Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Breakthrough 1978-11
Page 7
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 7. November 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/953.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1978). Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 7. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/953

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 7, November 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/953.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1978-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_545g.jpg
Transcript Games families play by Judith Richards "It can't help but help," Joan Weltzien says about Communication Bridge, the game she helped invent. "It can help a woman be seen as an individual, not a stereotype. It takes off the mask. It's a great way of sharing and getting in touch with other people. "I've learned about myself from the game. I've gotten feedback, sometimes surprising, about how I relate to my family." A family therapy experience provided the stimulus for developing the game. "I would give a family some homework: every person was to suggest something for the whole group to do together. The next week, I'd ask what they had done and hear, 'Oh, we played Monopoly' " So Weltzien, a psychological associate, and psychologist Larry Brandt went to work and developed a new board game. "Now family members can do something together, gamelike in quality, not too risky, that can also give them feedback about how they appear to each other," says Weltzien. There need be no loser in me game. Players discuss how and when to stop. Often they compromise on an arbitrary limit, such as crossing a bridge three times or getting six "warm fuzzies." "People like the 'warm fuzzies' — positive feedback — in this game," Weltzien says. "Positive feedback is something about you that's true that someone likes. People just eat it up. They remember these positive strokes. Not many get them in ordinary living. "My seven-year-old daughter sometimes says, 'Why don't we all play the warm fuzzy game? It makes everybody feel better." "Warm fuzzy" is a term borrowed from transactional analysis (TA), one of the therapeutic methods the game incorporates, along with some behavioral psychology, Freudian, and gestalt. "The game is cognitively well done," says Weltzien. "I think we've covered the holes that detract from similar games on the market." Players are not allowed put-downs that make others feel bad. "You find out that what you do gets done again," says Weltzien. "If you practice making supportive statements and actions, you'll do them more and more. Often, we take for granted the good and comment only on failure. "Children can't be expected to know that all the negative stuff they hear is coming from a very loving and caring concern for their well-being. They need to hear that they are liked and appreciated. These positive statements are important to hear and say. "From my work with school groups, I find that mothers and fathers really want to parent well, but they just don't have the information. This game heightens awareness of what you're doing, how you act. If you know these things, then you can change more easily. You need to learn to talk about feelings. "A child or teen can be helped to feel important just by sharing time with a parent. Merely sitting down and playing with someone tells the other person that he or she is of value. "I'd say adolescents, as a group, get less positive feedback than any other people in our society. And women are caught in situations almost like a kid. But they're finding out they have a right to fantasies." The game project has taken about a year, so far. "We first decided on important topics to be covered - feelings, reactions to family members, personal values," Weltzien says. "Then we worked up questions to develop self-knowledge in these areas. What piece of furniture, what animal, what kind of building would you choose to be and why? If you could write a book, what would it be about? What's your favorite time of day? Describe how your family celebrates your birthday. Is it what you want? "Then we decided to make it very gestalty and include feedback that has to do with the game at hand: Who would you like to go to a movie with in this group? If you were Santa Claus, what would you give the person across from you? This kind of question can help a person learn about what is going on at that minute. It's important to share with each other, so that others know about you in ways not covered in daily interchanges." Weltzien and Brandt also designed the board, chose colors, wrote and rewrote instructions, experimented with many different production techniques and all along got feedback from friends and other professionals. Since completion, the game has been used by church, therapy and teaching groups. "I don't know how to get it to more people who need to communicate more clearly but who aren't involved in therapy," Weltzien says. "We've advertised in Psychology Today and other magazines, talked with major game companies and publishing houses specializing in guidance and counseling materials. We did a direct mailing in the field. Our biggest source of sales right now is word of mouth. We've almost reached break-even point. "I'd like to see us break even and have someone else sell and market it," she says. "We've talked about the next step being to tailor it more for certain groups who want to use it, such as management training seminars or singles. "I just don't like to sell things. I like the challenge of having a novel idea, putting it together and seeing that it is packaged nicely. I'm not willing to spend the time to do what it takes to sell and market something to make a lot of money. I've got other priorities — my family, my professional work, alone time, and 'outs' - contact with friends for lunch, a show, a trip to the art museum, l like to spend time with people who are on the ball, well-rounded, stimulating, idea-oriented." Contact with such people is one reason for Weltzien's work with the Unitarian Church, where she was membership chair of the Women's Group last year. Of all her experiences with the game, Weltzien takes umbrage in only one area — the details of production. "I hated the nitty gritty. I hated the hassles related to having a good idea and getting it in somewhat reasonable form so I could share it." But she has stuck by the project and is optimistic about its worth: "I really like seeing psychology applied in a non-threatening way. I like to see solid concepts put into everyday practice." Communication Bridge is carried by H. Walt Hauffe & Co., 4203 Richmond, near Weslayan, 622-7191. Joe Pentony DEMOCRAT FOR COUNTY JUDGE Joe Pentony has an impressive record in public office. As a state representative in 1973 and 1975, Joe Pentony • Supported national and state ERA and opposed efforts to rescind. •Opposed introduction of legislation which would circumvent the 1973 Supreme Court ruling on abortion. •Supported increased funding for day care centers. •Supported Texas rape legislation. •Hired a woman or a minority person as his top aide. As County Judge, Joe Pentony will support •A county women's advocate. •Women for managerial positions in county government. ENDORSED BY HARRIS COUNTY WOMEN'S POLITICAL CAUCUS Political advertisement paid for by Joe Pentony Campaign Committee Joe Pentony, Chairman; 3219 Milam, Houston, TX 77006 Here's how a successful Attorney General will become a successful Governor As Attorney General, John Hill has: Tax Relief. John Hill was the lead-off witness at legislative hearings on property tax relief and has led the fight for reform of our unfair property tax laws. Women's Rights * John Hill supported the extension of the deadline for the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. He increased the number of female attorneys on the Attorney General's staff from 4 to 43. He was the first Attorney General in the country to appoint a woman as a division chief and he has promoted women to administrative positions and to head regional offices. Crime. In his first eleven months in office, John Hill closed more than 4,496 cases, winning judgements in 3,249 of these. He led a team of prosecutors who obtained 107 indictments in Duval County, and broke the back of local corruption. Hill used his Consumer Protection Division to process some 15,000 complaints and won $850,000 in awards for unhappy purchasers. Education. John Hill's role as lawyer for the state agencies put him in the forefront of the major legal battles involving education and gave him valuable insight into steps needed to improve our educational system. As Governor, John Hill would: Tax Relief. John Hill has campaigned on a platform of "no new taxes'* and a pledge to veto any new tax bill. His campaign platform of repealing the state sales tax on utility bills and providing property tax relief to homeowners, the elderly and farmers was adopted by the legislature during the special session this summer. Women's Rights. John Hill reaffirms his commitment that the Equal Rights Amendment be part of the Texas State Constitution, and he supports the establishment of a statutory Commission on the Status of Women. Crime. John Hill believes rape and abuse victims should be counselled, protected and encouraged to report all such incidents. Special training should be provided by law enforcement officers to avoid the humiliation and distress of rape victims and other abuse victims caused by insensitive handling. Education. John Hill will make education his No. 1 priority to assure adequate funding and adequate attention to all issues confronting our public schools. He will emphasize improved compensation for teachers, expansion of state programs for gifted and talented, handicapped and vocational education students, as well as better state equalization support for poor districts. •I( )I! \ 111IJU Vote For Experienced Leadership <«jvi-:kxoi{ NOVEMBER 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH