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Breakthrough 1978-11
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Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 8. November 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1978). Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 8. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/954

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 8, November 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough 1978-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_545h.jpg
Transcript POLLS con'd from p. 3 Armstrong was a two-term member of the Brazoria County School Board, while Garcia's credentials consist of civic activities and a stint as president of an elementary school's Parent-Teacher Association. THE LEGISLATURE There are an awful lot of little Howard Jarvises running around the state of Texas this year. They frequently bump into each other. And in many races voters hear Jarvis in stereo. Everybody wants to limit and/or reduce taxes and/or the bureaucracy. But then it's really no wonder. The state's coffers will be bulging with an estimated $2 billion budget surplus when the biennial circus opens in Austin in January. And the tax relief package concocted by the special session is a sham, but more about that later. The two state senate seats up for election in Harris County this year offer only unopposed incumbent Democrats, Lindon Williams in District 6 and Chet Brooks in District 11. Here's a rundown of the contested house races in the county: DIST. 17: Incumbent Democrat Ed R. Watson, faces Republican George M. Gray, a conservative trying to label his foe a "labor liberal." Watson is president of an Oil, Chemical & Atomic Workers Union local, if not exactly a liberal, and has worked for tighter regulation of utilities. DIST. 78: This is a tough one to call. Joe Allen, a six-term incumbent moderate Democrat of Bay town, faces a stiff challenge from a young Republican who is already drawing the attention of national party leaders. Ed Emmett, 29, of the Kingwood area drew an endorsement from the Harris County Women's Political Caucus. DIST. 79 is a solidly liberal enclave, mostly in Montrose, that has been well- served for six years by Democrat Ron Waters, who has recently moved uptown to the Heights. He has token opposition from Republican Art Dula and Daniel R. Bustamante of La Raza Unida party. DIST. 82: Incumbent John Whitmire, a moderate Democrat and brother of city Controller Kathy Whitmire's late husband, vies with Republican Bill Hanna, who makes his money fixing up old houses and selling them. Hanna is a good taxes and red tape conservative and Whitmire agrees limiting taxes is the number one priority. DIST. 83 is a bastion of conservativ- ism, mostly in River Oaks. Republican incumbent Chase Untermeyer, a protege of George Bush, competes with Cyril J. Smith Jr., the Democrats' sacrificial lamb in silk-stocking territory. "I'm more fiscally conservative," says Smith, former head of a savings and loan association. Untermeyer, a former Houston Chronicle reporter, is a Harvard graduate, a member of the Houston Area Urban League and the Rice Design Alliance and serves on Mayor Jim McConn's panel that is trying to draw up a plan to get urban development dollars out of Jimmy Carter. DIST. 84: Democrat Herman Lauhoff, a two-termer, helped get the city charter change raising city council members' salaries from $3,600 to $17,000 annually, so perhaps someone other than a wealthy real estate developer can afford to serve. That made Don Whitefield so mad he decided to challenge the incumbent on the GOP ticket. Lauhoff enjoys the support of the black Harris County Council of Organizations and the Harris County Women's Political Caucus. ANITA RODEHEAVER DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE FOR COUNTY CLERK Native Houstonian 17 Ms Years Experience As Executive Assistant to County Clerk VOTE - NOV. 7, 1978 GENERAL ELECTION (Pol. Advertising Paid for by Anita Rixkluavrr Campaign. Aniia Rodrtu-avrr Treasurer. 4.514 Mouniwood. Houston. Texas 77018 - 686-9765) DIST. 90: A thoroughly undistinguished Republican incumbent, Brad Wright, is pitted against Democratic challenger, Dick Jenkins, in Kay Bailey's old district, taking in parts of southwest Houston, Bellaire and West University Place. Jenkins, who has a master's degree in economics, thinks tax relief should be directed toward the elderly and people on fixed incomes. The district is almost solid GOP territory, but with a strong progressive turnout Jenkins could win. DIST. 91: Four-term Republican incumbent W. J. "Bill" Blythe Jr. is different — right down to his haircut. It's a crew cut. His own brand of conservatism didn't stop him from sponsoring the state mass transportation bill that was the foundation for Houston's new Mass Transit Authority. But Democratic challenger Steven Fagerquist is liberal on social issues, supporting both the Equal Rights Amendment and abortion rights. DIST. 93: Milton Fox, a petroleum engineer, is a conservative Republican seeking his fourth term representing the Spring Branch-Memorial district. He and his Democratic opponent echo the district's Alief constituents' opposition to annexation by Houston. But Mary Woodall Creasy, daughter of Judge Ben Woodall, is more moderate and believes in energy conservation and promoting solar energy. DIST. 94: Three-term Republican Don Henderson, a lawyer and vice president of his family's Central Iron Works, vows to limit state spending and fight annexation by Houston in his Farm Road 1960 area turf. So does Democrat Kyle H. Brown. But the Brown & Root Inc. employee also thinks utility rates should increase with usage (it's the other way around now). DIST. 95: Incumbent Democrat Gene Green says insurance is his specialty and pledges to work for an end to revolving door regulation by the State Insurance Board, where some members come from the industry, serve on the panel and then return to the business. The main concerns of Republican O. L. "Buddy" Moritz seem to be annexation and prostitution in the north Houston and Aldine district. DIST. 97: First-term Democrat Ralph Wallace, operator of a rent-a-cop service, has drawn notice mainly for his tireless and ineffectual crusade against kiddie porn. He believes the solution to the energy problem is to "let the free market operate unimpeded." And his proposal to prosecute employers of illegal aliens mostly would mean trouble for Chicano citizens. His opponent in this East End race is Republican J. L. Brisco, 53, an engineer with a petro-chemical company. Brisco believes a governor's committee of "energy-experienced people" could best help us to greater use of non-fossil fuel energy sources — as long as "pseudo- experts in Washington" leave us alone. And he wants to abolish parole for felony offenders. DIST. 99: Six-termer Jim Clark, a Pasadena Democrat, says he is neither the best nor the worst legislator. The former labor leader says he is "fairly conservative" on money matters but liberal on "people issues." Challenger Jeff Calvert has been a Democrat and a Libertarian and is now the GOP nominee. Calvert would abolish public education, most state regulatory boards and most laws. DIST. 100: A lively race in the Clear Lake City area pits incumbent Democrat Bill Caraway against free-spending Republican Randy Pennington. It appears that Pennington was sent into battle (he moved into the district from southwest Houston just before the filing deadline) by state GOP head Ray Barnhart, who held the post until Caraway knocked him off in 1974. Limiting taxes is important to both, and both still oppose Clear Lake's recent annexation by Houston. COUNTY RACES COUNTY JUDGE Jon Lindsay is the first Republican elected to the $49,400-a- year administrative position since Reconstruction. Basically he is an honest hard worker and is ideologically on the conservative side of moderate. But his opponent, former state representative Joe Pentony, is more appealing to liberals. Although he did not have the unanimous support of progressives in the primary, the psychology professor at the University of St. Thomas is sensitive to social issues and vows to preside over mental illness commitment hearings, something Lindsay has passed to the probate judges, admitting he has no expertise in the field. Pentony also scores the incumbent for having served while county taxes were raised 16 percent. Lindsay says it's not his fault a federal court has mandated a costly new jail, forcing the boost. Pentony says jail operations costs could be lowered from Lindsay's projections if the new jail were to contain only single- prisoner cells, which the American Civil Liberties Union seeks as more humane. COMMISSIONERS. E. A. "Squatty Lyons" is a 68-year-old Democrat who has held the Precinct 4 post since 1943. Republican Carl L. Huff, who is half Lyon's age, is waging an uphill battle to unseat the veteran. Huff is one of the few Republicans to win endorsement from the Harris County Women's Political Caucus. He charges Lyons has tried to circumvent equal employment opportunity regulations and is a "tool of the developers." COUNTY TREASURER Hartsell Gray is an Episcopal minister, former pipefitter continued on following page / I <~f m\ ...«.'*-. ■ - -. ■'■■":, WE ARE NEW IN TOWN! For the discerning customer who appreciates dignified treatment,we offer •Customer Orientation •The Best Deals •Special Warranty ^Guaranteed Satisfaction •No Hard Sell FOR A PERSONAL APPOINTMENT, CALL JIM DIGGLES 523-9333 8 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 1978