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Breakthrough 1978-11
Page 6
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Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 6. November 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/952.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1978). Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 6. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/952

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 6, November 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/952.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Breakthrough 1978-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_545f.jpg
Transcript Colorado connection by Anita Davidson A monumental sculpture by Colorado artist Linda Fleming was recently installed in the outdoor space at Max Hutchinson Gallery. Fleming constructs with trees, lodge pole pine saplings that she cuts herself. Her work is about color and movement, bridges and connections. "I like to build something and then sit back and look for all the connections that the piece suggests," says Fleming. "It's like life, you look for the ways things interact." Roller Coaster spans 40 feet with 120 lodge pole pines threaded on steel cable and draped in graceful swoops over trees 9 to 17 feet tall anchored in metal springs. The effect is deceptively light, and the piece has a lacy quality that belies its 700 pounds. Fleming strips and colors her trees before she begins to build. Using oil paint and oil crayon, she achieves a weathered coloration that reacts organically to the changing light of day. Fleming was first a painter. When she began to attach things to her canvases she dealt with problems that became increasingly more sculptural, and eventually her work evolved into freestanding sculpture. "I like being able to walk through or under and around a piece, literally climbing into the work," she says. "A painter must do this visually, of course, but I like being able to do it physically." Fleming was a successful painter in New York 10 years ago when she realized that the pressure of success was channeling her energies away from growth and development. She began to look for a place to live and work where she would be free to direct the course of her art. That place turned out to be about 300 acres nestled within the southern Rocky mountain range near Faracitas, Colorado. Fleming and her husband, a painter, built their own home and lived off the land as much as they could. "We felt so good about what we had done, and we went on a lecture tour to talk about it," Fleming says. "A lot of people were ready to come back with us. We told them to just come and look a while and then decide. Many came and some stayed. There are now about 20 families in our community, which we call Libre [free]," says Fleming, then adds, smiling, "that's a goal, not yet a true status." Libre is not a commune, it's a community of settlers—poets, doctors, writers —individual families with as much diversity as any other small town. "We have a community theatre where almost everyone has some part in the production of each play," says Fleming. "I enjoy making scenery and costumes. I like working back and forth in different mediums. It's a way to reach out, broaden." One drawback to living in a small and isolated community is the limited opportunity for such reaching out. With neither telephone nor television, Libre is free from the daily impact of outside distractions; but it lacks a variety of informational input and exchange. "That's why I go to New York every four months and spend three or four months just being with people, watching television to see what people are being bombarded with, and talking." Fleming grins, "I've been talking ever since I got to Houston." The move from New York City to Colorado's vast and isolated beauty was overwhelming in the beginning. "I could not work at all the first year." When she began working again, she looked for ways to relate her art to the environment. Her sculptures are closely attuned to the land. She builds with young saplings that must be weeded out to allow for growth of larger trees, creating an ongoing and symbiotic relationship between the artist and nature. Seen in its natural environment, with a backdrop of snowcapped mountains, Fleming's work mutes the difference between art and nature. Transported to Montrose, Roller Coaster achieves that delicacy of balance that occurs when the organic beauty of the materials reinforces a firm artistic statement. HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH NOVEMBER 1978