Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Breakthrough 1978-11
Page 3
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 3. November 1978. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 14, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/949.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 1978). Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 3. Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/949

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Breakthrough 1978-11 - Page 3, November 1978, Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 14, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist/item/959/show/949.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Breakthrough 1978-11
Publisher Breakthrough Publishing Co.
Date November 1978
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Genre (AAT)
  • periodicals
Language English
Physical Description 12 page periodical
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b2332724~S11
Digital Collection Houston and Texas Feminist and Lesbian Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/feminist
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Women--Texas--Periodicals
  • Feminism--United States--Periodicals
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by the content creator, author, artist or other entity, and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the copyright owner. For more information please see the UH Digital Library Fair Use policy on the “About” page of this website.
File name femin_201109_545c.jpg
Transcript Feminists go to the polls by Red Zenger The most significant fact about the elections coming November 7 is one that politicians don't talk about much. It is that two out of three persons eligible to vote won't bother to do so. (If the experts are right, it will be the lowest turnout in a general election since 1942.) The argument can be made that most people will stay home from the polls on November 7 because they are so satisfied with their government that it doesn't really matter to them who wins. But most public opinion polls suggest the opposite: that citizens are so turned off, they feel little good will result from any election outcome. There certainly is little to turn on Houston area progressives and feminists. There are few liberals and only 12 women on Harris County ballots, which will feature 138 races. Five of the women are Socialist Workers Party candidates. The ballot is so long and complex that few intelligent voters will attempt to make their choices without advice. Here is a guide to the contested races in Harris County: STATEWIDE RACES It's crying time again in Texas. It seems so long since we've had a chance to vote for a Sissy Farenthold or a Ralph Yarborough. Most of liberals got bumped off in the primary this time. And there weren't even any libs to begin with in most races. Then there is the withering of La Raza Unida party. Things just haven't been the same since 1974 gubernatorial candidate Ramsey Muniz was convicted of trafficking in marijuana. Some of La Raza's leaders worry about gathering the two percent of the vote necessary to keep the party name on the ballot in Texas. GOVERNOR It's going to happen sooner or later. It'll be like Mao Tse-tung dying. Texas will elect a Republican governor. Hank Grover almost did it against Preston Smith, much to everyone's surprise. Now comes Bill Clements, a very conservative, self-made oil-drilling millionaire 30 times over, who vows to protect our "petroculture." Clements is an entertaining fellow. He once tried to present opponent John Hill with a rubber chicken, symbolizing the Carter administration. Hill declined the gift. His government service is limited to a stint as deputy defense secretary under Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. He was frequently at odds with Congress and constantly in trouble for conflict of interest but was widely held to be a gifted manager of the day-to-day affairs of the sprawling Pentagon. The Texas Observer called Clements' campaign "the biggest advertising account to hit Texas TV since light beer," but concludes he is "all fizz." Clements enjoys support of many Briscoe-type Democrats, even including blacks. And with a close race, La Raza's Mario Compean might steal the margin of victory from Hill, giving Clements the win. Compean has said this is what he hopes to do. The problem with state attorney general John Hill of Houston is nobody really knows where he stands (see Breakthrough, April 1978). The Observer has decided he is a "moderate-conservative (but) an honest and pragmatic one, not the reactionary ideologue we've grown accustomed to." Although, as the Houston Chronicle points out, he may be a moderate because of the way his positions average out, Hill's tenure as the state's top lawyer has generally been a plus for consumers, environmentalists and women. LT. GOVERNOR The perenniel plodder Bill Hobby is virtually assured of another four years in what is arguably the most powerful position in the state government, lieutenant governor. He says it will be his last term. Gaylord Marshall, the Republican candidate, is just as right-leaning as Clements, on whose coattails he could conceivably ride to victory. Andrea Doorack, a shop steward, is the Socialist Workers Party candidate. U.S. SENATOR Here's a good ol' mudslinger for you, fans: the highlight of the season has been the famous refusal of three-term conservative Republican John Tower of Wichita Falls to shake hands with challenger Bob Krueger, a two-term Democratic U.S. representative of New Braun- fels. Tower turned a cold shoulder in Houston after the conservative Democrat sent copies of a syndicated column appearing in the Karnes City Times around the state. It accused an unnamed senator of being "low in the ranks of nice women who avoid getting on senate elevators alone with him." Krueger said he didn't know if it was true but knows it refers to Tower. But as the Chronicle's Joe Nolan pointed out, the piece, written by Tennessee American Party leader Tom Anderson, may have been alluding to Sen. Howard Baker. Tower has cancelled a TV appearance with Krueger and has filed a complaint with the federal Fair Elections Practices Commission acorn rvrueger misrepresenting Tower's voting record in campaign literature. And La Raza's candidate, Luis A. de Leon, gave FBI agents a sworn statement that Krueger people tried to bribe him to withdraw. Krueger denies both charges. Krueger, who is widely believed to have a detailed "game plan" for how he will become president, is a champion of natural gas deregulation. He voted against aid to New York City and common situs picketing. He also voted for extension of the ERA deadline, labor reform and senators for the District of Columbia. Tower is the ranking minority member of the Armed Services Committee and a party power nationally but has written no major legislation. He admits he sees his job as throwing up roadblocks to progressive legislation. He was absent for the vote on the ERA deadline extension but worked for an ill-fated amendment to allow states to rescind ratification. Socialist Worker Miguel Pendas is also on the ballot. ATTORNEY GENERAL There's not much difference between Democrat Mark White, Dolph Briscoe's former secretary of state, and Republican Jim Baker, Gerald Ford's former Campaign photos on opposite page (clockwise from upper left): Rosalyn Carter with Bob Gammage (right) and Bob Krueger (behind Carter); Ron Paul: John Hill; Bill Clements; Bob Eckhardt with Lillian Carter; Jim Baker (left) with Gerald Ford; John Tower; (center photo) Bob Krueger. Photos by F. Carter Smith. campaign manager. They're both from Houston and they're both conservative. White says although he has never publicly endorsed the ERA, privately he supports it. RAILROAD COMMISSION This one is really grim. Democrat John H. Poerner won the endorsement of the likes of liberal state representatives Lance Lalor and Ron Waters in the primary runoff, but only because he faced racist maverick Jerry Sadler. Peorner has been going around arguing with Republican James W. Lacy about who would better serve the oil industry. And incumbent Mack Wallace has done a fine job of serving oil in another position. Socialist Worker candidate Jana Pellusch works at the ARCO oil refinery in Houston. She wants to "expose and fight unsafe working conditions in the energy industry" and opposes nuclear power in Texas. TREASURER For eons, Texas voters entrusted the state treasury to a man with the unlikely name of Jesse James. But when the aged James died in office, Gov. Dolph Briscoe came up with the punch-line to the joke by appointing as successor a man named Warren G. Harding. Democrat Harding, who was Dallas County treasurer from 1950 to 1977, faces Socialist Worker Derrick Adams in his second race for the office (He lost to James in 1956.). Harding would probably do little to upset the status quo. Adams says he would work for 100% state income tax on persons earning more than $30,000 annually and for the elimination of funding for the Texas Rangers, who are a thorn in the side of his party. U.S. HOUSE DIST. 7: Bill Archer, the Republican incumbent, is consistently conservative. He voted against labor reform, the extension of the ratification deadline for the ERA, senators for the district of Columbia, common situs picketing, the Humphrey-Hawkins full employment bill and loans to New York City last session. He also voted for natural gas pricing deregulation, the B-l bomber and to override President Carter's veto of a new aircraft carrier. Archer can always be counted on to speak up for an unregulated free market, tax relief and trimming the bureaucracy. And that's just fine with his west Harris County constituents. The district was tops in the nation in support of Gerald Ford in the 1976 presidential election. All this does not bode well for Democratic challenger Robert L. Hutchings, who sees the women's and gay rights movements as the logical extension of what began at Plymouth Rock. Hutchings supports the ERA and federally-funded abortions. DIST. 8: Bob Eckhardt is as solidly liberal as Archer is reactionary. He was the only Texas representative to vote the liberal line on each of three bellwether issues last session - natural gas deregulation (no), aid to New York City (yes) and banning reparations to Vietnam (no). But the east Harris County pol has gotten himself in trouble on an issue of deep concern to feminists. The bow-tied lawyer voted against extension of the ERA deadline. The Harris County Women's Political Caucus, which endorsed him before the vote came up in Congress, summoned Eckhardt to a special meeting to explain himself. The clear implication was that the endorsement was in jeopardy. Eckhardt, who is a genuine constitutional scholar, said as much as he favors the ERA, he simply could not bring himself to vote for what he sees as a dangerous precedent of allowing amendment deadlines to be extended. Or, as one seasoned local political observer explained, "Bob's always been queer about the constitution." The caucus censured Eckhardt but maintained its endorsement. Eckhardt's opponent is conservative Republican Nick Gearhart, a "television personality" turned public relations consultant. He's spending $200,000 on the challenge, and he says his name recognition is up since the two battled over the seat two years ago. The district is solid blue-collar turf and labor unions are potent here. But one politician's working class people is another's silent majority. The area is anything but a "safe" liberal district (there ain't no such animal in Texas). DIST. 9: stretches from here to Beaumont, home of feisty, cigar-chomping incumbent Jack Brooks, who chairs the House Government Operations Committee and who voted against extending the ERA deadline. Conservative Republican challenger Randy Evans probably will not dent the popularity of the long-time incumbent. DIST. 18: Liberal Democratic state Rep. Mickey Leland faces token opposition from Socialist Workers Party candidate Deborah Vernier to succeed Barbara Jordan in the inner-city district. The outspoken Leland angered feminists recently by saying women present problems to affirmative action. He explained it by saying he was merely giving his assessment of attitudes among blacks. Leland has been endorsed by the Harris County Women's Political Caucus. DIST. 22 covering parts of Harris, Brazoria and Fort Bend counties, pits two old foes (each of whom has the seat) against one another. It's pretty conservative territory, especially to the south, and first-termer Bob Gammage, a moderate Democrat, has had to do some real juggling to protect his right flank without losing liberal support. As a result, Gammage has been on both sides of the fence in Congressional voting, sometimes on the same issue. He voted for the ERA deadline extension. His opponent is arch-conservative Republican Ron Paul, a Lake Jackson gynecologist, who held the post briefly in 1976. He is a well-financed mossback who believes in little government and Adam Smith economics. Gammage believes abortion is "immoral." But Paul fares worse with feminists. He told Breakthrough women are just meant to hold some jobs, "especially topless waitresses and stewardesses." The Harris County Women's Political Caucus endorsed Gammage challenger Gerald Liedtke in the primary. At a recent meeting to consider endorsing candidates for the general election, Gammage failed by only a few votes to win the necessary two-thirds majority. STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION An obscure race in Congressional District 22 is between two political novices. Democrat Elizabeth Armstrong, a Lake Jackson attorney who was appointed to the board, believes, "Texas has one of the best systems of public education in the country." That notwithstanding, she appears to have greater experience in public education than her Republican challenger, Lionel Garcia, a Seabrook veterinarian. continued on page 8 NOVEMBER 1978 HOUSTON BREAKTHROUGH