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Bradshaw, Jim
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UH - Houston History Project. Bradshaw, Jim. May 7, 2003. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory/item/1292.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

UH - Houston History Project. (May 7, 2003). Bradshaw, Jim. Oral Histories from the Houston History Project. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory/item/1292

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

UH - Houston History Project, Bradshaw, Jim, May 7, 2003, Oral Histories from the Houston History Project, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory/item/1292.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Bradshaw, Jim
Creator (LCNAF)
  • UH - Houston History Project
Interviewer (LCNAF)
  • Wiltz, Steven
Date May 7, 2003
Description Jim Bradshaw is originally from Lake Charles, LA and moved to Lafayette in 1964. His father worked for Union Oil and Gas. He graduated from the University of Southwestern Louisiana with a Bachelor's in English and Journalism. Since then, he has worked in media and is currently employed by the Lafayette Daily Advertiser. In the interview, he talks about the changes that the oil industry brought to Lafayette, including economic, cultural, religious, and commercial changes.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Energy development
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Bradshaw, Jim
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Lafayette, Louisiana
Genre (AAT)
  • interviews
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 2006-005, Box 1, HHA 00050
Original Collection Oral Histories - Houston History Project
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=231
Digital Collection Oral Histories from the Houston History Project
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the "About" page of this website.
File name hhaoh_201207_015.pdf
Transcript HHA # 00050 Page 1 of 2 Interviewee: Jim Bradshaw Interview Date: May 7, 2003 University of Houston Houston History Archives HHA#___00050____ Interviewee: Jim Bradshaw Interviewer: Steven Wiltz Interview Date: May 7, 2003 Interview Site: Lafayette, LA Interview Module & No.: MMS: SW050 Transcriber: Lauren Penney [Transcriber’s note: The majority of “uhs” and “ums”, repeated words, and the interviewer’s backchanneling have not been transcribed for the purposes of readability. The interview is recorded in VCD format on 2 disks; were only able to extract audio from one of the disks and it contained only three minutes worth of audio. It appears that most of the interview was either not recorded or was not extractable.] Ethnographic preface: Jim Bradshaw is originally from Lake Charles, LA and moved to Lafayette in 1964. His father worked for Union Oil and Gas. He graduated from the University of Southwestern Louisiana with a Bachelor's in English and Journalism. Since then, he has worked in media and is currently employed by the Lafayette Daily Advertiser. In the interview, he talks about the changes that the oil industry brought to Lafayette, including economic, cultural, religious, and commercial changes. TRANSCRIPTION Interviewer initials: [SW] Interviewee initials: [JB] JB: -and again, you know, you [had?] making the change. Because the oil industry came here to Lafayette reached this level and brought, established these things. So when we report that the Acadiana Mall set another sales records, it’s partly because of Lafayette having reached this level, but it’s also partly because there’s no place else to shop in Opelousas or Saint Martinville or Breaux Bridge or Abbeville and they have to come here to shop. And they have to come here to go to the doctor, which means that they’ll probably pick up their prescription here. And they have to come here for, you know, services that are no longer available because the kids left the family farm, [it’s/they’re?] sustainin’ the farm dealerships in Abbeville, then sustaining the economy and a uh, agricultural parish. So there’s this chain of things connected to that huge monster [Inaudible] 1997 [Inaudible] maybe [more?] than that. I did, I wrote a piece for Acadiana Profile. The impact of the oil industry on south Louisiana. And, you know, you just start talkin’ about all of the places that it reached. You talk about my family. My mamma for years and years got little royalty that was the difference between her livin’ marginally and her livin’ comfortably. Because we had some, a well on the old family [Inaudible]. My dad worked in the oil industry and he was a petroleum engineer. Um… Mom and pop grocery stores at Intercoastal City all of a sudden became stepping off places. The guys that used to build shrimp boats all of a sudden began building big service boats for the offshore industry. Whole industries like PHI were created, which brought new jobs, which brought new synergies. Uh… so all this, it touched everything, you know. Oil money created new banks, oil money did, you know, so it, there was no place that it did not reach, and so also when it began to pull back there was no place it did not touch [Chuckling] you know. And uh, now we’re, you know, we’re like I say, you gotta [think I?], we may be, we finally moved and it may be in the right proportion, ha, to what it actually should’ve been all along. You know, uh, and ‘cause we’ve always had these advantages of geography and all these kinds of things. But it was the oil synergy, the oil sp-, that made it all pull together and coalesce. Uh-HHA # 00050 Page 2 of 2 Interviewee: Jim Bradshaw Interview Date: May 7, 2003 University of Houston Houston History Archives SW: Gettin’ ready to run out of tape. We have a couple of options here. I can put another one in and we can continue. Or we can do it on another day. JB: Oh no- SW: ‘Cause I have questions to ask. JB: Well go ahead. Let’s do it. SW: You wanna take a break and get some coffee too or somethin’? JB: Alright, just- [END OF CD 1; CD2 in VCD form and unable to extract audio only for transcription]
Project
  • University of Louisiana at Lafayette