM: A month and a half after turning 50 and it was in Boston. So the place that humbled me also gave me my best race. Audience member: Wow. Audience member: That’s great. [brief pause] Audience member: How hot was it? AM: How what? Audience member repeats: How hot was it? AM: I didn’t hear you. KH: How fast? AM: How fast? Audience together: How hot? KH: Uh huh. AM: How hot, in Boston? KH: Which year? Audience: How hot? [mumblings from many] This year. AM: This year. Actually it wasn’t as cool as I would have liked [chuckle] but it was – I guess it wasn’t 85. It was about 70. It was 50. No no no. It was cold at the start as I recall. Probably in the 40s and it climbed to the mid to high 60s. Boston has this quirk. It starts at noon and so you’re freezing while you’re waiting for the race to start, in this particular case, but then it warmed up. Were you there in the spring? KH: Ah huh. AM: Yeah. Audience: How fast? AM: Ugh. KH: Come on! [chuckles] I wanna know! [laughs] [chuckles from all] AM: 3:27. KH: Wooo. [clapping from all] RM: Okay this brings me to another thing. She’s obviously embarrassed about this time that most of us just dream about. [chuckles from some] RM: But how do you think the fact that you run marathons changes people’s perceptions of yourself – of you. I mean, what’s the reaction you get when people find out that you run marathons, because most people do view this as something superhuman. AM: Well quite often I’ll get the question. How long is this marathon? [chuckles] [loud laughter from all] KH: Right. [chuckles] AM: Sorry I shouldn’t laugh. It’s not intuitive for everybody. 26.2 miles. And if you’ve run then you know you’re very aware of the .2. How does their perception change? I think they’re in awe of you. Especially those who aren’t runners. They can’t even begin to imagine. Those who are runners and dare to dream of running a longer race are also in awe of you. I’m a little uncomfortable with it because I think if I can do it, everybody can do it. I mean I feel with the right kind of training it’s within everybody’s reach. So I’m a little uncomfortable with the way people view us. KH: I’m not uncomfortable at all [laughs] [laughter from many] KH: Anything for attention. But I think, yeah there’s – with me, because of what I do for a living, a lot of my patients look as this as an example that they can get strong, they can recover, they can get healthy. Because I went through an eating disorder and I am healthy and I am strong, then perhaps there is hope for them as well. For my friends that are runners, you know, we’re all in this together. MA: Yeah. And I love that part of it. To me that’s the best part, being a marathon runner. And this year at work some women who are much younger than I am, were running the marathon and the shock at everyone when they realized that I came in an hour before these women. It was like, “Wow! Oh! You do have a decent time.” I guess they really hadn’t realized that until, you know, the twenty-somethings were a lot slower. [chuckles] [laughter from many] RM: Which I guess would get into the whole issue about, you know, women running marathons. I mean, do you think that what brings extra credibility when you’re out working and very often it’s a man’s world. I don’t want to be cliché about it, but do you think that gives you extra strength or extra confidence that might not be there other wise? Or respect, maybe? AM: Uh, probably. Probably. There aren’t that many marathons where women even come close to making up 50%. I think Walt Disney world and possibly New York have pretty high women percentages. But for the most part we’re a minority. I mean, Boston wouldn’t even accept women until 1972! This is yesterday. [brief pause & chuckle] [mumbled comments followed by chuckles] AM: 1972 is right. Yeah. RM: Oh no ’72 is right. KH: I knew Katherine Switzer, when did she…? RM: That was 1967. KH: ’67. AM: Is that when Johnny Kelly pulled her out of the race? RM: Yeah. AM: Little Johnny. RM: There’s a little history, when the first women who ran the first Boston Marathon did so in 1967. Katherine Switzer. She actually entered under her initial K. Switzer. The race director didn’t realize she was in the race. I don’t know, they were fairly into it. AM: I think so. RM: Fairly along and he happened to go by on the press truck and she was running with her boyfriend who was an Olympic dicathelete or something. He saw her in the race. He hopped off the press truck and tried to push her physically off the course. Saying, “No woman will run in my race.” Now that wasn’t so smart to do because he did do it right in front of the press truck. [chuckles from some] RM: And so there is a series of photos – I don’t have them here tonight - that shows her actually lunging for her Panelist: [Gasp] RM: and her boyfriend coming an just sending him flying. AM: There is a statue for this man in Boston. KH: Yeah. AM: So – RM: They ended up actually as friends. [chuckles from some] KH: They did. They make amends. AM: When you go by. KH: Yeah. AM: Great him appropriately. [chuckles] [chuckles from many] RM: Women didn’t even have the marathon in the Olympics ‘til 1984 AM: Yeah.. Yeah. True. RM: when Joan Sanderson ran. AM: True. RM: Although it’s changing here in Houston, I think. Including the half marathon for the first time it was 60% AM: Oh. RM: Is it Joan? Joan in audience: The Mini Marathon in Indianapolis is the same, it’s more than 50% women. RM: Yeah. It’s changing. AM: It’s good. [coughs] I think women shouldn’t a) fear it and shouldn’t think that it’s beyond their reach. RM: What do your mother’s say about it? KH: Uh. My mother lives on mile 18. [laughter from all] KH: And so she sits there [chuckles] every year and watches. And one of my friends came up this year, Molly, came and was crying and saying “This is so hard.” It’s my mom who’s from Brooklyn, New York and said, “So what are you doing? You know, get off the course. Stop! Just stop.” [loud laughter from all] KH: My parents, yeah they think I’m pretty crazy. But they support. They do support. They come to my races as they can. MA: My parents totally don’t get it, but my mother did bring my kids to the first race and my son was holding a sign that said, “Go Mom. Win!” [laughs] [laughter from all] AM: Well, you are winning. MA: Yeah. [laughs] [more laughter] AM: You do win. When you cross that finish line you might as well have won that medal – I mean not medal but the plaque. KH: The money! The money. [laughter from many] AM: Not many races that – well yeah. [mumbled comments] AM: I think my mother is proud of my doing them. I don’t – I’m not remembering now if she’s against me doing them or thinking that I’m gonna to wear out. My father isn’t alive, but I think about him a lot when I do the races and I think that he would really be proud. Maybe I’m putting thoughts in my memory of him, but I think he would have been supportive. RM: So what would you tell women who were thinking, Melissa mentioned that you know, somebody told her that she could do this. So what would you tell somebody who was thinking, “Can I do a marathon? Can I train for a marathon? And then execute it?” And what would you tell them to expect. Would you tell them, I’m assuming you would encourage them, what would you say? AM: I would encourage them to find a good supportive group, a good training group. I would invite them to come run with us. I coach – co-coach for a small running group. Not necessarily to sell my group but I would sell the concept of training in a group. I would emphasize getting the right kind of training. I would emphasize having a solid base. I would emphasize not trying to do too much too soon. I think a lot of us get – you know we hook into the idea of doing marathon. We then – we’re not getting fast enough, soon enough! We think we should be doing more. If the program calls for hills once a week, we think we should be doing hills 3 times a week! [chuckles from all] AM: and I’m NOT looking at anyone in particular! [chuckles] [laughter from all] AM: so, to not over do it. To be patient with the training, but to definitely get a good training foundation. KH: My number one recommendation would be to sign up with a program that really does help beginner marathoners train. Like, Aida’s program is great. And there’s a few others that are really good for the beginner runners in that they have the guidance. They have the support. They have the lectures to teach them about hydration and food. And to perhaps read a marathon – intro the marathon running book. That would be my number one suggestion, because my first one just not knowing what I was doing and it was pretty hard. MA: And I think the mental aspect of it is so important, just to stay positive and to reassure yourself and give yourself “At a girls.” That would be my advice. AM: Can I add one thing? RM: Yes. AM: The training is much harder than the actual marathon. You’re going to experience ups and downs during your 6 month or 8 month that you’re never going to see on race day. So you try not to get discouraged when you do hit a low in your training. It’s part of the process. It’s part of learning about yourself – learning your inner strength. RM: So what would you tell them that they could expect to take away when they cross that finish line? AM: They will never be the same. [laughter from all] AM: You will be changed forever and you will – it will be harder for you to say next time, “Oh, I don’t think I can do this,” because you will have achieved something so great and something that a lot of people aren’t interested in and a lot of people can’t even get near. And you’ll be part of a minority and you will have – you will have [brief pause] seen your core. You will have this great understanding of what you’re about and how far you can go and what you can reach for. KH: And I believe it’s less than 1% of Americans can actually run a marathon so you’re part of this very small, elite group that trained, that pushed yourself to the limit and did it. And so there’s a great feeling of accomplishment and pride and joy. You’ve done this great feat. MA: You can do this, you can do anything. RM: And then, I think I’ll just maybe – another question or two and then we’ll open it up for questions. What do you hope? Do you think there’s more for you to learn? I know we have a range of experiences here. You know, why do you keep doing it? And what do you think you may learn? AM: Well, for me it shifted a little bit. I’m racing less and spending more time coaching and the process of sharing that training and that achievement with out runners is giving me knew highs that I didn’t have before. And while I’m helping to train some experienced and some newbies I’m learning a lot about myself as well. You know, compassion, co-misery, and empathy, all of that. So, I don’t know. Every race is a new learning experience. RM: Why don’t you mention the name of your training group? AM: It’s called Soaring Ibus. Audience: Yeah! [clapping] AM: Ringers [laughs] [laughter from many] KH: And for me – you know I’m getting slower, I’m fighting it, I’m surviving – AM: Wait t’il you’re fifty. KH: Faster. [laughs] AM: I’m telling you, you can. [chuckles] KH: Like right now, I’ve had to change my priorities. I have to be okay with not running a 3:30 marathon. I have to be okay with a slower marathon. And that’s okay. As long as I – it has to be fun. I have to enjoy it and I just have to – I’ve had to switch my priorities. Maybe not as fast as I like to be, but I certainly still enjoy it. RM: Speaking of priorities, just really quick. You have a seminar coming up on Saturday don’t you? [chuckles from some] KH: It’s my priority. Yes, it’s an eating disorders conference on Saturday at the Hotel Derek and I have speakers coming in from all over the country and it’s – if anyone would like a brochure I’ll just leave them there, but it’s taken up, yeah, a lot of my energy right now. Thank you for mentioning that. RM: How about you Melissa? MA: Well, I have all sorts of hopes. I want to go to other cities and run marathons. I want to get faster. I want to – you know. It’s a new thing and I just can’t wait to do more with it. RM: That’s what kind of what I find interesting about the three of you, you have the range of experiences. KH: Mm hmm. MA: Yeah. I’m gonna to join a running group. [chuckles] [laughter from some] AM: And do New York. MA: [laughs] And do New York, yeah. I was there – I watched New York this year. Ohh! It was so much fun. AM: I was there! MA: Yeah. AM: You didn’t see me? MA: I wish I had known. [laughter from all] KH: You were Lance, with Lance. [laughs] MA: I didn’t see Lance. I was just a little bit ahead of him. [chuckles from some] AM: I didn’t hurt as much as he did though, because I trained properly. [clapping and laughter] RM: Was there anything that you three would like to add that I haven’t touched on or anything before we open it up to questions? [mumbling, brief pause] AM: I think you’ve done a great job, I feel like we should be asking y’all. KH: Right. [chuckles from all] AM: How many have you done Roberta? RM: You know, last count it was about 12 I think, but that includes one 50K. AM: Wow. KH: We even have a sub-3 hour marathoner in our midst, right? [chuckles] Yeah. AM: Well. RM: Okay well are there any questions. MA: Right. [chuckles from panel] Audience member 1: This has been really eye opening for me because I always thought of running as a solo sport. And I was not ever really interested in it anything because – well I have my own fitness journey is certainly alone, I really enjoy doing things within a community. So I guess my question is do you think, women have influenced running to become much more a sport that can involve community? [brief pause] could you talk a little bit about that? KH: Well, like I know our group of women we solve each other’s problems and it is very bonding. Do you think Claire? Claire: Yeah. KH: Yeah. [chuckles from some] KH: You know, we all know about each other’s families and work and transitions, and everything and to me it’s a very bonding experience. And women need that. Women need other women to connect with. Running’s a great way to do that. AM: Were you asking whether or not men Audience member 1: Have running groups? AM: tend to run in groups? KH: Oh yeah. AM: Because, I mean, they do. Audience member 1: They do. AM: They do. AM1: Have they always? AM: I think they probably have. AM1: Because my dad just went off and ran by himself. AM: Eh, it probably varies. AM1: Yeah. [inaudible comment] [laughter from some] AM1: well there you go. Well, on the track team. KH: Running groups, per se, weren’t as popular as they are now. Now there’s a million running groups. I think Houston Fit was the first and they probably were 10 years ago and they started with 8 people. And so now running groups are very popular. AM2: But do you think women are driving that KH: Oh. AM2: Or do you think that’s attracting women to the sport? Is it like a ___[59:50]___. I actually - The funny thing is I was going to ask – I had written down the exact same question she asked [chuckles] [chuckles from some] AM2: I think it’s interesting ‘cause like she said – you know, I started running when I was a little kid and it was me and my dad, and that was it. We didn’t run with a group. We never ran with a group. If he wasn’t running with me he ran by himself. KH: Hmm. AM2: And I kind of got the impression that’s kind of the way it was. And now you know, he’s – it’s got 3000 members – and you know, so are women – and women – and there seems to be kind of a running boom you know among – more I think among women than among – I mean it’s strongly among men but the men were kinda – I think it’s slower. I think now women are really being attracted to the sport. And so I guess kinda what she pointed at is that, are we driving that or are we attracted to that? AM: I think we might be attrac[ted] - well there’s probably a little bit of both. But I think we are – well, we! I was attracted to that kind of a setting, that kind of a training. A one-on-one for me was too intimidating. Because you know what, if you were having a bad day there was no one else you could ____[1:00:47]____ [loud laughter] AM: And sometimes I didn’t want to work that hard. I didn’t want the coach to come – I didn’t want it to be work, I wanted it to be fun. And I find that the groups –Houston Fits co-ed or anyone of these groups, ours included, the co-ed, it’s just a good way to foment friendships. I think they create a safe environment even if you’re a little bit shy, a little bit insecure, about your abilities, “Am I going to make it to the end of this thing?” I think the group – [interrupted/break in tape?] AM3: All the, you know training and all that and really set my minds to it, and so my friends are not yet tired of me. [laughter from some] KH: talking about it? AM3: Yeah. Yeah. They’re probably pretty close to getting tired of hearing me say, “I did it! I did it! I did it!” But anyway, my question is, it became goal for me. And it became – I declared it, and there was no way I was not going to be able to do it. So now my goal is to enjoy running, because I never even run 4 miles before I started and I’m 50. So I’m reading a book called Chi Running AM: Hmm. AM3: That talks about relaxing and using your energy towards it and I was just wondering if y’all had any comments on that or enjoying running. I mean, I enjoy the commaraderie. I love how I felt afterwards. KH: Mmm hmm. AM3: But it was a project. KH: Mmm. AM3: So now I want it to be fun. KH: Did you enjoy the training part? Did you enjoy the actual running that starting and finishing. AM3: Not always. KH: Not always, right. Well you won’t. Yeah. [chuckles from few] MA: I do kind of feel like I get into that zone where it’s the Chi thing and you’re just, you know, letting your mind work through the day or the problems, or what’s ahead, and that’s what attracts me to running. AM: Mm hmm. [brief pause] Do you enjoy – forget the marathon training, but do you like the idea of going out for a run. AM3: I’ve never enjoyed running. AM: But today, now, a month later? AM3: I’m starting to get there. [chuckles from some] AM: Okay. AM3: But that’s my goal now is to really – is to enjoy the running. And now that the pressure’s off, that I did it, it’s all been worth it, enjoy running. AM: Do you like being outdoors? AM3: I love being outdoors. AM: Okay. So for me, one of the things that I love about running is that I can be outside and be unencumbered. You know you’re not having to wear a helmet, you do have to pay attention to traffic. So there things about the outdoors. I find that if I’m running on a route that I like – I can’t do Memorial. I cannot do loops at memorial anymore because it’s just going KH: It’s just too boring. [chuckles/laughs from panel] AM: Well. KH: After 20 something years [chuckles] AM: Well it’s too confining. It’s noisy when you’re up and down Memorial. But if you can find routes – and one of my goals is to run as many streets of Houston as I can. I keep track of every time I go out for a run. Talk about compulsive [laughter from audience] AM: So I find ways to make it interesting so that I can get a blend of nature as well as the physical high that I get. And I find that getting to the high it makes it easier to get going every time because I know that I’m soon to achieve this trance like state – I don’t know if trance is the right word. KH: It’s a high. AM: It is a high. And I’m guessing maybe you haven’t had that experience. AM3: Well no, I mean running the marathon was a high. AM: But if you go out for a 4 mile, say or a short run do you…? AM3: Yeah. AM: [Smacks lips & brief pause] Well I think you maybe are there. I don’t [stutters] AM3: I don’t enjoy this. KH: I don’t think you can force yourself to enjoy running. You know, I think you – I don’t know, do you think some people love it. MA: Some people REALLY don’t like it [chuckles] KH: Right. [laughter from audience] KH: I mean are you liking it? Do you like it? AM4: I think that years ago when we starting running, late ‘60s early ‘70s we just started running because it was an exercise to do. You had the kids, you worked, you needed some sort of outlet and you worked into it gradually. There’s nothing wrong with a training group, but they say “We’re going to train you to run a marathon.” But we went out and learned how to run. AM: Mm hmm. AM4: And we did everything wrong. We had no clue. KH: [laughs] AM4: We had no nothing. Panelist: Mm hmm. AM4: You know, we had - we ran our first marathon in 3 year-old tennis shoes. [laughter from some] Panelist: Yup. [chuckles] AM4: You did stupid things like that. But you really got to where you enjoy running and then you said, “Oh well maybe I can do a marathon.” And you didn’t go out and say, “I’m going to train to be a marathoner. To be a marathoner. Because then it’s sort of a – it’s really kind of a let down after that. I ran 13 or 14 marathons until my knees gave out, but you learn how to run first. You learn that you enjoy this and it’s something I can do. And yes we had – there was no trail at Memorial when we learned. We made the trail. [chuckles & murmuring from audience] Audience: Wow. KH: Yeah. [brief pause] AM4: Um, I lost my train of thought there, but [chuckles] uh, just enjoy it. Learn, for now forget the marathon. Don’t think about running a marathon for a while until you learn how to run. Until you learn how to go out and say, “Okay, I’m going to maybe go run for 45 minutes today. I maybe go to run an hour today. And pick a different route. But run with people. We ran by ourselves. He went out the door at 4 o’clock in the morning, I ran out at 4:30. And, on – we looked forward to Saturday and Sundays when we had a group to run with. Everybody during the week ran on their own and on Sundays we would meet a whole bunch of people at Memorial park and we would maybe go around the park. And we may go out to run out to Sage, you know up memorial, or up Allen Parkway, just lots of different places. And then 3 or 4 years later I said, “Maybe I’m going to do a marathon” and I did. So, that’s what you have to go through now. AM3: Okay. [inaudible comment] AM4: Yeah. [chuckles] MA: Have you found anything to replace running since you can’t run now? AM4: Um, walking and exercise bicycle and weight lifting. I swam for a while but I have a chlorine allergy. [chuckle from many] Audience: Oooo. KH: I think it’s important you find your, you know, what brings you joy. And if it’s not the marathon, if it’s a 5K or if it’s walking, or if it’s Pilates, whatever it is that you find what makes you happy. You know, not to force yourself to do anything but find your joy. Find what makes you be, what makes you happy. AM5: That brings up a question. I’m sorry [inaudible]. Have any of y’all ever been injured enough – badly enough that you had to stop running for a certain amount of time and what did you do when you couldn’t run. [chuckles from many] MA: I sprained my ankle, and I had to go through that physical training, um physical therapy and that was just a really hard time because I couldn’t run, but at least going through the physical therapy I could do other things. They had a gym there and so I started doing some weight training which, you know I’ve tried to continue. It’s horrible not to be able to run. [laughs] KH: Any injury I’ve had, knock on wood I haven’t had many, but I’ve been able to run under water with the belt and swim, so I’d still run but it just wasn’t on land, it was in water. So knock on wood, I’ve been fairly healthy. I’m built like I should be, I don’t get injured very often. [knocks on table & chuckles] [laughter from all] AM: In my early days of running, I had some plantar fascites issues, and this was many years ago, but what I turned to was cycling. So then I went to the extreme. I was doing long distance cycling and then the carpel tunnel got to me [laughter from some] AM: because the roads were like this. So, I kind of came full circle. I went to running to cycling to triathaloning to running. And yeah it’s devastating when you get injured and you really - you’re better off cutting your loses and saying, “Okay. Let’s take the time to recover. Give yourself that time. Do weight lifting, do walking if you can. Cycling. Swimming if you can. Any other type of exercise so you stay fit. Try to stay fit. And eventually you do heal and then you can try again. RM: There’s a question up here. [chuckle] EG: I heard that if you were older and you were just starting running that you have an advantage because the people who’ve been running all along MA: Have bad knees. [chuckles from all] EG: have bad knees. And the people who have just been sitting around have a lot of advantage [chuckles from all] EG: in their later life as runners. Which I thought was very inspiring. [laughter from panel] EG: When I’m in my 70s I’m going to do it. really, but I was just wondering what the role of age was. Because you were saying that when you – you just ran your fastest race and there’s the issue of injury and wear down and that kind of thing, and then there’s also the issue of experience. And do you look forward to getting older because then you’ll be the youngest one in your new age category? [laughter from all] MA: Yes. Yes. [laughter from panel] AM: You know, I don’t know if the same thing is true for you KH: Don’t look at me. [laughs] AM: But, those competitive women that are fast, you know when I was 45, they’re fast now at 50. KH: Right. [laughs] [loud laughter from all] KH: Right. AM: I can’t seem to escape them. KH: Right. [laughing] I’m sorry. [more laughter from all] AM: There’s a couple things you asked. One thing I want to address is – as I’ve gotten older, yes I’ve gotten faster but I think it’s because I’m running smarter. In my early days, and maybe I could do it then – I think I mentioned that now, I aim for about a 40-50 mile week. I would think that if I wasn’t running between 50 and 70 miles [slams hands on table] I might as well have just thrown the week away because it wasn’t worth taking note of that training and I was on a borderline of injury. Fortunately nothing happened, but it just wasn’t very smart. Now I find I can be a lot more efficient. I can have quality runs. I don’t have to go out and climb Everest every time I do a training session. So I think the bit about age – there really is something about getting smarter. And yeah, your body does break down. And different bodies are going to react different. You know the whole calcium, osteoporosis issue that we have. You have to take that seriously. Take calcium supplements if that’s what you do. I guess that’s it. KH: I’m still learning. [chuckles] AM: Yeah! KH: Like I was – I had my races right after I had my two children they were back-to- back – 18 months apart. And right after that was when I was setting my PRs. But then I think just life situations with everything that’s going on. I am, like I said, getting older and I’m getting slower and I’m just dealing with it. Not gracefully, but I’m dealing. [chuckles from some] MA: It seems like that’s more of an issue for men than women. Like the women who won the marathon last year, wasn’t she - I think she was 47 or something. Am I wrong? RM: She was that old or a little bit older. MA: She was in her 40s. It just seems like that’s more of an issue for men that as they age they get slower, but doesn’t seem to happen that much to women. I don’t know. RM: I think I really have more endurance and I know that they – I think the farther you go too, the more prominently women figure that they Panelist: Mm hmm. RM: the time differences between a man running and a women running shrink as you get out there Panelist: Mm hmm [mummers in audience] AM: There’s one thing about the concept of getting slower. I’ve noticed that a lot of – a lot of times both men and women, the first time they run a longer race, they probably haven’t achieved their full potential. They’re either holding back, for whatever reason they think they can’t go any faster than what they’re doing. And maybe they can’t and maybe they can. And so I think everybody has some potential to improve with perhaps better designed training. MA: So it’s a mental thing. AM: Well there – it could be some physical part to that as well, but yeah, I’d say mental could be. [brief pause] AM6 (male voice): Uh, question for the panel there, [cough] excuse me. Are there any barriers left out there? KH: Yeah! [chuckles from some] KH: You mean goals? Or what do you mean? [phone rings] AM6: No. I’m coming from the aspect of, you couldn’t rest [1:14:45] a marathon, and it was not even an Olympic marathon ‘til ‘84. Are there any restrictions out there? I’m not aware of any of them? Are there? MA: Oh. RM: Do you encounter them? EG: For women. RM: Do you encounter restrictions in your running? AM: I haven’t. MA: No. Uh huh. KH: I don’t think I’ll make the Olympics. [laughter from some] RM: That’s not a goal. [chuckles] [chuckles from some] AM: Yeah, I can’t think of any. The Hawaiian Ironman, but even that has a lottery. KH: Right. MA: Right. AM: Yeah. [phone rings again] Panelist: Jeez. KH: Kinda loud there. [chuckles] Audience: I’m sorry! [chuckles] [murmurs in audience] [another phone rings] AM7: Is it inevitable that your knees will give out or something, or something? I mean do you have it in the back of your mind that this is something that “I will eventually have to stop doing for some reason or another,” or not? AM: Mmm. MA: I think people’s body types are just, you know – I really feel like my body is right for running. I have a hard time cycling. My arms are too short, you know, I’m never comfortable on the bike, but for running, that just suits me. So I’m hoping that you know, my knees will be fine. I don’t encounter those kind of problems really. AM: I think it depends on the training that you pursue, and don’t [brief pause]. You probably know by now if you’re a 3 minute or a 4 minute miler versus a 10 minute miler [laughter from some] AM: Don’t try and push something that isn’t realistic because I think your knees will give out and your brain will give out I think. [chuckles from few] AM: You’ll get so burnt out. I think understanding what your sphere of possibilities is, is important. KH: And everybody is built so differently. I mean, we see marathoners out there in their 70s, 80s and they’re still running, and so I don’t ever think it’s ever inevitable that I’m going to break down. Just hope for the best. AM: Yeah, it doesn’t have to be a given. KH: Yeah. Right, Right. RM: There’s one thing I’d just like to point out sort of, tangentially related to that, that these people all obviously, as many people in this room have a passion for running and then you get people like Tom and Marianne McBraer. I can’t let them go without mentioning them. KH: Yeah. RM: They were among one of Houston’s original runners. And even though they themselves have not run for years, they still have that passion and are still very involved in the running community which I think we’ve all touched on here, you know. They were there at the first Houston Marathon, they’re still active in the marathon warm-up series. They do all the sports. AM: They do the racecourses. KH: Right. RM: They measure the racecourses. They’re just involved in every aspect of Houston running. So even if they don’t do it they still have the passion KH: Right. RM: And so you can always be there no matter how it manifests itself. MA: Yeah. AM: Good point. RM: Any other questions? [brief pause] Well I would like to thank the panelists. AM: Thank you! [loud clapping] EG: Please join us for wine [inaudible] and food. RM: For what?! AM: Wine! Wine! Forget the training. [chuckles] [talking among all]