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Copies of published letters from Americans who are held prisoners of war in Zentsuji War Prison Camp, Island of Shikoku, Japan
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Copies of published letters from Americans who are held prisoners of war in Zentsuji War Prison Camp, Island of Shikoku, Japan - Page 1. approximately 1944. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/fulton/item/130/show/127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(approximately 1944). Copies of published letters from Americans who are held prisoners of war in Zentsuji War Prison Camp, Island of Shikoku, Japan - Page 1. Lt. Robert B. Fulton USS Houston Letters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/fulton/item/130/show/127

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Copies of published letters from Americans who are held prisoners of war in Zentsuji War Prison Camp, Island of Shikoku, Japan - Page 1, approximately 1944, Lt. Robert B. Fulton USS Houston Letters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/fulton/item/130/show/127.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Copies of published letters from Americans who are held prisoners of war in Zentsuji War Prison Camp, Island of Shikoku, Japan
Date approximately 1944
Description Copies of published letters from Americans who were held as prisoners of war in Zentsuji War Prison Camp on the Island of Shikoku, Japan.
Donor Robert B. Fulton
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Japanese
  • Prisoners of War--United States
  • Prisoners of War--Japan
Genre (AAT)
  • documents
Language English
Physical Description 3 page document
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 7, Folder 4, Item 25
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection Lt. Robert B. Fulton USS Houston Letters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/fulton
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the UH Digital Library About page.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name cruis_201303_025_001.jpg
Transcript Copies of published letters from Americans who are held prisoners of war in &entsuji ^ar Prison Camp, Island of Shikoku, Japan. Zentsuji «ar Irison Camp, Japan, December 24, 1942 1 am well and in good spirits as usual, sp please keep your mind at rest. My hair is hack to normal and I have developed a fine heard which Joe has aptly said makes me looknlike a fugitive Santa Claus. I'm still determined to take a psychology M.A. at Columbia. I have designs on an interesting future and I am confident of success*****Hemeinber me to all my relations and friends. My love to you all. Zentsuji $ar Prison Camp, Japan, 23 October, 1942 Beceived three of your letters, plus two from mother and one from Carl Y< —. It is impossible to say what letters mean to us here. It is such a grand pleasure that it hurts at first. Then you read, reread and reread them until you are again happily at home. V«hen I received your letters I realized what a fool I had been to send that radio message for clothes—it seemed to worry you. My first radio message seeins to have gone astray some place. After San Francisco radio inquired about me I was given an opportunity to send a second. % second message was sent just at the time we heard about theeexchange ships, after someone here had started the rumor that we could get eleven lbs. each by these ships. Hence the word about the size 13 shoes. Anyway that should have convinced you that it was really your dumb husband writing. As you probably know. Tommy P— is here rooming with me. He is feeling fine and looking well. Tell Jean that he has gained about twenty pounds since he had his picture taken and is his normal self again. Here are two of my latest pics for you and mother. We were all elated to hear about Joe and Bill, may they keep up the good work. This is my community letter so pass it on. It is good to know that you have found something useful to do that you seem to enjoy. Of course it seems impossible to us here that life goe - usual, vut it boosts tv •-.-•«.. v *-.-.* -- - -.<.• t tc \.~-- -"bout it. % thoughts are always with you. I am well and safe. (Later from the same prisoner) For the past eleven years I have longed to settle down. Now I have, sad and oh-so dumb. In spite of the Davy's notification, you probably have worried, but you have no cause to worry any longer. I am here with Herbie H , our plane crews, the officers and men from Guam and Wake, and some Allied personnel, entirely safe; just waiting and hoping for an early and satisfactory end to the war—. HBse we are in barracks with a room about 30 x 20 for six of us, Herbie, two Dutch officers, two Australians, and myself; the entire group of prisoners have complete freedom in a large compound. We have daily classes in a wide variety of subjects of our own selection, then exercise, play cards, or "acey- ducey." We are living each day for the happiness in it—may you do the same until we can be reunited. Communication will necessarily be much more difficult in this war than in the last; it may be impossible to send a ship in either direction for a long, long time, but try to write, for my heart is with you. My only desire is that you should make a happay and complete life for yourself. We cannot predict when or how the war will end, we only know now ^ that it will last long enough for there to be many cahnges at home before we