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Domingue, A.G.
Domngue transcript, 1 of 1
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UH - Houston History Project. Domingue, A.G. - Domngue transcript, 1 of 1. December 22, 2002. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory/item/307/show/306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

UH - Houston History Project. (December 22, 2002). Domingue, A.G. - Domngue transcript, 1 of 1. Oral Histories from the Houston History Project. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory/item/307/show/306

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

UH - Houston History Project, Domingue, A.G. - Domngue transcript, 1 of 1, December 22, 2002, Oral Histories from the Houston History Project, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory/item/307/show/306.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Domingue, A.G.
Creator (LCNAF)
  • UH - Houston History Project
Interviewer (LCNAF)
  • Wiltz, Steven
Date December 22, 2002
Description Born in 1915, A. G. Domingue was raised in Carencro in a farming family. He began working as a roustabout for Superior Oil Company the summer before his senior year of high school in 1934. Although he received a scholarship to go to college, he decided to continue working in the oil industry. In 1941 he was drafted into the military and he served in the Pacific Theater during World War Two. When he returned in 1945, he began work in production in the Bosco Field; he started out on a workover rig, worked in the warehouse for a few years, and then worked on gas lifting the wells until 1976. He retired as a compressor operator. Upon retiring he worked from time to time as contract labor when the company needed him.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Energy development
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Domingue, A.G., 1915-2011
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Lafayette, Louisiana
Genre (AAT)
  • interviews
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • audio/mp3
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 2006-005, Box 2, HHA 00137
Original Collection Oral Histories - Houston History Project
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=231
Digital Collection Oral Histories from the Houston History Project
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the "About" page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Project
  • University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Item Description
Title Domngue transcript, 1 of 1
Date December 22, 2002
Original Collection Oral Histories – Houston History Project http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=231
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the "About" page of this website.
File name hhaoh_201207_032c.pdf
Transcript HHA#00137 Page 1 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 1 Houston History Archives HHA# 00137 Interviewee: A. G. Domingue Interviewer: Steven Wiltz Interview Date: December 22, 2002 Interview Site: Lafayette, LA Interview Module & No. : MMS : SW031 Transcriber: Lauren Penney [Transcriber’s note: The majority of the interviewer’s backchanneling and “uhs” and “ums” have not been transcribed for the purposes of readability. The interview comprises two audio tracks on the CD. There is also unknown men and a woman present during the interview; because there are so many people present and they often speak over one another, some sections were difficult to transcribe. The woman is the interviewee’s niece; the younger man might be his nephew and the older man might be his brother-in-law.] Ethnographic preface: Born in 1915, A. G. Domingue was raised in Carencro in a farming family. He began working as a roustabout for Superior Oil Company the summer before his senior year of high school in 1934. Although he received a scholarship to go to college, he decided to continue working in the oil industry. In 1941 he was drafted into the military and he served in the Pacific Theater during World War Two. When he returned in 1945, he began work in production in the Bosco Field; he started out on a workover rig, worked in the warehouse for a few years, and then worked on gas lifting the wells until 1976. He retired as a compressor operator. Upon retiring he worked from time to time as contract labor when the company needed him. TRANSCRIPTION Interviewer initials: [SW] Interviewee initials: [AD] SW: Interview with Mister A. G. Domingue. It is December twenty-second, 2002 in his… Niece: Brother-in-law’s home. AD: Brother-in-law. SW: Brother-in-law’s home. So uh, you said you, you were showing me this picture of the Bosco Oilfield. You wanna tell me something about that? AD: Well it, they, they find a well in the spring of 1934, the first well they drilled in that area. They called it the Bosco Field. And the well was on [Peorg?] and then the, the property [where/or?] his wife, whatever. It was, but it was the lease was Peorg and that house right in front of Southwestern. What, who, who owns the house there? Niece: The one that looks uh, Spanish style? AD: It’s older. St-HHA#00137 Page 2 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 2 Houston History Archives Niece: With the white stucco? AD: Yeah, white stucco. Right. Niece: Uh huh, I know where that is. AD: Right, it’s got a fence around it. SW: It’s [Inaudible]. AD: I believe they got a street [inside?]. But that’s, he built that right there. Unknown man: Gordon Street I think. AD: Yeah, ‘cause he had around… over 200 acres. Two-tw-, I think 250 acres of land. And he had around 12 wells on it, they put on it. They drilled the field in a little over a year. They had 10 rigs goin’. Superior Oil Company had two rigs and there was 10 contract rigs. Smith-McDaniel and Laughlin Brothers. And there was, Superior was runnin’ through at, at that time was uh, John Cody and Frank [Sevins?] and Slim [Low?], which was here. I’m pretty sure them, them three was in there. And some of the, the old, old was, that was Buster Carpenter and a few of ‘em which I don’t remember much. But Superior was owned by the Keck Family from California. And the, the field was drilled on a joint account because the Pure Oil Company had half of the royalties, I mean half, had the lease and Superior Oil Company had the working right. And uh, that’s how it was, it was done. And I believe the peak production uh, to me as I was quoted, it was, at the peak of time was around 20,000 barrels of oil a day. SW: It made him a rich man pretty quick. AD: Yeah, the oil price was around two, two to three dollars a barrel at that time. Gas, there was no market for. I believe they just, they started selling natural gas during the war years. That’s World War Two years, which was about a cent and a half an MCF, that’s a thousand cubic feet. SW: What did you, what did you do out there at the Bosco Field? AD: I was in production, I worked as a, I went to work there in 1934 in the summer vacation, I was still in high school. Was working up there, they were buildin’ these foundations for these, to drill these wells, as a roustabout. Then I worked, worked there that summer vacation, Christmas vacation, and I, I finished school that following year. Had my exam about two weeks, two, three weeks ahead of time, then I went to work over there. And that, that’s when the dif-, the field, all the work was just about to be over, so there was, they had too many men, they were just keeping a small token of peoples, so I got laid off [Inaudible]. I stayed off there, I worked for-, off and on in ’36 with ‘em, then I went back in 1937, early part of ’37 went ‘til in ’76. SW: How did you uh, how did you get this job if you were still in high school um- AD: Well I had my brother-in-law that was workin’ there, he was runnin’ a gang. And he asked me if I wanted to work, [they like to kill me?]. It was in the summer time. You know, 18 years old workin’ with fellas that was cured in that, workin’ hard. They liked to killed me. [Chuckling] That’s [some of it?]. I made it. SW: Wh-, what kinds of things did you do? AD: Well, shoveled gravel, sand, dig ditches, and everything else. Making, pouring concrete. See these foundations for these wells, see Superior Oil Company come from California, they thought we was in a swampy area here. So they had to have a good foundation to put these rigs on. So they had to have concrete foundation. But that didn’t last HHA#00137 Page 3 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 3 Houston History Archives too long. After they drilled these, these wells there at Bosco they, [some of the management?], they went, they, they done away with that, they used [timbers?] and mattings and all of that. SW: They realized it wasn’t- AD: Yeah. SW: A swamp, it was more- AD: That, that is correct. Then uh, Steve, let’s see, then Superior drilled, they drilled well towards [Cackton?], they had quite a bit of lease around Cackton and north, the north part of Cackton and the south. But they never, never drilled too, too much in that area. In the Bosco Field I believe there was, to me, from my recollection there was around 50 wells there. SW: How much did they pay you for your work? AD: Started at 65 cents an hour. SW: Was that good or bad for that time? AD: It was very good at that time. Well you buy bread for five cents. And uh, you’d go to, on s-, you, with 25 cents you made a good weekend. That’s about right. Unknown man: Oh yeah? Well sure- AD: Oh man, oh yeah you’d have some to spare. With 25 cents you were got goin’ right. Unknown man: It was 10 cents, you was [Inaudible]. AD: Yeah, five or 10 cents. SW: So that was uh, that was a good job for you to get ahold of even though they were trying to kill you, right? AD: That’s correct, oh yeah, you made money, man. I was o-, uh, I sported for that darn last year in high school. SW: Did anybody else you went to high school with want to, want to work there because they saw that you had- AD: Well, no, well- SW: Had extra money? AD: By the time, yeah. By the time they got doin’ it, they, they used their head. They went s-, most of ‘em went to school. And uh, we had, let’s see when I finished school there was uh, he was a la-, athletic director, Rex McCullough was in Carencro, which he was state senator. And uh, he helped a lot of these boys get scholarship to go to Southwestern. And I was workin’, he gave me a scholarship, but I didn’t fulfill my, I didn’t use my head. SW: So what’d you do, you said after 1936 the, the field kind of dried up. AD: Did I, yeah, yeah, then I started in ’37 as, when in ’37 they started kind of [blowing?] up there. They started doing some [outposts?] like Evangeline Oilfield. That’s out of Jennings, north of Jennings. SW: You mean Superior was doing this? [Inaudible, overlapping speech]HHA#00137 Page 4 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 4 Houston History Archives AD: Yeah, they, yeah, that is correct. Then uh, see they had some production there in Evangeline. There was production there before and they went back in the same old field, which the production over there, I believe, I’m not positive, but it was around 85, 9,000 feet. Which all the production in Bosco is from eighty-four hundred to below, little below 9,000 feet. That’s where all the Superior production was. I might be goin’ back and forth, I don’t know. I’m just, my recollection from that, I was kind of young then. I was workin’ in production after I came back from the service, I, I was drafted in 1941 and uh, I came back in the latter part of ’45. I was in the European Theater of operations. SW: I see. What did you do after you came back? You, you went back to work- AD: I went back to work. SW: For- AD: The, yeah, they w-, they wanted me to go back to Lake Arthur because before the war they drilled the, the Grand Lake Field, which was out of Lake Arthur. They had all these leases back of Lake, uh, Grand Lake. And they had uh, field uh, they had the Creole [Pier?] out of Cameron that was drilled. But they drilled a few wells there, it was, wasn’t all that good. They’d drill some land, a well onshores with, all, it was all, they never made no wells. Then they had production in Hackberry that was there. SW: This is, this is with Superior again? AD: Yes- SW: You came back and just started to work for them again? AD: Yeah, but see that was before the war. Before ’41 I’m talkin’ about. See, see when I came back they wanted me to go to work out of Lake Arthur because there was that, Superior field had expanded out there in Grand Lake and White Lake and all in that area they, they was doin’ a lot of water jobs. See we had a barge, they had a drilling barge before the war, let’s see about ’41, ‘bout ’41, somethin’ in that. No, it must’ve been, I got, I went in the service in ’41. In the late ‘30s. I mean ’38, ’39. And which they was drilling these wells in Grand Lake was around 8,000 feet. They drilled the well in eight days with them barges. They, they had pilings, they’d drive pilings for where the well, well was for, uh, they had a split in that barge. And they took that barge and drive it on that splitting that piling, then they’d sink it, there was only eight feet of water there, seven to eight feet of water. And they drilled that well there. And every eight days they were movin’, they drilled a well. That was, that was before I went in the service [when I?] working Cameron and Grand Lake. And that was too much, so uh, I knew the production foreman in Bosco, so I asked him if he would, he’s gonna take me, hire me, and he said yeah when I come back. So that’s where I went to work and I stayed there. I was in production. SW: Did you ever work offshore uh, later? AD: No. No. When I come back from the service, no. The only offshore work I done was Grand Lake, but it’s not offshore, it was a water job, and little bit at the Creole Pier in Cameron. But that was marsh. I had, I had a [full taste?] of that water stuff, because everything was done man handle, there was no, you, it was hard work at that time. SW: Um, I think Miss Thomas said you, you retired with Superior? AD: Yeah. SW: So after, after you came back from Europe, did you continue to be a roustabout or- AD: No, uh, yeah… They, I, I went to work on the ri-, uh, workover rig for Superior. I stayed there a little while. Then they put me in the warehouse, I worked in the warehouse about a year or two, then, then um, but I was [offered?] in HHA#00137 Page 5 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 5 Houston History Archives that, it was a production field then, that’s, we were all in production. Then they had a gas plant, they built a gas plant, we to gas lift for all these wells, they w-, because they would, as the field got to be a stripping, see we were stripping. We had to pick up the gas and, and boost it up to 1,000 pounds to gas lift these well, most of these wells. And that’s what I was doing for uh, the early ‘60s to ’76. I was working runnin’ that operation. SW: This is sometimes back over at Bosco, right? AD: That was all, that was all at Bosco. SW: W-, oh. AD: After, after 1945 when I come back from the service I was in Bosco. Never left Bosco. SW: You had said that the oil was running out over there, so y’all were doing different things. AD: Well, y-, the oil was depletin’, yeah, at Bosco. SW: That’s why y’all were boosting the gas and- AD: Y-, we were strip-, they called it “stripping.” You know, you, your wells didn’t have no pressure to flow by itself. So you had to help it out. And it wasn’t by, by pumping like these, we call ‘em [dunker heads?], you know, that you see all over that’s goin’ up and down. And uh, so, but all the production was around eighty-four, eighty-nine hundred feet. So we was uh, wanted to put, we put uh, we start gas lifting. That’s when they build that, the plant was to put some compressor to pump gas, pick up gas at 100 pound, pump it to 1,000 pound, and put it back into the well to lift the, the production and pick up the gas and pump it back up, see. It was just a rotatin’ all around, you know. [Slight pause] SW: Did you g-, would you consider the work you did at Bosco dangerous? AD: Well I guess so, at times, yeah. SW: [You had to be careful?]? AD: Yeah, we’d come, we had quite a few p-, close calls, yeah. SW: Did you ever get hurt yourself? AD: No. No. I was lucky, I never got hurt. With, back trouble, hurt my back and that’s about it. [As for hurt?], no. SW: You’ve seen maybe some other people lose some fingers or something like that? AD: Well yeah, some of ‘em, yeah. Niece: What about your brother-in-law? He wasn’t hurt in the oilfield? AD: No. Niece: What was his job? AD: He, he, he, he run, he run again, but he was working on the railroads, see. So, and he would work the fall of the year for the railroad, that’s [Gordon McHale?], Marie’s brother. He would work in the, in the fall of the year, then in summer he would go to work for Superior, see. And he would run, we’d run pipelines and every god [darn?] thing and HHA#00137 Page 6 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 6 Houston History Archives all of that. Then uh, during the war just, during the war b-, when the war started they, they build up a big uh, recycling plant in uh, in Tomball, Texas, that’s north of Houston. That’s uh… oh, that’s uh, that town and a-, it’s about 55, 60 miles north of Houston. And uh, they build a big recycling plant there. And uh, the worked there quite a while then, then he, then he couldn’t get away from the railroad during the war years. So he had to take [on?] either, either work for Superior or go to work for Southern Pacific. So he went back to work the railroad. And another fella that’s still living today, about uh, the ga-, recycling plant in Texas would be Arthur Berry. He’s still living, he lives- SW: We talked with him. Unknown man: Y’all talk- AD: You talked to him? SW: Yeah. AD: He, he lied. [All chuckle] Niece: [Inaudible] AD: No uh, he… he’s uh, two years younger than I am. Yeah. And he went to work, that was before the war in the ‘30s. When he finished school at LSU. I guess he told you what year it was, but to tell the year, I don’t know. But he worked in the gang with us ‘til I guess he worked about a year or two. Then he went to, in the office in Lake Charles. The office moved from, the office used to be in the Bosco where that picture is there. That’s first, the first Superior office was. Then they, they had that main office in Lake Charles. That was during th-, during the war. And during the war they moved on Buchanan Street. The number, I don’t know. Then uh, then they moved to Ambassador Caffery. But uh, then Arthur Berry, well he worked for Superior over there in, in, invented this uh, LTX, the low temperature- SW: Uh hm. AD: Well he told you about that? SW: Yeah, we have it all on tape. [Chuckles] AD: Yeah, that’s good. SW: I did the interview and my officemate interviewed him. But I’ve seen all of the- AD: Oh you did. SW: I’ve seen it. [Chuckles] AD: That’s [about it?]. SW: So I don’t, I don’t know if he lied to you or not [AD chuckles] but uh- AD: No, I’m j- SW: Uh, but we did- AD: I’m just kidding. Niece: He’s a kidder. HHA#00137 Page 7 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 7 Houston History Archives SW: We, we did interview him not too, well, I guess maybe six months ago. AD: Oh yeah. SW: And so uh, I think he was [Lancone Louis?] at one point too, wasn’t he? AD: I, I believe so, yeah, at one time. SW: I think we have some pictures of him with the little hat. AD: Yeah. SW: Where uh, you’re from Carencro? AD: Yeah. SW: And you were uh, I was lookin’ on the cake here, it says you were born in nine-, 1915? AD: Correct. SW: Is that correct, okay. In, in this area? AD: Yeah. SW: Okay. What did your, what did your parents do for a living? AD: Farming. SW: Like pretty much everybody else, right? [Chuckles] AD: That is right. SW: You didn’t have a desire to become a farmer? Um- AD: No, I wanted to get out of that. SW: Get away from it, okay. I hear a lot of people tell me this. [SW and AD chuckle] Niece: Uh hm. SW: And so maybe the oilfield was a chance to do that? AD: That is correct. SW: That’s good, okay. Um… I heard one of you mention that uh, 10 cents would get you a movie back in this time, is that what you guys did for fun? Is that- AD: Oh, that’s about, back then that was all the fun. Well, they had dance hall too. Unknown man: [Inaudible, overlapping speech] pool. AD: Yeah, little bit of pool. Yeah, they had a pool hall at-HHA#00137 Page 8 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 8 Houston History Archives Unknown man: Broussard’s [Inaudible]. AD: Well they had one in Lafayette too at m-, on Jefferson Street. Unknown man: Then they had dance, but most of the dance- AD: I don’t know [Inaudible]. Across from [Inaudible] now. Unknown man: [Us?] and Broussard, most of the dancing was in their home, you know. AD: Yeah. Unknown man: We had, we lived on the farm as a, a sharecrop like my daddy would hire somebody livin’ there. Most of the time it was empty, so we could have a dance in there. AD: But see they, they had dance hall, they had a dance hall in Carencro right on Evangeline Throughway there, by [Hector Connelly?] Road there. Well the Evangeline Throughway took it. And that was in the early ‘30s. And you go to the dance hall there. I believe it was 10 or 15 cents, that’s all it cost. SW: To get in? AD: Yeah. SW: And uh, was it, it was live music or? AD: Yeah. Yeah they had, ah, there was no [Inaudible], it was a- Unknown man: Good band. AD: They had uh, they, at that time they had the Landry Six, it was all ochestra. Unknown man: Bill Landry. AD: Bill Landry and them, yeah. Unknown man: You could go to the casino right here in [Inaudible]. Used to have a big dance hall in the casin- Niece: [Inaudible, overlapping speech] club. Unknown man: Casino club when you, [Inaudible] Highway meets it. They were right there when I was [Inaudible, overlapping speech]- AD: [There because?] and I don’t much remember, they had some others. They had another couple of bands here and they would play. Unknown man: [Good bands?], yeah. The one with [Inaudible]. [Pause] [Inaudible]. Niece: [Piyet?]? Unknown man: Piyet. He had his own band, that was a good band. Piyet. AD: Yeah. Well I believe that was after the war, ah yeah?HHA#00137 Page 9 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 9 Houston History Archives Unknown man: Uh, yeah. SW: So what kind, what kind of music? AD: It, it was uh, orchestra. It was uh, oh- Niece: Big band. AD: Big band music. Well, [how you, not the same?]. Unknown man: For us it was big band. [All chuckle] AD: It was, it was, yeah. And that’s what we was raised on. We, they had a few… uh, the Cajun band, I believe Joe [Farcon?] made the, the Cajun music. Well they had the Cajun music before that, they had Hos-, [Hosdan?] Cajun Music. Unknown man: Yeah. Niece: It wasn’t commercial. AD: No. Niece: It was within the homes. AD: Yeah, it was in the homes, yeah. SW: I, I was just trying to see, everybody assumes it’s all just Cajun music around here. Unknown man: Oh no. SW: But y’all were listening to big band, some Cajun, but, but it was big band music- AD: Well if you went to a dance hall it was big band music. SW: Big band music. AD: At that time. They had that and they had the Martin Hall was on, you know where Sam is? At the corner of Ambassador, well they called it Ambassador Caffery, when you, at that corner where the [Baque?], there’s a Baque stand, they got the horse riding. Right there was a Martin Hall right there. And they had the, there used to be a Martin School. Then on weekend they would have dances in them. SW: It was, it was a grade school? AD: Well, they called it the Martin School and uh, that was before my time. [Slight pause] And uh- Niece: Was it like a community dance? AD: Yeah. It was a community, the, the Martin Family was a big family and they was up-to-date, they had a lot of property. Then they had a hall in Scott, [Foreman’s Hall?]. That was, you probably might have, it’s next to, well Moot’s Bar, that old bar on the corner by the [cotton gin?], that two-story house. That was, well he had a son Felix Foreman and his, his daddy was Felix Foreman.HHA#00137 Page 10 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 10 Houston History Archives Unknown man: The country music band, the Wild Cherry, that was- AD: That, yeah, that, that was in Breaux Bridge, that was after the war [Inaudible]- Unknown man: [Inaudible, overlapping speech]- AD: Before that? Unknown man: Yeah. AD: Yeah, could’ve been. Unknown man: See- AD: And a-, yeah. And uh, see they got the [La Pueseir?] in Breaux Bridge and a, and they, they was across the road, then they moved on, on the road. When they was across the road, they was there before the war. Unknown man: See Wild Cherry’s a big place. And they have adjoining, together was the bar. Usually you wouldn’t see the ladies in the bar, they were in the dance hall. And then the old people would sit there on that bench around and watch you. AD: Oh yeah they had, we called ‘em- Unknown man: Oh yeah. AD: “Kitchen roost.” You know, they had [booze?]. Unknown man: Yeah. AD: You go up there and they stand there and the ladies would, that, that’s h-, that’s how it was [Inaudible]. Unknown man: [You talk?], yeah, I was in the country and the truck [in the north?] would come there in the morning at two and my brother-in-law, two of my brothers, brother-in-law, and uncle got drafted, so I’d [go?] there at two o’clock in the [north?] truck. Go on the side he’d clean the truck with [Inaudible] we’d come there and like pay like five cents to get in that truck. And this was to the dance. But there’s always one or two old ladies in the back [Chuckles] you better, you better stay in line there. AD: That’s correct. Unknown man: Oh yeah, we’d ride that, the [balloon?], whatever they called it, the, the it’s a bus, not a bus, a truck. AD: Yeah it was, yeah, a two and a half ton truck. Unknown man: Yeah, he put a canvas on the top. AD: Yeah. Unknown man: And you’d ride in the back. AD: Sometime it was open-air. Unknown man: Oh yeah. [All chuckle] HHA#00137 Page 11 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 11 Houston History Archives SW: So that’s what you guys did for fun is y’all went to the dance halls and, and these places. AD: Yeah. SW: Uh, movies and movie houses. Unknown man: Yeah. AD: Yeah, they had movie houses. Unknown man: They had one in [Broussard?]. AD: Yeah, see Lafayette had- Unknown man: Oh yeah, Lafayette had- AD: Two, two or three mo-, uh, movie theaters, then they had one in Carencro, Carencro had a movie theater. Unknown man: At least three on Jefferson Street. AD: Yeah. SW: How much did the movie cost? AD: Oh you go, we, the western, you used to go see the western that was… at the Royal, well, the Royal was the, you know that was Montgomery Ward, the old Montgomery Ward on Jefferson and right next to it there was that uh, Royal Theater. And they had, they had westerns there every Saturday. Unknown man: Western movie. AD: I believe it was around five cents. Unknown man: [Must’ve?]. AD: It was run, I believe it was owned by Paul [Blanchet?], that’s where he started. You know the Blanchet Family that was here? And he started working at that and he, he owned that thing after that. [Slight pause] SW: Now I, like I said, my parents live in Carencro and uh, I’ve watched it grow over the recent years. What did it look like back then when you were living there? Um, how many people lived in the town, how, how large of a town was it? AD: Oh it wasn’t much. About 600 [feet?], that’s about the most. SW: Small, really small. AD: Yeah. Well it was named under two names. Where the church was, b-, they had… I believe it was uh, they called it Saint Pierre at first. Carencro was the, they called it Saint Pierre. Where the church is, you know where the church is and that cemetery. And they had a few stores along there, but they called it Saint Pierre. Then you’d go down North to the other end of there it was, they started calling it Carencro. Then some of it called it Napville, because there was an old man they would call it Nap somebody. And they called it Napville. And uh, they had uh, at that time they had, that, when I was real small they had, they had bef-, I don’t know where [Inaudible] like the streets in Carencro, well everybody that had a, I don’t know if they had to pay tax or what, how that goes, but they had to go HHA#00137 Page 12 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 12 Houston History Archives put a [day?] on the street with a pair of mules, a horse, or whatever to go work, you know, to, to fix the street in the town of Car-, uh, of Carencro right now, see. SW: Ever-, ever-, every, all the citizens were obligated to- AD: Yeah, that was the rural people, that was in the rural area. I, it was, it was like a, it was a tax you was, had to perform, see. It, you had to go put in some time. Niece: Do you know the name of the road where y’all grew up? It was in the country, now it’s in the middle of Carencro. Where the m-, where your mom and dad lived? With the [Inaudible]? AD: Well that last, was, well we stayed on Gloria Switch. Well we stayed there around the uh, the Evan-, the race track, in that area there. That was long time when I was small. Unknown man: [Inaudible]. AD: Where Lowes is. Unknown man: [Yes?]. AD: Where the old Lowe, back of old Lowes in that area there. Unknown man: Is that the Carencro [corporate?], in there? AD: Yeah. SW: It’s still part of Lafayette I think. Unknown man: I don’t know. [Inaudible]. AD: It’s Carencro. SW: It’s Carencro? AD: Yeah, the race track was in Caren-, is in Carencro city limit. Unknown man: Yeah, because there’s [Inaudible, overlapping speech]. AD: Yeah, they’re drawin’ taxes. That’s correct. SW: How many, did you also come to Lafayette during this time? Whenever you were working- AD: Not, not too often. Well, that time, that’s when… well I had uh, uh… the, my daddy was raised, my daddy was raised by his uncle and aunt, which they stayed… must be Jefferson. You know where the, the [Sloan?] Hospital was, across there? That’s where they lived. Unknown man: Jefferson Street. AD: And uh, well my daddy would come often and we’d come in, that was goin’ in buggies, they would, the, the old University, you know what is University now, that was gravel road. That was gravel. They, they paved that in 1940 I believe. Believe the first paving. ‘Cause, yeah, it was gravel road because I bought my first car in 1939, car in, and it was gravel road. HHA#00137 Page 13 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 13 Houston History Archives SW: So… it was a kind of hard trip in other words then. AD: Oh yeah. SW: It took awhile to get from Carencro to Lafayette. AD: Yeah. SW: Now it takes about five minutes. AD: That’s correct. SW: But uh, what, what kind of changes did you see in Lafayette? I know Carencro’s changing because more people, growing, but um, we had uh, all of the oil companies were located, the offices were right here downtown, right? AD: Yeah. Oh, well, before that, most, that was just a field. In the early ‘20s that was just a field from what I remember. Where the Oil Center is? Unknown man: Oh yeah. AD: That was just a field. Unknown man: Oh yeah. It was- Niece: Like what you would tell, how it- AD: And uh, there was hardly no houses. There was no houses in front of Southwestern. They called it [Inaudible] where Jefferson is, that was uh, Oak Avenue, huh? They called it- Unknown man: [Inaudible]- AD: Where Lafayette Motor was, that was, that was Oak Avenue. Unknown man: Oak Avenue, yeah. AD: Now it’s uh, University. Unknown man: Still uh, no it’s Jefferson. AD: Jefferson, Jefferson, yeah. Unknown man: Oak, yeah, and University at uh, at USL. AD: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, University’s USL. It was Jefferson Street. The main street in town would go up, it’s still. Unknown man: Yeah, that used to be Oak Avenue- AD: But it would come up to General Mouton statue, then it would convert to Oak Avenue there, in that time. And that’s where see the saloon was staying and uh, and all of that. I, I don’t know too much about Lafayette. SW: Okay, so you stayed, you stayed mostly in Carencro, you didn’t see a lot of the changes that happened here in Lafayette?HHA#00137 Page 14 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 14 Houston History Archives AD: No. SW: Okay. Well what did uh… how, how, this is sort of an opinion question. The oilfield gave people jobs and things like that, how did you see the oilfield coming into town and changing Carencro? AD: Well, some of the people, some of the people rented houses in Carencro, I mean, they’d board, some of ‘em board there. And it looked like, it made the, the salary go up a little bit. I mean, the, the working conditions got, they changed because you was, you wouldn’t be working for 50 cents a day. And uh, that kind of changed. Niece: Were you fortunate to get the job? Or were there many people in Carencro that got jobs at the oilfield? SW: Well, there was a few, a few from Carencro that was workin’, after the war there was quite a few of ‘em, quite a few of ‘em that was working. Niece: Wouldn’t you say along with the railroad the oil companies were like a desirable job to have? AD: Oh yeah. Niece: To get away from farming, yeah. AD: That is correct. Niece: Uh hm. AD: I mean you, I mean the salary part because farmin’ wasn’t uh, there was no money hardly in farmin’. Unknown man: Exist. AD: Huh? Unknown man: You could exist. AD: You was just existing that’s, that is right. [Pause] SW: Were there uh, more people moving in from out of town or, or out of the area to live nearby so they could go to work for the oilfield? AD: Well, see when the drilling department, they hired a lot of people. The most, they had to have experience worker. And people around here wasn’t experienced in roughnecking, drilling, and then all of that. So that came from Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. Because right there at Bosco they called that area [Mariboulet?]. [Pause] And uh, the, see the, you know what I’m talkin’ about? Mariboulet, that’s just a darn community up there where, we called it Mar-, they were bullies. E-, when they would go to dance, they had a dance hall just, just on the edge of Bosco Field, and they called it the place where [Dogay’s?] Hall is. And they had a place [Reshard’s] Casi-, uh, Reshard had a dance hall. But at Dogay’s place there them Mariboulets would go up there and they would, they had all daggers, they’d hang, stick their dagger on the wall and hang their hats. And when all them rednecks from Texas and Oklahoma came down here they had 10 rigs goin’, so that takes quite a few men to, I mean, to be running all night. And they liked to party. So they, they made some bars right there in the field itself. They had I don’t know how many of ‘em. And I, they had some slow women in there so to attract uh, the roughnecks and all the, the personnel. And them rough-, them Mariboulets come in there and so they wanted to take over. They hated them peoples that was there to take, they were taking their territory. So they would get in fights. So they would be fightin’ every night and uh, so until, and then r-, uh, them rednecks, we called ‘em rednecks f-, people from uh, people from Texas, and Oklahoma, and Arkansas. They were used to because they had production in Longview, Texas, they called it that East Texas Field. Some of in HHA#00137 Page 15 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 15 Houston History Archives that, in uh, Arkansas, was [Spikeover?] Field. And they had the field out of Beaumont in that area there was, they were used to in the drilling department, see. And some from California come down, quite a few from the company came down here. But they would have a good time. Them roughnecks would be fightin’ every night. Until them rou-, them bou-, Mariboulet got tired of that damn fightin’, they couldn’t fight every night. That got old. They would get, they would beat on somebody, but they would get beat up too. And you go out there today you ain’t gonna find no nicer people in that area that’s from the Bosco Field to the Church Point area. Niece: So you’re saying the men that came from, from Texas and all ended up staying here? Is that what you’re saying? A lot of them? AD: Oh yeah. Lot of ‘em. Niece: A lot of ‘em stay here? AD: Stayed here. Yeah. Niece: Increased the size of Lafayette and the surrounding areas. AD: Uh hm, that’s correct. Niece: And remember when you were talking about when you worked in the field and how small you were? You said that some of those guys were like 250 pounds. Are those the ones from far away? AD: No, it was all local people. Niece: Oh, okay. AD: You know, being 150 pound workin’ with a man 200, 200-some pounds, six foot high, was a man. And I was just a [growin’ greenhorn?]. [Pause] SW: So uh, so so-, sounds like it was kind of rough. [Chuckles] AD: It wasn’t easy. You had to work. SW: And uh, and uh, the night life was kind of rough too, huh? [Chuckles] AD: Well yeah, but I did-, you, I didn’t participate in that, though. [All chuckle] You don’t think I’m gonna say that? [All laugh] SW: These, these people comin’ from east Texas and Oklahoma and everything, when they first got here in town, these were the people that you said were comin’, they were experienced drillers? AD: Yeah, they were experienced worker. SW: What was uh, how, how did the people around here receive those people? Uh, did they in-, did they want to have them here or- AD: Yeah, as far as the other people here in Lafayette and all that accepted them. It was just the people in that area, they was invadin’ their territory. You know, because out there they, they was a different breed of people out of Bosco there, back of west, the west Bosco on into Church Point. They were mean people’s out there. Unknown man: [Inaudible].HHA#00137 Page 16 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 16 Houston History Archives AD: Yeah, they, they fight with knives, sticks, and everything. They meant business. And uh, called ‘em [meshers?] and everybody else, and some of ‘em, some of ‘em work-, started workin’ there and they worked ‘til they retired. And I knew some of them meshes boys, men, they were nice people. Like I him, I said, “Man, you was like me and worse than I was.” I said, “You wasn’t civilized when you started working here.” But it, I said, “It had to take people from Texas and Oklahoma to civilize your people.” [Several people chuckle] And I said, and I said, “Don’t get me wrong,” I said, “You can’t find no nicer people than you go in that area.” They’re very friendly. SW: Today you’re talking about- [END OF TRACK 1 to TRACK 2] [Note: Some overlap between tracks; transcript picks up with new material] AD: Today, today. SW: And these, these are the people that uh, that lived there before and the new workers you’re talkin’ about. AD: Yeah. SW: But, so what you’re telling me is the oil companies and the, the type of work uh, civilized [Chuckles] the Mariboulet people. AD: Yeah, that’s correct. SW: That’s an interesting take. Niece: What about the language? Was the language a barrier? Not, maybe not for you, but some of the other workers? AD: Well I guess so. Some of ‘em couldn’t har-, uh, had a broken English, you know, that they could talk too good of English. But uh, they didn’t stay all that long. SW: What kind of a reputation did the, did the oil people eventually have? The one’s that were coming from out of town? AD: Oh they was, it, it was good. They had good reputation. SW: It was the Mariboulet that had, that were the troublemakers? AD: That’s correct. SW: Everybody knew that? AD: That’s right, that’s right. Everybody knew that and they’d make those dif-, they’d mix with ‘em. SW: Kind of stay away from ‘em if you could, right? AD: That’s right. [Pause] SW: I think you had mentioned to me you stayed with Superior uh, except for the time you were in the war. AD: That’s right. HHA#00137 Page 17 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 17 Houston History Archives SW: You stayed with Superior the whole time. AD: That’s correct. SW: Did you uh, you started out as a roustabout. AD: Yeah. SW: But you worked up to other positions. AD: Yeah. I stayed, I pumpin’, you know, they called it pumping, gauging, or uh, plant workers. SW: Plant worker. Was it, was it easy to move up and get a higher position? AD: Yeah. SW: And get more money. AD: Yeah, you get more money. You get more overtime, too. Unknown man: You were in maint-, maintenance now, you were in maintenance. AD: Yeah. Lot of maintenance, yeah. Unknown man: That’s what- AD: But we had a maintenance section that was workin’ there. Niece: What was your, just the job title that, when you retired? AD: Compressor operator. [Pause] SW: [Whispering] Compressor operator. That’s uh, higher than a roustabout, right? AD: Yeah, that was. SW: A little bit. [Several people chuckle] AD: Yeah. Well you had authority. You was runnin’, [oh?] then I was workin’ by myself and you run the plant. And you just had to answer to the supervisor. And sometime you had to make the supervisor back down, when you was right. Niece: Your experience. SW: You [Inaudible, overlapping speech]- AD: And vica versa. SW: You knew what you were doing out there, right. AD: That’s right. HHA#00137 Page 18 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 18 Houston History Archives SW: I see. [Slight pause] What about uh, they talk a lot days, these days about the oilfield goin’ up and down. What kind of job security did you feel that you had back then? AD: That, that, at first, that was bad. They, they hired you when they needed you and after they didn’t need you, you was laid off, see. See, that, up and down like that. [They’ll?], I guess… in the ‘50s when uh, the Korean War started well that picked up fuel demands, you know, workin’ men wasn’t, it was gettin’ [levels?] [Inaudible], but they try to find work for you. After that they try to find you, they try to kept, keep all the. And I believe a big credit to that to me as, that’s my thinking, was o-, old uh, Slim Law they called, he was runnin’ the company here at that time. He didn’t believe in switchin’ [over?] and all of that, hirin’ and firin’ and all of that. He was a shrewd operator, a shrewd man, but he was straight. [Slight pause] And I worked for him under Arthur Berry, he was uh, head of Superior Oil Company in uh, in this area. I worked with him as a roustabout and I worked for him ‘cause under him uh, through production, ‘cause he was over everything here in, here in Louisiana. SW: It sounds like it was still, they had some companies that when they had work they would hire people and then they, they would get rid of ‘em. AD: Yeah. SW: This didn’t, did that factor ever turn any people away from the oilfield or were they- AD: Well, yeah, they, sure it did. It did turn a lot of people, good, good mens, too, away from there. They didn’t want to do that, which you couldn’t much believe, blame ‘em. You know, if you had a little bit more seniority and you done your work, they tried to keep you. But you know when they had a lot or work, they needed some more men, they would hire men. And uh, after the darn work was over, well they laid ‘em off, or transfer ‘em to somewhere else, to another field. You take men that was raised here and they sent ‘em off to… uh, up there to Dulac, up there in the s-, by, below Houma, in that area. And they, or to Bayou Blue, that’s below Baton Rouge there by Mor-, uh, [Grosse Tete?]. They had a field out, the [Inaudible]. I worked in that field there, too, that was before the war, all that stuff there, before the war. SW: You said it uh, uh, they l-, they, they couldn’t attract a lot of good people because of that kind of hiring practice, so the guys at the bottom, the roustabouts and the roughnecks, you didn’t always have a, such a great worker. Is, is, would you say that’s true? AD: Yeah. Well, as far, the, the drilling department, they kept, after 1937, they kept… uh, they kept the man pretty good, because they kept the rigs goin’. So to keep, when the rig was goin’ there, they keep the, they try to keep some uh, experienced man. See they started spreadin’ out, see. They was just spread out to, like Evangeline, Bayou [Moulet?], they went to Cameron, Hackberry, Dra-, Grand Lake, in that area, then… they went to Houma, in that area, that was a big field they had out there, Bayou Blue they had quite a few wells in there. And they, all that take, took, took more men. They didn’t get extra rig, they started uh, contracting rigs, they would use ‘em. So the contractor will use their own worker, they wasn’t Superior workers [they had?]. SW: And did you ever see if anyone uh, was working maybe at Bosco and then uh, there was no more work, but the company had a job in Dulac and he would move? AD: That’s right. SW: You saw, did you see a lot of that? AD: Not, not all that much, but quite a bit of it. Yeah. SW: Was it, must’ve been hard on those guys. HHA#00137 Page 19 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 19 Houston History Archives AD: Well they had, yeah, you had to take, you had to move t-, and, and you didn’t have a week, they would tell you this morning, “Well, you transferred to Dulac. [Fold up?].” Then you had to get your stuff up there and, and go up there. Or Bayou Blue. SW: And if you had a family you- AD: Well that is correct. SW: Create some problems. AD: That’s why I got out of there. I wanted to go into production because production was, you didn’t make as much money as in the drilling department and all of that, but you had a steadier job. And you wasn’t moving around as much like you was before the war. Because you drill a well there and you drill a well in one place, you drill a well in other place, that kept moving. And that was a lot of expenses. SW: In production you stay in one spot- AD: Then you, that’s correct. SW: Okay, I see. That, that makes more sense. [Chuckles] Would you uh, you’re saying production paid a little bit less, but was more stable. AD: That is correct. SW: Was the, the production or the drilling aspect more dangerous? I know- AD: The, that drilling department was more dangerous. SW: Because of pipe flying around? AD: Well yeah, that. Well you had more moving stuff going on and all of that. And production wasn’t, you had to, you had to watch yourself, I mean, you- SW: And you’re dealing with high pressure in production- AD: Yeah, some, well, we never did work with too much high pressure because there wasn’t that much high pressure there at Bosco. But now you, you took at the end, you know, like in the ‘70s they had these high pressure gas wells that was goin’ on. You work with wells that have six, seven, eight, 10 thousand pound pressure. So you have to be careful. You, you don’t go to them do something around something I just uh, go out there and do it, you gotta be darn sure you know what you’re doin’. SW: Did you uh, did you guys ever, were you ever in a union or did they ever- AD: No. SW: Have any union that operated? AD: Superior, Superior didn’t believe in union. [Pause] SW: Superior as the company didn’t believe in unions. AD: That, they was an independent company, yeah. HHA#00137 Page 20 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 20 Houston History Archives SW: Independent. AD: Yeah. SW: What about other, other oil companies or other- AD: Yeah, they had, they were in union. [They took?] Sun Oil, Sun Oil was just uh, north of the Bosco Field. They were in union. [Coughs] Most of ‘em were. SW: Were, were the unions popular or well-liked by people or? AD: I don’t know. They, we uh, Superior tried to keep up like what union wages were. If the union went up, they would give more to their employee, well Superior always try to kept up close to it. Niece: They try to satisfy the employees. AD: Correct. Niece: So they wouldn’t have trouble. AD: That’s correct. They, they wouldn’t go into the union. Because the owner of the company at that time, it was still, it was still the family company ‘til they merged with Mobil in 1980, around that area. SW: I believe so. AD: Yeah. SW: It was owned by the, the working [right?] the company was owned by the Keck Family. Old man Keck had died. And I, and I, [it’s?] somethin’ that when we go back to the first well that they drilled in Bosco, which I should have told you that to start off with. And I was told by the geologist that worked on that well, there was two geologists. One geologist was, belonged to Superior Oil Company, that drilled that well there, and one geologist from uh, Pure Oil Company was Tom Arceneaux’s brother. He died today, uh, what’s his name? [Pause] He, he died, he was 100 years old. He was the geologist. And they, they went and d-, they drilled that well there on the [Peorg Hernandez?], they drilled that well to a certain depth. And they, they was out of money. And the geologist from Superior wanted to go 150 feet. That was told by Mister Arceneaux, the geologist from Pure Oil Company. And old man Arceneaux agreed with that geologist. And he went th-, he went, they, they had c-, a conference and uh, and that man, that geologist wanted to go 150 feet. And they didn’t have the money. So they said, “Well,” he said, “We’ll go your 150 feet. But,” he said, “if we don’t hit oil,” he said, “you look, see yourself a job.” So they went, they hit the oil at 100 feet. They borrowed money from National Supply, was, that was, that was a big supply outfit. But most of the money was borrowed through them, through National Supply. And they, that’s when they, they hit that well there and they, see they produced that well, they, they left, they just took, they didn’t have the money to buy tubing to flow the well. So they put the darn packer, they had the casing in and the packer and they put the uh, the p-, they used the drill pipe as a production spring. They didn’t take it out of the well. They took it out about two, three years after that. They flowed, you know, through that, just like that. Niece: Who’s the old man who said- AD: Huh? Niece: Who is the old man who said, “If you don’t hit it, you’re out of a job”?HHA#00137 Page 21 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 21 Houston History Archives AD: Well that’s was Superior, the Superior, Superior head man who was there, I don’t know who it was. But old man, that’s [through/two?] old man, that’s Tom Arceneaux’s brother told me that more than one time. He was a geologist at that time. I don’t know [Inaudible]. Uh, his name, I d- Niece: You’ll think of it. Unknown man: That the one used to come to church here? AD: Yeah, Tom’s brother. Tom, Tom. Unknown man: [Inaudible, overlapping speech] AD: Tom was agriculture uh, dean of agriculture at Southwestern. Niece: Uh hm. [Slight pause] How long after you re-, when did you retire? What year? AD: Seventy-six. Niece: And when did they close that field? AD: It’s still goin’ today. Niece: It’s still goin’ [correct?]? Unknown man: You retired in ’76? AD: Yeah. Unknown man: [Inaudible]? AD: I don’t know. No, December the first, 1976. Unknown man: Oh, I retired 1980. [After you retired?]. AD: No, no. I worked w-, I’ve worked quite a bit [Unclear who is speaking here] after that. Unknown man: After, right, after- AD: I mean, as contract labor. SW: I see. But you weren’t uh- AD: No, it wasn’t- SW: Full-time? AD: No. Uh, they, I work over there when they needed me. SW: What kind of schedule when you were working full-time, what kind of schedule did you have? Uh, either out in the fields or in production.HHA#00137 Page 22 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 22 Houston History Archives AD: You work p-, five days on, five or two days off. Sometimes we was, you was off during the week, sometime… Saturday and Sunday, not too often. SW: It wasn’t five days Monday through Friday- AD: They, I wasn’t uh, see, they had the pumpers, which they had three strings of pumper, they would work 24 hours a day. The gaugers, they’d work eight hours and three uh, and that way they had three eight hour shifts. And they’d rotate around, see. And sometime I, they’d put me in there go b-, I would work a day or two then, but I stayed at the plant when [the oil went?]. Sometime when my, they took a day off for me and they put me in there because I guess they wanted to punish me because they think I had it a little too easy. [Chuckles] SW: How many hours a day did you work? AD: Eight hours. SW: Eight hours and. AD: Then sometimes it was uh… when we broke down, sometime it was 24 hours. When the bad weather was 16 hours a day [Inaudible]- SW: You just had to get it done, right? AD: That’s right. SW: That’s the way they did it. AD: Keep it rollin’. SW: Did you ever, any of the time you worked for Superior, did you uh, did you ever work with any women? AD: No. They didn’t hire, they hired ladies after I retired, they started hiring. [Pause] SW: Um, what about when you, when you were out there uh, what kind of uh, if you were workin’ over there eight hours a day or how many hours a day, sometimes they must, they had to feed you, right? AD: Well if you wanted somethin’ to eat you had to go to the store and get it. SW: Get it on your own, so the company didn’t buy anything. AD: No, you go, they didn’t, uh uh. Niece: You brought your lunch everyday didn’t you? AD: That’s correct. That’s right. Unknown man: Uh hm, uh hm. Niece: [Dad used to fix his lunch everyday?]. AD: That’s right. But at the la-, the latter years they paid the coffee. [All chuckle] SW: What about all these, these guys from Texas that were moving here and uh-HHA#00137 Page 23 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 23 Houston History Archives AD: Well they’d all filtered out and uh- SW: When, when they weren’t fighting with them uh, the Mariboulet or uh, going to the dance halls, they must’ve seen some of the food we have around here and thought it was different than what they had back home. Uh, did they ever talk to you about that? AD: Well, no, not too much, no. Niece: Did many of ‘em s- AD: Well we never did mix together with that drilling department too. They would… the Mariboulet was kind of wild, but them rednecks was kind of too, you know. They were kind of rough. Niece: You said most of ‘em didn’t marry girls from here. Would they go back where they were from or? AD: Well lot of ‘em married s-, ladies from here. Niece: Oh. And then they, they, they’d come to the- AD: They, they uh… they got civilized in other words. Just like the Mariboulet did. [Several people chuckle] We didn’t, yeah, I used to kid uh, you remember Tom White. Tom White was married to… she was a Landrieu. And uh… [Consty?], Martin Consty funeral home, the old man was married to one of the Landrieus. They were sisters. And Tom White, from Oklahoma, and I’d always kid him, you know. He was a… oh, he was uh… he was in the drilling department. And he would do a lot of uh, workovers on, in production. And he was in the drilling department. And I said uh, sometime he would, he was uh, uh, he was a nice one, you could talk to him. And I, I said, “Well,” I said, he said, uh, I said, “You from Oklahoma, you must not’ve liked it, because I was in the service and I was stationed up there in Oklahoma for a year and somethin’.” And I said, “They nice people over there.” He said, “Yeah, yeah.” I said, “How come you married a lady from uh, a Cajun from here?” “Because she was a nice woman,” he said, “that’s why I married her.” Niece: Did, did any of ‘em ever learn the language? They never did learn to speak? AD: No, not, oh no. Niece: None of ‘em? AD: Uh uh, no. Not too much. They, they, now, there were French uh- Unknown man: [Inaudible] AD: They, they thought they were better [you could see?]. [Chuckles] Not too many of ‘em. SW: Do you uh, do you have any regrets about uh, takin’ that job with Superior- AD: No. No, they ma-, I made my livin’, I made a, I, I’m thankful I made a good living. SW: Sounds like it. [Chuckles] Sounds like you had some interesting times, too. AD: Well, I guess so. Niece: There were 13 children in your family, were you the only one who went to the oil business? Did anybody else in your-HHA#00137 Page 24 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 24 Houston History Archives AD: Well, uh, Walter worked a little bit, not much. Not much. That’s all. Well, Louis did too, a little bit. Niece: Short-term, all of ‘em just for a few, a little while? AD: Yeah, yeah. [Slight pause] SW: Um, I’m kinda, got all my questions more or less answered. Do you wanna add anything or, or uh, you have a funny story that’s popping up in your head that uh- AD: No. Well, [I don’t know?]. Niece: Your mama, your mama, you said your daddy lived across from Saint Anne’s is where he was raised right? But your mama was- AD: Oh no, he wasn’t raised there. He, the lady and the man that raised him lived there. Niece: Oh, okay. AD: It was his aunt, that was his aunt. His- Niece: Alright. But your mama- AD: His mother died, he was six or seven years old at that time. And he had uh… three sisters and I believe their daddy married uh, some lady out of Breaux Bridge, and she was mean. And they, they s-, they didn’t want to stay, so they took the road. [All chuckle] They run away from home. Niece: But y-, but your mama was a Mouton, huh? AD: Yeah. Niece: But she lived in Carencro? AD: She was raised in Carencro. You know where your daddy stays there? It’s Magnolia [Height?]. You would go straight east ‘til you can’t go no more. Well it’s in that area. You can’t go no more. They call it the [Moulas?]. And that was the, right across the road that was the, the [Pregone?] Family, Doctor Pregone and all of them that was, that’s where they were raised. Beverly Dupree, you know, Beverly [To someone in room] you know Beverly. So. Then I made four years, fiv-, close to five years in the service. I was drafted. At that time they put a rope in your neck and you go, and you go where you [Inaudible]. Unknown man: They don’t ask you if you want- AD: It, it’s, and you, they didn’t ask you what you wanted to do, no nothin’. You go and you do like that. SW: Yeah. If you were drafted that was it, huh? AD: That, that’s correct. Unknown man: Uh hm. AD: Then I went, and I was lucky. I, I was drafted and I was sent to Florida in the, thirty-si-, thirty-first division. And I was put into artillery. So in nineteen-, well in 1941 was, that was the early part of ’41 then. In 1942 uh, uh, in January we moved to Texas uh, close to Brownwood, Texas, that’s by… not too far from Abilene. And they, they stripped the HHA#00137 Page 25 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 25 Houston History Archives division. They took the, the, the division at that time was square divisions. They had four of everything, that’s what we call square division. And they made a triangle division, three of everything. They had, you had uh, the three regiments, the three battalions, and all that before it was four. And we was one of the battalion that got kicked out. So we got [put?] and we went into a little a further west. We stayed there that summer in, just out of Abilene, Camp Barkley, Texas. And, and we stayed in training that summer there, then we, they shipped us to Oklahoma, by Tulsa. And that was a nice place that we were living. It was out there in the hills of Texas, [Inaudible] [placement?]. But [everything?] it wasn’t, it was only 50 miles to Tulsa, so we could go to the dance. Man, they had a big dance hall and they, they had that big aircraft plant there, the Douglas plant. Douglas Aircraft plant was there in Tulsa. And they had a lot of ladies. Man, you go to the dance hall, whatever, there was ladies like that. There were soldiers like that too. And no place to stand. You had, you slept in the lobbies of them ho-, the hotel, they wouldn’t tell you nothin’. And we stayed there and we went overseas in ’43. We went to Africa. We stayed there awhile and uh, we got out equipment and we went in uh, Italy. Went, went in, into combat uh, in 1943, Chris-, I mean, Thanksgiving Day. In 1943 ‘til the war ended. Niece: [Inaudible]. AD: No, and there we went from Italy, went up to Florence, right on the outskirt of Florence they pulled us back and sent us to southern France. Niece: Uncle, is it because you were from this area and you spoke French. AD: Yeah. Niece: You were bilingual. Wasn’t that an asset, wasn’t that good f-, didn’t that help you over there? AD: In France? Yeah. Niece: Didn’t you serve as an interpretor? AD: Yeah, s-, some, I worked at the [rest center?] for a few weeks. SW: When, when uh, I’m curious, when did you get married? [Slight pause] Was it before the war or after? AD: Oh after. I was too ornery before the war. [Several people chuckle] I guess. Oh, I- SW: Your wife is, is from this area? AD: Yeah. Niece: My mother’s sister. AD: Yeah uh- Unknown man: He married- AD: It’s his mother’s sister. Niece: My mother’s sister. Unknown man: My sister. AD: She’s my niece by marriage.HHA#00137 Page 26 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 26 Houston History Archives Niece: Yeah, his favorite niece. His favorite. Unknown man: Favorite. [Chuckles] AD: So, but you know you don’t choose your [Unknown man and woman laugh] your relatives. Niece: Remember your [Inaudible]. Uh, you know when your, when the, the people from k-, you know, jolly Cajuns and people did come into the area my ge-, people didn’t leave the area. Remember when the, the guys came in? That was a novelty huh? Uncle A.G., they were different, right? AD: Yeah. Niece: Then how did, it would force y’all to speak English more probably. AD: Well that’s right, yeah. We had to. Unknown man: [Inaudible, overlapping speech] to communicate. AD: That’s right. Yeah, ‘cause like me I was raised in French. Niece: No English [taught/talked?]. AD: Uh hm. [I was taught in French?]. Then when you started working, well, they was English, you had to talk a little English. [Pause] Unknown man: I don’t know about you, but when we start school we didn’t speak English. AD: That’s right. [That was true?]. Unknown man: You better not speak French at school. Niece: They would punish you. Um, remember when you talked about the [why in the perihoo?] um, at first they were just hiring, firing, they didn’t care, but after awhile they started paying attention. Was that because they had stayed here for quite a long time or because they had married people from the area or is it, was that just their style, they were just good people? AD: Well it was uh, I guess it was money-wise, you know. It was, they, they was expanding, they needed more men, so they kept, they, they had got rid of some of that, those that wasn’t all that good and they kept their good men, see. Niece: So with time they started paying attention to how they were operating, right? AD: Yeah. That’s right. Niece: The longer they were there. AD: That’s correct. You talk, you, you make speeches to people? SW: Me? No. AD: ‘Cause uh, I belong to the Oil Pioneer Group. SW: Okay. HHA#00137 Page 27 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 27 Houston History Archives AD: And uh, we meet once a month. Arthur Berry didn’t tell you that? SW: Uh, well I didn’t interview him, my office mate did. AD: And uh- SW: I guess he didn’t. [Chuckles] AD: On the fourth Tuesday of the month, that, that will be startin’ next January we won’t have none this month. At the Petroleum Club, that’s where we at. And we, they, they, they need a speaker most of the time. Niece: So what will- AD: And they all, all people from different companies. Some of ‘em just about as old as I am and they worked from different companies. You know like uh, see that, when they started this oil company well it brought service, lot of service companies and different oil companies come in. And uh, like the service company, Baker, Baker, Halliburton, Lane-Wells, Schlumberger, and all of that. And they all belong, working for, from different companies that belong in that. And there about 50, 60 people that meets there. SW: Do, you mi-, you think I could come along next month and uh, and watch, listen? AD: Yeah. Yeah, b- Niece: What do you do at the meetings? What do you d- AD: Huh? Niece: What do y’all do at the meetings? AD: Well we got a speaker, we eat, and, and [lie?]. Niece: And [lie?], yeah, sure, lot of good stories. SW: I’d like to come along if that would be possible, if I could be a guest maybe. AD: Yeah. SW: Or, or is it, is it exclusive? AD: Well we… let me talk to the, to the president that’s runnin’ the thing. And you may have to do a little talk. Niece: They probably would want you to get up there and explain what the university is doing- AD: What you’re doin’, what you’re doin’ and all of that. SW: We could do that, I couldn’t give a speech on my experience in the oilfield, because- AD: No no no no no. No, but you, you can interview them men. You know, they got men from Halliburton, they got men from all different part of the oil industry that’s there. And e-, you can get their kind of halfway story. You know, with that. HHA#00137 Page 28 of 28 Interviewee: Domingue, A. G. Interview Date: December 22, 2002 University of Houston 28 Houston History Archives SW: Okay. Well that, that would be great. I would, I would appreciate that if uh, you can check with him and get back with me. You know, for- AD: Yeah. ‘Cause, I, I’m the one that’s [doin’ the calling?]. They, they, they roped me in to that, so I’ll call. But then uh, so we, but we didn’t have no meeting last month and this month because Thanksgiving and Christmas. It, it hits right at that time. SW: Yeah. AD: But uh, and a-, at the Petroleum Club you go over there, when you go in there, it’s gonna be on the board where it uh, uh, Oil Pioneers, Lafayette Oil Pioneers, that’s what it is. And there’s a fella in your area, I can’t think of his name. [Slight pause] God damn. I talk to him every time I’m over there. Ah, a nice fella. Niece: What’s the name of that guy that heads your, professor of history? Bob Carrington? SW: Carrington or Carriker? Niece: That’s his name, Carriker? AD: My direct professor’s Doctor Carriker, yes. Niece: [Inaudible] might be from [geology?]. SW: [Continue talking about professors at ULL for about 20 more seconds] [END OF RECORDING]